how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Export highlighted text from pdf SDK control service wpf web page winforms dnn Excel25-part196

such as=MAX(AE6:AE206). In order to find the corresponding time use the instruction
=MATCH(MAX(AE6:AE206), AE6:AE206,0) which has the syntax MATCH(value to be
found, array to be searched, in what order), with commas to separate the three different
pieces of information. This will find the (integer) value of t/
where the curve has a
maximum. When the maximum lies between two integer t/
-values, it will pick the
time associated with the higher value; when the two values near the maximum are
identical, as in Fig. 6.5-2, it will pick one of them. We will use the resulting t/
-value
(which is only good to±0.5) as a rough, first estimate of t
r
/
. That is good enough for
now; in section 6.7 we will see how t
r
/
should actually be determined.
15 Use these data to plot the estimated value of t
r
/
versus 1/
μ
. This should result in a
linear graph through the origin, i.e., a proportionality.
16 Save the spreadsheet for further use in subsequent sections.
Why do we get this proportionality between t
r
and 1/
μ
? Consider again the
mechanism: the sample moves only when it is in the mobile phase, so that it
will emerge from the column after a retention time t
r
=t
m
/
μ
, where t
m
is the
time needed for the pure mobile phase itself to travel through all N
p
plates in
the column (so that t
m
/
=N
p
), and 
μ
is the fraction of time that the sample
spends in the mobile phase. The value of t
m
can often be estimated by injec-
tion of a compound that is not or barely retarded; in gas chromatography,
methane is often used as such.
We now consider the entire column rather than a small section thereof, as
was done in the plate model. Let the column contain a total volume V
s
of sta-
tionary phase, and a total volume V
m
that can be occupied by the mobile
phase. Since the column is uniformly coated or “packed”, the ratio V
m
/V
s
will
be equal to the ratio v
m
/v
s
we used earlier for a single plate. Therefore the
6.5 Chromatographic plate theory 1
237
Fig.6.5-2:Three simulated chromatograms, for μ= 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 respectively.
Export highlighted text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf in preview; extracting text from pdf
Export highlighted text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
get text from pdf file c#; c# extract text from pdf
fraction of time that the sample spends in the mobile phase, 
μ
, can also be
expressed  in  terms  of  these  macroscopic,  directly  measurable  volumes,
because
(6.5-3)
Upon combining (6.5-4) with t
r
=t
m
/
μ
we obtain
t
r
=t
m
(1+K
p
V
s
/V
m
)
(6.5-4)
and after multiplication by the volume velocity v(e.g., in mL/s) of the mobile
phase, so that V
r
=vt
r
andV
m
=v t
m
,
V
r
=V
m
(1 +K
p
V
s
/V
m
)=V
m
+K
p
V
s
(6.5-5)
which expresses the retention volume V
r
in terms of the void volume V
m
of
the column, the volume V
s
of stationary phase in the column, and the parti-
tion coefficient K
p
. Equation (6.5-5) is the basic law of partition chromatog-
raphy, and is often rewritten as
V
r
′=V
r
-V
m
=K
p
V
s
(6.5-6)
where V
r
′is called the adjusted retention volume, which is here seen to be
directly proportional  to both  K
p
and V
s
. The linear relation  you observed
‘experimentally’ in the results of the simulation was nothing but the combi-
nation of (6.5-3) and (6.5-4).
The velocity v has the dimension of volume per time; v=V
m
/t
m
. We can
also define a linear velocity v′ defined as v′=L/t
m
=N
p
H/t
m
=H/
, where L
is the column length, and H is the corresponding length of a single plate; H
stands for ‘height’. For a vapor, these velocities vary with pressure along the
column, and are usually referred to the column outlet; for liquids, which are
essentially incompressible, vand v′are constant throughout the column.
The notion of a chromatographic ‘plate’ comes from the oil refinery, where
distillation columns indeed have identifiable platforms or plates. However,
a continuous column has no such discernible subdivisions. Still, the model
defines a plate as a column segment of such length that it corresponds, on
average, with one equilibration of the sample between the mobile and the
stationary phase. We will come back to this matter in sections 6.8 and 6.9. In
practice, the ‘number of theoretical plates’ is an empirical quantity, deter-
mined from the shape of the chromatographic peak. Typically, one plate cor-
responds with a column length of the order of 0.1mm. Note that a relatively
small number of plates N
p
suffices to simulate the characteristic chromato-
graphic behavior of individual peaks, even though any self-respecting chro-
matographic column will have thousands of theoretical plates. As we will see
in section 6.6, a large number of theoretical plates is needed for the parti-
tion-chromatographic  separation of  compounds  with  very  similar  K
p
-
values.
μ
=
1
1+K
p
v
s
/v
m
=
1
1+K
p
V
s
/V
m
238
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
etc. Able to remove highlighted text in PDF document in C#.NET. Support to change PDF highlight color in Visual C# .NET class. Able
acrobat remove text from pdf; extract text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text in any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters are easy to be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR
copy text from encrypted pdf; get text from pdf into excel
There is something amazing about the above simulation: all it  takes to
represent the equilibrium distribution of the sample in the column, in any
plate and at any time, is one simple recursion formula, (6.5-2), repeated over
the entire array C6:Z206. Even the expression for the mass passing the detec-
tor comes from that same equation, merely by deleting the term represent-
ing the (absent) stationary phase in that detector. The entire process can of
course be described mathematically, which in this case will yield a response
similar to a binomial distribution, see below. However, the molecules know
no  mathematics,  and  merely  follow  the  simple  rules  of  probability  that
determine  their  partitioning  behavior.  Likewise,  the  simulation  uses  no
higher math, but finds the same result through the repeated application of
the simple recursion formula for partitioning between a stationary and a
mobile phase.
6.6
Chromatographic plate theory 2
The same logic that leads to the simulation of the previous section can of
course be used to obtain a closed-form expression for the chromatographic
peak. As derived by, e.g., Fritz & Scott in J.Chromat.271 (1983) 193, and again
assuming  (as  in section 6.5) unit sample  size and  detector sensitivity, we
have
(6.6-1)
where t is time, t
m
=
N
p
is the time it takes a non-retained species to elute
from the column, and 
μ
(equal to 1/(1+k) in the notation of Fritz & Scott) is
the mass fraction in the mobile phase.
A major advantage of (6.6-1) over a simulation is that the equation can
generate results for a variety of conditions. This is especially useful for large
numbers of plates and correspondingly long elution times, where the simu-
lation becomes unwieldy; the equation has no such limitations. However,
for large times t there may be a computational problem with the numerical
evaluation of (6.6-1), because the factorials can quickly grow too large for
the spreadsheet. At that point, the spreadsheet will show the error message
#NUM! rather than the hoped-for numerical result.
The culprit is digital overflow, a problem discussed in section 8.12, where
we also describe a way to bypass it. Our remedy is based on the observation
that the quantity described in (6.6-1) is always well within the capabilities
of the  spreadsheet (after  all, the total area  under  the  curve is 1,  and the
peaks are not all that narrow), while individual terms in its numerator and
=
t
m
t
(t/
)!
(t/
-N
p
)!N
p
!
μ
t/
(1 -
μ
)
(t/
–N
p
)
(t/
-1)!
(t/
-t
m
/
)!(t
m
/
-1)!
μ
t/
(1 -
μ
)
(t–t
m
)/
6.6 Chromatographic plate theory 2
239
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Plain text can get from any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters. Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET.
copy pdf text to word; extract text from pdf file
denominator may lead to overflow. The trick, then, is to avoid calculating
those individual terms, and instead compute the logarithms of the individ-
ual terms in (6.6-1), to combine these to form the logarithm of (6.6-1), and
only then to exponentiate to find its direct value. Below we will first show
that the results  of the  simulation indeed coincide with the predictions of
(6.6-1).
Instructions for exercise 6.6-1
Reopen the spreadsheet of exercise 6.5.
In cell AB7 deposit the instruction=LN(A7), and in cell AB8 the command
=AB7 +LN(A8). Copy the latter instruction down to the bottom row (306) of the com-
putation. This will calculate the values of ln (N!).
Now compute the binomial coefficients (t/
-1)! / [(t/
-N
p
)!(N
p
-1)!] in cell AC30
as=EXP(AB29 -AB6-$AB$29). Copy this down. Note that we start in cell AC30, i.e., at
t=t
m
.
Calculate the detector output in cell AD30 with=AC30*($A$2^A30)*
(1/$A$2 -1)^(A30 -24). Again copy this down.
Compare the result in column AD with the simulated detector response in column AA.
Asimple way to do so is to calculate the sum of squares of the differences, using the
instruction=SUMXMY2(AA30:AA306,AD30:AD306). This will show the complete coin-
cidence between simulation and theory, i.e., with differences of the order of the compu-
tational and truncation errors of the spreadsheet.
So  far  we  have  considered  a  single  compound  traveling  through  the
column. Any separation by partition chromatography must involve at least
two different compounds, with different values of K
p
, otherwise the parti-
tioning  process  cannot  distinguish between  them.  For realistic  values  of
V
s
/V
m
,  and  for K
p
-values differing  by  less than  a  few percent,  we usually
need a far larger number of plates than we can simulate realistically on a
spreadsheet. We will use (6.6-1) to calculate chromatograms of binary mix-
tures  for  10  to  1000  plates,  whereas  the  spreadsheet  can  only  hold  256
columns.
For an analysis of the chromatographic separation of a binary mixture we
will  again  assume  the  same,  constant  linear  flow  rate  v′=L/t
m
=H/
throughout all plates, as one can expect with a non-compressible mobile
phase.
240
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Instructions for exercise 6.6-2
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cells A1 and B1 enter labels N and N! respectively.
In cells B3 and B4 enter labels for 
μ
and N
p
, and place some corresponding values (e.g.,
0.9 and 10) in cells C3 and C4.
In cell A7 deposit the number 0, in cell A8 the instruction=A7+1, and copy this
instruction down to row 2007.
In cell B7 deposit a zero, in cell B8 the value LN(A8), in cell B9 the instruction
=A8+ LN(A9), then copy this instruction down to row 2007.
In cell C4 you have specified a value for N
p
. Skip (starting with row 7) the first N
p
cells in
column C, i.e., for N
p
=10 start in cell 17, and there compute the function (6.6-1) as
=(EXP($B16 – $B7 -$B$16))*(C$3^$A17)*(1/C$3-1) ^$A17- C$4).
Copy this instruction down to row 157; going down much further makes little sense for
this particular parameter choice.
Plot C7:C157 versus A7:A157 to show the resulting peak position and shape.
Copy the value for N
p
from cell C4 to cell D4, and in cell D3 deposit a different value of
μ
, such as 0.8.
10 Copy cell C17 to cell D17, and then down column D to row 157. Note that the dollar
signs in the instruction in cell C17 do not protect the C, so that the copied instruction
will work without further modification in column D.
11 Highlight D7:D207, copy it (with Ctrl+c), then activate the inner frame of the graph
you made under point (8), and paste (Ctrl +v) the new data into the graph.
12 In column E calculate the sum of the two signals, i.e., in cell E7 deposit=C7+D7, and
copy this down to row 157.
13 Following the procedure under point (11), copy and paste E7:E157 into the graph.
Differentiate by line width and/or color between the total detector response E7:E157
and its individual components, C7:C157 and D7:D157.
14 You should now have a graph that resembles the left-hand part of the top panel in Fig.
6.6-1.
15 Now repeat this for the same values of 
μ
but different values of t
m
, keeping in mind that
you should start the computations at row 7+ N
p
, i.e., at row 32 for N
p
=25, etc. When
you copy the instructions from column C into the new columns, make sure that the
middle term in the exponential is set to $B7 in the first row of that calculation. And
that, in plotting the data, you always start from row 7.
16 As you calculate for larger N
p
-values, you must start further down in the spreadsheet,
and you should also extend the computation further. For example, for N
p
=100, you
6.6 Chromatographic plate theory 2
241
start at row 107, and you might want to calculate the response through row 207; for
N
p
=1000, start in row 1007, and compute all the way down through row 1507. Of
course, the horizontal scale of the graph must be adjusted to this longer range. Figure
6.6-1 illustrates how this can be done by splitting the display into two parts.
17 At some point the factor exp [ln (t/
)!-ln (t/
-N
p
)!-ln N
p
!] will become too large, and
the spreadsheet will warn you with #NUM!. But now you know the trick: merely change
the instruction to yield exp [ln (t/
)!-ln (t/
-N
p
)!-ln (N
p
)!+(t/
) ln 
μ
+(t/
-N
p
) ln
(1-
μ
)], and continue. You can of course use this form everywhere in the spreadsheet.
For the rather large differences in 
μ
-values (
μ
1
=0.8, 
μ
2
=0.9) shown in
Fig. 6.6-1, baseline separation requires almost 500 plates; to resolve peaks
with  a  smaller  difference  in 
μ
,  a  larger number  of plates will be  needed.
242
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.6-1:Calculated chromatograms for two sample components, with 
μ
=0.9 and
μ
=0.8 respectively, and their combined response (in color), for various values of the
number N
p
of theoretical plates, as indicated with the curves.
Fortunately,  most  columns  contain  many  thousands  of  plates,  and  can
therefore separate compounds that differ only little in their 
μ
-values.
The above example illustrate that a separation between two compounds
requires two factors: (1) that their retention times are different, and (2) that
the  resulting peaks  are  sufficiently narrow so that, despite their  different
retention times, they do not overlap appreciably. Consequently, both peak
position (as defined by t
r
or V
r
) and peak width (as characterized by 
σ
r
) are
important for a chromatographic separation. Retention times are propor-
tional to N
p
, whereas peak widths are (approximately) proportional to √N
p
.
This is why, everything else being the same, larger values of N
p
yield better
peak separations.
6.7
Peak area, position, and width
We now return to the simulated curves, in order to show how to extract the
area,  position,  and  width  from  a  chromatographic  peak.  Several  simple
methods are available for symmetrical peaks (and even more for a special
subset of these, Gaussian peaks), but since chromatographic peaks are often
visibly asymmetric (and in that case obviously non-Gaussian), we will here
use a method that is independent of the particular shape of the peak. It is a
standard method that, in a chromatographic context, is described, e.g., by
Kevra et al. in J.Chem.Educ. 71 (1994) 1023.
Let the detector response as a function of time tbe described by the func-
tion f (t). The area A under the response curve can then be computed as
(6.7-1)
while the time at which the peak goes through its maximum, and the peak
width 
σ
 follow  from  its  first  and  second  moments  about  the  origin.
Specifically, the first moment yields the retention time t
r
as
(6.7-2)
and the variance 
σ
2
of the peak is given by
(6.7-3)
σ
2
=
0
t
2
f(t)dt
0
f(t)dt
-
0
t f(t)dt
0
f(t)dt
2
=
1
A
0
t
2
f(t)dt-
1
A
0
t f(t)dt 
2
t
r
=
0
t f(t)dt
0
f(t)dt
=
1
A
0
t f(t)dt 
A=
0
f(t)dt 
6.7 Peak area, position, and width
243
The area under a chromatographic peak is routinely calculated by integra-
tion, through (6.7-1), and is used here to verify that the integration works;
since we “injected” 1, we should obtain an area of 1.00. It is often advocated
that the value of t
r
be read off directly from the chromatographic peak, as the
value of  t at  the  peak maximum,  but  this is  correct only  for symmetrical
peaks. In general, for symmetrical and asymmetrical peaks alike, it is better
to use (6.7-2) instead.
Likewise, it is sometimes advocated that the standard deviation 
σ
of the
peak be determined as half its width at 60.7% of its maximum peak height,
implying a Gaussian peak shape. A far worse suggestion is to draw tangents
to the peak at that height, and extrapolate these tangents to determine the
difference  of  their  intercepts  with  the  baseline,  which  difference  is  then
taken to be 4
σ
.  Integration  based on (6.7-3) is more generally  applicable,
more accurate, and more precise, and should therefore be used whenever
the chromatogram is available in digital form.
Instructions for exercise 6.7
Reopen the spreadsheet of exercise 6.5.
We will now use the three columns AB through AD that we had kept open for later use.
(If you did not do that, highlight the column labels AB through AD, right-click, then in
the resulting menu click on I
nsert to insert three new columns.) We will use the first
column to compute the area A using (6.7-1), the second to find t
r
with (6.7-2), and the
third to obtain 
σ
2
from (6.7-3).
In cells AB7 through AD7 deposit the instructions=(AA6+AA7)/2,=(A6+A7)*AB7/2,
and=(A6 +A7)*AC7/2 respectively, and copy these down to row 205, where
(A6+A7)/2 represents the average value of time tin this interval.
In cell AB3 compute the peak area Aby trapezoidal integration, with the
instruction=SUM(AB6:AB205).
Likewise, in cell AC3, calculate the retention time t
r
with =SUM(AB6: AB205)/AB3.
Use cell AD3 to compute 
σ
p
2
as =SUM(AB6:AB205)/AB3- (AC2)^2.
Verify in cell AC4 that the product of 
μ
and t
/
is indeed constant using the
instruction=A2*AC3, and in cell AD4 compute the number of theoretical plates from
(6.5-10) as=AC3*(AC3-24)/AD3^2.
Copy these results to the top left corner of the spreadsheet, so that you can readily
change 
μ
and read the results. For example, in cells D2 through H2 place the instruc-
tions =AB3, =AC3,=AC4,=SQRT(AD3), and=AD4 respectively, and label these
appropriately, as illustrated in Fig. 6.5-1.
Make a table of A, t
r
/
μ
t
r
/
σ
p
, and N
p
as a function of 
μ
for 
μ
-values ranging from 0.2
through 0.9.
244
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
These numerical examples  indicate  that  the  plate  model  predicts both
t
r
=
μ
t
m
and 
σ
p
=t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)/N
p
. This latter result suggests that the number of
theoretical plates can be obtained experimentally from
(6.7-4)
The numerical agreement between simulation and (6.7-4) is quite good,
but not perfect. Below we illustrate how we can obtain more complete agree-
ment by using a better integration algorithm, such as a Newton–Cotes inte-
gration described in section 8.7.
10 Change the instruction in cell AB8 to=(7*AA6+32*AA7+12*AA8+32*AA9+
7*AA10)/90, and copy this instruction down the column.
11 Likewise change the instructions in columns AC and AD. For instance, the instruction
in cell AC8 should read =(7*A6*AA6+32*A7*AA7+12*A8*AA8 +32*A9*AA9 +
7*A10*AA10)/90, while the instruction in cell AD8 should instead have terms with
7*A6^2*AA6 etc.
12 Go to the top left corner of the worksheet, change the value of 
μ
in cell A2, and tabulate
your results as a function of 
μ
as they will appear in cells D2:H2. The new data will
reflect the improved integration accuracy.
6.8
Determining the number of theoretical plates
For a sufficiently large number of theoretical plates, the closed-form plate
theory result (6.6-1) for the chromatographic curve can be approximated by
the Gaussian distribution
(6.8-1)
Instructions for exercise 6.8
Reopen the spreadsheet of exercise 6.6-2.
Highlight the column heading F, click on it, and in the resulting menu select I
nsert.
In the new cell F3 copy the value for 
μ
from cell C3, and likewise copy the value of N
p
from C4 to F4. In cell F5 deposit the value for 
σ
2
as =F4*(1 -F3)/ (F3*F3).
In cell F17 deposit=(1/SQRT(F$5*2*PI()))*EXP(-($A17-F$4/F$3)*
($A17-F$4/F$3)/(2*F$5)), and copy this down to row 157.
1
σ
2
π
exp 
-(t-t
r
)
2
2
σ
2
   t
r
=
t
m
μ
,    
σ
2
=
t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)
N
p
N
p
=
t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)
σ
p
2
6.8 Determining the number of theoretical plates
245
Plot C7:C157 and F7:F157 versus A7:A157, identifying one data set as discrete points, the
other as a continuous curve.
Repeat the above for some other values of 
μ
and N
p
.
Figure 6.8-1 illustrates what you might find.
The  agreement between  the  theoretical  result  and a  Gaussian curve  is
fairly  poor for N
p
=25, especially for 
μ
-values close  to 1 (where the  plate
model predicts quite asymmetrical peaks), but it is already quite good for
N
p
=1000.  For  columns  with  many  thousands  of  theoretical  plates,  it  is
clearly justified to treat the resulting peaks as Gaussians, with the values of t
r
and 
σ
r
as defined in (6.8-1).
There are several independent factors that can cause broadening of chro-
matographic peaks, and the resulting variances 
σ
2
are additive. For example
we may have
246
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.8-1:Theoretical partition chromatograms (open circles) for 
μ
=0.9 and 
μ
=0.8 (as
indicated with the curves), for N
p
=25 (top panel) and N
p
=1000 (bottom panel) respec-
tively. The Gaussian curves (colored) are calculated from (6.8-1).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested