how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Get text from pdf c# Library control component .net azure asp.net mvc Excel24-part195

Instructions for exercise 6.2
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cell B4 deposit a label for the matrix A, in cell B11 a label for the matrix A1, in F4 place
a label for the vector X, and in F11 a label for the vector C.
In A6:D9 enter the numbers from the middle four columns of Table 6.2-1, in the order in
which they appear there, i.e., with 1.6534 in cell A6, and 2.8288 in cell D9.
In F6:F9 enter the numbers from the last column of Table 6.2-1, i.e., starting with
0.07386 in F6, and ending with 0.07721 in F9.
Now that the experimental data are in place, here comes the matrix algebra.
Highlight A13:D16, then type=MINVERSE(A6:D9), and press Ctrl+Shift+Enter (i.e.,
hold down the Control and Shift keys while depressing the Enter key), in order to inform
the spreadsheet that you intend this formula for the entireblock. You will see the inverse
matrix appear in that block.
Now highlight F13:F16, type=MMULT(A13:D16,F6:F9), and again depress Ctrl+Shift
+Enter to enter this instruction in the highlighted block. That’s it: F13:F16 now contains
the four sought concentrations.
In order to validate your answer, in H6 compute the absorbance at 696.3 cm–1as=
A6*$F$13+ B6*$F$14+C6*$F$15+D6*$F$16.
Copy this instruction to cells H7:H9. What do they show?
For your information: the ‘unknown’ mixture had been made up from the
pure components, and contained 0.420, 0.398, 0.271, and 0.248 g/50 mL of
ethylbenzene and of ortho-, meta-, and para-xylene respectively. The (rela-
tively small) differences between these numbers and your results in F13:F16,
of less than±2.5%, are not caused by computational errors, but instead
reflect uncertainties in the measured absorbances. Although the infrared
absorbances are listed in Table 6.2-1 to three or four digits, they were (con-
servatively) rated as most likely good to±5% only.
Also for your information: in 1962, when Bauman wrote his book, neither
personal computers nor spreadsheets were available, and he commented on
page 411 of his book that calculating the inverse matrix A
1
“represents
roughly an hour and a quarter of work, including checking”. Thank you, per-
sonal computer; thank you, spreadsheet.
6.3
Multi-component spectrometric analysis 2
In the preceding section we determined the concentrations of four chemical
substances by making measurements on the unknown mixture and on four
6.3 Multi-component spectrometric analysis 2
227
Get text from pdf c# - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from scanned pdf to word; extract text from scanned pdf
Get text from pdf c# - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
how to copy and paste pdf text; copy text from protected pdf to word
single-component standards at four different wavelengths. Four measure-
ments are clearly the minimum requirement for determining four unknown
concentrations. While use of the minimum number of wavelengths may
save some time, it makes the results critically dependent on the quality of
the measurements, because it leaves no margin for experimental error. It is
therefore preferable to determine the entire spectrum of the mixture (or,
more precisely, measure a large number of absorbance data over a fairly
wide range of wavelengths), to be compared with the corresponding spectra
of the single components, each of course obtained under otherwise identi-
cal conditions in the same solvent. Here we will illustrate this approach for a
simulated mixture of three different species. As you will see, generating the
synthetic spectra will take more time than analyzing them!
To keep things simple, we will use Gaussian curves to generate our mock
spectra, but you are welcome to modify the instructions by substituting
other shapes, or even by ‘drawing them by hand’ by entering numbers.
Figure 6.3-1 illustrates three such made-up spectra, and the spectrum of a
mixture of arbitrary amounts of these three. It does not matter that the spec-
trum of the mixture does not show much structure.
Instructions for exercise 6.3
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cell A1 deposit label ampl=, in A2 the label center=, and in A3 the label width=.
Copy A1:A3 and paste it into cell A4.
In some out-of-view place like N10:Q40, enter some Gaussian noise (using T
ools 
D
ata Analysis… Random Number Generation, OK  D
istribution: Normal,
Me
an=0, S
tandard Deviation=1, O
utput Range: N10:Q10, OK).
In cell G1 deposit the label na=, and in H1 its value, say 0.005.
In cells C1:C6 deposit some numbers, such as 0.7, 470, 2000, 0.4, 600, and 500. Right-
align them.
In row 8 deposit the labels wavelength, unknown, spectrum 1, spectrum 2, and spec-
trum 3.
Fill A10:A40 with the numbers 400 (10) 700 representing the wavelengths of the visible
region of the spectrum, in nanometers.
For the time being, skip column B, and in C10 deposit the
instruction=C$1*EXP(-(($A10-C$2)^2)/C$3)+$H$1*O10.
Highlight cell C10, go to the formula box, there highlight the part
(C$1*EXP(-(($A10-C$2)^2)/C$3)), copy it with Ctrl+c, then go to the end of that
same instruction, add a plus sign, and paste it in.
228
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
try this C# demo. // Open a document. String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Get a text
cut and paste text from pdf; extract text from pdf file
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
PDF and edit font size and color in text box field Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or Learn how to retrieve all annotations from PDF file in
copy and paste text from pdf to excel; copying text from pdf to word
10 In the part of the instruction just added, replace the numbers 1, 2, and 3 by 4, 5, and 6
respectively, so that it reads=C$1*EXP(–(($A10 – C$2)^2)/C$3)+ $H$1*O10+
C$4*EXP(-(($A10-C$5)^2)/C$6). Depress the Enter key.
11 Copy the modified instruction down to row 40.
12 Make a graph of C10:C40 vs. A10:A40. You will recognize the values of $C$1 and $C$4 as
the amplitudes, $C$2 and $C$5 as the center wavelengths, and $C$3 and $C$6 as
determining the peak widths.
13 Place a set of constants (different from those in C1:C6) in D1:D6.
6.3 Multi-component spectrometric analysis 2
229
Fig.6.3-1:Three made-up spectra of pure species (top), and that of their mixture.
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
you will see how to use RaterEdge .NET OCR SDK in your application to extract and get text from Tiff Extracted text can be output to Word or PDF document.
copy text from encrypted pdf; acrobat remove text from pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C# Project: DLLs for PDF Image Extraction.
erase text from pdf file; edit pdf replace text
14 Copy the instruction from cell C10 to cell D10, then copy it to row 40.
15 Plot the resulting spectrum #2 as D10:D40 versus A10:A40. Alternatively you can high-
light D10:D40, copy it with Ctrl+c, activate the inner frame of the figure made under
point (11), then paste the new curve in with Ctrl+v.
16 Repeat steps (13) through (15) to generate a third fantasy spectrum in column E. If you
feel like it, you can of course make these spectra more varied, e.g., by letting one have
only one absorption peak, while another gets three or more. Suit your fancy.
17 Now you are ready to simulate the spectrum of the ‘unknown’ mixture. In cell B10
deposit the instruction=0.3*(C10+$H$1*O10)+0.2*(D10+$H$1*P10)+0.45*(E10
+$H$1*Q10)+0.005*N10 to simulate the spectrum of the unknown.
18 Plot the simulated ‘unknown’ spectrum.
You are free, of course, to pick three characteristic wavelengths, and to
solve the resulting three simultaneous equations. The added noise will then
(rather strongly) affect your results, but you will have no way of knowing by
how much. The method illustrated below is not only much less sensitive to
noise, but also provides error estimates and, most importantly, is much
easier to implement. Of course it uses matrix algebra, just as you did in
section 6.2, but that will be completely invisible to you, the user. The entire
analysis comes prepackaged with the spreadsheet.
We will use the standard linear least squares routine, with column B as the
dependent variable y, and columns C, D, and E as the independent variables
x
1
, x
2
, and x
3
. After all, the absorbance of the mixture, A
mixture
, is given by
Beer’s law as
A
mixture
=b( a
1
c
1
+a
2
c
2
+a
3
c
3
)
(6.3-1)
where b is the optical path-length, the a
i
’s are the absorbances of the indi-
vidual species i, and the c
i
’s their concentrations in the mixture. Since the
spectra  of  the  individual  species  represent  b times  the  a
i
’s,  the  entire
problem has only three unknowns, c
1
, c
2
, and c
3
. The a
i
’s of course are func-
tions of the wavelength, as is A
mixture
, which is why we have entire columns
for them. But the whole problem is simply one of a multiple-parameter
fitting, which we already encountered in section 3.1. (Now you understand
why we initially left column B free, so that we could fit the standard format of
the regression routine.) So here we go.
19 Select T
ools  D
ata Analysis…Regression, OK Input Y
Range: B10:B40, Input X
Range: C10:E40, O
utput Range: A44, OK). Now sit back, it is done, the problem is
solved. You will find the results in B61:C63. The intercept should be insignificant, i.e.,
smaller than its standard deviation.
230
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and
copy paste pdf text; copy pdf text to word with formatting
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into
export highlighted text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf
20 Print out the results, together with the concentrations assumed in the simulation, for
various amounts of added noise (as selectable in H1).
In the above example, using the data illustrated in Fig. 6.3-1, we find
c
1
=0.305 ± 0.004, c
2
=0.198 ± 0.005, c
1
=0.453 ± 0.008. You will recognize
that these results are all right on target. Moreover, when we make the noise
amplitudes zero, we recover the exact numbers we had put in, 0.3, 0.2, and
0.45 in our example. Clearly, the uncertainty is purely the result of the added
noise, introduced on purpose to simulate more realistic data. Because this
method uses 120 data points, much of the random noise will now cancel.
You will have noticed that you spent much  more  time setting up the
problem (by generating phantom spectra) in exercise 6.3 than you spent
solving it. In practice, you will of course use existing spectra, generated by a
spectrophotometer.  In  that  case,  the  analysis  merely  requires  that  you
import the data arrays in the proper order (unknown mixture first, reference
spectra of pure compounds next), and then invoke the Regression analysis.
It really is that simple.
6.4
The absorbance–absorbance diagram
When a compound has a spectrum that is a complicated function of pH (or
of some other variable, such as a ligand concentration), as the result of suc-
cessive protonation (or complexation) steps, as in Fig. 6.4-1, we first need to
establish how many speciesare involved in the optical behavior. To this end it
is often useful to analyze the set of spectra in terms of an absorbance–absor-
bance diagram. In such a diagram we plot the absorbance at one wavelength
against that at another wavelength, at constant optical pathlength b and
total analytical concentration C of the absorbing species, using the pH (or
pX) as the implicit variable. The resulting plot consists of a series of con-
nected, near-linear line segments, one fewer than the number of different
species formed. The points where the extrapolated linear sections intersect
yield the absorbances of the intermediate species at the two wavelengths
used, see Fig. 6.4-2. Midway between these special points we have A= (A
i
+
A
i+1
)/2 or pH≈pK
a
. The book by J. Polster and H. Lachmann, Spectrometric
Titrations (VCH, 1989) contains a number of fine examples of such dia-
grams. Below we simulate an absorbance–absorbance diagram in order to
introduce the reader to this interesting method.
We will use as our example a weak diprotic acid, H
2
A. We will label the
three species by the number of attached, dissociable protons, i.e., H
2
A will
be denoted by the subscript 2, HA
by 1, and A
2–
by 0. The corresponding
concentration fractions 
α
2
α
1
, and 
α
are given in (4.8-5) through (4.8-7)
respectively. Furthermore we denote two different wavelengths by ′ and ″
respectively, and associate different molar absorptivities with each species.
6.4 The absorbance–absorbance diagram
231
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
annotating features, provides developers with a great .NET solution to annotate .pdf file with both text & graphics. From this page, you will get a simple VB
extract all text from pdf; copy text from pdf reader
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Able to find and get PDF text position details in C#.NET application. Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole document.
copy text from pdf without formatting; erase text from pdf
We then have
A′
mixture
=(a
2
α
2
′+a
1
α
1
′+a
0
α
0
′)bC
=
(6.4-1)
A″
mixture
=(a
2
α
2
″+a
1
α
1
″+a
0
α
0
″)bC
=
(6.4-2)
[H
+
]
2
a
2
″+[H
+
]K
a1
a
1
″+K
a1
K
a2
a
0
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
bC
[H
+
]
2
a
2
′+[H
+
]K
a1
a
1
′+K
a1
K
a2
a
0
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
bC
232
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.4-1:The absorbances A′and A″as a function of pH.
Fig.6.4-2:The corresponding absorbance–absorbance plot. The special points (a
0
″, a
0
′),
(a
1
″, a
1
′), and (a
2
″, a
2
′) are shown and labeled in color.
We now plot A′
mixture
versus A″
mixture
as a function of [H
+
]. We could con-
sider the resulting plot in terms of mathematics, but here we will take the
less rigorous approach of merely illustrating it, using the spreadsheet. Since
the total analytical concentration C and the optical path-length b must be
kept constant, they can both be set to unity; they will only affect the scale of
the resulting plots, not their shape.
Instructions for exercise 6.4
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cells A1 and A2 place the labels a
2
′=and a
2
″=respectively, and right-align them.
Similarly, in cells C1:C2 deposit the labels a
1
′=and a
1
″=, in cells E1:E2 the labels a
0
′=
and a
0
″=, and in G1:G2 the labels K
a1
=and K
a2
=.
In cells B1 and B2 deposit the values 0.5 and 0.25, in D1:D2 0.8 and 0.6, in F1:F2 0.2 and
0.1, and in H1:H2=10^- 3 and=10^-5.4. Left-align them.
You may wonder why we select these specific numbers. They are roughly those that can
be read from the data on phthalic acid at 286 and 290 nm respectively, as published by
R. Blume et al., Z.Naturforsch. 30B (1975) 263 and in the earlier-mentioned book by
Polster & Lachmann on Spectrometric Titrations, and reproduced, for those without
easy access to the original sources, on page 503 of my Principles of Quantitative
Chemical Analysis. If you prefer to use other numbers, by all means feel free to use your
own; the method does not hinge on the specific numbers used.
In row 4 deposit the labels pH, [H+], A′, and A″.
In A6:A86 calculate the numbers 0 (0.1) 8.
In B6:B86 compute the corresponding values of [H+].
In C6:C86 use (6.3-1) to calculate A′, the absorbance at 286 nm.
In D6:D86 likewise compute A″, at 290 nm.
Plot A′and A″versus pH, see Fig. 6.4-1.
10 Plot A″versus A′, compare Fig. 6.4-2.
This example is a close image of the experimental data at 290 and 286 nm
for phthalic acid, as published by R. Blume et al. and Polster & Lachmann.
Upon extrapolation, the two straight-line segments will intersect in the point
(a
1
″, a
1
′). Such absorbance–absorbance plots are superb diagnostics of the
number of species involved, especially when the analysis uses several differ-
ent wavelengths. The plots require high-quality data at constant total analyt-
ical  concentration  C,  which  are  most  readily  obtained  by  titrating  the
solution with a much more concentrated titrant (to keep dilution effects neg-
ligibly small) or by using (dilution-less) electrochemical titrant generation,
6.4 The absorbance–absorbance diagram
233
and by circulating the test solution through a stationary, firmly seated cuvet.
Removing and reinserting a cuvet is almost always a prescription for low-
precision absorbance measurements. Extrapolation of the linear parts of the
plot yields values of the absorbances a
1
″and a
1
′ of the monoprotonated
species.
6.5
Chromatographic plate theory 1
Chromatography is the most versatile chemical separation method we have
available at present. In it, a mixture is separated into various components on
the basis of differences in the speed at  which these  components move
through a chromatographic column. What differentiates their speeds is that
the column slows them down by one mechanism or another. Many different
retarding effects can be exploited, based on such diverse molecular proper-
ties as solubility, charge, size, adsorption, or biochemical affinity. Here we
will consider partition chromatography, which is based on differences in
(solvation) energy.
In a chromatographic column there are always two phases: one moving
(the mobile phase), the other stationary. The mobile phase can be either a
gas or a liquid, and chromatographies are often characterized on that basis
as either gas or liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a wall
coating or, in a so-called packed column, a coating on and inside porous
particles. Here we will model the continuous column as composed of a large
number N
p
of very small sections or “plates”. We will describe the continu-
ous motion of the mobile phase as proceeding in discrete installments, in
which the mobile phase from one plate displaces that from the next plate,
and then stays in place long enough to establish local equilibrium.
The centerpiece of our model is the partition coefficient K
p
=c
s
/c
m
, the
equilibrium constant that describes the equilibrium distribution of a chem-
ical species between the two contacting phases. Here c
s
is the concentration
in the stationary phase, and c
m
that in the mobile phase. Just as in the treat-
ment of extraction in section 5.3, we now define a mass fraction in the
mobile phase, 
μ
, as
(6.5-1)
where v
s
and v
m
are the plate volumes of the stationary and mobile phase
respectively. In each plate the ratio v
s
and v
m
is the same, as is K
p
, so that we
can consider 
μ
as our primary model parameter.
Now consider the total mass m
p,t
of the chemical species considered in
plate p at time t. It is composed of two parts: the mobile phase in that plate
contains the fraction 
μ
of the total mass m
p,t
, i.e., 
μ
m
p,t
, while the stationary
phase holds a mass (1-
μ
)m
p,t
. Likewise we have a mass 
μ
m
p–1,t
in the
mobile phase just upstream from plate p.
μ
=
c
m
v
m
c
m
v
m
+c
s
v
s
=
1
1+K
p
v
s
/v
m
234
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
We now move the mobile phase from plate p-1 to plate p while, simulta-
neously, moving the mobile phase in plate p to plate p +1. The total mass in
plate p at time t+1 will then be
m
p,t+1
=
μ
m
p–1,t
+(1-
μ
)m
p,t
(6.5-2)
which you  will  recognize as a recursion formula. We will use (6.5-2) to
describe the separation process in partition chromatography, in which the
chemical species traveling down the column hops in and out of the station-
ary phase. Since the sample will move through the column only when it
resides in the mobile phase, the more time it spends in the stationary phase,
the slower it moves through the column, and the longer will be its retention
time t
r
, i.e., the time it takes that species to travel the entire length of the
column. We will assume that the mobile phase moves with a constant linear
velocity through the column (which is correct for a liquid, but must be cor-
rected for the compressibility of gases and vapors when these constitute the
mobile phase) and therefore spends a fixed time 
in each plate. We will
measure the elapsed time t in units of 
.
Instructions for exercise 6.5
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cell A1 deposit the label 
μ
=, and in cell A2 a corresponding value between 0 and 1
(because 
μ
is a fraction).
In cell B4 place the label p=, and enter the labels 1, 2, 3, etc. in cells C4, D4, E4, etc., all
the way till Z4. Of course you will only enter the first two, and will let the spreadsheet
put the other numbers in place, by dragging them sideways by the handle. Tricks that
work vertically also work horizontally.
In cell A5 place the label t/
=in the left-most corner of the cell.
In cell A6 deposit the value 0, in cell A7 place the number 1, in cell A8 the instruction
=A7+1, and copy this down till row 206. This will be our time scale, i.e., the numbers
in column A will be our simulated times t/
.
In cell C6 deposit the instruction=$A$2*B5+(1–$A$2)*C5 expressing the recursive
relation (6.5-2).
Copy this instruction to the entire block C6:Z206. Since you have not yet introduced
any sample into the model, the entire block will show zeros.
Finally, introduce your sample by overwriting the instruction in cell C6 with the
number 1, equivalent to injecting your sample at the end of the column connected to
the injection port. Bingo! The spreadsheet fills, showing the distribution of the species
in the various plates (each plate being represented by a separate column) and at differ-
ent times (in the rows, with time increasing as you move down). The top of the spread-
sheet (except for cells E1:H2) will now look like Fig. 6.5-1, with numbers that depend
on the value of 
μ
used.
6.5 Chromatographic plate theory 1
235
So far the spreadsheet is just as useful as a chromatograph without a detector: we have
yet to find out when and how much of the sample emerges from the column. Do this by
entering in cell AA6 the instruction=$A$2*Z6, which represents the amount of
material 
μ
m
Np,t
moving out of the last plate, p =N
p
, at time t. You will recognize the
above instruction as corresponding to the absence of a stationary phase in the detector
‘plate’.
10 Plot AA6:AA206 versus A6:A206. This will be the chromatogram (provided the detector
response is proportional to the amount of material that passes it) of a species that
travels with a mobile mass fraction 
μ
through a column containing N
p
plates.
11 Now make a composite chromatogram, showing how the elution differs for various
mixture components that have different values of 
μ
. In order to organize such a plot,
label cells AB4 through AI4 with values for 
μ
in the sequence 0.2 (0.1) 0.9.
12 Highlight the data in AA6:AA206, copy that column with Ctrl+c to the clipboard, high-
light the appropriate target cell in row AB6:AI6, then use E
dit Paste S
pecial Values
to copy the valuesin column AA to the column for that particular value of 
μ
.
13 Change the value of 
μ
in A2, copy the resulting values from column AA to their proper
places, then plot them. Figure 6.5-2 shows an example of such a graph for just three
values of 
μ
.
14 For each elution curve, note the time tat which the maximum amount of sample
passes the detector. You can find the maximum valuein a given column by scanning
them visually or, easier, by letting the spreadsheet do it for you with an instruction
236
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.5-1:The top of the spreadsheet, except for the contents of cells D1 through H2.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested