how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Can't copy text from pdf software control dll winforms azure asp.net web forms mer19-part1965

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
181
Table 12.6   Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption:  Electric Power Sector
(Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide
e
a
)
Coal
Natural
Gasb
Petroleum
Geo-
thermal
Non-
Biomass
Wasted
Totale
Distillate
Fuel Oilc
Petroleum
Coke
Residual
Fuel Oil
Total
1973 Total............................
.
812
199
20
2
254
276
NA
NA
1,286
1975 Total............................
.
824
172
17
(s)
231
248
NA
NA
1,244
1980 Total............................
.
1,137
200
12
1
194
207
NA
NA
1,544
1985 Total............................
.
1,367
166
6
1
79
86
NA
NA
1,619
1990 Total............................
.
1,548
176
7
3
92
102
(s)
6
1,831
1995 Total............................
.
1,661
228
8
8
45
61
(s)
10
1,960
1996 Total............................
.
1,752
205
8
8
50
66
(s)
10
2,033
1997 Total............................
.
1,797
219
8
10
56
75
(s)
10
2,101
1998 Total............................
.
1,828
248
10
13
82
105
(s)
10
2,192
1999 Total............................
.
1,836
260
10
11
76
97
(s)
10
2,204
2000 Total............................
.
1,927
281
13
10
69
91
(s)
10
2,310
2001 Total............................
.
1,870
290
12
11
79
102
(s)
11
2,273
2002 Total............................
.
1,890
306
9
18
52
79
(s)
13
2,288
2003 Total............................
.
1,931
278
12
18
69
98
(s)
11
2,319
2004 Total............................
.
1,943
297
8
22
69
99
(s)
11
2,350
2005 Total............................
.
1,984
319
8
24
69
101
(s)
11
2,416
2006 Total............................
.
1,954
338
5
21
28
55
(s)
12
2,358
2007 Total............................
.
1,987
372
6
17
31
54
(s)
11
2,425
2008 Total............................
.
1,959
362
5
15
19
39
(s)
12
2,373
2009 Total............................
.
1,741
373
5
13
14
33
(s)
11
2,158
2010 Total............................
.
1,828
399
6
14
12
32
(s)
5
2,265
2011 Total............................
.
1,723
409
5
14
7
26
(s)
6
2,165
2012 Total............................
.
1,511
493
4
9
6
19
(s)
6
2,029
2013 Total............................
.
1,571
444
4
13
6
23
(s)
6
2,045
2014 January........................
.
154
36
2
1
2
5
(s)
1
196
February ......................
.
140
30
1
1
1
2
(s)
(s)
173
March...........................
.
133
31
1
1
1
3
(s)
1
167
April .............................
.
107
30
(s)
1
(s)
1
(s)
1
139
May..............................
.
118
35
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
155
June .............................
.
137
39
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
178
July ..............................
.
150
46
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
198
August .........................
.
149
49
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
200
September ...................
.
127
42
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
171
October ........................
.
112
38
(s)
1
(s)
1
(s)
1
153
November ....................
.
119
33
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
154
December ....................
.
125
35
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
162
 Total............................
.
1,570
444
6
12
7
26
(s)
6
2,046
2015 January........................
.
131
39
1
1
1
3
(s)
1
174
February ......................
.
123
36
2
1
2
5
(s)
(s)
164
March...........................
.
107
39
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
148
April .............................
.
89
37
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
128
May..............................
.
105
40
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
148
June .............................
.
127
49
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
178
July ..............................
.
141
58
(s)
1
1
2
(s)
1
202
August .........................
.
136
57
(s)
1
1
2
(s)
1
195
September ...................
.
120
49
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
171
October ........................
.
99
44
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
145
November ....................
.
91
40
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
133
December ....................
.
92
42
(s)
1
(s)
2
(s)
1
137
 Total............................
.
1,364
530
5
11
7
24
(s)
6
1,925
2016 January........................
.
114
43
1
1
1
2
(s)
1
160
Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon
equivalent by multiplying by 12/44.
.
Natural gas, excluding supplemental gaseous fuels.
Distillate fuel oil, excluding biodiesel.
Municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels.
Through 1994, also includes blast furnace gas, and other manufactured and waste
gases derived from fossil fuels.  Through 2009, also includes municipal solid waste
from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, and other
biomass.
.
Excludes emissions from biomass energy consumption.  See Table 12.7.
NA=Not available.  (s)=Less than 0.5 million metric tons.  
Notes:  
 Data are estimates  for carbon  dioxide emissions  from energy
consumption.  See "Section 12 Methodology and Sources" at end of section.
See "Carbon Dioxide" in Glossary.  
See Note 1, "Emissions of Carbon Dioxide
and Other Greenhouse Gases," at end of section.  
Data exclude emissions from
biomass energy consumption.  See Table 12.7 and Note 2, "Accounting for Carbon
Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section.  
Totals
may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.  
Geographic
coverage is the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Web  Page:    See  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#environment
(Excel and CSV files) for all available annual and monthly data beginning in 1973.
Sources:  See end of section.
Can't copy text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract text from pdf with formatting; copy pdf text to word
Can't copy text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf c#; extract all text from pdf
182
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Table 12.7   Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Consumption
(Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide
e
a
)
By Source
By Sector
Woodb
Biomass
Wastec
Fuel
Ethanold
Bio-
diesel
Total
Resi-
dential
Com-
merciale
Indus-
trialf
Trans-
portation
Electric
Powerg
Total
1973 Total......................
.
143
(s)
NA
NA
143
33
1
109
NA
(s)
143
1975 Total......................
.
140
(s)
NA
NA
141
40
1
100
NA
(s)
141
1980 Total......................
.
232
(s)
NA
NA
232
80
2
150
NA
(s)
232
1985 Total......................
.
252
14
3
NA
270
95
2
168
3
1
270
1990 Total......................
.
208
24
4
NA
237
54
8
147
4
23
237
1995 Total......................
.
222
30
8
NA
260
49
9
166
8
28
260
1996 Total......................
.
229
32
6
NA
266
51
10
170
6
30
266
1997 Total......................
.
222
30
7
NA
259
40
10
172
7
30
259
1998 Total......................
.
205
30
8
NA
242
36
9
160
8
30
242
1999 Total......................
.
208
29
8
NA
245
37
9
161
8
30
245
2000 Total......................
.
212
27
9
NA
248
39
9
161
9
29
248
2001 Total......................
.
188
33
10
(s)
231
35
9
147
10
31
231
2002 Total......................
.
187
36
12
(s)
235
36
9
144
12
35
235
2003 Total......................
.
188
36
16
(s)
240
38
9
141
16
37
240
2004 Total......................
.
199
35
20
(s)
255
38
10
151
20
36
255
2005 Total......................
.
200
37
23
1
261
40
10
150
23
37
261
2006 Total......................
.
197
36
31
2
266
36
9
151
33
38
266
2007 Total......................
.
196
37
39
3
276
39
9
146
41
39
276
2008 Total......................
.
193
39
55
3
290
44
10
139
57
40
290
2009 Total......................
.
181
41
62
3
287
47
10
125
64
41
287
2010 Total......................
.
186
42
73
2
303
41
10
136
74
42
303
2011 Total......................
.
189
42
73
8
312
42
11
139
80
40
312
2012 Total......................
.
189
42
73
8
312
39
10
141
80
42
312
2013 Total......................
.
204
45
75
13
337
54
11
141
87
43
337
2014 January..................
.
18
4
6
1
29
5
1
12
7
4
29
February ................
.
16
4
6
1
26
4
1
11
6
4
26
March.....................
.
18
4
6
1
29
5
1
12
7
4
29
April .......................
.
17
4
6
1
28
4
1
12
7
4
28
May........................
.
17
4
7
1
29
5
1
12
7
4
29
June .......................
.
17
4
6
1
29
4
1
12
7
4
29
July ........................
.
18
4
7
1
30
5
1
12
8
4
30
August ...................
.
18
4
7
1
30
5
1
12
8
4
30
September .............
.
17
4
6
1
28
4
1
11
7
4
28
October ..................
.
17
4
7
1
29
5
1
12
8
4
29
November ..............
.
17
4
6
1
29
4
1
12
7
4
29
December ..............
.
18
4
7
1
30
5
1
12
8
4
30
 Total......................
.
209
47
76
13
345
54
11
143
88
49
345
2015 January..................
.
17
4
6
1
28
3
1
12
7
4
28
February ................
.
15
4
6
1
25
3
1
11
7
4
25
March.....................
.
16
4
7
1
27
3
1
12
7
4
27
April .......................
.
15
4
6
1
26
3
1
12
7
4
26
May........................
.
16
4
7
1
28
3
1
12
8
4
28
June .......................
.
16
4
7
2
28
3
1
12
8
4
28
July ........................
.
17
4
7
1
29
3
1
12
8
4
29
August ...................
.
16
4
7
1
29
3
1
12
8
4
29
September .............
.
16
4
7
1
27
3
1
11
8
4
27
October ..................
.
16
4
7
1
28
3
1
12
8
4
28
November ..............
.
16
4
7
1
27
3
1
11
7
4
27
December ..............
.
16
4
7
1
28
3
1
12
8
4
28
 Total......................
.
191
47
79
14
331
40
11
140
91
48
331
2016 January..................
.
16
4
6
1
27
3
1
12
7
4
27
Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon
equivalent by multiplying by 12/44.
.
Wood and wood-derived fuels.
Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste,
agricultural byproducts, and other biomass.
.
Fuel ethanol minus denaturant.
Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)
and commercial electricity-only plants.
.
Industrial sector, including industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and
industrial electricity-only plants.
.
The 
electric 
power 
sector 
comprises 
electricity-only 
and
combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants within the NAICS  22  category whose
primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.
.
R=Revised.  NA=Not available.  (s)=Less than 0.5 million metric tons.  
Notes:  
Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are
excluded from the energy-related carbon dioxide emissions reported in Tables
12.1–12.6.  See Note 2, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass
Energy Combustion," at end of section.  
Data are estimates.  See "Section 12
Methodology and Sources" at end of section.  
See "Carbon Dioxide" in Glossary.
See Note 1, "Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Other Greenhouse Gases," at
end of section.  
Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent
rounding.  
Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Web  Page:    See  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#environment
(Excel and CSV files) for all available annual and monthly data beginning in 1973.
Sources:  See end of section.
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
PDFImage image = PDFImageHandler.SelectImage(page1, cursorPos); // Copy the image. Extract all images in a PDF document doc, Target document object, Can't be null
export text from pdf to word; cut and paste text from pdf
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. targetSize, The size of the output image. Can't be
find and replace text in pdf; extract text from pdf acrobat
Environment
Note 1.  Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Other Green-
house Gases.  Greenhouse gases are those gases—such as
water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO
2
), methane, nitrous oxide,
hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and
sulfur  hexafluoride—that  are  transparent  to  solar  (short-
wave) radiation but opaque to long-wave (infrared) radiation,
thus  preventing  long-wave  radiant  energy  from  leaving
Earth's atmosphere. The net effect is a trapping of absorbed
radiation and a tendency to warm the planet's surface.
Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions account for about
98% of  U.S.  CO
2
emissions.   The vast majority  of  CO
2
emissions come from fossil fuel combustion, with smaller
amounts from the nonfuel use of fossil fuels, as well as from
electricity  generation  using  geothermal  energy  and  non-
biomass waste.   Other  sources of CO
2
emissions include
industrial processes, such as cement and limestone produc-
tion.  Data in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s
(EIA) Monthly Energy Review (MER) Tables 12.112.6 are
estimates for U.S. CO
2
emissions from energy consumption,
including the nonfuel use of fossil fuels (excluded are esti-
mates for CO
2
emissions from biomass energy consumption,
which appear in MER Table 12.7).
For annual U.S. estimates for  emissions  of CO
2
from all
sources, as well as for emissions of other greenhouse gases,
see  EIA’s Emissions of Greenhouse Gases Report at
http://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/ghg_report/.
Note 2.  Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From
Biomass  Energy  Combustion.  Carbon dioxide (CO
2
)
emissions  from  the  combustion  of  biomass  to  produce
energy are excluded from the energy-related CO
2
emissions
reported  in  MER  Tables  12.112.6,  but  appear  in  MER
Table 12.7.  According to current international convention
(see  the  Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate  Change’s
“2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inven-
tories”),  carbon  released  through  biomass  combustion  is
excluded  from  reported  energy-related  emissions.  The
release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be
balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown,
resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time. (This
is not to say that biomass energy is carbon-neutral. Energy
inputs are required in order to grow, fertilize, and harvest the
feedstock and to produce and process the biomass into fuels.)
However, analysts have debated whether increased use of
biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon
stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than
the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported
energy-related  emissions.    For  example,  the  clearing  of
forests for biofuel crops could result in an initial release of
carbon that is not fully recaptured in subsequent use of the
land for agriculture.
To  reflect  the  potential  net  emissions,  the  international
convention  for  greenhouse  gas  inventories  is  to  report
biomass emissions in the category “agriculture, forestry, and
other land use,” usually based on estimates of net changes in
carbon stocks over time. 
This indirect accounting of CO
2
emissions from biomass can
potentially lead to confusion in accounting for and under-
standing the flow of CO
2
emissions within energy and non-
energy systems. In  recognition of this issue, reporting of
CO
2
emissions  from biomass  combustion  alongside other
energy-related CO
2
emissions offers an alternative account-
ing treatment. It is important, however, to avoid misinter-
preting  emissions  from fossil energy and  biomass  energy
sources as necessarily additive. Instead, the combined total
of direct  CO
emissions from biomass and  energy-related
CO
2
emissions implicitly assumes that none of the carbon
emitted was previously or subsequently reabsorbed in terres-
trial sinks or that other emissions sources offset any such
sequestration.
Section 12 Methodology and Sources
To estimate carbon dioxide emissions from energy consump-
tion for the Monthly Energy Review (MER), Tables 12.112.7,
the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) uses the
following methodology and sources:
Step 1.  Determine Fuel Consumption
Coal—Coal sectoral (residential, commercial, coke plants,
other industrial, transportation, electric power) consumption
data in thousand short tons are from MER Table 6.2.  Coal
sectoral consumption data are converted to trillion Btu by
multiplying by the coal heat content factors in MER Table
A5.
Coal Coke Net Imports—Coal coke net imports data in tril-
lion Btu are derived from coal coke imports and exports data
in MER Tables 1.4a and 1.4b.
Natural Gas (excluding supplemental gaseous fuels)—Natu-
ral gas sectoral consumption data in trillion Btu are from
MER Tables 2.22.6.
Petroleum—Total  and  sectoral  consumption  (product
supplied) data in thousand barrels per day for asphalt and
road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel oil, jet fuel, kero-
sene,  liquefied  petroleum  gases  (LPG),  lubricants,  motor
gasoline, petroleum  coke,  and  residual  fuel  oil  are  from
MER Tables 3.5 and 3.7a3.7c.  For the component prod-
ucts  of  LPG  (ethane/ethylene,  propane/propylene,  normal
butane/butylene,  and  isobutane/isobutylene)  and  “other
petroleum” (aviation gasoline blending components, crude
oil,  motor  gasoline  blending  components,  naphthas  for
petrochemical  feedstock  use, other oils for petrochemical
feedstock  use,  pentanes  plus,  special  naphthas,  still  gas,
unfinished oils, waxes, and miscellaneous petroleum prod-
ucts),  consumption  (product  supplied)  data  in  thousand
barrels per day are from EIA’s Petroleum Supply Annual
(PSA), Petroleum Supply Monthly  (PSM),  and  earlier
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
183
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
on the original page are removed, including text, images, interactive String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; doc.Save Can't be null.
copy text from pdf without formatting; copy paste pdf text
C#: How to Extract Text from Adobe PDF Document Using OCR Library
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath it will be helpful to recognize the text, but it can't be too large.
.net extract pdf text; c# get text from pdf
publications (see sources for MER Table 3.5).  Petroleum
consumption data by product are converted to trillion Btu by
multiplying by the petroleum heat content factors in MER
Tables A1 and A3.
Biomass—Sectoral  consumption  data  in  trillion  Btu  for
wood, biomass waste, fuel ethanol (minus denaturant), and
biodiesel are from MER Tables 10.2a10.2c.
Step 2.  Remove Biofuels From Petroleum
Distillate Fuel Oil—Beginning in 2009, the distillate fuel
oil  data  (for  total  and  transportation  sector)  in  Step  1
include biodiesel, a non-fossil renewable fuel.  To remove
the biodiesel portion from distillate fuel oil, data in thou-
sand barrels per day for refinery and blender net inputs of
renewable diesel fuel (from the PSA/PSM) are converted
to trillion Btu by multiplying by the biodiesel heat content
factor  in  MER  Table A1, and  then  subtracted  from  the
distillate fuel oil consumption values.
Motor  Gasoline—Beginning  in  1993, the motor gasoline
data (for  total,  commercial  sector, industrial  sector,  and
transportation sector) in Step 1 include fuel ethanol, a non-
fossil renewable fuel.  To remove the fuel ethanol portion
from motor gasoline, data in trillion Btu for fuel ethanol
consumption (from MER Tables 10.2a, 10.2b, and 10.3)
are  subtracted  from  the  motor  gasoline  consumption
values.  (Note that about 2% of fuel ethanol is fossil-based
petroleum  denaturant,  to  make  the  fuel  ethanol
undrinkable.    For  19932008,  petroleum  denaturant  is
double  counted in the PSA product supplied  statistics, in
both  the  original  product  category—e.g.,  pentanes
plus—and also in the finished motor gasoline category; for
this time period for MER Section 12, petroleum denaturant
is removed along with the fuel ethanol from motor gaso-
line, but left in the original product.  Beginning in 2009,
petroleum  denaturant  is  counted  only  in  the  PSA/PSM
product supplied statistics for motor gasoline; for this time
period for MER Section 12, petroleum denaturant is left in
motor gasoline.)
Step 3.  Remove Carbon Sequestered by Nonfuel Use
The following fuels have industrial nonfuel uses as chemi-
cal feedstocks and other products: coal, natural gas, asphalt
and  road  oil, distillate  fuel  oil, liquefied petroleum  gases
(ethane/ethylene,  propane/propylene,  normal  butane/buty-
lene,  and  isobutane/isobutylene),  lubricants  (which  have
industrial  and  transportation  nonfuel  uses),  naphthas  for
petrochemical feedstock  use,  other  oils  for  petrochemical
feedstock use, pentanes plus, petroleum coke, residual fuel
oil,  special  naphthas,  still gas, waxes,  and  miscellaneous
petroleum products.  In the nonfuel use of these fuels, some
of the carbon is sequestered, and is thus subtracted from the
fuel consumption values in Steps 1 and 2.
Estimates  of  annual  nonfuel  use  and  associated  carbon
sequestration are developed by EIA using the methodology
detailed  in  “Documentation  for Emissions of Greenhouse
Gases 
in 
the 
United 
States 
2008” 
at
http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/1605/ggrpt/documentation/pdf/0638(2008).pdf.
To obtain monthly estimates of nonfuel use and associated
carbon  sequestration,  monthly  patterns  for  industrial
consumption and product supplied data series are used.  For
coal nonfuel use, the monthly pattern for coke plants coal
consumption from MER Table 6.2 is used.  For natural gas,
the monthly pattern for other industrial non-CHP natural gas
consumption from MER Table 4.3 is used.  For distillate
fuel oil, petroleum coke, and residual fuel oil, the monthly
patterns for industrial consumption from MER Table 3.7b
are used.  For the other petroleum products, the monthly
patterns for product supplied from the PSA and PSM are
used.
Step  4.    Determine  Carbon  Dioxide  Emissions  From
Energy Consumption
Carbon dioxide (CO
2
) emissions data in million metric tons
are calculated by multiplying consumption values in trillion
Btu from Steps 1 and 2 (minus the carbon sequestered in
nonfuel  use  in  Step  3)  by  the  CO
2
emissions  factors  at
http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/1605/ggrpt/excel/CO2_coeffs_09_v2.xls
.
Beginning in 2010, the 2009 factors are used.
Coal—CO
2
emissions for coal are calculated for each sector
(residential, commercial, coke plants, other industrial, trans-
portation, electric power).  Total coal emissions are the sum
of the sectoral coal emissions.  
Coal Coke Net Imports—CO
2
emissions for coal coke net
imports are calculated.
Natural Gas—CO
2
emissions for natural gas are calculated
for each sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transpor-
tation, electric power).  Total natural gas emissions are the
sum of the sectoral natural gas emissions.
Petroleum—CO
2
emissions are calculated for each petroleum
product.  Total petroleum emissions are the sum of the product
emissions.  Total LPG emissions are the sum of the emissions
for the component products (ethane/ethylene, propane/propyl-
ene, normal butane/butylene, and isobutane/isobutylene); resi-
dential, commercial, and transportation sector LPG emissions
are estimated by multiplying consumption values in trillion
Btu from MER Tables 3.8a and 3.8c by the propane emis-
sions factor; industrial sector LPG emissions are estimated as
total LPG emissions minus emissions by the other sectors.  
Geothermal and Non-Biomass Waste—Annual CO
2
emis-
sions data for geothermal and non-biomass waste are EIA
estimates based on Form EIA-923, “Power Plant Opera-
tions Report” (and predecessor forms).  Monthly estimates
are created by dividing the annual data by the number of
days in the year and then multiplying by the number of
days in the month.  (Annual estimates for the current year
are set equal to those of the previous year.)
184
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
If it can't get text successfully, please try as follows You can directly copy demos to your .NET application to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, ) and output to text or PDF
acrobat remove text from pdf; delete text from pdf acrobat
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; Copy and embed your required DLL libraries into web viewer control, I can't upload document
copying text from pdf to excel; get text from pdf image
Biomass—CO
2
emissions  for  wood,  biomass  waste,  fuel
ethanol (minus denaturant), and biodiesel are calculated for
each sector.  Total emissions for each biomass fuel are the
sum of  the sectoral emissions.  The following factors, in
million metric tons CO
2
per quadrillion Btu, are used:  wood
—93.80; biomass waste—90.70; fuel ethanol—68.44; and
biodiesel—73.84.  For 19731988, the biomass portion
of waste in MER Tables 10.2a10.2c  is estimated as
67%; for 19892000, the biomass portion of waste is esti-
mated  as  67%  in  1989  to  58%  in  2000,  based  on  the
biogenic  shares  of  total  municipal  solid  waste  shown  in
EIA’s “Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste
to  Biogenic  and  Non-Biogenic  Energy,”  Table  1  at
http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/pdf/historical/msw.pdf.
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
185
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Read Linear Identcode Within RasterEdge .
read Identcode in high speed just through copy-and-paste; fileName As String = FolderName & "Sample.pdf" Dim reImage at one time, then you can't miss RasterEdge
get text from pdf file c#; pdf text replace tool
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
You can't miss it Copy and paste demo code below to your VB.NET application for dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copy pdf text to word with formatting; edit pdf replace text
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
VB.NET Word: How to Convert Word Document to PNG Image Format in
and document formats, including converting Word to PDF in VB on this page and you can directly copy it to If a strong CSP is chosen, a password can't be removed
delete text from pdf online; c# extract text from pdf
The thermal conversion factors presented in the following
tables can be used to estimate the heat content in British
thermal units (Btu) of a given amount of energy measured
in  physical  units,  such  as  barrels  or  cubic  feet.    For
example,  10  barrels  of  asphalt  has  a  heat  content  of
approximately 66.36 million Btu (10 barrels x 6.636 million
Btu per barrel = 66.36 million Btu).
The  heat  content  rates  (i.e.,  thermal  conversion  factors)
provided in this section represent the gross (or higher or
upper) energy content of the fuels.  Gross heat content rates
are applied in all Btu calculations for the Monthly Energy
Review and are commonly used in energy calculations in
the  United  States;  net  (or  lower)  heat  content  rates  are
typically used in European energy calculations.  The differ-
ence between the two rates is the amount of energy that is
consumed  to  vaporize  water  that  is  created  during  the
combustion process.  Generally, the difference ranges from
2% to 10%, depending on the specific fuel and its hydrogen
content.   Some  fuels, such as  unseasoned wood, can be
more than 40% different in their gross and net heat content
rates.      See  “Heat  Content”  and  “British  Thermal  Unit
(Btu)” in the Glossary for more information.  
In general, the annual thermal conversion factors presented
in Tables A2 through A6 are computed from final annual
data or from the best available data and labeled “prelimi-
nary.”    Often,  the  current  year’s  factors  are  labeled
“estimate,” and are set equal to the previous year’s values
until data become available to calculate the factors.  The
source of each factor  is described in the section entitled
“Thermal  Conversion  Factor  Source  Documentation,”
which follows Table A6 in this appendix.
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
187
Appendix A 
British Thermal Unit Conversion Factors
Table A1.  Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Other Liquids
(Million Btu per Barrel, Except as Noted)
a Per residual fuel oil equivalent barrel (6.287 million Btu per barrel).
b The biodiesel heat content factor, 5.359 million Btu per barrel, is used for “Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel” and “Other Renewable Fuels”;
however, a factor of 5.494 million Btu per barrel is used for “Other Renewable Diesel Fuel.”
c Per fuel oil equivalent barrel (6.000 million Btu per barrel).
Note:  The values in this table are for gross heat contents. See "Heat Content" in Glossary.
Web Page:  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Sources:  See “Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation,” which follows Table A6.
Motor Gasoline (Finished)–see Tables A2/A3
5.825
Other Hydrocarbons
6.065
Lubricants
5.796
Miscellaneous Products
5.670
Kerosene
5.537
Waxes
5.355
Jet Fuel, Naphtha Type
5.418
Unfractionated Stream
5.670
Jet Fuel, Kerosene Type
5.825
Unfinished Oils
a6.287
Hydrogen
c6.000
Still Gas
4.620
Natural Gasoline (Pentanes Plus)
5.248
Special Naphthas
3.974
Isobutane/Isobutylene
6.287
Residual Fuel Oil
4.326
Normal Butane/Butylene 
b5.359
Renewable Fuels Except Fuel Ethanol
3.836
Propane/Propylene
5.418
Plant Condensate
3.082
Ethane/Ethylene
5.719
Marketable, beginning in 2004 
Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids
a6.287
Catalyst, beginning in 2004
Fuel Ethanol–see Table A3 
6.024
Total, through 2003
5.825
Greater than 500 ppm sulfur 
Petroleum Coke–see Table A3 for averages
5.817
Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm sulfur
5.825
Other Oils Equal to or Greater Than 401°F
5.770
15 ppm sulfur and under
5.248
Naphtha Less Than 401°F
Distillate Fuel Oil–see Table A3 for averages
Petrochemical Feedstocks
Crude Oil–see Table A2
4.247
Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol)
5.359
Biodiesel
5.222
Beginning in 2007
5.048
Aviation Gasoline Blending Components
5.253
Through 2006
5.048
Aviation Gasoline (Finished)
Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC)
6.636
Asphalt and Road Oil
Heat Content
Commodity
Heat Content
Commodity
ec
188
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Table A2.   Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Production, Imports, and Exports
s
(Million Btu per Barrel)
)
Production
Imports
Exports
Crude
Oila
Petroleum Products
Total
Crude
Oila
Petroleum Products
Total
Crude
Oila
Natural Gas
Plant Liquids
Motor
Gasolineb
Total
Products
Motor
Gasolinec
Total
Products
1950......................
.
5.800
4.522
5.943
5.253
6.263
6.080
5.800
5.253
5.751
5.766
1955......................
.
5.800
4.406
5.924
5.253
6.234
6.040
5.800
5.253
5.765
5.768
1960......................
.
5.800
4.295
5.911
5.253
6.161
6.021
5.800
5.253
5.835
5.834
1965......................
.
5.800
4.264
5.872
5.253
6.123
5.997
5.800
5.253
5.742
5.743
1970......................
.
5.800
4.146
5.822
5.253
6.088
5.985
5.800
5.253
5.811
5.810
1975......................
.
5.800
3.984
5.821
5.253
5.935
5.858
5.800
5.253
5.747
5.748
1980......................
.
5.800
3.914
5.812
5.253
5.748
5.796
5.800
5.253
5.841
5.820
1981......................
.
5.800
3.930
5.818
5.253
5.659
5.775
5.800
5.253
5.837
5.821
1982......................
.
5.800
3.872
5.826
5.253
5.664
5.775
5.800
5.253
5.829
5.820
1983......................
.
5.800
3.839
5.825
5.253
5.677
5.774
5.800
5.253
5.800
5.800
1984......................
.
5.800
3.812
5.823
5.253
5.613
5.745
5.800
5.253
5.867
5.850
1985......................
.
5.800
3.815
5.832
5.253
5.572
5.736
5.800
5.253
5.819
5.814
1986......................
.
5.800
3.797
5.903
5.253
5.624
5.808
5.800
5.253
5.839
5.832
1987......................
.
5.800
3.804
5.901
5.253
5.599
5.820
5.800
5.253
5.860
5.858
1988......................
.
5.800
3.800
5.900
5.253
5.618
5.820
5.800
5.253
5.842
5.840
1989......................
.
5.800
3.826
5.906
5.253
5.641
5.833
5.800
5.253
5.869
5.857
1990......................
.
5.800
3.822
5.934
5.253
5.614
5.849
5.800
5.253
5.838
5.833
1991......................
.
5.800
3.807
5.948
5.253
5.636
5.873
5.800
5.253
5.827
5.823
1992......................
.
5.800
3.804
5.953
5.253
5.623
5.877
5.800
5.253
5.774
5.777
1993......................
.
5.800
3.801
5.954
5.253
5.539
5.866
5.800
5.253
5.681
5.693
1994......................
.
5.800
3.794
5.950
5.253
5.416
5.835
5.800
5.253
5.693
5.704
1995......................
.
5.800
3.796
5.938
5.253
5.345
5.830
5.800
5.253
5.692
5.703
1996......................
.
5.800
3.777
5.947
5.253
5.373
5.828
5.800
5.253
5.663
5.678
1997......................
.
5.800
3.762
5.954
5.253
5.333
5.836
5.800
5.253
5.663
5.678
1998......................
.
5.800
3.769
5.953
5.253
5.314
5.833
5.800
5.253
5.505
5.539
1999......................
.
5.800
3.744
5.942
5.253
5.291
5.815
5.800
5.253
5.530
5.564
2000......................
.
5.800
3.733
5.959
5.253
5.309
5.823
5.800
5.253
5.529
5.542
2001......................
.
5.800
3.735
5.976
5.253
5.330
5.838
5.800
5.253
5.637
5.641
2002......................
.
5.800
3.729
5.971
5.253
5.362
5.845
5.800
5.253
5.517
5.519
2003......................
.
5.800
3.739
5.970
5.253
5.381
5.845
5.800
5.253
5.628
5.630
2004......................
.
5.800
3.724
5.981
5.253
5.429
5.853
5.800
5.253
5.532
5.539
2005......................
.
5.800
3.724
5.977
5.253
5.436
5.835
5.800
5.253
5.504
5.513
2006......................
.
5.800
3.712
5.980
5.253
5.431
5.836
5.800
5.219
5.415
5.423
2007......................
.
5.800
3.701
5.985
5.222
5.483
5.857
5.800
5.188
5.465
5.471
2008......................
.
5.800
3.706
5.990
5.222
5.459
5.861
5.800
5.215
5.587
5.591
2009......................
.
5.800
3.692
5.988
5.222
5.509
5.878
5.800
5.221
5.674
5.677
2010......................
.
5.800
3.674
5.989
5.222
5.545
5.892
5.800
5.214
5.601
5.604
2011......................
.
5.800
3.672
6.008
5.222
5.538
5.905
5.800
5.216
5.526
5.530
2012......................
.
5.800
3.683
6.165
5.222
5.501
6.035
5.800
5.217
5.520
5.526
2013......................
.
5.800
3.714
6.010
5.222
5.497
5.899
5.800
5.216
5.470
5.482
2014......................
.
5.800
3.723
6.035
5.222
5.518
5.929
5.800
5.218
5.369
5.406
2015......................
.
5.800
3.745
6.035
5.222
5.518
5.929
5.800
5.218
5.369
5.406
2016......................
.
5.800
3.745
6.035
5.222
5.518
5.929
5.800
5.218
5.369
5.406
Includes lease condensate.
Excludes fuel ethanol, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and other oxygenates blended into motor gasoline.
Through 2005, excludes fuel ethanol, MTBE, and other oxygenates blended into motor gasoline.  Beginning in 2006, includes MTBE, but excludes fuel ethanol and other
oxygenates blended into motor gasoline.
.
P=Preliminary. E=Estimate.
Note:  The values in this table are for gross heat contents.  See "Heat Content" in Glossary. 
Web Page:  See http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices (Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
Sources:  See "Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation," which follows Table A6.
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
189
Table A3.    Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption and Fuel Ethanol
(Million Btu per Barrel)
)
Total Petroleuma Consumption by Sector
Distillate
Fuel Oil
Consump-
tionf
Liquefied
Petroleum
Gases
Consump-
tiong
Motor
Gasoline
(Finished)
Consump-
tionh
Petroleum
Coke
Consump-
tioni
Fuel
Ethanolj
Fuel
Ethanol
Feed-
stock
Factork
Resi-
dential
Com-
mercialb
Indus-
trialb
Trans-
porta-
tionb,c
Electric
Powerd,e
Totalb,c
1950..............
.
5.473
5.817
5.953
5.461
6.254
5.649
5.825
4.011
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1955..............
.
5.469
5.781
5.881
5.407
6.254
5.591
5.825
4.011
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1960..............
.
5.417
5.781
5.818
5.387
6.267
5.555
5.825
4.011
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1965..............
.
5.364
5.760
5.748
5.386
6.267
5.532
5.825
4.011
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1970..............
.
5.260
5.708
5.595
5.393
6.252
5.503
5.825
3.779
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1975..............
.
5.253
5.649
5.513
5.392
6.250
5.494
5.825
3.715
5.253
6.024
NA
NA
1980..............
.
5.321
5.751
5.366
5.441
6.254
5.479
5.825
3.674
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.586
1981..............
.
5.283
5.693
5.299
5.433
6.258
5.448
5.825
3.643
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.562
1982..............
.
5.266
5.698
5.247
5.423
6.258
5.415
5.825
3.615
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.539
1983..............
.
5.140
5.591
5.254
5.416
6.255
5.406
5.825
3.614
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.515
1984..............
.
5.307
5.657
5.207
5.418
6.251
5.395
5.825
3.599
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.492
1985..............
.
5.263
5.598
5.199
5.423
6.247
5.387
5.825
3.603
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.469
1986..............
.
5.268
5.632
5.269
5.426
6.257
5.418
5.825
3.640
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.446
1987..............
.
5.239
5.594
5.233
5.429
6.249
5.403
5.825
3.659
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.423
1988..............
.
5.257
5.597
5.228
5.433
6.250
5.410
5.825
3.652
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.400
1989..............
.
5.194
5.549
5.219
5.438
6.240
5.410
5.825
3.683
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.377
1990..............
.
5.145
5.553
5.253
5.442
6.244
5.411
5.825
3.625
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.355
1991..............
.
5.094
5.528
5.167
5.441
6.246
5.384
5.825
3.614
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.332
1992..............
.
5.124
5.513
5.168
5.443
6.238
5.378
5.825
3.624
5.253
6.024
3.563
6.309
1993..............
.
5.102
5.504
5.177
5.422
6.230
5.370
5.825
3.606
5.232
6.024
3.563
6.287
1994..............
.
5.095
5.512
5.149
5.424
6.213
5.360
5.820
3.635
5.231
6.024
3.563
6.264
1995..............
.
5.060
5.475
5.121
5.418
6.187
5.342
5.820
3.623
5.218
6.024
3.563
6.242
1996..............
.
4.995
5.430
5.114
5.420
6.194
5.336
5.820
3.613
5.218
6.024
3.563
6.220
1997..............
.
4.986
5.388
5.119
5.416
6.198
5.336
5.820
3.616
5.215
6.024
3.563
6.198
1998..............
.
4.972
5.362
5.136
5.414
6.210
5.349
5.819
3.614
5.215
6.024
3.563
6.176
1999..............
.
4.899
5.288
5.091
5.413
6.204
5.328
5.819
3.616
5.213
6.024
3.563
6.167
2000..............
.
4.905
5.313
5.056
5.423
6.188
5.326
5.819
3.607
5.214
6.024
3.563
6.159
2001..............
.
4.934
5.322
5.141
5.413
6.199
5.346
5.819
3.614
5.214
6.024
3.563
6.151
2002..............
.
4.883
5.290
5.092
5.411
6.172
5.324
5.819
3.613
5.211
6.024
3.563
6.143
2003..............
.
4.918
5.312
5.143
5.404
6.182
5.338
5.819
3.629
5.203
6.024
3.563
6.106
2004..............
.
4.949
5.323
5.144
5.410
6.134
5.341
5.818
3.618
5.201
5.982
3.563
6.069
2005..............
.
4.913
5.359
5.179
5.412
6.126
5.353
5.818
3.620
5.198
5.982
3.563
6.032
2006..............
.
4.883
5.296
5.159
5.409
6.038
5.336
5.803
3.605
5.191
5.987
3.563
5.995
2007..............
.
4.831
5.271
5.122
5.385
6.064
5.309
5.785
3.591
5.155
5.996
3.563
5.959
2008..............
.
4.769
5.156
5.147
5.355
6.013
5.287
5.780
3.600
5.126
5.992
3.563
5.922
2009..............
.
4.661
5.216
5.014
5.328
5.987
5.236
5.781
3.558
5.101
6.017
3.563
5.901
2010..............
.
4.660
5.193
4.983
5.321
5.956
5.222
5.778
3.557
5.078
6.059
3.561
5.880
2011..............
.
4.660
5.180
4.957
5.317
5.900
5.212
5.776
3.528
5.068
6.077
3.560
5.859
2012..............
.
4.703
5.117
4.909
5.305
5.925
5.191
5.774
3.534
5.063
6.084
3.560
5.838
2013..............
.
4.637
5.045
4.871
5.301
5.892
5.174
5.774
3.556
5.062
6.089
3.559
5.817
2014..............
.
4.688
5.039
4.868
5.299
5.906
5.178
5.773
3.534
5.060
6.100
3.558
5.797
2015..............
.
4.673
5.028
4.872
5.297
5.915
5.178
5.773
3.530
5.060
6.083
3.558
5.776
2016..............
.
4.673
5.028
4.872
5.297
5.915
5.178
5.773
3.530
5.060
6.083
3.558
5.755
Petroleum products supplied, including natural gas plant liquids and crude oil burned directly as fuel. Quantity-weighted averages of the petroleum products included in
each category are calculated by using heat content values for individual products shown in Tables A1 and A3.
.
Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline. 
Beginning in 2009, includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distillate fuel oil. 
Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants within the NAICS 22 category whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the
public.  Through 1988, data are for electric utilities only; beginning in 1989, data are for electric utilities and independent power producers.
.
Electric power sector factors are weighted average heat contents for distillate fuel oil, petroleum coke, and residual fuel oil; they exclude other liquids.
There is a discontinuity in this time series between 1993 and 1994; beginning in 1994, the single constant factor is replaced by a quantity-weighted factor. 
Quantity-weighted averages of the sulfur-content categories of distillate fuel oil are calculated by using heat content values shown in Table A1.  Excludes renewable diesel
fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distillate fuel oil.
.
There is a discontinuity in this time series between 1966 and 1967; beginning in 1967, the single constant factor is replaced by a quantity-weighted factor. 
Quantity-weighted averages of the major components of liquefied petroleum gases are calculated by using heat content values shown in Table A1.
.
 Through 1992, excludes oxygenates.   Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline; and for 1993–2006, also includes methyl tertiary butyl
ether (MTBE) and other oxygenates blended into motor gasoline.
.
There is a discontinuity in this time series between 2003 and 2004; beginning in 2004, the single constant factor is replaced by a quantity-weighted factor. 
Quantity-weighted averages of the two categories of petroleum coke are calculated by using heat content values shown in Table A1.
.
Includes denaturant (petroleum added to ethanol to make it undrinkable).  Fuel ethanol factors are weighted average heat contents for undenatured ethanol (3.539
million Btu per barrel) and products used as denaturant (pentanes plus, finished motor gasoline, and motor gasoline blending components—see Tables A1 and A3 for
factors).  The factor for 2009 is used as the estimated factor for 1980–2008.
.
Corn input to the production of undenatured ethanol (million Btu corn per barrel undenatured ethanol), used as the factor to estimate total biomass inputs to the
production of undenatured ethanol.  Observed ethanol yields (gallons undenatured ethanol per bushel of corn) are 2.5 in 1980, 2.666 in 1998, 2.68 in 2002, 2.78 in 2008, and
d
2.82 in 2012; yields in other years are estimated.  Corn is assumed to have a gross heat content of 0.392 million Btu per bushel.  Undenatured ethanol is assumed to have a
gross heat content of 3.539 million Btu per barrel.
.
R=Revised. P=Preliminary. E=Estimate. NA=Not available. 
Note:  The heat content values in this table are for gross heat contents.  See "Heat Content" in Glossary. 
Web Page:  See http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices (Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
Sources:  See "Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation," which follows Table A6.
190
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Table A4.   Approximate Heat Content of Natural Gas
(Btu per Cubic Foot)
)
Production
Consumptiona
Imports
Exports
Marketed
Dry
End-Use
Sectorsb
Electric Power
Sectorc
Total
1950............................
.
1,119
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
– –
1,035
1955............................
.
1,120
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1960............................
.
1,107
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1,035
1965............................
.
1,101
1,032
1,032
1,032
1,032
1,032
1,032
1970............................
.
1,102
1,031
1,031
1,031
1,031
1,031
1,031
1975............................
.
1,095
1,021
1,020
1,026
1,021
1,026
1,014
1980............................
.
1,098
1,026
1,024
1,035
1,026
1,022
1,013
1981............................
.
1,103
1,027
1,025
1,035
1,027
1,014
1,011
1982............................
.
1,107
1,028
1,026
1,036
1,028
1,018
1,011
1983............................
.
1,115
1,031
1,031
1,030
1,031
1,024
1,010
1984............................
.
1,109
1,031
1,030
1,035
1,031
1,005
1,010
1985............................
.
1,112
1,032
1,031
1,038
1,032
1,002
1,011
1986............................
.
1,110
1,030
1,029
1,034
1,030
997
1,008
1987............................
.
1,112
1,031
1,031
1,032
1,031
999
1,011
1988............................
.
1,109
1,029
1,029
1,028
1,029
1,002
1,018
1989............................
.
1,107
1,031
1,031
1,028
1,031
1,004
1,019
1990............................
.
1,105
1,029
1,030
1,027
1,029
1,012
1,018
1991............................
.
1,108
1,030
1,031
1,025
1,030
1,014
1,022
1992............................
.
1,110
1,030
1,031
1,025
1,030
1,011
1,018
1993............................
.
1,106
1,027
1,028
1,025
1,027
1,020
1,016
1994............................
.
1,105
1,028
1,029
1,025
1,028
1,022
1,011
1995............................
.
1,106
1,026
1,027
1,021
1,026
1,021
1,011
1996............................
.
1,109
1,026
1,027
1,020
1,026
1,022
1,011
1997............................
.
1,107
1,026
1,027
1,020
1,026
1,023
1,011
1998............................
.
1,109
1,031
1,033
1,024
1,031
1,023
1,011
1999............................
.
1,107
1,027
1,028
1,022
1,027
1,022
1,006
2000............................
.
1,107
1,025
1,026
1,021
1,025
1,023
1,006
2001............................
.
1,105
1,028
1,029
1,026
1,028
1,023
1,010
2002............................
.
1,103
1,024
1,025
1,020
1,024
1,022
1,008
2003............................
.
1,103
1,028
1,029
1,025
1,028
1,025
1,009
2004............................
.
1,104
1,026
1,026
1,027
1,026
1,025
1,009
2005............................
.
1,104
1,028
1,028
1,028
1,028
1,025
1,009
2006............................
.
1,103
1,028
1,028
1,028
1,028
1,025
1,009
2007............................
.
1,102
1,027
1,027
1,027
1,027
1,025
1,009
2008............................
.
1,100
1,027
1,027
1,027
1,027
1,025
1,009
2009............................
.
1,101
1,025
1,025
1,025
1,025
1,025
1,009
2010............................
.
1,098
1,023
1,023
1,022
1,023
1,025
1,009
2011............................
.
1,142
1,022
1,022
1,021
1,022
1,025
1,009
2012............................
.
1,091
1,024
1,025
1,022
1,024
1,025
1,009
2013............................
.
1,101
1,027
1,028
1,025
1,027
1,025
1,009
2014............................
.
1,116
1,032
1,032
1,029
1,032
1,025
1,009
2015............................
.
1,116
1,033
1,032
1,035
1,033
1,025
1,009
2016............................
.
1,116
1,033
1,032
1,035
1,033
1,025
1,009
Consumption factors are for natural gas, plus a small amount of supplemental gaseous fuels.
Residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors.
Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants within the NAICS 22 category whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the
public. Through 1988, data are for electric utilities only; beginning in 1989, data are for electric utilities and independent power producers.
.
P=Preliminary.  E=Estimate.  – – =Not applicable.  
Note:  The values in this table are for gross heat contents.  See "Heat Content" in Glossary. 
Web Page:  See http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices (Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
Sources:  See "Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation," which follows Table A6.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested