how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Extract pdf text to excel control Library system web page asp.net winforms console mer20-part1967

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
191
Table A5.   Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke
(Million Btu per Short Ton)
)
Coal
Coal Coke
Productiona
Waste
Coal
Suppliedb
Consumption
Imports
Exports
Imports
and
Exports
Residential
and
Commercial
Sectorsc
Industrial Sector
Electric
Power
Sectore,f
Total
Coke Plants
Otherd
1950........................
.
25.090
NA
24.461
26.798
24.820
23.937
24.989
25.020
26.788
24.800
1955........................
.
25.201
NA
24.373
26.794
24.821
24.056
24.982
25.000
26.907
24.800
1960........................
.
24.906
NA
24.226
26.791
24.609
23.927
24.713
25.003
26.939
24.800
1965........................
.
24.775
NA
24.028
26.787
24.385
23.780
24.537
25.000
26.973
24.800
1970........................
.
23.842
NA
23.203
26.784
22.983
22.573
23.440
25.000
26.982
24.800
1975........................
.
22.897
NA
22.261
26.782
22.436
21.642
22.506
25.000
26.562
24.800
1980........................
.
22.415
NA
22.543
26.790
22.690
21.295
21.947
25.000
26.384
24.800
1981........................
.
22.308
NA
22.474
26.794
22.585
21.085
21.713
25.000
26.160
24.800
1982........................
.
22.239
NA
22.695
26.797
22.712
21.194
21.674
25.000
26.223
24.800
1983........................
.
22.052
NA
22.775
26.798
22.691
21.133
21.576
25.000
26.291
24.800
1984........................
.
22.010
NA
22.844
26.799
22.543
21.101
21.573
25.000
26.402
24.800
1985........................
.
21.870
NA
22.646
26.798
22.020
20.959
21.366
25.000
26.307
24.800
1986........................
.
21.913
NA
22.947
26.798
22.198
21.084
21.462
25.000
26.292
24.800
1987........................
.
21.922
NA
23.404
26.799
22.381
21.136
21.517
25.000
26.291
24.800
1988........................
.
21.823
NA
23.571
26.799
22.360
20.900
21.328
25.000
26.299
24.800
1989........................
.
21.765
10.391
23.650
26.800
22.347
20.898
21.307
25.000
26.160
24.800
1990........................
.
21.822
9.303
23.137
26.799
22.457
20.779
21.197
25.000
26.202
24.800
1991........................
.
21.681
10.758
23.114
26.799
22.460
20.730
21.120
25.000
26.188
24.800
1992........................
.
21.682
10.396
23.105
26.799
22.250
20.709
21.068
25.000
26.161
24.800
1993........................
.
21.418
10.638
22.994
26.800
22.123
20.677
21.010
25.000
26.335
24.800
1994........................
.
21.394
11.097
23.112
26.800
22.068
20.589
20.929
25.000
26.329
24.800
1995........................
.
21.326
11.722
23.118
26.800
21.950
20.543
20.880
25.000
26.180
24.800
1996........................
.
21.322
12.147
23.011
26.800
22.105
20.547
20.870
25.000
26.174
24.800
1997........................
.
21.296
12.158
22.494
26.800
22.172
20.518
20.830
25.000
26.251
24.800
1998........................
.
21.418
12.639
21.620
27.426
23.164
20.516
20.881
25.000
26.800
24.800
1999........................
.
21.070
12.552
23.880
27.426
22.489
20.490
20.818
25.000
26.081
24.800
2000........................
.
21.072
12.360
25.020
27.426
22.433
20.511
20.828
25.000
26.117
24.800
2001........................
.
20.772
12.169
24.909
27.426
22.622
20.337
20.671
25.000
25.998
24.800
2002........................
.
20.673
12.165
22.962
27.426
22.562
20.238
20.541
25.000
26.062
24.800
2003........................
.
20.499
12.360
22.242
27.425
22.468
20.082
20.387
25.000
25.972
24.800
2004........................
.
20.424
12.266
22.324
27.426
22.473
19.980
20.290
25.000
26.108
24.800
2005........................
.
20.348
12.093
22.342
26.279
22.178
19.988
20.246
25.000
25.494
24.800
2006........................
.
20.310
12.080
22.066
26.271
22.050
19.931
20.181
25.000
25.453
24.800
2007........................
.
20.340
12.090
22.069
26.329
22.371
19.909
20.168
25.000
25.466
24.800
2008........................
.
20.208
12.121
23.035
26.281
22.304
19.713
19.979
25.000
25.399
24.800
2009........................
.
19.963
12.076
22.852
26.334
21.823
19.521
19.741
25.000
25.633
24.800
2010........................
.
20.173
11.960
22.611
26.295
21.846
19.623
19.870
25.000
25.713
24.800
2011........................
.
20.142
11.604
22.099
26.299
21.568
19.341
19.600
25.000
25.645
24.800
2012........................
.
20.215
11.539
21.300
28.636
21.449
19.211
19.544
23.128
24.551
24.800
2013........................
.
20.182
11.103
21.233
28.705
21.600
19.174
19.513
22.379
24.605
24.800
2014........................
.
20.160
11.961
21.652
28.611
21.509
19.306
19.622
21.864
25.414
24.800
2015........................
.
20.160
11.961
21.652
28.611
21.509
19.306
19.622
21.864
25.414
24.800
2016........................
.
20.160
11.961
21.652
28.611
21.509
19.306
19.622
21.864
25.414
24.800
Beginning in 2001, includes a small amount of refuse recovery (coal recaptured from a refuse mine, and cleaned to reduce the concentration of noncombustible
materials). 
Waste coal (including fine coal, coal obtained from a refuse bank or slurry dam, anthracite culm, bituminous gob, and lignite waste) consumed by the electric power and
industrial sectors.  Beginning in 1989, waste coal supplied is counted as a supply-side item to balance the same amount of waste coal included in "Consumption."  
Through 2007, used as the thermal conversion factor for coal consumption by the residential and commercial sectors.  Beginning in 2008, used as the thermal
conversion factor for coal consumption by the commercial sector only. 
Includes transportation.  Excludes coal synfuel plants.
Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants within the NAICS 22 category whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the
public. Through 1988, data are for electric utilities only; beginning in 1989, data are for electric utilities and independent power producers.
.
Electric power sector factors are for anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and, beginning in 1998, coal synfuel.
P=Preliminary.  E=Estimate.  NA=Not available.  
Note:  The values in this table are for gross heat contents.  See "Heat Content" in Glossary. 
Web Page:  See http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices (Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
Sources:  See "Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation," which follows Table A6.
Extract pdf text to excel - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
export highlighted text from pdf to word; find and replace text in pdf file
Extract pdf text to excel - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy formatted text from pdf; delete text from pdf with acrobat
192
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Table A6.   Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity
(Btu per Kilowatthour)
)
Approximate Heat Ratesa for Electricity Net Generation
Heat Contentj of
Electricityk
Fossil Fuelsb
Nuclearh
Noncombustible
Renewable
Energyg,i
Coalc
Petroleumd
Natural
Gase
Total
Fossil Fuelsf,g
1950..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
14,030
– –
14,030
3,412
1955..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
11,699
– –
11,699
3,412
1960..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,760
11,629
10,760
3,412
1965..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,453
11,804
10,453
3,412
1970..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,494
10,977
10,494
3,412
1975..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,406
11,013
10,406
3,412
1980..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,388
10,908
10,388
3,412
1981..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,453
11,030
10,453
3,412
1982..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,454
11,073
10,454
3,412
1983..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,520
10,905
10,520
3,412
1984..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,440
10,843
10,440
3,412
1985..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,447
10,622
10,447
3,412
1986..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,446
10,579
10,446
3,412
1987..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,419
10,442
10,419
3,412
1988..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,324
10,602
10,324
3,412
1989..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,432
10,583
10,432
3,412
1990..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,402
10,582
10,402
3,412
1991..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,436
10,484
10,436
3,412
1992..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,342
10,471
10,342
3,412
1993..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,309
10,504
10,309
3,412
1994..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,316
10,452
10,316
3,412
1995..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,312
10,507
10,312
3,412
1996..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,340
10,503
10,340
3,412
1997..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,213
10,494
10,213
3,412
1998..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,197
10,491
10,197
3,412
1999..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,226
10,450
10,226
3,412
2000..............................
.
NA
NA
NA
10,201
10,429
10,201
3,412
2001..............................
.
10,378
10,742
10,051
10,333
10,443
10,333
3,412
2002..............................
.
10,314
10,641
9,533
10,173
10,442
10,173
3,412
2003..............................
.
10,297
10,610
9,207
10,125
10,422
10,125
3,412
2004..............................
.
10,331
10,571
8,647
10,016
10,428
10,016
3,412
2005..............................
.
10,373
10,631
8,551
9,999
10,436
9,999
3,412
2006..............................
.
10,351
10,809
8,471
9,919
10,435
9,919
3,412
2007..............................
.
10,375
10,794
8,403
9,884
10,489
9,884
3,412
2008..............................
.
10,378
11,015
8,305
9,854
10,452
9,854
3,412
2009..............................
.
10,414
10,923
8,160
9,760
10,459
9,760
3,412
2010..............................
.
10,415
10,984
8,185
9,756
10,452
9,756
3,412
2011..............................
.
10,444
10,829
8,152
9,716
10,464
9,716
3,412
2012..............................
.
10,498
10,991
8,039
9,516
10,479
9,516
3,412
2013..............................
.
10,459
10,713
7,948
9,541
10,449
9,541
3,412
2014..............................
.
10,428
10,814
7,907
9,510
10,459
9,510
3,412
2015..............................
.
10,428
10,814
7,907
9,510
10,459
9,510
3,412
2016..............................
.
10,428
10,814
7,907
9,510
10,459
9,510
3,412
The values in columns 1–6 of this table are for net heat rates.  See "Heat Rate" in Glossary.
Through 2000, heat rates are for fossil-fueled steam-electric plants at electric utilities.  Beginning in 2001, heat rates are for all fossil-fueled plants at electric utilities and
electricity-only independent power producers.
.
Includes anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, and, beginning in 2002, waste coal and coal synfuel.
Includes distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.
Includes natural gas and supplemental gaseous fuels.
Includes coal, petroleum, natural gas, and, beginning in 2001, other gases (blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil
fuels).
.
The fossil-fuels heat rate is used as the thermal conversion factor for electricity net generation from noncombustible renewable energy (hydro, geothermal, solar
thermal, photovoltaic, and wind) to approximate the quantity of fossil fuels replaced by these sources.  Through 2000, also used as the thermal conversion factor for wood
and waste electricity net generation at electric utilities; beginning in 2001, Btu data for wood and waste at electric utilities are available from surveys.
.
Used as the thermal conversion factor for nuclear electricity net generation.
Technology-based geothermal heat rates are no longer used in Btu calculations in this report.  For technology-based geothermal heat rates for 1960–2010, see the
Annual Energy Review 2010, Table A6.
.
See "Heat Content" in Glossary. 
The value of 3,412 Btu per kilowatthour is a constant.  It is used as the thermal conversion factor for electricity retail sales, and electricity imports and exports.
E=Estimate.  NA=Not available.  – – =Not applicable.  
Web Page:  See http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices (Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
Sources:  See "Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation," which follows this table.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Editor; C#: WPF PDF Viewer; C#: Create PDF from Word; C#: Create PDF from Excel; PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract
copy text from locked pdf; extract text from pdf to excel
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
copy text from pdf reader; extract text from pdf java open source
Thermal Conversion Factor
Source Documentation
Approximate Heat Content of Petro-
leum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids
Asphalt.  The  U.S.  Energy  Information  Administration
(EIA)  adopted  the  thermal  conversion  factor  of  6.636
million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated
by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petro-
leum Statement, Annual, 1956.
Aviation Gasoline Blending Components.  Assumed by
EIA  to  be 5.048  million Btu per  barrel  or  equal to the
thermal  conversion  factor  for  Aviation  Gasoline
(Finished).
Aviation  Gasoline (Finished).  EIA  adopted  the  thermal
conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted
by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmis-
sion Corporation publication Competition and Growth in
American Energy Markets 1947–1985, a 1968 release of
historical and projected statistics.
Butane-Propane  Mixture.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of
Mines calculation of 4.130 million Btu per barrel based on
an  assumed  mixture  of  60%  normal  butane  and  40%
propane. 
See 
Normal 
Butane/Butylene 
and
Propane/Propylene.
Crude Oil Exports. Assumed by EIA to be 5.800 million
Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal conversion factor for
crude oil produced in the United States.  See Crude Oil
Production.
Crude  Oil Imports. Calculated  annually by  EIA  as the
average of the thermal conversion factors for each type of
crude  oil imported weighted  by  the quantities  imported.
Thermal conversion factors for each type were calculated
on  a  foreign  country  basis,  by  determining  the  average
American Petroleum  Institute (API)  gravity  of  crude  oil
imported from each foreign country from Form ERA-60 in
1977 and converting average API gravity to average Btu
content by using National Bureau of Standards, Miscellane-
ous Publication No. 97, Thermal Properties of Petroleum
Products, 1933.
Crude Oil Production. EIA adopted the thermal conver-
sion factor of 5.800 million Btu per barrel as reported in a
Bureau of Mines internal memorandum, “Bureau of Mines
Standard  Average  Heating  Values  of  Various  Fuels,
Adopted January 3, 1950.”
Distillate  Fuel  Oil  Consumption.  •  1949–1993:  EIA
adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of
5.825 million Btu per barrel as  reported in a  Bureau  of
Mines internal memorandum, “Bureau of Mines Standard
Average  Heating  Values  of  Various  Fuels,  Adopted
January 3, 1950.”  • 1994 forward:  Calculated by EIA as
the  annual  quantity-weighted  average  of  the  conversion
factors for Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under
(5.770 million Btu per barrel), Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater
Than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur (5.817 million Btu per
barrel), and Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater Than 500 ppm
Sulfur (5.825 million Btu per barrel).
Distillate  Fuel  Oil,  15  ppm  Sulfur  and  Under.    EIA
adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.770 million Btu
per barrel (137,380 Btu per gallon) for U.S. conventional
diesel from U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne National
Laboratory, “The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions,
and  Energy  Use  in  Transportation  Model”  (GREET),
version GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater Than 15 ppm to 500 ppm
Sulfur.    EIA  adopted  the  thermal  conversion  factor  of
5.817 million Btu per barrel (138,490 Btu per gallon) for
low-sulfur  diesel  from  U.S.  Department  of  Energy,
Argonne  Laboratory,  “The  Greenhouse Gases,  Regulated
Emissions,  and  Energy  Use  in  Transportation  Model”
(GREET), version GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater Than 500 ppm Sulfur.  EIA
adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of
5.825 million  Btu per barrel as reported in  a Bureau of
Mines internal memorandum, “Bureau of Mines Standard
Average  Heating  Values  of  Various  Fuels,  Adopted
January 3, 1950.”   
Ethane/Ethylene.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines
thermal conversion factor of 3.082 million Btu per barrel as
published  in  the  California  Oil  World  and  Petroleum
Industry, First Issue, April 1942.
Ethane-Propane  Mixture.  EIA  calculation  of  3.308
million Btu per barrel based on an assumed mixture of 70%
ethane  and  30%  propane.  See  Ethane/Ethylene  and
Propane/Propylene.
Hydrogen.  Assumed by EIA to be 6.287 million Btu per
barrel or equal to the thermal conversion factor for Resid-
ual Fuel Oil.  
Isobutane/Isobutylene. EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines
thermal conversion factor of 3.974 million Btu per barrel as
published  in  the  California  Oil  World  and  Petroleum
Industry, First Issue, April 1942.
Jet  Fuel,  Kerosene-Type.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of
Mines thermal conversion factor of 5.670 million Btu per
barrel for “Jet Fuel, Commercial” as published by the Texas
Eastern Transmission Corporation in the report Competi-
tion and Growth in American Energy Markets 1947–1985,
a 1968 release of historical and projected statistics.
Jet  Fuel,  Naphtha-Type.    EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of
Mines thermal conversion factor of 5.355 million Btu per
barrel for “Jet Fuel, Military” as published by the Texas
Eastern Transmission Corporation in the report Competi-
tion and Growth in American Energy Markets 1947–1985,
a 1968 release of historical and projected statistics.
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
193
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
extract text from image pdf file; get text from pdf into excel
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create PDF from Excel. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from Excel. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border.
.net extract text from pdf; copy and paste text from pdf
Kerosene.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines  thermal
conversion  factor  of  5.670  million  Btu  per  barrel  as
reported  in  a  Bureau  of  Mines  internal  memorandum,
“Bureau  of  Mines  Standard  Average  Heating  Values  of
Various Fuels, Adopted January 3, 1950.”
Liquefied Petroleum Gases Consumption.  • 1949–1966:  
U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Mineral
Industry  Surveys,  “Crude  Petroleum  and  Petroleum
Products, 1956,” Table 4 footnote, constant value of 4.011
million Btu per barrel.  • 1967 forward: Calculated annually
by EIA as the average of the thermal conversion factors for
all  liquefied  petroleum  gases  consumed  (see  Table  A1)
weighted  by  the  quantities  consumed.  The  component
products of liquefied petroleum gases are ethane (including
ethylene),  propane  (including  propylene),  normal  butane
(including  butylene),  butane-propane  mixtures,  ethane-
propane mixtures, and isobutane. For 1967–1980, quantities
consumed are from EIA, Energy Data Reports, “Petroleum
Statement, Annual,” Table 1.  For 1981 forward, quantities
consumed are from EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Table
2.
Lubricants. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of
6.065 million Btu per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of
Mines  and  first  published  in  the  Petroleum  Statement,
Annual, 1956.
Miscellaneous Products. EIA adopted the thermal conver-
sion factor of 5.796 million Btu per barrel as estimated by
the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petroleum
Statement, Annual, 1956.
Motor Gasoline Blending Components.  • 1949–2006:  
EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor
of 5.253 million Btu per barrel for “Gasoline, Motor Fuel”
as published by the Texas Eastern Transmission Corpora-
tion in Appendix V of Competition and Growth in Ameri-
can Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of historical and
projected  statistics.    •  2007  forward:    EIA  adopted  the
thermal conversion factor of 5.222 million Btu per barrel
(124,340 Btu per gallon) for gasoline blendstock from U.S.
Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory, “The
Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use
in 
Transportation 
Model” 
(GREET), 
version
GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Motor Gasoline Exports.  • 1949–2005:  EIA adopted the
Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of 5.253 million
Btu per barrel for “Gasoline, Motor Fuel” as published by
the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation in Appendix V
of Competition and Growth in American Energy Markets
1947–1985, a 1968 release of historical and projected statis-
tics.  • 2006 forward:  Calculated  by EIA  as the annual
quantity-weighted  average  of  the  conversion  factors  for
gasoline  blendstock  and  the  methyl  tertiary  butyl  ether
(MTBE) blended into motor gasoline exports.  The factor
for gasoline blendstock is 5.253 million Btu per barrel in
2006 and 5.222 million Btu per barrel beginning in 2007
(see Motor Gasoline Blending Components).  For MTBE,
EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 4.247 million
Btu  per  barrel  (101,130  Btu  per  gallon)  from  U.S.
Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory, “The
Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use
in 
Transportation 
Model” 
(GREET), 
version
GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Motor Gasoline (Finished) Consumption.  • 1949–1992:  
EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor
of 5.253 million Btu per barrel for “Gasoline, Motor Fuel”
as published by the Texas Eastern Transmission Corpora-
tion in Appendix V of Competition and Growth in Ameri-
can Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of historical and
projected statistics.  • 1993–2006:  Calculated by EIA as the
annual quantity-weighted average of the conversion factors
for gasoline blendstock  and  the  oxygenates blended into
motor gasoline.  The factor for gasoline blendstock is 5.253
million Btu per barrel (the motor gasoline factor used for
previous years).  The factors for fuel ethanol are shown in
Table A3 (see Fuel Ethanol, Denatured).  The following
factors for other oxygenates are from U.S. Department of
Energy,  Argonne  National  Laboratory,  “The  Greenhouse
Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transporta-
tion  Model”  (GREET),  version  GREET1_2013,  October
2013—methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE): 4.247 million
Btu  per  barrel  (101,130  Btu  per  gallon);  tertiary  amyl
methyl  ether  (TAME):  4.560  million  Btu  per  barrel
(108,570 Btu per gallon); ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE):
4.390  million  Btu  per  barrel  (104,530  Btu  per  gallon);
methanol:  2.738  million  Btu  per  barrel  (65,200  Btu  per
gallon); and butanol: 4.555 million Btu per barrel (108,458
Btu per gallon).  • 2007 forward:  Calculated by EIA as the
annual quantity-weighted average of the conversion factors
for gasoline blendstock and fuel ethanol blended into motor
gasoline.    The  factor  for  gasoline  blendstock  is  5.222
million Btu per barrel (124,340 Btu per gallon), which is
from the GREET model (see above).  The factors for fuel
ethanol  are  shown  in  Table  A3  (see  Fuel  Ethanol,
Denatured).    
Motor Gasoline Imports.  • 1949–2006:  EIA adopted the
Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of 5.253 million
Btu per barrel for “Gasoline, Motor Fuel” as published by
the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation in Appendix V
of Competition and Growth in American Energy Markets
1947–1985, a 1968 release of historical and projected statis-
tics.  • 2007 forward:  EIA adopted the thermal conversion
factor  of  5.222 million  Btu  per barrel (124,340  Btu  per
gallon) for gasoline  blendstock from U.S. Department of
Energy,  Argonne  National  Laboratory,  “The  Greenhouse
Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transporta-
tion  Model”  (GREET),  version  GREET1_2013,  October
2013.
Natural  Gas  Plant  Liquids  Production.  Calculated
annually by EIA as the average of the thermal conversion
factors for each natural gas plant liquid produced weighted
by the quantities produced.
Natural  Gasoline.  EIA  adopted  the  thermal  conversion
factor of 4.620 million Btu per barrel as estimated by the
194
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
export highlighted text from pdf; copy text from scanned pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
freely implement conversion from Excel document to PDF, Tiff and HTML file. Users can add annotations to Excel when viewing it online and use text search and
erase text from pdf; delete text from pdf file
Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petroleum State-
ment, Annual, 1956.
Normal  Butane/Butylene.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of
Mines thermal conversion factor of 4.326 million Btu per
barrel as published in the California Oil World and Petro-
leum Industry, First Issue, April 1942.
Other  Hydrocarbons.    Assumed  by  EIA  to  be  5.825
million Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal conversion
factor for Unfinished Oils.
Oxygenates (Excluding Fuel Ethanol).  EIA adopted the
thermal conversion factor of 4.247 million Btu per barrel
(101,130  Btu  per  gallon) for  methyl  tertiary  butyl  ether
(MTBE)  from  U.S.  Department  of  Energy,  Argonne
National  Laboratory,  “The Greenhouse  Gases, Regulated
Emissions,  and  Energy  Use  in  Transportation  Model”
(GREET), version GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Pentanes Plus. Assumed by EIA to be 4.620 million Btu
per  barrel  or  equal  to the thermal  conversion  factor  for
Natural Gasoline.
Petrochemical  Feedstocks,  Naphtha  Less  Than  401
Degrees Fahrenheit. Assumed by EIA to be 5.248 million
Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal conversion factor for
Special Naphthas.
Petrochemical  Feedstocks,  Other  Oils  Equal  to  or
Greater Than 401 Degrees Fahrenheit. Assumed by EIA
to be 5.825 million Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal
conversion factor for Distillate Fuel Oil.
Petrochemical Feedstocks, Still Gas. Assumed by EIA to
be 6.000  million  Btu  per barrel or  equal to the thermal
conversion factor for Still Gas.
Petroleum Coke, Catalyst.  Assumed by EIA to be 6.287
million Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal conversion
factor for Residual Fuel Oil.
.
Petroleum Coke, Marketable.  EIA adopted the thermal
conversion factor of 5.719 million Btu per barrel, calcu-
lated by dividing 28,595,925 Btu per short ton for petro-
leum  coke  (from  U.S.  Department  of  Energy,  Argonne
National  Laboratory,  “The Greenhouse  Gases, Regulated
Emissions,  and  Energy  Use  in  Transportation  Model”
(GREET), version GREET1_October 2013) by 5.0 barrels
per  short  ton  (as  given  in  the  Bureau  of  Mines  Form
6-1300-M and successor EIA forms).
Petroleum Coke, Total.  • 1949–2003:  EIA adopted the
thermal conversion factor of 6.024 million Btu per barrel as
reported in Btu per short ton in the Bureau of Mines inter-
nal  memorandum,  “Bureau  of  Mines  Standard  Average
Heating  Values  of  Various  Fuels,  Adopted  January  3,
1950.” The Bureau of Mines calculated this factor by divid-
ing 30.120 million Btu per short ton, as given in the refer-
enced Bureau of Mines internal memorandum, by 5.0 barrels
per  short  ton,  as  given  in  the  Bureau  of  Mines  Form
6-1300-M and successor EIA  forms.    •  2004 forward:   
Calculated by EIA as the annual quantity-weighted average
of the conversion factors for  Petroleum Coke, Catalyst
(6.287  million  Btu  per  barrel)  and  Petroleum  Coke,
Marketable (5.719 million Btu per barrel).
Petroleum  Consumption,  Commercial  Sector.  Calcu-
lated  annually  by  EIA  as  the  average  of  the  thermal
conversion factors for all petroleum  products consumed
by  the  commercial  sector  weighted  by  the  estimated
quantities  consumed  by  the  commercial  sector.  The
quantities  of  petroleum  products  consumed  by  the
commercial sector are estimated in the State
Energy Data
System—see documentation at
http://www.eia.gov/state/seds/sep_use/notes/use_petrol.pdf. 
Petroleum Consumption, Electric Power Sector. Calcu-
lated annually by EIA as the average of the thermal conver-
sion factors for distillate fuel oil, petroleum coke, and resid-
ual fuel oil consumed by the electric power sector weighted
by the quantities consumed by the electric power sector.
Data  are  from  Form  EIA-923,  “Power  Plant  Operations
Report,” and predecessor forms.
Petroleum  Consumption,  Industrial  Sector.  Calculated
annually by EIA as the average of the thermal conversion
factors for all petroleum products consumed by the indus-
trial sector weighted by the estimated quantities consumed
by  the  industrial  sector.  The  quantities  of  petroleum
products consumed by the industrial sector are estimated in
the State Energy Data System—see documentation at
http://www.eia.gov/state/seds/sep_use/notes/use_petrol.pdf.
Petroleum Consumption, Residential Sector. Calculated
annually by EIA as the average of the thermal conversion
factors for all petroleum products consumed by the residen-
tial sector weighted by the estimated quantities consumed
by  the  residential  sector.  The  quantities  of  petroleum
products consumed by the residential sector are estimated
in the State Energy Data System—see documentation at 
http://www.eia.gov/state/seds/sep_use/notes/use_petrol.pdf.
Petroleum Consumption, Total. Calculated annually  by
EIA as the average of the thermal conversion factors for all
petroleum products consumed weighted by the quantities
consumed.
Petroleum Consumption, Transportation Sector. Calcu-
lated annually by EIA as the average of the thermal conver-
sion factors  for  all petroleum products  consumed by  the
transportation sector weighted by the estimated quantities
consumed by  the transportation sector. The  quantities of
petroleum products consumed by the transportation sector
are  estimated  in  the  State  Energy  Data  System—see
documentation at
http://www.eia.gov/state/seds/sep_use/notes/use_petrol.pdf.
Petroleum Products Exports. Calculated annually by EIA
as the average of the thermal conversion factors for each
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
195
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
extract text from pdf online; copy text from pdf in preview
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies; RasterEdge.XDoc.Excel.dll.
can't copy text from pdf; export text from pdf to excel
petroleum  product  exported  weighted  by  the  quantities
exported.
Petroleum Products Imports. Calculated annually by EIA
as the average of the thermal conversion factors for each
petroleum  product  imported  weighted  by  the  quantities
imported.
Plant Condensate. Estimated to be 5.418 million Btu per
barrel by EIA from data provided by McClanahan Consult-
ants, Inc., Houston, Texas.
Propane/Propylene.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines
thermal conversion factor of 3.836 million Btu per barrel as
published in the California Oil World and Petroleum Indus-
try, First Issue, April 1942.
Renewable Fuels Except Fuel Ethanol.  For “Biomass-
Based  Diesel  Fuel”  and  “Other  Renewable  Fuels,”  EIA
assumed the thermal conversion factor to be 5.359 million
Btu per barrel or equal to the thermal conversion factor for
Biodiesel.    For  “Other  Renewable  Diesel  Fuel,”  EIA
adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.494 million Btu
per barrel (130,817 Btu per gallon) for renewable diesel II
(UOP-HDO)  from  U.S.  Department of Energy,  Argonne
National  Laboratory, “The  Greenhouse  Gases,  Regulated
Emissions,  and  Energy  Use  in  Transportation  Model”
(GREET), version GREET1_2013, October 2013.
Residual Fuel Oil.  EIA  adopted  the  thermal conversion
factor of 6.287 million Btu per  barrel as reported in the
Bureau of Mines internal memorandum, “Bureau of Mines
Standard  Average  Heating  Values  of  Various  Fuels,
Adopted January 3, 1950.”
Road  Oil.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines  thermal
conversion factor  of 6.636 million Btu per  barrel, which
was assumed to be equal to that of Asphalt and was first
published by the Bureau of Mines in the Petroleum State-
ment, Annual, 1970.
Special  Naphthas.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines
thermal conversion factor of 5.248 million Btu per barrel,
which was assumed to be equal to that of the total gasoline
(aviation and motor) factor and was first published in the
Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1970.
Still  Gas.  EIA  adopted  the  Bureau  of  Mines  estimated
thermal conversion factor of 6.000 million Btu per barrel,
first published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1970.
Total Petroleum Exports. Calculated annually by EIA as
the average of the thermal conversion factors for crude oil
and  each  petroleum  product  exported  weighted  by  the
quantities  exported.  See  Crude  Oil Exports and Petro-
leum Products Exports.
Total Petroleum Imports. Calculated annually by EIA as
the average of the thermal conversion factors for each type
of crude oil and petroleum product imported weighted by
the quantities imported. See Crude Oil Imports and Petro-
leum Products Imports.
Unfinished  Oils.  EIA  assumed  the  thermal  conversion
factor to be 5.825 million Btu per barrel or equal to that for
Distillate Fuel Oil and first published it in EIA’s Annual
Report to Congress, Volume 3, 1977.
Unfractionated Stream. EIA assumed the thermal conver-
sion factor to be 5.418 million Btu per barrel or equal to
that for Plant Condensate and first published it in EIA’s
Annual Report to Congress, Volume 2, 1981.
Waxes.  EIA  adopted  the  thermal  conversion  factor  of
5.537 million Btu per barrel as estimated by the Bureau
of Mines and first published in the Petroleum Statement,
Annual, 1956.
Approximate Heat Content of Biofuels 
Biodiesel.  EIA estimated the thermal conversion factor for
biodiesel to be 5.359 million Btu per barrel, or 17,253 Btu
per pound. 
Biodiesel Feedstock.  EIA used soybean oil input to the
production of biodiesel (million Btu soybean oil per barrel
biodiesel) as the factor to estimate total biomass inputs to
the production of biodiesel.  EIA assumed that 7.65 pounds
of  soybean  oil  are  needed  to  produce  one  gallon  of
biodiesel, and 5.433 million Btu of soybean oil are needed
to produce one barrel of biodiesel.  EIA also assumed that
soybean  oil has  a gross heat content of 16,909  Btu  per
pound, or 5.483 million Btu per barrel.
Ethanol  (Undenatured).    EIA  adopted  the  thermal
conversion  factor  of  3.539  million  Btu  per  barrel
published in “Oxygenate Flexibility for Future Fuels,” a
paper presented by William J. Piel of the ARCO Chemi-
cal Company at the National Conference on Reformulated
Gasolines and Clean Air Act Implementation, Washington,
D.C., October 1991.
Fuel Ethanol (Denatured).  • 1981–2008:  EIA used the
2009 factor.  • 2009 forward:  Calculated by EIA as the
annual quantity-weighted average of the thermal conver-
sion factors for undenatured ethanol (3.539  million Btu
per  barrel),  pentanes  plus  used  as  denaturant  (4.620
million Btu per barrel), and conventional motor gasoline
and motor gasoline blending components used as denatur-
ant (5.253 million Btu per barrel).  The quantity of ethanol
consumed is from EIA’s Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA)
and Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), Table 1, data for
renewable  fuels  and  oxygenate  plant  net  production  of
fuel  ethanol.    The  quantity  of  pentanes  plus  used  as
denaturant is from PSA/PSM, Table 1, data for renewable
fuels and oxygenate plant net production of pentanes plus,
multiplied  by  -1.    The  quantity  of  conventional  motor
gasoline and motor gasoline blending components used as
196
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
denaturant is from PSA/PSM, Table 1, data for renewable
fuels and oxygenate plant net production of conventional
motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components,
multiplied by -1.    
Fuel  Ethanol  Feedstock.    EIA  used  corn  input  to  the
production of undenatured ethanol (million Btu corn per
barrel  undenatured  ethanol)  as  the  annual  factor  to
estimate total biomass inputs to the production of undena-
tured ethanol.  EIA used the following observed ethanol
yields (in gallons undenatured ethanol per bushel of corn)
from U.S. Department of Agriculture:  2.5 in 1980, 2.666
in 1998, 2.68 in 2002; and from University of Illinois at
Chicago,  Energy  Resources  Center,  “2012  Corn
Ethanol:    Emerging  Plant  Energy  and  Environmental
Technologies”:    2.78  in  2008,  and  2.82  in  2012.  EIA
estimated  the  ethanol  yields  in  other  years.    EIA  also
assumed  that  corn  has  a  gross  heat  content  of  0.392
million Btu per bushel.
Approximate  Heat  Content  of  Natural
Gas
Natural  Gas  Consumption,  Electric  Power  Sector.
Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of
natural gas consumed by the electric power sector by the
quantity  consumed.      Data  are    from  Form  EIA-923,
“Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.
Natural Gas Consumption, End-Use Sectors. Calculated
annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of natural gas
consumed by the end-use sectors (residential, commercial,
industrial, and transportation) by the  quantity consumed.
Data are from Form EIA-176, “Annual Report of Natural
and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition.”
Natural Gas Consumption, Total.  • 1949–1962:  EIA
adopted  the thermal  conversion factor of 1,035 Btu  per
cubic foot as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first
published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1956.
• 1963–1979:  EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor
calculated annually by the American Gas Association (AGA)
and published in Gas Facts, an AGA annual publication.
• 1980 forward: Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the
total  heat  content  of  natural  gas  consumed  by  the  total
quantity consumed.
Natural Gas Exports.  • 1949–1972:  Assumed by EIA to
be equal to the thermal conversion factor for dry natural gas
consumed (see Natural Gas Consumption, Total).  • 1973
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of natural gas exported by the quantity exported.
For  1973–1995,  data  are  from  Form  FPC-14,  “Annual
Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas.” Begin-
ning in 1996, data are from U.S. Department of Energy,
Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.
Natural Gas Imports.  • 1949–1972:  Assumed by EIA to
be equal to the thermal conversion factor for dry natural
gas consumed (see Natural Gas Consumption, Total).
• 1973 forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing
the heat content of natural  gas  imported by  the quantity
imported.  For  1973–1995,  data  are  from  Form  FPC-14,
“Annual  Report  for  Importers  and  Exporters  of  Natural
Gas.” Beginning in 1996, data are from U.S. Department of
Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and
Exports.
Natural  Gas  Production,  Dry.  Assumed by EIA to be
equal to the thermal conversion factor for dry natural gas
consumed. See Natural Gas Consumption, Total.
Natural Gas Production, Marketed. Calculated annually
by EIA by dividing the heat content of dry natural gas
produced (see Natural Gas Production, Dry) and natural
gas  plant  liquids  produced  (see  Natural  Gas  Plant
Liquids  Production)  by the total quantity of marketed
natural gas produced.
Approximate Heat Content of Coal and
Coal Coke
Coal Coke Imports and Exports. EIA adopted the Bureau
of Mines estimate of 24.800 million Btu per short ton.
Coal  Consumption,  Electric  Power  Sector.  Calculated
annually  by  EIA  by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  coal
consumed  by  the  electric  power  sector  by  the  quantity
consumed.  Data  are  from Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.
Coal Consumption, Industrial Sector, Coke Plants. 
• 1949–2011:  Calculated annually by EIA based on the
reported volatility (low, medium, or high) of coal received
by coke plants. (For 2011, EIA used the following volatility
factors, in million Btu per short ton:  low volatile—26.680;
medium  volatile—27.506;  and  high  volatile—25.652.)
Data are from Form EIA-5, “Quarterly Coal Consumption
and Quality Report—Coke Plants,” and predecessor forms.
• 2012 forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing
the heat  content  of coal received  by  coke plants  by  the
quantity received.  Data are from Form EIA-5, “Quarterly
Coal Consumption and Quality Report—Coke Plants.”
Coal Consumption, Industrial Sector, Other.  
• 1949–2007:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the
heat content of coal received by manufacturing plants by
the  quantity  received.  Data  are  from  Form  EIA-3,
“Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality  Report—
Manufacturing  Plants,”  and  predecessor  forms.    •  2008
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of coal received by manufacturing, gasification, and
liquefaction plants by the quantity received.  Data are from
Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal Consumption  and  Quality
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
197
Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/Processing
Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users.”
Coal  Consumption,  Residential  and  Commercial
Sectors.  •  1949–1999:    Calculated  annually  by  EIA  by
dividing the heat content of coal received by the residential
and commercial sectors by the quantity received. Data are
from Form EIA-6, “Coal Distribution Report,” and prede-
cessor forms.  • 2000–2007:  Calculated annually by EIA
by dividing the heat content of coal consumed by commer-
cial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants by the quantity
consumed.  Data are  from Form EIA-923, “Power  Plant
Operations  Report,”  and  predecessor  forms.    •  2008
forward: Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content  of  coal received by commercial and institutional
users by the quantity received.  Data are from Form EIA-3,
“Quarterly 
Coal 
Consumption 
and 
Quality
Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/Processing
Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users.”
Coal Consumption, Total. Calculated annually by EIA by
dividing  the  total heat  content  of  coal  consumed by  all
sectors by the total quantity consumed.
Coal Exports. • 1949–2011: Calculated annually by EIA
by dividing the heat content of steam coal and metallurgi-
cal coal exported by the quantity exported. Data are from
U.S.  Department  of  Commerce,  U.S.  Census  Bureau,
“Monthly Report EM 545,” and predecessor forms.  • 2012
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of steam coal and metallurgical coal exported by the
quantity exported.  The average heat content of steam coal
is derived from receipts data from Form EIA-3, “Quarterly
Coal Consumption and Quality Report—Manufacturing and
Transformation/Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial
and Institutional Users,” and Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations Report.”  The average heat content of metallur-
gical coal is derived from receipts data from Form EIA-5,
“Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality  Report—Coke
Plants.”  Data for export quantities are from U.S. Department
of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, “Monthly Report EM
545.” 
Coal Imports.  • 1949–1963:  Calculated annually by EIA
by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  coal  imported  by  the
quantity  imported.    Data  are  from  U.S.  Department  of
Commerce,  U.S.  Census  Bureau,  “Monthly  Report  IM
145,” and predecessor forms.  • 1964–2011:  Assumed by
EIA to be 25.000 million Btu per short ton.  • 2012 forward:
Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of
coal  imported  (received)  by  the  quantity  imported
(received).  Data  are from Form EIA-3, “Quarterly Coal
Consumption  and  Quality  Report—Manufacturing  and
Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and
Institutional  Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal
Consumption and Quality Report—Coke Plants”; and Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report.” 
Coal Production.  • 1949–2011:  Calculated annually by
EIA  by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  domestic  coal
(excluding waste coal) received by the quantity received.
Data are from Form EIA-3, “Quarterly Coal Consumption
and  Quality  Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/
Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial  and  Institutional
Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and
Quality Report—Coke Plants”; Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations  Report”;  and  predecessor  forms.      •  2012
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of domestic coal (excluding waste coal) received
and exported by the quantity received and exported.  Data
are from Form EIA-3, “Quarterly Coal Consumption and
Quality 
Report—Manufacturing 
and
Transformation/Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial
and  Institutional  Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal
Consumption  and  Quality  Report—Coke  Plants”;  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report”; U.S. Department
of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau,  “Monthly  Report EM
545”; and predecessor forms.
Waste Coal Supplied.  • 1989–2000:  Calculated annually
by EIA by dividing the heat content of waste coal consumed
by the quantity consumed.  Data are from Form EIA-860B,
“Annual Electric Generator Report—Nonutility,” and prede-
cessor form.  • 2001 forward:  Calculated by EIA by dividing
the heat content of waste coal received (or consumed) by the
quantity received  (or  consumed).   Receipts  data are  from
Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality
Report—Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal
Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users,” and prede-
cessor form.  Consumption data are from Form  EIA-923,
“Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.  
Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity
Electricity Net Generation, Coal.  • 2001 forward:  Calcu-
lated annually by EIA by using fuel consumption and net
generation data reported on Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.  The computa-
tion includes data  for all electric  utilities and electricity-
only independent power producers using anthracite, bitumi-
nous  coal, subbituminous  coal,  lignite, and beginning  in
2002, waste coal and coal synfuel.
Electricity  Net  Generation,  Natural  Gas.    •  2001
forward:    Calculated  annually  by  EIA  by  using  fuel
consumption  and  net  generation  data  reported  on  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report,” and predeces-
sor forms.  The computation includes data for all electric
utilities and electricity-only independent power producers
using natural gas and supplemental gaseous fuels.
Electricity Net Generation, Noncombustible Renewable
Energy.    There  is  no  generally  accepted  practice  for
measuring the  thermal conversion rates for power plants
that  generate  electricity  from  hydro,  geothermal,  solar
thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy sources.  Therefore,
EIA  calculates  a  rate  factor  that  is  equal  to  the  annual
average heat rate factor for fossil-fueled power plants in the
198
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
United States (see “Electricity Net Generation, Total Fossil
Fuels”).  By using that factor it is possible to evaluate fossil
fuel  requirements  for  replacing  those  sources  during
periods of interruption, such as droughts.
Electricity  Net  Generation,  Nuclear.    •  1957–1984:
Calculated  annually  by  dividing  the  total  heat  content
consumed  in  nuclear  generating  units  by  the  total  (net)
electricity generated by nuclear generating units. The heat
content  and  electricity generation  were reported on Form
FERC-1, “Annual Report of Major Electric Utilities, Licen-
sees, and Others”; Form EIA-412, “Annual Report of Public
Electric  Utilities”;  and  predecessor  forms.  For  1982,  the
factors  were published in  EIA, Historical Plant Cost and
Annual  Production  Expenses  for  Selected  Electric  Plants
1982,  page  215.    For  1983  and  1984,  the  factors  were
published in EIA, Electric Plant Cost and Power Production
Expenses  1991,  Table  13.    •  1985  forward:
Calculated
annually by EIA by using the heat rate data reported on
Form EIA-860, “Annual Electric Generator Report,” and
predecessor forms.
Electricity Net Generation, Petroleum.  • 2001 forward:  
Calculated annually by EIA by using fuel consumption and
net  generation  data  reported  on  Form  EIA-923,  “Power
Plant  Operations  Report,”  and  predecessor  forms.    The
computation  includes  data  for  all  electric  utilities  and
electricity-only independent power producers using distillate
fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke,
and waste oil.
Electricity Net Generation, Total Fossil Fuels.
• 1949–1955:  The weighted annual average heat rate for 
fossil-fueled  steam-electric  power  plants  in  the  United
States,  as  published  by  EIA  in  Thermal-Electric  Plant
Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses—1981
and  Steam-Electric  Plant  Construction  Cost  and  Annual
Production Expenses—1978.  •
1956–1988:  The weighted
annual  average  heat  rate  for  fossil-fueled  steam-electric
power plants
in the United  States,  as published  in  EIA,
Electric Plant Cost and Power Production Expenses 1991,
Table  9.  
1989–2000:   Calculated annually by EIA by
using heat rate data reported on Form EIA-860, “Annual
Electric Generator Report,” and predecessor forms; and net
generation  data  reported  on  Form  EIA-759,  “Monthly
Power Plant Report.”  The computation includes data for all
electric utility steam-electric plants using fossil fuels.
• 2001 forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by using fuel
consumption  and  net  generation  data  reported  on  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor
forms. The computation includes data for all electric utilities
and  electricity-only  independent  power  producers  using
coal, petroleum, natural gas, and other gases (blast furnace
gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases
derived from fossil fuels).
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
199
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested