how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy text from pdf online software control dll windows web page html web forms Excel27-part198

considerations determine the shape of the observed behavior) you will see
that they are quite close representations. The message is that you can now
simulate almost any curve for which you have an appropriate theoretical,
closed-form description. And then you can use that simulation  to design
and/or test your analysis protocols.
6.11
Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry 1
Most  metals  are  solid  at  room  temperature,  in  which  case  polarography
(based on the reproducible formation and detachment of mercury droplets)
cannot be used. When we apply to a stationary electrode the same experi-
mental  method  (of  recording  the  current  resulting  from  scanning  the
applied voltage  as a linear  function  of  time)  we  obtain a current–voltage
curve that is called a linear sweep voltammogram. Except when it is applied
to  microelectrodes,  such current–voltage  curves do  not resemble  polaro-
grams (without the fluctuations in the current caused by the growth and fall
of the mercury droplets)  but exhibit a current  maximum where a polaro-
gram might have shown a S-shaped polarographic wave. When the direction
of the voltage scan is subsequently traced in reverse, the resulting curve is a
cyclic voltammogram.
The direct mathematical analysis of a linear sweep or cyclic voltammo-
gram  is much  more complicated  than  that of a polarogram,  because the
6.11 Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry 1
257
Fig.6.10-3:The simulated polarogram for a one-electron redox couple with a half-wave
potential of -0.3 V plus a two-electron reduction of another species with a half-wave
potential of -0.8 V. Again, all concentrations are directly proportional to their respec-
tive limiting currents. 
Copy text from pdf online - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
get text from pdf c#; extract text from pdf file using java
Copy text from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy pdf text to word; cut and paste text from pdf
rates of the electrochemical reactions (indirectly, through their dependence
on potential), as well as the rate at which material can reach the electrode,
are then time-dependent. (In polarography, the scan rate  dE/dt, where E is
the applied potential and t is time, is so small that its effect on the electrode
reactions can be neglected; in linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry, much
higher scan rates are typically used.) The resulting current–voltage curves
can either be compared with theoretical models obtained by digital simula-
tion, or they can be transformed into the shape of the corresponding polaro-
gram (without those drop-caused fluctuations), which can then be analyzed
by existing methods.
The  currently  available  digital  simulation  packages  make  simplifying
assumptions regarding the dependence of the rates of the electrode reac-
tions on the applied potential, which they take to be exponential. The trans-
form methods do not make such assumptions, and are therefore sometimes
preferable. In this section we will illustrate how we can use the transform
method to simulate a linear sweep voltammogram and a cyclic voltammo-
gram. And in section 6.12 we will illustrate how to apply the transform to
experimental data.
The complicated time dependence  of the  faradaic current is  caused  by
mass transport, specifically by  diffusion. (The other forms  of mass trans-
port, convection and electromigration, can  both be kept negligibly small:
convection  by  not  using  the  method  close  to,  say,  a  construction  site,
machine shop, or other source of mechanical vibrations; electromigration
by using an excess of an otherwise inert electrolyte.) Oldham (Anal. Chem.
41 (1969) 1121; 44 (1972) 196) showed that a linear sweep voltammogram
obtained on a planar electrode can be transformed into the corresponding
polarogram  by  a  method  called  semi-integration.  Conversely,  a  polaro-
graphic  wave  can  be  transformed  into  the  corresponding  linear  sweep
voltammogram  by  the  inverse  operation,  semi-differentiation.  Strictly
speaking,  the transforms given here work only for  planar electrodes with
negligible edge effects (so that planar diffusion applies everywhere), in the
absence of (or after correction for) charging current i
c
. (Note that the charg-
ing current on a stationary electrode is due to the changing potential dE/dt,
whereas at a dropping mercury electrode it is primarily caused by the chang-
ing electrode area dA/dt.)
We start from the stationary current–voltage curve (6.10.2) for a solution
that contains one oxidizable electroactive species (so that  =0), which we
write in dimensionless form as
(6.11-1)
For a linear sweep voltammogram, the applied voltage is a linear function
of time, E=E
1
+νt, where ν= dE/dt is the sweep rate, in V s
-1
. We then use
the macro SemiDifferentiate to find the corresponding shape of the linear
sweep voltammogram.
i
i
=
exp[nF(E-E
o
)/RT ]
exp[nF(E-E
o
)/RT]+1
i
258
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Security PDF component download. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
erase text from pdf file; export highlighted text from pdf to word
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
In this online article, we will address the robust functionality to copy and paste PDF page(s) in C#.NET document imaging application.
copy text pdf; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
6.11 Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry 1
259
Fig.6.11-1:The dependence of the current ratio (6.11-1) (black) and of its semi-
differential (blue) on time t (left) and potential E(right).
Instructions for exercise 6.11
Start a new spreadsheet.
In the top two rows of the spreadsheet, enter labels and values respectively for the time
increment ∆t, the sweep rate ν, the potentials E
1
and E
2
, the standard potential E
o
, and
the values of n and F/RT, such as ∆t=0.001, ν=0.02, E
1
=0, E
2
=0.5, E
o
=0.25, n=1,
and F/RT =40.
Below those (and separated by an empty row) enter labels for time t, potential E, and
dimensionless current i /i
lim
.
In the columns below these labels, enter values for t(from 0 to 25 in increments of
0.05), the corresponding values for E =E
1
+νt (from 0 to 0.5 in increments of 0.001),
and values of i/i
lim
calculated from (6.11-1).
Call the SemiDifferentiate macro, and reply to the input boxes.
Plot the resulting curve, together with i/i
lim
, as a function of t.
Also plot the resulting curve, together with i/i
lim
, as a function of E. The two plots
should be identical when the voltage axis from E
1
to E
2
has the same length as the time
axis from 0 to E
2
-E
1
/ν.
Figure 6.11-1 illustrates the types of plot you should have made.
For the simulation of a cyclic voltammogram we retrace the potential after
we have reached its final value, E
2
, so that E=E
1
+νt for 0tE
2
-E
1
/ν
while E=E
2
-νt for E
2
-E
1
/νt2 E
2
-E
1
/ν.
Now extend the spreadsheet by doubling the length of the time column to 0 (0.05) 50.
10 For t25 use the reversed direction of the voltage scan, so that Eruns back from E
2
to E
1
as E=E
2
-ν(t-25). A plot of E vs. t would now have the form of an isosceles triangle.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
copy pdf text to word with formatting; .net extract pdf text
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
extracting text from pdf; extract text from image pdf file
260
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.11-2:The dependence of the current ratio (6.11-1) (black) and of its semi-
differential (blue) on time t(left) and potential E(right). Note that the traces in the left-
hand panel have, as it were, been folded back.
11 Again call the SemiDifferentiate macro, and apply it to the entire data set.
12 Plot the resulting curve, together with i/i
lim
, as a function of t.
13 Also plot the resulting curve, together with i/i
lim
, as a function of E.
14 Compare your results with Fig. 6.11-2.
The two plots in Fig. 6.11-2 are now quite different: the signal as a function
of time shows oxidation first, followed (after reversal of the scan direction)
by a reduction of the just-oxidized) material. The same signal in the cyclic
voltammogram  is  folded  back  because  it  is  plotted  not  versus  time,  but
versus the applied potential.
15 Again double the length of the time axis, and make the potential retrace the ‘up’ and
‘down’ scans a second time.
16 Calculate the resulting semi-differential, and plot the resulting curve, together with
i/i
lim
, as a function of tand of E, respectively. Compare with Fig. 6.11-3.
Note that the second cycle does not quite retrace the first. However, the
difference between subsequent cycles becomes rather small, and after a few
cycles a steady-state cyclic voltammogram is approached. You can of course
verify this by further extending the simulation. In that case you may want to
reduce the data density by using, e.g., ∆t=0.2 instead, thereby changing the
voltage  increments  to  ∆t×ν=0.2 ×0.02=0.004,  as  otherwise  the  macro
might become quite slow.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
copy text from protected pdf; extract text from pdf image
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
extract text from pdf using c#; copy text from scanned pdf to word
6.12 Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry 2
261
Fig.6.11-3:The dependence of the current ratio (6.11-1) (black) and of its semi-
differential (blue) on time t (top) and potential E (bottom).
6.12
Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry 2
We will now illustrate the use of semi-integration to convert a linear sweep
voltammogram into the shape of the equivalent stationary current–voltage
curve. To this end we will use an experimental data set kindly provided by
Hromadova  &  Fawcett,  obtained for the reduction  on Au(110)  of 0.5  mM
[Co(NH
3
)
6
](ClO
4
)
3
in 0.093 M aqueous HClO
4
at 25 °C, using a scan rate of 20
mV s
-1
, as described in J.Phys.Chem.104A (2000) 4356.
Instructions for exercise 6.12
Start a new spreadsheet.
Import the data set labeled Hromadova &Fawcett.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe Free Visual Studio .NET PDF library, easy to be Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET
copy and paste pdf text; copy pdf text to word document
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF.
get text from pdf image; extract pdf text to word
Insert a few lines above the data table to make space for constants and column headings.
The first data column contains the time, in seconds, and the second column the current,
in μA.
262
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Fig.6.12.(a):The linear sweep voltammogram (black) of the reduction of 0.5 mM
[Co(NH
3
)
6
](ClO
4
)
3
in 0.093 M aqueous HClO
4
at Au(110), at 25 °C, with a scan rate of
20mV s-1, and its semi-integral (blue). (c) through (f): The same after the original data
set has been thinned by successive factors of 2, finally (in panel f) ending up with only 15
equidistant data points. Data from Hromadova & Fawcett, J.Phys.Chem. 104A (2000)
4356.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to Text Using VB. Integrate following RasterEdge text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your VB.NET project assemblies;
extract text from scanned pdf; delete text from pdf file
6.13 Summary
263
Use the macro SemiIntegrate to convert the linear sweep voltammogram to its steady-
state counterpart. In this form it can readily be analyzed by the methods pioneered by
Koutecky´, and described in, e.g., Principles of Polarography by Heyrovsky´ & Ku˚ta
(Academic Press 1966).
As in any numerical integration or differentiation, the data density must be sufficient.
Since the data are given, their density cannot be increased, but we can see the effect of
reducing the data density by culling data from the original set. An auxiliary macro,
DataThinner, is provided for this purpose. Check it out. Figure 6.12 illustrates what
happens with this data set when its density is reduced successively by factors of two. In
this case of high-quality experimental data, the resulting data deterioration in the semi-
integral is barely noticeable in the graphs, even after several repeated reduction steps.
6.13
Summary
This chapter showcases various ways in which spreadsheets can be applied
to problems of instrumental chemical analysis, with examples taken from
spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry.
We started with a simple set of spectrometric observations from which we
could determine a pK
a
by extrapolating its value to infinite dilution. Then we
used matrix algebra to solve a set of simultaneous equations representing
the spectrometric analysis of a mixture. In section 6.3 we showed the power
and convenience  of performing the same type of analysis using far more
than  the  minimum  number  of  input  data,  improving  data  precision  (by
diminishing the effects of experimental uncertainty) while at the same time
simplifying  the  analysis  (by  using  a  standard  least  squares  routine).
Subsequently we used the spreadsheet to illustrate the general appearance
of absorbance–absorbance diagrams, diagnostic plots that are most useful
in  establishing  the  number of separately  identifiable  species  involved in
equilibria of light-absorbing compounds.
In sections 6.5 through 6.7 we simulated chromatographic plate theory
and used it to demonstrate some of the basic results of partition chromatog-
raphy: the dependence of retention volume on the partition coefficient of
the  eluting  species,  and  the  volume  ratio  of  the  mobile  and  stationary
phases in the column. In sections 6.8 and 6.9 we explored the predictions of
plate  theory  for the width  of  the  chromatographic  peak  – and  found the
theoretical plate to be a somewhat shaky concept. In this example, then, we
used the spreadsheet to help us evaluate the numerical consequences of a
theory, thereby allowing us to ask more fundamental questions regarding
the underlying model.
The  last  section  dealing  with  chromatography  returned  to  the  more
mundane problem of using the spreadsheet to determine the parameters of
the van Deemter  equation. Alternatively we  could  have used  Solver  plus
SolverAid.
In section 6.10, we used the spreadsheet to simulate polarograms, fairly
complicated,  time-dependent  current–voltage  curves  observed  on  drop-
ping mercury  electrodes,  with  faradaic  currents  determined  by  diffusion
coefficients,  the  Nernst  equation,  and  drop  growth,  plus  (background)
charging currents. And in sections 6.11 and 6.12 we encountered transfor-
mations that can convert a linear sweep voltammogram onto the shape of a
polarographic  wave  and  vice  versa,  thereby  making  them  more  easily
amenable to further mathematical analysis.
There are countless analytical uses of  spreadsheets, and we could have
picked  many  other examples.  In  fact, some  of  the cases incorporated  in
earlier chapters of this book would have fitted right in here, such as resolving
different  radiochemical  half-lives,  a  problem  addressed  in  section  3.6.
Additional illustrations will be given in chapters 7 and 8. But even from the
few  examples  given here  you will get the  idea: spreadsheets  can  be used
profitably for many quantitative aspects of chemical analysis: for simulating
mathematical  relations,  for  extracting  specific  information  from  experi-
mental data, and for general data fitting.
Many of the data-fitting  procedures demonstrated  so far  are  based on
least-squares analysis. In the next chapter we will encounter Fourier trans-
formation, which can often provide an alternative approach to solving such
problems.
264
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
part v mathematical methods
chapter
7
fo u r i e r
tr a n s fo r m at i o n
7.1
Introduction to Fourier transformation
We can describe the sine wave A sin(2
π
ft) as a never-ending function of
time t, forever oscillating between the limits+A and -A. Alternately we can
represent it in the frequency domain as a signal with a single frequency, f,
and a given, fixed amplitude, A. The two descriptions are fully equivalent,
and illustrate that, in this example, the same function can be represented
either as a continuous function of time t, or as a single-valued function of
frequency f. In general, any time-dependent phenomenon can alternatively
be expressed as a function of frequency,and vice versa, and Fourier transfor-
mation allows us to transform data from the time domain to the frequency
domain, and back. Since Fourier transformation is a mathematical opera-
tion, time and frequency are merely examples of two associated parame-
ters x and 1/x that have a dimensionless product. In spectroscopy,
wavelength
and wavenumber
form another pair of such associated
parameters.
Fourier  transformation  has  found  important  applications  in  many
branches of science; here we mention especially its use in various analytical
instruments  (such  as  nuclear  magnetic  resonance,  infrared,  and  mass
spectrometry), and in signal processing. Below we will illustrate some prop-
erties of Fourier transformation in the latter context.
The  Fourier  transform  F(f )  of  a  time-dependent  function  f(t)  will  be
defined as
(7.1-1)
which can be combined with Euler’s theorem
(7.1-2)
to yield
e
-jx
=cos(x) -j sin(x)
F(f ) =
-∞
f(t)e
-2
π
jft
dt
v
265
(7.1-3)
where  F( f )  and  f(t)  are  continuous  functions  of  time  t and  frequency  f
respectively,  while  j =
 Numerical  computation  has  difficulty  with
infinity, and the discrete Fourier transform is therefore defined somewhat
differently, namely as
(7.1-4)
where the frequencies are restricted to the discrete set k =0, 1, 2, …, N. It is
the discrete Fourier transform that is readily calculated on a computer, and
that has revolutionized the way  Fourier transformation  is used  in instru-
mentation and signal analysis. Consequently, it is the discrete Fourier trans-
form  which  we  will  use  here:  from  now  on,  when  we  mention  Fourier
transformation, we will mean discrete Fourier transformation.
In  order  to  facilitate  the  calculations,  a  macro  computing  the  Fourier
transform  of  an  array  of  complex  numbers  is  provided;  the  program  is
described in some detail in section 9.5. (For details about the Fourier trans-
form method itself you might want to consult books such as R. Bracewell,
The  Fourier  Transform  and  its  Applications,  McGraw-Hill,  1965,  or  E.  O.
Brigham, The Fast Fourier Transform, Prentice-Hall, 1974, 2nd ed. 1988.) The
macro has the following properties, restrictions, and requirements:
(a) The input data can be real, imaginary or complex. In fact, they will be
treated as complex numbers; when they are real, their imaginary compo-
nents just happen to be zero, and similarly the real components will be
zero for imaginary input data. The same applies to the output data.
(b) The macro is restricted to k input data, where k is an integer power of 2,
from 2
1
=2 through 2
10
=1024. Allowable k-values are therefore 2, 4, 8, 16,
32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and 1024. (This limitation is linked to the version of
Excel used; Excel 97, 98, and 2000 can handle larger arrays, and users of
these versions may want to increase the maximum value of kin the macro
accordingly.)
(c) The input data are preferably centeredaround t=0 or f =0.
(d) The macro requires a specific, three-column format. The first column con-
tains the variable (such as time, frequency, etc.), the second the real parts
of the input data, and the third their imaginary components. When the
input data are real, the third column should contain zeros and/or blanks;
likewise, when the input data are imaginary numbers, the second column
should be filled with zeros and/or blanks.
(e) The macro writes its output again in the three columns immediately to the
right of the input data. The output uses the same format as the input: first
the variable, then the real components of the output data, and finally its
imaginary components.
F(f )=
N
k=0
f(t)cos(2
π
k/N )dt-j
N
k=0
f(t)sin(2
π
k/N )dt
√-1
F( f )=
-∞
f(t)cos(2
π
f t)dt-j
-∞
f(t)sin(2
π
f t)dt
266
Fourier transformation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested