how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Extract text from pdf using c# control Library system web page asp.net .net console Excel28-part199

(f) After operation, the output will remain highlighted, thereby facilitating
subsequent operations, such as inverse transformation.
(g) In order to use the macro, firsthighlight the three-columns-wide block
containing the input data, then call the macro. The specific mechanism of
calling the macro depends on how it has been installed. The general
method is via T
ools  M
acro. In the resulting Macro dialog box you can
then select either Forward() or Inverse(). It is convenient to assign these
macros shortcut key combinations (e.g., Ctrl+F and Ctrl +f, or Ctrl+f
and Ctrl+g in case you do not want to use the Shift key), and even more
convenient to build them into the menu, or to insert an icon for them in a
toolbar. The various methods of installing the macro are described in
section 10.4, and the macro itself is detailed in section 10.5.
In what follows we will assume that the forward and inverse Fourier trans-
form macros have been installed; if this is not the case, follow the installa-
tion instructions given in section 10.4 before proceeding with the exercises
of the present chapter.
Instructions for exercise 7.1
Open a new spreadsheet.
Reserve the top 8 rows for thumbnail sketches.
In cell A9 place the label A=, in B9 enter the numerical value 3, in C9 place the label f=,
and in D9 deposit the instruction=pi()/8. (In order to emphasize that these form
pairs, use the align right and align left icons on the formula bar to shift the label to the
right, and the associated value to the left.)
In row 11 deposit the labels time, Re, Im, frequency, Re, and Im.
In column A, starting with cell A13, place the numbers -8, -7, -6, 
, -1, 0, 1, , 6, 7,
i.e., -8 (1) 7.
In B13 deposit the instruction=$B$9*COS(A13*$D$9), and copy this down to row 28.
Fill C13:C28 with zeros.
Plot A13:C28 on the sheet, in A1:C8, which should show one cycle of a cosine wave,
centered around t=0.
Highlight A13:C28, and call the macro Forward(). This is all it takes to perform a Fourier
transformation.
10 Plot the output of the macro, D13:F28, in a thumbnail sketch at D1:F8. The spreadsheet
should now resemble Fig. 7.1-1.
7.1 Introduction to Fourier transformation
267
Extract text from pdf using c# - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
c# read text from pdf; extract text from pdf open source
Extract text from pdf using c# - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from pdf to word; .net extract pdf text
The  thumbnail  sketches  tell the  story. The  left  graph  shows the cosine
wave, plotted as a function of time t. The Fourier transform is to its right, in a
graph that has frequency f as its abscissa (horizontal axis). Just like the time
scale, the frequency scale starts at a negative value. The Fourier transform
generates results for both positive and negative frequencies, even though
the latter have no apparent physical meaning.
268
Fourier transformation
Fig. 7.1-1: The spreadsheet as it should look after Fourier transformation of a cosine
wave 3 cos(
π
t/8). In the figures, the colored dots show the real components of the trans-
form, the open circles its imaginary component.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET Sample Code: Insert Text Character to PDF Using C#.NET. This C#.NET Sample Code: Insert Text String to PDF Using C#.NET. If
copy formatted text from pdf; cut text pdf
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
C#.NET PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK for C#.NET. How to Extract Text from Adobe PDF Document Using .NET OCR Library in Visual C#. Overview.
delete text from pdf online; copy and paste pdf text
Also note that, in the plot of the cosine wave, the point at t=+8 is missing.
This is fully intentional: the data string shown is interpreted by the Fourier
transform as  a  segment  of an infinitely repeating  sequence, and  the first
point of the next segment will start at t=8. The digital Fourier transforma-
tion requires precisely one repeat unit, then analyzes this unit as if the signal
contained an infinite number of repeating units on either side.
Upon comparison of the thumbnail plots in Fig. 7.1-1 with those in many
standard texts on Fourier transformation you may notice that the input data
are customarily displayed starting at t=0, with the output data shown on a
frequency axis with  a discontinuity in its middle. The way we display the
data here  avoids this  discontinuity  in  the  frequency axis, but in all other
respects is fully equivalent to the usual representation.
Now let’s see how to read the transform. If we ignore the negative frequen-
cies for the moment, we see that the Fourier transform of a cosine is a single
point, since all other points (at positive frequencies) have the value zero.
That single point has a frequency of 0.0625 Hz, where 0.0625 =1/16, where
16 is the period of the time segment used. Its amplitude is 1.5, which is half of
the value 3 stored in $B$9. (The other half can be found at f =-0.0625 Hz.) In
the next exercise we will change both the frequency and the amplitude to see
what happens.
11 Change the value of the amplitude, and verify that the amplitude of the Fourier trans-
form tracks that of the cosine wave. Note that the Fourier transform is not automatic:
you must invoke the macro before you will see the consequent change in columns D
through F, and in the right thumbnail sketch.
12 Change the time scale used, and look at what happens with the transform.
13 Also change the frequency in $D$9, say to 
π
/4 or 
π
/2. Observe the resulting change in
the transform.
14 NowchangetheinstructioninA13:A28fromcosinetosine,andtransformthedata.
You will see that asine wave hasan imaginaryFourier transform,asillustratedin
Fig. 7.1-2.
15 Place the label C=in cell E9, and D=in G9, together with some associated numbers,
such as 2 in cell F9 and 
π
in cell H9. Also, change the code in A13:A28 to the sum of a
sine and a cosine, with different frequencies and amplitudes. Observe the transform: it
should be the sum of the transforms of the individual cosines, each with its own fre-
quency and amplitude, see Fig. 7.1-3.
16 Sines and cosines oscillate symmetrically around zero, and therefore have zero
average over the time period considered in the transform. Add an offset to the function
and see what happens in that case. Figure 7.1-4 gives it away: an offset only affects the
point at zero-frequency in the transform. That zero-frequency contribution indeed
shows the function average.
7.1 Introduction to Fourier transformation
269
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document. C# programming sample for extracting all images from PDF.
edit pdf replace text; cut and paste pdf text
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract single or multiple pages from adobe portable document format, known as PDF document, is a documents even though they are using different types
extract text from pdf acrobat; erase text from pdf file
It is one of the main properties of Fourier transforms that they allow us to
view the individual components of a complex mixture of sinusoidal signals.
In Fig. 7.1-3 we see the cosine in the real part of the transform, at f =0.25 Hz,
and the sine in its imaginary component, with a frequency of 0.5 Hz and a
three times larger amplitude.
Fourier transformation is a two-way street: there is a forward transform
270
Fourier transformation
Fig. 7.1-2:The function 3 sin(
π
t) and its Fourier transform. The continuous line through
the sine wave is shown in order to emphasize the underlying function, sampled here at
discrete intervals. Again, the colored dots show the real components, the open circles
the imaginary components.
Fig. 7.1-3: The function cos(
π
t/2) +3 sin(
π
t) and its Fourier transform.
Fig. 7.1-4:The function cos(
π
t/2) +3 sin(
π
t) -1 and its Fourier transform.
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
copy text from locked pdf; c# extract text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Now you can convert source PDF document to text file using the C# demo code we have offered below. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET.
extract text from pdf file using java; copying text from pdf into word
(which we have used so far) as well as an inverse transform. The latter brings
us back from, say, the frequency domain to the time domain. This is possible
because Fourier transformation leads to a unique relation between a func-
tion and its transform, and vice versa, so that we can recover the original
function unambiguously with an inverse Fourier transform.
An example of a unique transform pair is the pH: to every value of [H
+
]>0
we  can  assign  a  corresponding  pH,  and  likewise  from  every  pH  we  can
compute a specific [H
+
];  no information is lost in going from one to the
other. There is, of course, a difference: the pH is a single number, while the
Fourier transformation involves an entire function. Nonetheless, the idea of
uniqueness is applicable to both. But note that not all familiar transforms
are unique: when we specify x, the quantity sin(x) is well-defined, but when
we specify the value of sin(x) we cannot recover x without ambiguity: when
x=x
0
is a solution, so is x= x
0
±2n
π
, where n is an arbitrary integer.
17 Highlight D13:D28 and call the inverse Fourier transform. Plot it in G1:I8. You should
get back a replica of the graph in A1:C8.
It is not necessary to use just sines or cosines. A square wave is also an infi-
nitely  repetitive  signal, and  we  can  use just  one  repeat  unit of it. A  new
aspect of a square  wave  is that it  has discontinuities. Where the function
switches abruptly from, say,+ 1 to -1, you should use its average value at
that discontinuity, i.e., [(+1)+(-1)]/2 =0.
18 Extend A13:A28 to A44.
19 Enter 1 in B13:B20, 0 in B21, -1 in B22:B36, 0 in B37, and 1 in B38:B44. Now call the
forward Fourier transform, and follow that up with an inverse Fourier transform to
make sure that you recover the original signal.
Figure 7.1-5 illustrates a square wave symmetrical around t=0, and its
Fourier transform. Such a square wave can indeed be considered as the sum
of a number of cosines,
(7.1-5)
Upon checkingyouwillfindthatthecoefficients produced by the 16-point
Fourier  transformation  are not quite equal to 2/[(2n +1)
π
], because we
do not use an infinite series. (Still, we get fairly close even with a 16-point
transform, with only four cosines,the first coefficient being 0.628 instead of
=
4
π
n=0
(- 1)
n
cos[(2n +1)
t]
2n +1
sqw(
t)=
4
π
cos(
t)-
1
3
cos(3
t) +
1
5
cos(5
t)-
1
7
cos(7
t)+
7.1 Introduction to Fourier transformation
271
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
copy text from pdf reader; a pdf text extractor
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.InsertPage(page, pageIndex); // Output the new document. doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
extract text from pdf java; extract text from pdf online
2/
π
=0.637.) Interestingly, even though the Fourier series is truncated, the
inversetransformexactly duplicates the original function.Figure 7.1-6 illus-
trates why this is so, with only four cosine terms: while the expression a
1
cos(
t)+a
3
cos(3
t)+ a
5
cos(5
t)+a
7
cos(7
t) does not provide a very
good approximation of a square wave, it does go precisely through the dis-
cretepointsofthe original waveform.
Transients  are  usually  non-repeating  signals,  but  there  is  no  harm  in
thinking about them as samples of an infinitely repeating set of them, as
long as these repeat units do not overlap, i.e., as long as the repeat unit shows
the transient reaching its final state, to within the required precision. Again,
when the transient starts at t=0 with a sudden transition from 0 to e
–kt
, its
value at t=0 should be taken as 
1
2
(0 +e
0
)=
1
2
(0 +1) =0.5.
20 In B13 deposit the instruction=$B$9*exp(-$E$9*A13), and copy this down till row 28.
21 Set the value in B9 to 2, and that in E9 to 5.
22 Call the forward Fourier transform, then the inverse transform.
272
Fourier transformation
Fig. 7.1-5: The square wave and its Fourier transform.
Fig. 7.1-6:The function y=2 [a
cos(
t) +a
3
cos(3
t) +a
5
cos(5
t) +a
7
cos(7
t)], with
=
π
/2, and the coefficients a
1
≈0.628, a
3
≈-0.187, a
5
≈0.0835, and a
7
≈-0.0249, pro-
duced by the Fourier transform of a square wave, see Fig. 7.1-5. Even though just four
terms provide a rather poor approximation of a square wave, the black line goes exactly
through all 16 colored points of the square wave.
23 Again see for yourself what happens when you change (one at the time) the values in
cells B9 and E9 respectively.
Figure  7.1-7 illustrates  that  the  Fourier  transform  method  indeed  also
works  for  transients.  This  may  not  come  as  a  surprise  to  an  analytical
chemist, since some of the major instrumental analytical methods that use
Fourier transformation apply  that  method to transients, such  as the free
induction decay in FT-NMR, and the interferogram in FT-IR.
We  will  now  summarize some of the most important properties  of the
digital Fourier transform. These properties are merely stated here. Readers
interested in their mathematical  proofs should  consult textbooks dealing
specifically with Fourier transformation.
1 Fourier transformation allows us to switch almost effortlessly between two
complementary aspects of afunction of timet,and its representation in
terms of the correspondingfrequencies f.Insteadof time tand frequencyf
wecan use other parametersthat areinversely relatedto each other (so that
their productisdimensionless), suchaswavelength
and wavenumber .
Althoughwetreat Fourier transformation here as a mathematical concept,
such a transformation isnotoutsideour normal, daily experience.When we
hear abirdinthe woods, wecan easily follow the songby itspitch (fre-
quency)even though theremaybemanyother, simultaneous sounds at
other frequencies, such as thenoiseof thewindin the trees.When welisten
to an orchestra,wecan focus on the flutes, or thecellos, byvirtue of their
specific frequencyranges, even though thesound of both ismixed withthat
of manyother instrumentsasa function of time. In other words,for sound
our brain performstheequivalence of a Fourier transform.The same
appliesto vision: when we experiencea color, we will often know immedi-
atelyits major components. Both of these skillscanof course behoned by
training, but apparently are already presentin rudimentaryform in our
untrainedbrains.DigitalFourier transformation performs thisservicefor us
onnumbers indata sets,explicitly and almost instantaneously.
v
7.1 Introduction to Fourier transformation
273
Fig.7.1-7:The transient 2e–5tand its Fourier transform.
a
b
2 The continuous Fourier transformation of a periodic(i.e., infinitely repeti-
tive), continuous function f(t) of time tis a representation F(f ) in the fre-
quency domain that contains only discrete frequencies f. The Fourier
transform of a non-repetitive, continuous function f(t), such as a single
transient, is a continuous function F(f ) of frequency f. Such distinctions
disappear, of course, in digital Fourier transformation, where both the
input and output arrays are discrete. Some consequences of the discrete
nature of the input data in digital Fourier transformation will be discussed
in section 7.4.
3 The Fourier transform provides a uniquerelation between a function and
its transform, i.e., there is no loss of information when we replace a function
by its Fourier transform, or vice versa. This property is, of course, crucial in
Fourier transform spectrometry, since it allows us to measure a time-
dependent function and obtain from it the spectrum, i.e., its representation
in the frequency domain.
4 The Fourier transform assumes that its input constitutes one complete
repeat unit of an infinitely repetitive signal. For non-periodic signals, many
problems (of which some are detailed in section 7.4) can be avoided by
making sure that f(t) starts and ends at the same value, and with the same
derivatives. ‘Same’ness here is not necessarily a mathematical identity, but
is best defined in terms of the required precision.
5 Functions that are symmetrical around t=0, i.e., functions such that
f(-t)=f(t), have a real Fourier transform. Such functions are called even;
we started out with such an even function in our first sample function,
cos(
t). For odd functions, i.e., where f(-t)=-f(t), the resulting Fourier
transform is imaginary, as was illustrated by sin(
t). In general, functions
will be neither even nor odd, in which case their Fourier transform will be
complex, i.e., with both real and imaginary components.
6 A shift in timein the time domain corresponds in the Fourier transform
domain to a shift in phase angle, and vice versa. In mathematical terms,
when f(t) is shifted in time by t
0
to f(t+t
0
), the corresponding Fourier trans-
form will be shifted from F(f ) to F(f )×exp[-2
π
jft
0
], where j=
.
Similarly, F(f +f
0
) has the inverse transform F(t)×exp[2
π
jf
0
t].
7 Differentiation in the time domain corresponds to division by 2
π
jf in the
frequency domain. Likewise, integration in the time domain corresponds to
multiplication by 2
π
jf in the frequency domain. We will use these proper-
ties in section 7.4.
8 One of the most useful properties of Fourier transformation is that it con-
verts a convolution into a multiplication. (Convolution is one of many cor-
relations, i.e., mathematical operations between functions, that can be
greatly simplified by Fourier transformation.) Since convolution is a rather
involved mathematical operation, whereas multiplication is simple, convo-
lutions are often performed with the help of Fourier transformation. We will
explore this property in more detail in sections 7.5 and 7.6.
-1
274
Fourier transformation
To end this section we now illustrate some of the above properties. Many of
the  figures  shown  on  the  next  two  pages  involve  the  Gaussian  function
y=(a/c)  exp[-(t/c)
2
],  where  the  pre-exponential  factor  (1/c)  is  used  to
compare peaks occupying the same area. A Gaussian is a convenient func-
tion because its Fourier transform is again a Gaussian, and the same applies
to the inverse transform. The factor a =0.9 is used here merely to obtain con-
venient scales. Gaussians curves are common in chromatograms. In Fig. 7.1-
8 we see that the narrower is the original function, the wider is its transform.
Figure 7.1-9 shows the effect of moving the center of the Gaussian peak, at
which point the function is no longer even (in the sense discussed above
under point  (5), i.e.,  symmetrical around t=0), so that  its  transform has
both real and imaginary components.
Figure 7.1-10 compares the Fourier transforms of a Gaussian and a
Lorentzian peak. The Lorentzian peak has wider ‘tails’, and consequently a
narrower Fourier transform. The comparison is made between the
Gaussian y
G
=a exp[-(t/c)
2
]and a Lorentzian of equal area, y
L
=(a/√
π
)/[1
+(t/c)
2
], see section 8.6. Lorentzian curves are often encountered in
spectroscopy.
As a convenience to the user, the Fourier transform macro will accept
two types of input: data that are properly centered (i.e., with sequence
numbers ranging from - 2
N/2
to 2
N/2
-1), or data that start at zero (i.e.,
ranging from 0 to 2
N
-1).
7.1 Introduction to Fourier transformation
275
Fig.7.1-8:The Gaussian y=(0.9/c) exp[-(t/c)2] (left) and its Fourier transform (right)
for c=3 (top) and c= 0.4 (bottom).
276
Fourier transformation
Fig. 7.1-9: The Gaussian y=0.9 exp[-(t-t
0
)
2
] (left) and its Fourier transform (right) for
t
0
=0 (top) and t
0
=2 (bottom).
Fig. 7.1-10:The Gaussian y
G
=0.9 exp[-t2] (top left) and a Lorentzian y
L
=(0.9/
) /
(1+ t2) of equal area (bottom left), together with their Fourier transforms (top right and
bottom right respectively).
π
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested