how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy text from scanned pdf to word SDK application API .net azure windows sharepoint mer21-part1968

Data presented in the Monthly Energy Review and in other
U.S.  Energy  Information  Administration  publications  are
expressed predominately in units that historically have been used
in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic
feet, and short tons.  The metric conversion factors presented in
Table B1 can be used to calculate the metric-unit equivalents of
values expressed in  U.S. Customary  units.  For example, 500
short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short tons
x 0.9071847 metric tons/short ton = 453.6 metric tons).
In the metric system of weights and measures, the names
of multiples and subdivisions of any unit may be derived
by combining the name of the unit with prefixes, such as
deka,  hecto,  and  kilo,  meaning,  respectively,  10,  100,
1,000,  and  deci,  centi,  and  milli,  meaning,  respectively,
one-tenth, one-hundredth,  and  one-thousandth.    Common
metric prefixes can be found in Table B2.
The conversion factors presented in Table B3 can be used to
calculate  equivalents in various physical  units commonly
used in energy analyses.  For example, 10 barrels are the
equivalent  of  420  U.S.  gallons  (10  barrels  x  42
gallons/barrel = 420 gallons).
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
201
Appendix B
Metric Conversion Factors, Metric Prefixes, and Other Physical
Conversion Factors
Copy text from scanned pdf to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf to word with formatting; copy and paste pdf text
Copy text from scanned pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf to word; copy and paste text from pdf to word
202
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
a
Exact conversion.
b
Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
c
The Btu used in this table is the International Table Btu adopted by the Fifth International Conference on Properties of Steam, London, 1956.
d
To convert degrees Fahrenheit (ºF) to degrees Celsius (ºC) exactly, subtract 32, then multiply by 5/9.
Notes:    Spaces have been inserted after every third digit to the right of the decimal for ease of reading.   •   Most metric units belong to the 
International System of Units (SI), and the liter, hectare, and metric ton are accepted for use with the SI units.  For more information about the SI
units, see http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/index.html.
Web Page:  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Sources:     General Services Administration, Federal Standard 376B, Preferred Metric Units for General Use by the Federal Government
(Washington, DC, January 1993), pp. 9-11, 13, and 16.   •   U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology,
Special Publications 330, 811, and 814.  •  American National Standards Institute/Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, ANSI/IEEE Std
268-1992, pp. 28 and 29. 
degrees Celsius (ºC)
100
a       
=
212 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF)     
degrees Celsius (ºC)
0
a       
=
32 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF)
Temperature
d
megajoules (MJ)
3.6
a
=
1 kilowatthour (kWh)
joules (J)
4.186 8
a
=
1 calorie (cal)
joules (J)
1,055.055 852 62
a
=
1 British thermal unit (Btu)
c
Energy
square centimeters (cm
2
)
6.451 6
a
=
1 square inch (in
2
)
square meters (m
2
)
0.092 903 04
a
=
1 square foot (ft
2
)
square meters (m
2
)
0.836 127 4
=
1 square yard (yd
2
)
square kilometers (km
2
)
2.589 988
=
1 square mile (mi
2
)
hectares (ha)
0.404 69
=
1 acre
Area
centimeters (cm)
2.54
a
=
1 inch (in)
meters (m)
0.304 8
a
=
1 foot (ft)
meters (m)
0.914 4
a
=
1 yard (yd)
kilometers (km)
1.609 344
a
=
1 mile (mi)
Length
milliliters (mL)
16.387 06
=
1 cubic inch (in
3
)
milliliters (mL)
29.573 53
=
1 ounce, fluid (fl oz)
liters (L)
3.785 412
=
1 U.S. gallon (gal)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.028 316 85
=
1 cubic foot (ft
3
)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.764 555
=
1 cubic yard (yd
3
)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.158 987 3
=
1 barrel of oil (bbl)
Volume
grams (g)
28.349 52
=
1 ounce, avoirdupois (avdp oz)
kilograms uranium (kgU) 
0.384 647
b
=
1 pound uranium oxide (lb U
3
O
8
)
kilograms (kg)
0.453 592 37
a
=
1 pound (lb)
metric tons (t) 
1.016 047
=
1 long ton
metric tons (t)
0.907 184 7
=
1 short ton (2,000 lb)
Mass
Metric Units
Equivalent in 
U.S. Unit
Type of Unit
Table B1.  Metric Conversion Factors
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# a page of PDF document and extract its text content. Recognize scanned PDF document and output OCR result to MS
c# read text from pdf; copy text from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing formats in VB.NET. Support
extract text from pdf; extract text from pdf file
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
203
a
Exact conversion.
b
Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
Web Page:  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Techni-
cal Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices, NIST Handbook 44, 1994 Edition (Washington, DC, October 1993), pp. B-10,
C-17,
and C-21.
cubic feet (ft
3
)
128
a
  
1 cord (cd)
shorts tons
1.25
b
  
1 cord (cd)
Wood
kilograms (kg)
1,000
a
  
1 metric ton (t)
pounds (lb)
2,240
a
  
1 long ton
pounds (lb)
2,000
a
  
1 short ton
Coal
U.S. gallons (gal)
42
a
  
1 barrel (bbl)
Petroleum
alent in Final Units                              
Equiv
Original Unit
Energy Source
Table B3. Other Physical Conversion Factors
Web Page: http ://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, The International System of Units (SI), NIST
Special Publication 330, 1991 Edition (Washington, DC, August 1991), p.10.
y
yocto
10
-24
Y
yotta
10
24
z
zepto
10
-21
Z
zetta
10
21
a
atto
10
-18
E
exa
10
18
f
femto
10
-15
P
peta
10
15
p
pico
10
-12
T
tera
10
12
n
nano
10
-9
G
giga
10
9

micro
10
-6
M
mega
10
6
m
milli
10
-3
k
kilo
10
3
c
centi
10
-2
h
hecto
10
2
d
deci
10
-1
da
deka
10
1
Symbol
Prefix
Unit Subdivision
Symbol
Prefix
Unit Multiple
Table B2.  Metric Prefixes
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
c# extract pdf text; cut and paste pdf text
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Export all Word text and image content into high Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
extract text from pdf open source; copy paste text pdf
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR file, converted by our C# PDF to text converting library as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word
a pdf text extractor; delete text from pdf preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
copy text from pdf with formatting; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
205
Appendix C
Table C1.  Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and U.S. Gross Output
t
Population
U.S. Gross Domestic Product
U.S. Gross Outputa
United Statesb
World
United States
as Share of World
Billion
Nominal
Dollarsd
Billion
Chained (2009)
Dollarse
Implicit Price
Deflatorc
(2009 = 1.00000)
Billion
Nominal
Dollarsd
Million People
Percent
1950..............
.
152.3
2,557.6
6.0
300.2
2,184.0
0.13745
NA
1955..............
.
165.9
2,782.1
6.0
426.2
2,739.0
.15559
NA
1960..............
.
180.7
3,043.0
5.9
543.3
3,108.7
.17476
NA
1965..............
.
194.3
3,350.4
5.8
743.7
3,976.7
.18702
NA
1970..............
.
205.1
3,712.7
5.5
1,075.9
4,722.0
.22784
NA
1975..............
.
216.0
4,089.1
5.3
1,688.9
5,385.4
.31361
NA
1980..............
.
227.2
4,451.4
5.1
2,862.5
6,450.4
.44377
NA
1981..............
.
229.5
4,534.4
5.1
3,211.0
6,617.7
.48520
NA
1982..............
.
231.7
4,614.6
5.0
3,345.0
6,491.3
.51530
NA
1983..............
.
233.8
4,695.7
5.0
3,638.1
6,792.0
.53565
NA
1984..............
.
235.8
4,774.6
4.9
4,040.7
7,285.0
.55466
NA
1985..............
.
237.9
4,856.5
4.9
4,346.7
7,593.8
.57240
NA
1986..............
.
240.1
4,940.6
4.9
4,590.2
7,860.5
.58395
NA
1987..............
.
242.3
5,027.2
4.8
4,870.2
8,132.6
.59885
8,639.9
1988..............
.
244.5
5,114.6
4.8
5,252.6
8,474.5
.61982
9,359.5
1989..............
.
246.8
5,201.4
4.7
5,657.7
8,786.4
.64392
9,969.6
1990..............
.
249.6
5,289.0
4.7
5,979.6
8,955.0
.66773
10,511.1
1991..............
.
253.0
5,371.6
4.7
6,174.0
8,948.4
.68996
10,676.5
1992..............
.
256.5
5,456.1
4.7
6,539.3
9,266.6
.70569
11,242.4
1993..............
.
259.9
5,538.3
4.7
6,878.7
9,521.0
.72248
11,857.6
1994..............
.
263.1
5,618.7
4.7
7,308.8
9,905.4
.73785
12,647.2
1995..............
.
266.3
5,699.2
4.7
7,664.1
10,174.8
.75324
13,451.6
1996..............
.
269.4
5,779.4
4.7
8,100.2
10,561.0
.76699
14,259.9
1997..............
.
272.6
5,858.0
4.7
8,608.5
11,034.9
.78012
15,355.4
1998..............
.
275.9
5,935.2
4.6
9,089.2
11,525.9
.78859
16,171.3
1999..............
.
279.0
6,012.1
4.6
9,660.6
12,065.9
.80065
17,244.8
2000..............
.
282.2
6,088.6
4.6
10,284.8
12,559.7
.81887
18,564.6
2001..............
.
285.0
6,165.2
4.6
10,621.8
12,682.2
.83754
18,863.1
2002..............
.
287.6
6,242.0
4.6
10,977.5
12,908.8
.85039
19,175.0
2003..............
.
290.1
6,318.6
4.6
11,510.7
13,271.1
.86735
20,135.1
2004..............
.
292.8
6,395.7
4.6
12,274.9
13,773.5
.89120
21,697.3
2005..............
.
295.5
6,473.0
4.6
13,093.7
14,234.2
.91988
23,514.9
2006..............
.
298.4
6,551.3
4.6
13,855.9
14,613.8
.94814
24,888.0
2007..............
.
301.2
6,629.9
4.5
14,477.6
14,873.7
.97337
26,151.3
2008..............
.
304.1
6,709.0
4.5
14,718.6
14,830.4
.99246
26,825.7
2009..............
.
306.8
6,788.2
4.5
14,418.7
14,418.7
1.00000
24,657.2
2010..............
.
309.3
6,866.3
4.5
14,964.4
14,783.8
1.01221
26,093.5
2011..............
.
311.7
6,944.1
4.5
15,517.9
15,020.6
1.03311
27,536.0
2012..............
.
314.1
7,022.3
4.5
16,155.3
15,354.6
1.05214
28,703.8
2013..............
.
316.4
7,101.0
4.5
16,663.2
15,583.3
1.06929
29,721.3
2014..............
.
318.9
7,178.7
4.4
17,348.1
15,961.7
1.08686
31,001.4
Gross output is the value of gross domestic product (GDP) plus the value of
intermediate inputs used to produce GDP.
.
Resident population of the 50 states and the District of Columbia estimated for
July 1 of each year.
.
The gross domestic product implicit price deflator is used to convert nominal
dollars to chained (2009) dollars.
.
See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary.
See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary.
NA=Not available.  
Notes:  
Data are estimates.  
U.S. geographic coverage is the 50 states and
the District of Columbia.
.
Web  Page:        See  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices
(Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
.
Sources:  
United States Population:  1949–1989—U.S. Department of
Commerce (DOC), U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports Series P-25
(June 2000).  1990–1999— DOC, U.S. Census Bureau, "Time Series of Intercensal
State Population Estimates" (April 2002).  2000–2009— DOC, U.S. Census Bureau,
"Intercensal Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions,
States, and Puerto Rico" (September 2011).  2010 forward—DOC, U.S. Census
Bureau, "Annual Estimates  of the Resident Population for  the  United States,
Regions, States, and Puerto Rico" (December 2014).  
World Population:  1950
forward—DOC, U.S. Census Bureau, International Database (July 2015).
United States as Share of World Population:  Calculated as U.S. population
divided  by  world  population.   
 U.S.  Gross  Domestic  Product:    1949
forward—DOC, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), National Income and Product
Accounts (September 2015), Tables 1.1.5, 1.1.6, and 1.1.9.  
U.S. Gross Output:
1987 forward—DOC, BEA, GDP by Industry data (July 2015).
C# PDF - Read Barcode on PDF in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text
get text from pdf online; copy text from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge text to PDF converter SDK dlls into RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
copy text from pdf without formatting; erase text from pdf
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
207
Appendix D
Table D1.  Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States,
Selected Years, 1635–1945
5
(Quadrillion Btu)
Fossil Fuels
Renewable Energy
Electricity
Net
Importsb
Total
Coal
Natural
Gas
Petroleum
Total
Conventional
Hydroelectric
Power
Biomass
Total
Wood a
1635..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
(s)
(s)
– –
(s)
1645..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
0.001
0.001
– –
0.001
1655..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.002
.002
– –
.002
1665..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.005
.005
– –
.005
1675..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.007
.007
– –
.007
1685..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.009
.009
– –
.009
1695..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.014
.014
– –
.014
1705..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.022
.022
– –
.022
1715..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.037
.037
– –
.037
1725..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.056
.056
– –
.056
1735..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.080
.080
– –
.080
1745..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.112
.112
– –
.112
1755..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.155
.155
– –
.155
1765..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.200
.200
– –
.200
1775..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.249
.249
– –
.249
1785..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.310
.310
– –
.310
1795..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.402
.402
– –
.402
1805..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.537
.537
– –
.537
1815..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.714
.714
– –
.714
1825..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
.960
.960
– –
.960
1835..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
1.305
1.305
– –
1.305
1845..............
.
NA
– –
– –
NA
– –
1.757
1.757
– –
1.757
1850..............
.
0.219
– –
– –
0.219
– –
2.138
2.138
– –
2.357
1855..............
.
.421
– –
– –
.421
– –
2.389
2.389
– –
2.810
1860..............
.
.518
– –
0.003
.521
– –
2.641
2.641
– –
3.162
1865..............
.
.632
– –
.010
.642
– –
2.767
2.767
– –
3.409
1870..............
.
1.048
– –
.011
1.059
– –
2.893
2.893
– –
3.952
1875..............
.
1.440
– –
.011
1.451
– –
2.872
2.872
– –
4.323
1880..............
.
2.054
– –
.096
2.150
– –
2.851
2.851
– –
5.001
1885..............
.
2.840
0.082
.040
2.962
– –
2.683
2.683
– –
5.645
1890..............
.
4.062
.257
.156
4.475
0.022
2.515
2.537
– –
7.012
1895..............
.
4.950
.147
.168
5.265
.090
2.306
2.396
– –
7.661
1900..............
.
6.841
.252
.229
7.322
.250
2.015
2.265
– –
9.587
1905..............
.
10.001
.372
.610
10.983
.386
1.843
2.229
– –
13.212
1910..............
.
12.714
.540
1.007
14.261
.539
1.765
2.304
– –
16.565
1915..............
.
13.294
.673
1.418
15.385
.659
1.688
2.347
0.002
17.734
1920..............
.
15.504
.813
2.676
18.993
.738
1.610
2.348
.003
21.344
1925..............
.
14.706
1.191
4.280
20.177
.668
1.533
2.201
.004
22.382
1930..............
.
13.639
1.932
5.897
21.468
.752
1.455
2.207
.005
23.680
1935..............
.
10.634
1.919
5.675
18.228
.806
1.397
2.203
.005
20.436
1940..............
.
12.535
2.665
7.760
22.960
.880
1.358
2.238
.007
25.205
1945..............
.
15.972
3.871
10.110
29.953
1.442
a1.261
2.703
.009
32.665
There is a discontinuity in the "Wood" time series between 1945 (in this table)
and 1949 (in Table 10.1).  Through 1945, data are for fuelwood only; beginning in
1949, data are for wood and wood-derived fuels.
.
Electricity transmitted across U.S. borders.  Net imports equal imports minus
exports.
.
NA=Not available.  – – =Not applicable.  (s)=Less than 0.0005 quadrillion Btu.  
Notes:  
For years not shown, data are not available.  
See Tables 1.3 and
10.1 for continuation of these data series beginning in 1949.  
See Note,
"Geographic Coverage of Statistics for 1635–1945," at end of section.
.
Sources:  
Fossil Fuels:  Energy in the American Economy, 1850–1975, Table
VII.  
Conventional Hydroelectric Power:  Energy in the American Economy,
1850–1975, Table II.  
Wood:  1635–1845—U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Circular No. 641, Fuel Wood Used in the United States 1630–1930, February 1942.
This source estimates fuelwood consumption in cords per decade, which were
converted to Btu using the conversion factor of 20 million Btu per cord.  The annual
average value for each decade was assigned to the fifth year of the decade on the
assumption that annual use was likely to increase during any given decade and the
average annual value was more likely to reflect mid-decade yearly consumption
than use at either the beginning or end of the decade.  Values thus begin in 1635
and  are  plotted  at  10-year  intervals.   1850–1945—Energy in the American
Economy, 1850–1975, Table VII.  
Electricity Net Imports:  Energy in the
American Economy, 1850–1975, Tables I and VI.  Electricity net imports are
assumed to equal hydroelectric consumption minus hydroelectric production (data
are converted to Btu by multiplying by 3,412 Btu per kilowatthour).
Note.  Geographic Coverage of Statistics for 1635–1945.
Table D1 presents estimates of U.S. energy consumption by
energy source for a period that begins a century and a half
before the original 13 colonies formed a political union and
continues  through  the  decades  during  which  the  United
States  was  still  expanding territorially.  The question  thus
arises, what exactly is meant by “U.S. consumption” of an
energy source for those years when the United States did not
formally  exist  or  consisted  of  less  territory  than  is  now
encompassed by the 50 states and the District of Columbia?
The documents used to assemble the estimates, and (as far as
possible)  the  sources  of  those  documents,  were  reviewed
carefully for clues to geographic coverage. For most energy
sources, the extent of coverage expanded more rapidly than
the nation, defined as all the official states and the District of
Columbia.  Estimates  or  measurements  of  consumption  of
each  energy source  generally appear to  follow  settlement
patterns. That is, they were made for areas of the continent
that were  settled enough to have economically  significant
consumption even though those areas were not to become
states for years. The wood data series, for example, begins in
1635  and  includes  12  of  the  original  colonies (excepting
Georgia),  as  well  as  Maine,  Vermont,  and  the  area  that
would  become  the  District  of Columbia.  By  the  time  the
series reaches 1810, the rest of the continental states are all
included, although the last of the 48 states to achieve state-
hood did not do so until 1912. Likewise, the coal data series
begins in 1850 but includes consumption in areas, such as
Utah and Washington (state), which were significant coal
producing regions but had not yet attained statehood. (Note:  
No  data  were  available  on  state-level  historical  coal
consumption.  The  coal  data  shown  in  Table  D1  through
1945 describe apparent consumption, i.e., production plus
imports minus exports. The  geographic  coverage  for  coal
was therefore based on a tally of coal-producing states listed
in various historical issues of Minerals Yearbook. It is likely
that coal was consumed in states where it was not mined in
significant quantities.)
By energy source, the extent of coverage can be summarized as
follows:  • Coal—35 coal-producing states by 1885. • Natural
Gas—All 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, and
Alaska by 1885.  • Petroleum—All 48 contiguous states, the
District of Columbia, and Alaska by 1885.  • Conventional
Hydroelectric  Power—Coverage  for  1890  and  1895  is
uncertain,  but  probably  the  48  contiguous  states  and  the
District  of  Columbia.  Coverage  for  1900–1945  is  the  48
contiguous states, and the District of Columbia.  • Wood—All
48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia by 1810.
208
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Alcohol:  The family name of a group of organic chemical
compounds  composed  of  carbon,  hydrogen,  and  oxygen.
The  series  of  molecules  vary  in  chain  length  and  are
composed  of  a  hydrocarbon  plus  a  hydroxyl  group;
CH(3)-(CH(2))
n
-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary
butyl alcohol).  See Fuel Ethanol.
Alternative  Fuel:    Alternative  fuels,  for  transportation
applications,  include  the  following:  methanol;  denatured
ethanol, and other alcohols; fuel mixtures containing 85
percent or more by volume of methanol, denatured ethanol,
and  other  alcohols  with  motor  gasoline  or  other  fuels;
natural gas; liquefied petroleum gas (propane); hydro-
gen; coal-derived liquid fuels; fuels (other than alcohol)
derived from biological materials (biofuels such  as soy
diesel fuel); electricity (including electricity from solar
energy); and "... any other fuel the Secretary determines,
by rule, is substantially not petroleum and would yield
substantial energy security benefits and substantial envi-
ronmental benefits." The term "alternative fuel" does not
include  alcohol  or  other  blended  portions  of  primarily
petroleum-based  fuels  used  as  oxygenates  or  extenders,
i.e., MTBE, ETBE, other ethers, and the 10-percent ethanol
portion of gasohol.
Alternative-Fuel Vehicle (AFV):  A vehicle designed to
operate on an alternative fuel (e.g., compressed natural
gas, methane blend, or electricity). The vehicle could be
either a dedicated vehicle designed to operate exclusively
on alternative fuel or a nondedicated vehicle designed to
operate on alternative fuel and/or a traditional fuel. 
Anthracite:  The highest rank of coal; used primarily for
residential and commercial space heating. It is a hard, brit-
tle, and black lustrous coal, often referred to as hard coal,
containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low
percentage  of  volatile  matter.  The  moisture  content  of
fresh-mined anthracite generally is less  than  15  percent.
The  heat  content  of  anthracite  ranges  from  22  to  28
million Btu per short ton on a moist, mineral-matter-free
basis.  The heat content of anthracite coal consumed in the
United States averages 25 million Btu per short ton, on the
as-received basis (i.e., containing both inherent moisture
and mineral  matter).   Note:  Since the  1980's, anthracite
refuse  or  mine  waste  has  been  used  for  steam-electric
power generation. This fuel typically has a heat content of
15 million Btu per ton or less.
Anthropogenic:  Made or generated by a human or caused
by human activity. The term is used in the context of global
climate change to refer to gaseous emissions that are the
result  of  human  activities,  as  well  as  other  potentially
climate-altering activities, such as deforestation.
Asphalt:    A  dark  brown-to-black  cement-like  material
obtained by petroleum processing and containing bitumens
as  the  predominant  component;  used  primarily  for  road
construction.  It includes crude asphalt as well as the follow-
ing finished products:  cements, fluxes, the asphalt content
of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates
blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts.  Note:  The
conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.
ASTM:  The American Society for Testing and Materials.
Aviation Gasoline Blending Components:  Naphthas that
will be used for blending or compounding into finished avia-
tion gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate,
benzene, toluene, and xylene).  Excludes oxygenates (alco-
hols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus.  Oxygenates are
reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.
See Aviation Gasoline, Finished.
Aviation Gasoline, Finished:  A complex mixture of rela-
tively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quanti-
ties of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in
aviation  reciprocating  engines.    Fuel  specifications  are
provided  in  ASTM  Specification  D  910  and  Military
Specification  MIL-G-5572.    Note:  Data  on  blending
components are not counted in data on finished aviation
gasoline.
Barrel (Petroleum):  A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S.
Gallons.
Base Gas:  The quantity of natural gas needed to maintain
adequate reservoir pressures and deliverability rates through-
out  the  withdrawal season.  Base gas  usually  is not  with-
drawn and remains in the reservoir. All natural gas native to
a depleted reservoir is included in the base gas volume. 
Biodiesel:  A fuel typically made from soybean, canola, or
other vegetable oils; animal fats; and recycled grease.   It
can serve as a substitute for petroleum-derived diesel fuel
or distillate fuel oil. For U.S. Energy Information Admin-
istration  reporting,  it  is  a  fuel  composed  of  mono-alkyl
esters of long chain fatty acids derived from vegetable oils or
animal fats, designated B100, and meeting the requirements of
ASTM (American Society for Testing & Materials) D 6751.
Biofuels:  Liquid fuels and blending components produced
from biomass (plant) feedstocks, used primarily for trans-
portation.  See Biodiesel and Fuel Ethanol.
Biogenic: Produced by biological processes of living organ-
isms. Note: EIA uses the term “biogenic” to refer only to
organic nonfossil material of biological origin.
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
209
Glossary
Biomass:  Organic non-fossil material of biological origin
constituting  a  renewable  energy  source.
See  Biodiesel,
Biofuels, Biomass Waste, Fuel Ethanol, and Wood and
Wood-Derived Fuels.
Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel:  Biodiesel and other renew-
able diesel fuel or diesel fuel blending components derived
from biomass, but excluding renewable diesel fuel copro-
cessed with petroleum feedstocks.  See Renewable Diesel
Fuel (Other).
Biomass Waste:  Organic non-fossil material of biologi-
cal  origin  that  is  a  byproduct  or  a  discarded  product.
“Biomass  waste”  includes  municipal  solid  waste  from
biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge  waste,  agricultural
crop byproducts, straw, and other biomass solids, liquids,
and  gases;  but  excludes wood  and  wood-derived  fuels
(including  black  liquor),  biofuels  feedstock,  biodiesel,
and fuel ethanol.  Note: EIA “biomass waste” data also
include energy crops grown specifically for energy produc-
tion, which would not normally constitute waste.
Bituminous Coal:  A dense coal, usually black, some-
times  dark  brown,  often  with  well-defined  bands  of
bright and dull material, used primarily as fuel in steam-
electric  power  generation,  with  substantial  quantities
also used for heat and power applications in manufactur-
ing and to make coke. Bituminous coal is the most abun-
dant  coal  in  active  U.S.  mining  regions.  Its  moisture
content usually is less than 20 percent. The heat content
of bituminous coal ranges from 21 to 30 million Btu per
short ton on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis. The heat
content  of  bituminous  coal  consumed  in  the  United
States  averages  24  million  Btu  per  short  ton,  on  the
as-received basis (i.e., containing both inherent moisture
and mineral matter).
Black Liquor:  A byproduct of the paper production proc-
ess, alkaline spent liquor, that can be used as a source of
energy. Alkaline spent liquor is removed from the diges-
ters in the process of chemically pulping wood.   After
evaporation, the residual "black" liquor is burned as a fuel
in a recovery furnace that permits the recovery of certain
basic chemicals.
British  Thermal  Unit  (Btu):    The  quantity  of  heat
required to  raise the  temperature  of  1  pound of  liquid
water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which
water  has its  greatest density (approximately 39  degrees
Fahrenheit).  See Heat Content.
Btu:  See British Thermal Unit.
Btu  Conversion  Factor:    A  factor  for  converting
energy data between one unit of measurement and Brit-
ish  thermal  units (Btu).    Btu  conversion  factors are
generally  used  to  convert  energy  data  from  physical
units of measure (such as barrels, cubic feet, or short
tons) into the  energy-equivalent measure  of  Btu.  (See
http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices
for further information on Btu conversion factors.)
Butane (C
4
H
10
):  A straight-chain or branch-chain hydro-
carbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams,
which  is gaseous at standard temperature and pressure. It
includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in
ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association
specifications for commercial butane.
Isobutane  (C
4
H
10
):
A branch-chain saturated  (paraffinic)
hydrocarbon extracted from both natural gas and refinery
gas streams, which is gaseous at standard temperature and
pressure.  It is a colorless gas that boils at a temperature of
11 degrees Fahrenheit.  See Paraffinic Hydrocarbons.
Normal Butane (C
4
H
10
):  A straight-chain saturated (paraf-
finic) hydrocarbon extracted from both natural gas and
refinery gas streams, which is gaseous at standard tempera-
ture  and  pressure.    It  is  a  colorless  gas  that  boils  at  a
temperature  of  31  degrees  Fahrenheit.    See  Paraffinic
Hydrocarbons.
Butylene (C
4
H
8
):  An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from
refinery  or  petrochemical  processes,  which  is  gaseous  at
standard temperature and pressure.  Butylene is used in the
production of gasoline and various petrochemical products.
See Olefinic Hydrocarbons (Olefins).
Capacity  Factor:    The  ratio  of  the  electrical  energy
produced by a generating unit for a given period of time
to the electrical energy that could have been produced at
continuous full-power operation during the same period.
Carbon  Dioxide  (CO
2
):    A  colorless,  odorless,  non-
poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere.
Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well
as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it
traps  heat (infrared energy) radiated  by the Earth into the
atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global
warming.  The global warming potential (GWP) of other
greenhouse gases is measured in relation to that of carbon
dioxide,  which  by  international  scientific  convention  is
assigned a value of one (1).
Chained Dollars:  A measure used to express real prices.
Real prices are those that have been adjusted to remove the
effect of changes in the purchasing power of the dollar; they
usually reflect buying power relative to a reference year.
Prior  to  1996,  real  prices  were  expressed  in  constant
dollars, a measure based on the weights of goods and serv-
ices in a single year, usually a recent year.  In 1996, the
U.S.  Department  of  Commerce  introduced  the  chained-
dollar measure.  The new measure is based on the average
weights of goods and services in successive pairs of years.
It is “chained” because the second year in each pair, with
its  weights, becomes the  first  year  of the  next  pair.  The
advantage of using the chained-dollar measure is that it is
210
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested