how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy text from scanned pdf to word application control utility azure web page winforms visual studio Excel26-part197

σ
2
=
σ
p
2
+
σ
i
2
+
σ
t
2
+
σ
d
2
+
σ
k
2
+
σ
e
2
(6.8-2)
where 
σ
i
describes broadening when the sample is not injected as a suffi-
ciently narrow plug, 
σ
t
2
+
σ
d
2
+
σ
k
2
represent the peak broadening effects of
tortuosity, diffusional, and interfacial kinetics considered in the van
Deemter equation (see section 6.9), and 
σ
e
is any extra-columnar peak
broadening, such as that due to a non-zero detector volume.
Of the variances listed in (6.8-2), the contribution from slow phase trans-
fer kinetics (
σ
k
2) is directly proportional to the flow rate of the mobile phase
through the column, whereas diffusional broadening (
σ
d
2
) is inversely pro-
portional to that flow rate. The contributions of these two terms can there-
fore be distinguished, as described in the next section. The magnitude of 
σ
e
2
can be kept small by proper instrument design, and that of 
σ
i
2
by proper
experimentation. We can therefore obtain N
p
by measuring 
σ
2
with an
assumption-free method based on (6.7-3), and by then subtracting esti-
mates for all non-negligible terms beyond 
σ
p
2
in (6.8-2). Finally, we can use
(6.7-4) to obtain N
p
from 
σ
p
2
through N
p
=t
r
(t
r
-ct
m
)/
σ
2
p
. Unfortunately
this is a rather elaborate procedure.
But here we must tread with some caution. Despite its venerable place in
the development of chromatography, there is an obvious problem with
applying plate theory to chromatography, because actual chromatographic
columns do not contain discrete, identifiable plates. Alternative models
have been used that do not involve the assumption of discrete plates, but
instead start with an infinitesimally thin slice of the column to obtain a diffe-
rential equation describing chromatographic behavior. Such models may
differ from the present approach in assuming that the mobile phase does
not move uniformly through the column, but that only a fraction of the
mobile phase moves on. Such models predict a Gaussian peak with the same
retention time t
r
but with a different peak width 
σ
, and lead to a different
expression for N, viz. N=(t
r
/
σ
2.
Which expression should one use, 
σ
p
2
=t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)/N
p
or 
σ
2
=t
r
2
/N? The
expression for 
σ
p
2
clearly represents band broadening by the partitioning
process, in which only a fraction of the sample transfers to the stationary
phase, so that the sample spreads out over many plates. This is most readily
seen by considering what happens with a non-retained sample: when
t
r
=t
m
, plate theory predicts 
σ
2
p
=t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)/N
p
=0, i.e., a sample that does
not partition into the stationary phase should show no corresponding
broadening. On the other hand, in continuum models that ascribe the
broadening to a partially stagnant mobile phase, all samples are affected,
independent of their partition coefficients. This leads to broadening even
for non-retained compounds, i.e., for t
r
=t
m
.
Which model better describes the experiments? The answer to this ques-
tion is not yet clear, and may well depend on the type of column used. A valid
criterion would seem to be that a constant value is found for either N
p
or N
6.8 Determining the number of theoretical plates
247
Copy text from scanned pdf to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy and paste text from pdf to excel; export highlighted text from pdf
Copy text from scanned pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf file using java; copy text from pdf with formatting
for members of a homologous series of compounds chromatographed at the
same time on the same column, after correction for the other peak-
broadening effects. There are too few experiments of this type in the litera-
ture to support one model or the other, and it may not even be an either/or
question: the flow of mobile phase in a packed column cannot be uniform,
and even in a capillary column it will exhibit a Poiseuille profile. Ultimately,
the usefulness of mathematical models to describe experimental data must
be determined by experiment. Sections 6-5 through 6-8 are mainly meant to
illustrate how much a spreadsheet can help one evaluate the consequences
of a mathematical model.
6.9
Optimizing the mobile phase velocity
Chromatography is a dynamicprocess; in practice, equilibrium between the
mobile and the stationary phase (as assumed in plate theory) is seldom
established. In principle, equilibrium might be approached by moving the
mobile phase slowly enough, but in that case all peaks may broaden because
the sample stays so long in the column that thermal motion (diffusion)
might spread them out. This is especially the case in gas chromatography,
because of the considerable molecular motion in the vapor phase, where the
mean free path between collisions is much larger than in solution. On the
other hand, when the mobile phase moves too fast through the column,
there may not be enough time for establishing partition equilibrium of the
sample molecules between the stationary and mobile phase. For a practical
separation, the optimum speed vof the mobile phase is therefore a compro-
mise, going fast enough to keep diffusional broadeningat bay, but not so fast
that interfacial transfer kinetics(i.e., the lack of equilibrium) become domi-
nant. That balancing act is described by the van Deemter equation
H=A+B/v+Cv
(6.9-1)
where His an abbreviation for the “height equivalent to a theoretical plate”.
The parameter Ais often associated with the tortuosity of a packed column
(in which case one would set A=0 for a capillary column), Breflects diffu-
sional broadening, and Cthe kinetic (i.e., non-equilibrium) behavior, that is,
the finite rates of interfacial processes. While closed-form expressions for B
and Ccan be derived, all three parameters in (6.9-1) are usually treated as
adjustable parameters. In order to express Hin terms of directly measurable
quantities one often uses
H=L/N
p
(6.9-2)
where Ldenotes the length of the column, and N
p
the number of plates it
contains. We have seen in section 6.8 that there is some question whether
to use N=t
r
(t
r
-t
m
)/
σ
2
or N
p
=t
r
2
/
σ
2
, but in the present context this is
248
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# a page of PDF document and extract its text content. Recognize scanned PDF document and output OCR result to MS
c# extract text from pdf; extract pdf text to excel
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing formats in VB.NET. Support
copy text from protected pdf to word; copy highlighted text from pdf
immaterial.Eitherdefinitionwilldo,oranyotherpracticaldefinitionofthe
reciprocalofthesquareofthepeakwidth,theparameterwewanttominimize.
The van Deemter equation contains three adjustable parameters, A, B,
and C, while Hand vare the observable parameters: vis calculated from the
measured linear carrier velocity at the column exit (in gas chromatography,
after correction for the pressure-dependent compressibility of the gas in the
column), and His found from the peak shape and position. It will not take
you long to figure out that (6.9-1) can be fitted to a second-order polynomial
of the form Y=A
0
+A
1
X+A
2
2
when we make the following substitutions:
Y=Hv, X=v, A
0
=B, A
1
=A, and A
2
=C. Therefore, a linear least-squares
routine can be used. The only remaining question concerns the nature of the
experimental uncertainties.
Of the experimentally accessible parameters, the column length and the
retention time t
r
(or the retention volume V
t
) can usually be determined
with sufficient precision. The same applies to the mobile phase velocity v.
The weakest link is usually the peak width, which yields 
σ
, because the peaks
are typically quite narrow. When the peak width w
1
2
=
σ
√(8 ln2) is taken
from a strip-chart recorder (as was done in much of the older work, before
computers or microprocessors were used), the line-width of the recorder
trace may be a significant part of the peak width. Similarly, when 
σ
was esti-
mated by drawing tangents to the peak, the relative uncertainties in the
resulting value are often considerable. We therefore assume that the major
source of experimental uncertainty lies in 
σ
. Since His proportional to 
σ
2
, so
that H/
σ
√H, a weighted second-order least-squares routine is indi-
cated, with weights given by w=1/{Y/
σ
v
}
2
=1/{(Hv)/
σ
v
}
2
1/Y. Note
that we only need the relativeweights w, because multiplying all weights by
an arbitrary constant is inconsequential to the result. We therefore use the
proportionality to avoid much unnecessary algebra.
As ourexample we will usedata taken from Fig. 1a ofa paper byR.
KieselbachinAnal.Chem.33(1961)23,whichshowsHasafunctionofv
forair,butane,andcyclohexane,flowingthroughagas-chromatographic
column(1mlong,6mminnerdiameter)packedwith35-80meshChromo-
sorb coatedwith 10%Dow-Corning 200siliconeoil.Thecarriergaswas
helium,thecolumnwaskeptatroomtemperature,andathermistorwas
usedasthedetector.Table6.9-1liststhedataasestimatedfromthegraph.
Instructions for exercise 6.9
Open a new spreadsheet.
Enter labels for vand Hin row 4, and enter the corresponding data from Table 6.9-1 for
air in A6:B21. This completes the data entry stage.
For the data analysis, enter additional labels in row 4 for Y, w, X, and XX.
6.9 Optimizing the mobile phase velocity
249
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
cut and paste pdf text; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Export all Word text and image content into high Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
extract text from pdf using c#; get text from pdf image
In columns C through F compute Y=Hv, w=1/Y, v, and v2respectively.
Highlight C6:F21, and call the weighted least-squares routine. It will deposit the results
for A
0
through A
2
in D22:F22, with the corresponding standard deviations below it, in
row 23. This completes the analysis stage.
Label column G for H
calc
, and in it compute Has A
0
/v+A
1
+A
2
v.
Plot the experimental data points (from columns A and B) together with the line calcu-
lated in column G. This completes the graphing stage.
Repeat the same procedure for the data for butane and cyclohexane. Figure 6.9-1 shows
you what the results should look like.
250
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Table 6.9-1:The height equivalent to a theoretical plate,H,as a function of
the linear,pressure-corrected mobile phase velocityv for air,butane,and
cyclohexane for a 1 m long,6mm ID glass column packed with 35-80 mesh
Chromosorb coated with 10% DC-200,using He at room temperature as the
mobile phase.
v / cm s
–1
H / cm
v / cm s
–1
H / cm
v / cm s
–1
H / cm
air
butane
air
butane
cyclohexane
2.14
0.417 0.201
16.7
0.071
4.20
0.226 0.120
18.8
0.066 0.094
2.46
0.161
7.02
0.142 0.093
18.8
0.075 0.101
4.76
0.090
9.20
0.104 0.087
21.6
0.065 0.101
8.64
0.075
11.5
0.099 0.077
21.6
0.069 0.108
11.0
0.073
13.8
0.076 0.082
26.6
0.075 0.108
13.8
0.069
16.3
0.060 0.089
26.6
0.085 0.115
16.1
0.083
16.3
0.071 0.092
31.6
0.069 0.134
18.5
0.082
Fig.6.9-1:The experimental data for air (circles), butane (squares) and cyclohexane
(triangles) together with the curves fitted through them. 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR file, converted by our C# PDF to text converting library as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word
extract text from pdf online; .net extract pdf text
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
extract text from pdf to excel; extract text from pdf open source
In this example, a numerical fit of the data is perhaps overkill, because the
optimal flow rate can be estimated directly from the graph. Its precise value
is not crucial, and one might even elect to use a velocity that is slightly higher
than optimal, thereby trading a small amount of extra peak broadening for a
considerably shorter analysis time.
6.10
Polarography
Polarography is an example of voltammetry that is quickly disappearing
from the undergraduate laboratory, the victim of what Foster, Bernstein, &
Huber have aptly called a Phantom Risk(MIT Press, 1993). At room tempera-
ture, mercury (melting point -39°C, boiling point +357°C)is a rather
innocuous liquid metal with a high surface tension (which makes its spills
difficult to clean up, since it causes mercury droplets to form non-wetting,
highly mobile spheres) and a very low vapor pressure (0.0012 Torr or 0.16 Pa
at 20°C). However, when mercury is heated, its vapor pressure becomes
considerable, at which point it can do much neurological harm, eventually
leading to mad-hatters disease. Another nasty one is when mercury is freely
discarded, in which case bacteria can convert it into the highly poisonous
methylmercury, the cause of Minamata disease. Fortunately, use of elemen-
tal mercury at room temperature, in a well-ventilated room, with distillation
and recycling of used mercury rather than disposal into the sink, is quite
harmless both to the experimenter and to the environment.
A polarographic experiment involves recording a current–voltage curve
on a mercury electrode immersed in a test solution. The electrical circuit is
completed by a reference electrode (and, usually, a separate ‘auxiliary’ elec-
trode), but these are of no consequence to the discussion to follow.
A typical mercury electrode is made from a mercury reservoir, some con-
necting tubing, and a glass capillary, often some 25 cm (about 10″) long and
5mm (0.2″) wide, with an internal diameter of about 0.1 mm. Under a hydro-
static pressure of about 1 atmosphere (from some 75 cm of mercury head)
the liquid metal flows through the vertical capillary at a rate of the order of a
milligram per second. It forms a near-spherical droplet at the bottom end of
the capillary, held together by interfacial tension. Eventually, as mercury
continues to flow into the droplet, its weight will become too large for the
interfacial tension to carry, the droplet will fall off, and the process will start
anew; typical drop times range from 5 to 15 seconds. Since electrical contact
with the drop is made through the capillary, the measurement is always
made on the drop that is still attached to the capillary. The entire assembly is
called a dropping mercury electrode, where ‘dropping’ pertains to the
mercury, not to the glass capillary.
In chapter 5 we have used the Nernst equation in terms of the solution
concentrations. That was permissible because, in potentiometry, the cur-
rents are negligible, so that there is no perceptible difference between the
6.10 Polarography
251
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text
erase text from pdf; copy pdf text to word with formatting
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge text to PDF converter SDK dlls into RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
copy text from locked pdf; extract pdf text to word
interfacial concentrations and those in the bulk of the solution. However,
when there are substantial currents flowing through the electrode, as in
voltammetry, the interfacial and bulk concentrations are no longer the
same, in which case the Nernst equation shows its true nature as a locallaw,
describing the relation between the potential and the interfacialconcentra-
tions, as long as the electron transfer is fast enough.
The relation between the interfacial and bulk concentrations depends on
mass transport, most often by diffusion (i.e., thermal motion) and/or con-
vection (mechanical stirring). Often a stationary state is reached, in which
the concentrations near the electrode can be described approximately by a
diffusion layer of thickness 
. For a constant diffusion layer thickness the
Nernst equation takes the form
(6.10-1)
where i
and i
are the limiting currentsassociated with reduction and oxi-
dation respectively. Equation (6.10-1) describes the stationary current–
voltage curve and, also, the envelopeof the polarographic current–voltage
curve. The limiting currents are the characteristic features of (6.10-1): when
the potential is sufficiently far from E
o
the currents are simply the limiting
currents, i.e., they are completely determined by the speed at which the
redox reagents can reach the electrode interface, or its products be removed
from it. We can invert (6.10-1) so that it expresses the current iin terms of the
potential E, as
(6.10-2)
In polarography, not enough time is available for the diffusion layer to
reach its stationary thickness. Instead, the current per unit electrode area
decreases with the square root of time, the signature time-dependence for
diffusion. On the other hand, the area of the growing drop expands, propor-
tional to the two-thirds power of drop age 
(i.e., time elapsed since the pre-
vious mercury drop fell off). These two counteracting effects, diffusion
currents per area proportional to 
–1/2
, and area growth as 
2/3
, combine to
yield polarographic current-time curves with a time dependence of 
–1/2
×
2/3
=
1/6
, as expressed in the Ilkovicˇ equation.
Finally, since polarography involves mercury, which often solvates metals
as amalgams, there can be a significant difference between the potential E
o
of standard tables and the appropriate value of E
o
for an amalgam-forming
metal. Polarography therefore uses so-called half-wave potentials E
1/2
instead of standard potentials E
o
. All the above effects are incorporated in
spreadsheet exercise 6.10.
i=
i
exp[nF(E-E
o
)/RT]+i
exp[nF(E-E
o
)/RT]+1
E=E
o
+
RT
nF
log 
i-i
i
-i
252
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Instructions for exercise 6.10
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 deposit labels for E
1/2
–1/6
–1/6
, F/RT, and the starting potential E
init
.
In row 2 place corresponding numerical values, such as -0.6, 0, -1, 40, and -0.3.
In row 4 place column headings for t(time), E, 
(drop age), and i
f
. The subscript fon
the current identifies this current as a faradaic current, i.e., one associated with
electrochemical reduction or oxidation, as distinct from the charging current we will
encounter soon. For 
either use ‘tau’ or type a ‘t’, then highlight it, select Fo
rmat 
Ce
lls, in the resulting Format Cells dialog box, select Fonts, then in the window for F
ont
select Symbol, and press OK. If your spreadsheet shows the Formatting toolbar, the
same can be accomplished simply by clicking on the arrow to the right of the Font
window, and selecting the Symbol font in the left-most window of the Formatting
toolbar instead.
In cell A6 place a very small number, such as 1E-10. The reason why we do not start
with 0 will become clear with instruction (9).
In cell A7 calculate=A6+0.2, and copy this down to cell A806.
In cell B6 refer to E
init
by depositing the instruction=$E$2.
In cell B7 calculate the gradually changing potential as=B6-0.002, and copy this
down to row 806. This will generate a 1.6 volt scan of the applied potential. (In polaro-
graphy the potential is typically scanned towards more negativepotentials during the
recording of a polarogram.)
In cell C6 simulate the drop age 
as=A6–INT(A6). This yields an output running from
0 (or, more precisely, 1E-10) to 0.9, thereby simulating the drop age 
. If we had
started in A6 with 0, the value of 
might occasionally run to 1.0, as the result of round-
offerrors in the values in column A. We prevent this by using in cell A6 a starting value
such as 1E-10, significantly larger than the accumulated round-offerrors yet still
insignificantly small for our calculations.
10 In cell D6 deposit the instruction for the faradaic current i
f
,=($B$2*EXP($D$2*(B6-
$A$2))+$C$2)*C6^(1/6)/(EXP($D$2*(B6-$A$2))+1). You will recognize this as
(6.10-2) times the time-dependency 
1/6
.
11 Plot iversus E. For both axes, select Values in R
everse Order on the Scale page of the
Format Axis dialog box. For the position of the scales use the options in the Format Axis
dialog box, on the Pattern page under Tick-Mark Labels. For Reverse Order you should
select to place them Hi
gh.
Usuallythecurrent–voltagecurvesarerecordedonastrip-chartrecorder,
whichcannotfollowtherapidfallofthecurrentwhenthemercurydroplet
fallsoff.ThiseffectcanbemimickedbyselectingalargervalueforA6,say0.04.
i
i
6.10 Polarography
253
The sensitivity limit of polarography is typically around 1 and 10 μM, and
is determined by the charging currenti
c
needed to charge the continuously
changing electrode interface. This current is proportional to (E-E
z
) C
–1/3
,
where E
z
is the potential of zero charge, and the integral capacitance Cis to a
first approximation independent of both potential and redox chemistry.
Upon  closer  examination  we  find  that  the  integral  capacitance  is
oftenabout a factor of 2 larger at E>E
z
than for E<E
z
, reflecting the fact that
solution anions can typically approach the electrode closer (because they
tend to be less strongly hydrated) than cations. We can readily incorporate
such a charging current, which should be added to the earlier-computed
faradaic current i
f
to yield the total current i.
12 In cell F1 place the label C, and in G1 the label Ez.
13 Enter numerical values for these, such as 0.1 and -0.4 respectively.
14 In cells F4 and G4 enter labels for i
c
and irespectively.
15 In cell F6 store the instruction=IF($B6>$G$2,2*($B6–$G$2)*$F$2
*C6^(-1/3),($B6–$G$2)*$F$2*$C6^(-1/3)), in G6 calculate the algebraic sum i
f
+i
c
,
and copy both down to row 806.
16 Plot F6:F806 vs. B6:B806 and G6:G806 vs. B6:B806. Your graphs should resemble those
of Fig. 6.10-1.
At higher concentrations of the electroactivespecies, adsorption of com-
ponents of the redox couple, coupled with the fluidity of the liquid–liquid
interface, may lead to mechanical streaming of the solution at the interface,
generating a polarographic maximum. Charging currents and polaro-
graphic maxima typically limit classical polarography to concentrations of
the electroactive species between 10
–3
and 10
–5
M.
Most applications of polarography involve metal ion analysis, where only
one valence state is present in solution, such as Tl
+
, Cd
2+
, Pb
2+
, or Zn
2+
.
However, that is not always the case: one can analyze Fe
2+
and Fe
3+
simulta-
neously by polarography, in a complexing solution such as made with
oxalate, in which case the polarogram shows (at E<E
1/2
) a limiting reduc-
tion current  due to the reduction of Fe
3+
to Fe
2+
, and (at E>E
1/2
) a limiting
oxidation current  for the oxidation of Fe
2+
to Fe
3+
. We simulate this in Fig.
6.10-2.
It is possible to exploit the difference in the time-dependencies of i
f
(pro-
portional to t
1/6
) and i
c
(proportional to t
–1/3
) to separate the two (J. N. Butler
& M. L. Meehan, J.Phys.Chem.69 (1965) 4051), and thereby to push back the
lower limit somewhat. However, instrumental refinements such as square
wave polarography(G. C. Barker & I. L. Jenkins, Analyst77 (1952) 685) and,
pulse polarography(G. C. Barker & A. W. Gardner, Z.Anal.Chem.173 (1960)
79) are much more efficient in doing so, and are therefore the methods of
choice for concentrations between 10
–5
and 10
–7
M.
i
i
254
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
6.10 Polarography
255
Fig.6.10-1 Top: the simulated faradaic current i
f
for a one-electron reduction at a half-
wave potential of -0.7 V. Middle panel: the simulated charging current i
c
. Bottom
panel: the total simulated polarographic current i=i
f
+i
c
. Parameters used: E
1/2
=-0.7,
–1/6=0, 
–1/6=-1, F/RT=40, C=0.03, E
z
=-0.4. 
i
i
Finally we expand the simulated polarogram by the inclusion of a second
reduction wave. This is easy because, in the absence of chemical interac-
tions between the electroactive species, the polarographic currents are
strictly additive.
17 Enter a positive value in B2 and observe the resulting curve for i
f
vs. E. Figure 6.10-2
illustrates such a polarogram.
18 Highlight the row number 3, right-click on it, and click on Insert. This will insert a new
row.
19 In the new row 3 enter numerical values for a second substance and its polarographic
characteristics, e.g., E
1
2
=-0.7, 
–1/6
=0, and 
–1/6
=-0.4.
20 Copy the instruction from D7 to E7, then extend it to read =($B$2*EXP($D$2*(B7-
$A$2))+$C$2) *C7^(1/6)/(EXP($D$2*($B7-A$2))+1)+($B$3*EXP(2*$D$2*($B7-
$A$3))+$C$3)*$C7^(1/6)/(EXP(2*$D$2*($B7-$A$3))+1) (for an added two-
electron reduction wave, n=2).
21 Plot the resulting polarogram, which should resemble Fig. 6.10-3.
When you compare graphs such as these with real polarograms of
‘reversible’ reductions (in electrochemistry, the term ‘reversible’ is meant to
convey that, except for mass transport, equilibrium rather than kinetic
i
i
256
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.10-2:The simulated polarogram for a one-electron redox couple with a half-wave
potential of -0.3 V. The concentrations of the reduced and oxidized forms of the couple
are directly proportional to their respective limiting currents,  and i .
i
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested