how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Delete text from pdf acrobat control SDK platform web page wpf windows web browser Excel30-part202

7.3 Di≈erentiation
287
Fig.7.3-1:(a) A Gaussian peak, and (b) its first derivative.
Fig.7.3-2:(a) A Gaussian peak with noise, and (b) its first derivative.
Fig.7.3-3:(a) The same Gaussian peak with noise, and (b) its filtered first derivative.
Delete text from pdf acrobat - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf to word; copy text from scanned pdf
Delete text from pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
delete text from pdf preview; get text from pdf image
7.4
Aliasing and leakage
A discussion of the digital Fourier transform would be incomplete without a
consideration of its inherent problems. Digital Fourier transformation has
two weak spots that are both consequences of its digital nature. Because we
only use a finite data set, some frequencies will fall outsidethe available fre-
quency range, and will then be misrepresented; this is called aliasing.
Another consequence of the finite set of frequencies is that some frequen-
cies insidethe range covered will not fit either, because they fall in between
the available frequencies. This leads to leakage. Below we will illustrate alias-
ing on a small data set, and leakage on a large set. Once you understand what
causes these problems you can often avoid them: homme averti en vaut
deux, forewarned is forearmed.
Instructions for exercise 7.4-1
Open a new spreadsheet.
Organize it in the fashion of exercise 7.1 (see Fig. 7.1-1), with space at the top, in rows 1
through 8, for small graphs.
In A9 and C9 deposit the labels A=and B=, and in B9 and D9 place the corresponding
numerical values 1.
In row 11 place the labels time, Re, Im, freq., Re, Im, time, Re, Im in A11:I11.
In A13:A20 deposit the numbers -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, and 3.
In B13 deposit=$B$9*COS($D$9*PI()*$A13/4). Note the dollar sign in front of the
letter A for a mixed absolute/relative address.
288
Fourier transformation
Fig.7.3-4:(a) The signal of Fig. 7.2-8, and (b) its first derivative (after filtering by zero-
filling at | f |>0.042).
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
copy paste pdf text; copy pdf text to word with formatting
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
extract text from pdf; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
In A22:A102 deposit the numbers -4.0, -3.9, -3.8, …, 3.9, 4.0.
Copy the instructions from A20 to J22. (This is where the dollar sign preceding the
letter A comes in handy.) Copy the instruction down to J102.
In A1:C8 make a thumbnail graph of the signal. In it, display the data in A13:A102 as
circles, those in D13:D102 as a line. (Note that A21:A102 and D13:D21 are left blank.) At
this point, the top of your spreadsheet should look more or less like Fig. 7.4-1.
10 In cell J9 place the label B′=, and in cell K9 the instruction=D9.
11 Copy D22:D102 to K22:K102.
12 Modify the instruction in K22 to refer to $K$9 rather than to $D$9, so that it will now
read=$B$9*COS($K$9*PI()*$A13/4). Copy this instruction down to K102.
7.4 Aliasing and leakage
289
Fig.7.4-1:The top left and right corners of the spreadsheet in exercise 7.4.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
extract text from pdf file; extract text from pdf image
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
copy text from protected pdf; extract all text from pdf
13 Highlight block A13:C20, and Fourier transform it. The result will show in D13:F20.
14 Continue with the inverse Fourier transform of D13:F20. The result in G13:I20 should
now contain a replica of A13:C20.
15 In D1:F8 make a graph of the data in block D13:F20, i.e., of E13:E20 and F13:F20 vs.
D13:D20.
16 In G1:I8 make a graph of the data in block G13:K102. Then remove the curve for
J13:J102 vs. G13:G102. The third panel should resemble the first.
17 Change the value of B in cell D9 to 2, then to 3, and see what happens.
18 We will for the moment skip B=4, and jump directly to B=5. Everything seems to be
OK until you notice that the middle panel is the same as the one you found for B=3.
Indeed, when you substitute a 3 for B′in cell K9 (so that it no longer automatically
traces cell D9) you will see that such a lower-frequency cosine fits the data just as well,
see Fig. 7.4-2.
19 Try B=6. Its transformation is identical to that for B=2, as you can again verify by
comparing the result in the third panel with B′=2, see Fig. 7.4-3.
290
Fourier transformation
Fig.7.4-2:From left to right: (a) the signal for B=5, (b) its transform, and (c) the inverse
transform of the latter. The line in (a) shows the cosine for B=5, and that in (c) the
cosine wave for B′=3, drawn through the samedata points.
Fig.7.4-3:From left to right: (a) the signal for B=6, (b) its transform, and (c) the inverse
transform of the latter. The line in (a) shows the cosine for B=6, and that in (c) the
cosine wave for B′=2, drawn through the same data points.
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
copy text from pdf reader; extract text from pdf open source
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
copy paste text pdf; cut and paste text from pdf document
What you see here is that an eight-point Fourier transform apparently
cannot count beyond 4, because it clearly confuses B=5 with B=3, and
likewise 6 with 2, and 7 with 1. This is called aliasing: a cosine with B=5 can
masquerade under the alias B=3.
For your consolation: the transform is still slightly smarter than those
birds that count zero, one, many, so that a birdwatcher’s blind entered by
three observers is considered empty after the bird has seen two observers
leave again: for such a bird brain, ‘many’ minus ‘many’ is zero!
As with most problems, aliasing is easily prevented once you understand
what causes it. You will avoid aliasing by using a sufficiently large data set.
Which immediately brings up the question: what is meant by ‘sufficiently
large’? The answer, called the Nyquist theorem, is that you need to sample
more than two points per cycleof any periodic signal in order to avoid alias-
ing. Otherwise the sample is said to be undersampled.
Note that this has nothing to do with the Fourier transform per se, but
everything with the more general problem of representing continuous func-
tions by discrete samples of such functions. The Nyquist theorem specifies
that the underlying, continuous, repetitive function cannot be defined
properly unless one samples it more than twice per its repeat period.
Let’s go back to the spreadsheet to experiment some more.
20 Now try B=4. In the graph you might miss its transform, since the real point at f=4
has the value 2, and therefore may require a change of vertical scale in the middle
thumbnail sketch.
21 But the problem is really more serious than that: while the frequency is well-defined,
its amplitude is not. This is illustrated in Fig. 7.4-4 with the signal y=3[sin(2
π
ft)+
cos(2
π
ft)], which fits the data equally well. And there are many more such combina-
tions.
Figure 7.4-4 illustrates the Nyquist criterion: the signal is sampled at
exactly two points per cycle, which is just not good enough. In this border-
line case the frequency is recovered, but the amplitudes of the possible sine
and cosine components of the signal are not.
The above illustrates what happens when the signal frequency lies outside
the range of frequencies used in the Fourier analysis, in which case the
digital Fourier transform will misread that frequency as one within its range.
As already indicated, another problem occurs when the frequency lies
within the analysis range, and also satisfies the Nyquist criterion (i.e., is
sampled more than twice during the repeat cycle of that signal), but has a
frequency that does not quite fit those of the analysis, as illustrated below.
7.4 Aliasing and leakage
291
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
copy text pdf; delete text from pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete text from pdf with acrobat; pdf text replace tool
Instructions for exercise 7.4-2
Open a new spreadsheet, and organize it as that in exercise 7.4-1, with rows 1 through 8
reserved for small graphs, and with similar labels.
In A13:A140 deposit the numbers -64, -63, … , -1, 0, 1, … , 62, 63.
In B13 deposit the instruction=$B$9*COS(A13*$D$9) where $B$9 refers to the ampli-
tude, and $D$9 to the frequency.
In B9 place the value 1, and in D9 the value=PI()/8, where 
π
/8≈0.3927.
In C13:C140 enter zeros.
Make a graph of the signal in A1:C8.
Compute the Fourier transform of the signal in D13:F140.
In D1:F8 make a graph of the transform or, better yet, of its middle half, for
-0.25f0.25 (since there is nothing to be seen at higher frequencies).
The top of the spreadsheet should now look like Fig. 7.4-5.
10 Now change the value in D9 from 
π
/8 to, say, 0.4, and repeat the transformation. Figure
7.4-6 shows what you should see.
In Fig. 7.4-5 the cosine wave fits exactly eight times, and this shows in its
transform, which exhibits a single point at f=±8×(1/128)=±0.0625. On
the other hand, the cosine wave in Fig. 7.4-6 does not quite form a repeating
sequence, and its frequency, 
π
/(0.4×128)≈0.06136, likewise does not fit
any of the frequencies used in the transform. Consequently the Fourier
transform cannot represent this cosine as a single frequency (because it
does not have the proper frequency to do so) but instead finds a combina-
tion of sine and cosine waves at adjacent frequencies to describe it. This is
what is called leakage: the signal at an in-between (but unavailable) fre-
quency as it were leaks into the adjacent (available) analysis frequencies.
292
Fourier transformation
Fig.7.4-4:From left to right: (a) the signal for B=4, (b) its transform, and (c) the inverse
transform of the signal in (b). The line in (c) shows the sum of a sine and cosine wave,
with A=3 and B=4.
11 Imagine that you take experimental data at a rate of 1 point per millisecond, a quite
comfortable rate for an analog-to-digital converter, and quite sufficient for many ana-
lytical experiments, such as the output of a gas chromatograph. Unavoidably, the
signal will also contain some 60 Hz emanating from the transformers in the power sup-
plies of the instrument. (The main frequency is 60 Hz in the US; in most other coun-
tries, it would be 50 Hz.) In D9 enter the corresponding frequency,=1000/60 (where
the factor 1000 is used to express the frequency in the corresponding units of per milli-
second) or=1000/50 (outside the US). Figures 7.4-7 and 7.4-8 illustrate what happens
with the Fourier transform of such a signal.
7.4 Aliasing and leakage
293
Fig.7.4-5:The top of the spreadsheet showing the function y=cos(
π
t/ 8) and its
Fourier transform.
Fig.7.4-6:The function y=cos (0.4 t) and its Fourier transform.
Keep in mind that leakage does notmisrepresent the signal, but expresses
it in terms of the available frequencies. It is successful in doing so. It is just
that a simpler representation would be obtained if the appropriate fre-
quency were available.
In both figures, leakage occurs because the Fourier transform of a data set
for -0.064t<0.064 s has the frequencies ±nfwhere n=0, 1, 2, 3, … , 64
and f=1 / 0.128=7.8125 Hz. Therefore, around 50 and 60 Hz, the closest the
transform can come to represent this signal is with 46.875, 54.6875, or 62.5
Hz.
We could have avoided this leakage by selecting a slightly different time
interval: at 60 Hz, an interval of 1.0416667 ms would have put the 60 Hz
signal in a single frequency slot, and likewise an interval of, e.g., 1.25 ms
would have put a 50 Hz signal in its unique place. A possible benefit of doing
so would be that we can then simply filter out any unwanted mains signal by
transforming, setting that singlefrequency to zero, and inverse transform-
ing. Here you have the ultimate in frequency-selective filtering, where you
just pick offthe one frequency you want to remove. In practice there will
294
Fourier transformation
Fig.7.4-7:The function y=cos (2
π
×60 t) sampled at 1 ms intervals, and the central
portion of its Fourier transform.
Fig.7.4-8:The function y=cos (2
π
×50 t) sampled at 1 ms intervals, and the central
portion of its Fourier transform.
usually be several related signals, e.g., at 120 and 180 Hz, but these harmon-
ics can be removed simultaneously because they are exact multiples of the
fundamental frequency to be removed. This is notto suggest that it is OK to
be careless with so-called mains-frequency pick-up: prevention (by proper
design and signal shielding) is always preferable to restoration.
Which brings us to a related point. Modern computer-based data acquisi-
tion methods sometimes show a low-frequency oscillation superimposed
on the signal. Say that we have a transient signal decaying with a time con-
stant of 0.1 s, and sampled with a 20 ms. Any 60 Hz pick-up will then show as
a 10 Hz oscillation, i.e., as the beat frequency between the sampling rate of
50 Hz and the 60 Hz pick-up. Fig. 7.4-9a illustrates this.
Here,then,wehaveanexample ofaliasing that hasnothingtodo with
Fouriertransformation!Theremedyissimple:firstreducethesourceofthe
pick-upas muchas possible,bycareful signal shielding. Ifthatdoesnot
suffice,useadifferentsamplingrate,sothatthebeatfrequencydisappears.
Inthiscase,sampleat60ratherthanat50Hz,i.e.,at16 ms intervals.Figure
7.4-9b shows theresult. Inthis case,the 60Hzsignal hasbeenconverted
into a constant offset, because it is sampled always at exactly the same
momentinits60Hzcycle.Whathappenswhenyoucannothititquiteatthis
samplingrate,buthavetosettlefor,say,onceevery16ms?Tryitoutonthe
spreadsheet.
7.5
Convolution
When we record the spectrum of a compound, the data obtained reflect both
the spectrum itself, andthe properties of the spectrometer, such as its slit
width. When the slits are wide open, we usually get plenty of light on the
photodetector but the spectrum may become blurred, i.e., lose resolution.
2
3
7.5 Convolution
295
Fig.7.4-9:The function y=exp(-10t) for t>0 with superimposed 60 Hz pick-up of 0.1
sin (2
π
×60t)+0.05 cos (2
π
×60t), sampled at 20 ms intervals (left) and at 16 ms inter-
vals (right).
2
3
On the other hand, when the slits are too narrow, we may have too little light
on the photodetector to make a measurement. Clearly, we must often make
an instrumental compromise between resolution and sensitivity. No matter
what compromise is used, what we observe is, in mathematical terms, the
convolution of the actual spectrum of the cell and the distortion of the
spectrometer.
Similarly, when we listen to music through a speaker, what we hear is the
original music, distorted by its passage through whatever recording device
(microphone+amplifier), storing device (such as tape, casette, record,
compact disk), and audio reproduction system (amplifier, speaker) is used.
More precisely, what we hear is the convolution of the original music and the
instrumental response.
Likewise, when we use a laser flash to excite fluorescence, we can
observe adecay curveofthat fluorescence.Whenthe laserflashisnot of
negligible durationcompared to the decay time, we actually observe the
convolutionoftheflashintensityandtheintrinsicfluorescentdecayofthe
sample.
The list of examples can go on, since convolution is a quite general phe-
nomenon every time an instrument is used to make a measurement.
However, the list is by no means restricted to instrumental distortion. For
example, in atomic absorption, the absorption process is typically observed
at the relatively high temperatures of a flame or a plasma. Consequently,
Doppler broadening (which leads to a Gaussian distribution) convolves
with the absorption process (exhibiting a Lorentzian distribution) because
the absorbing particles move with respect to the light source. Similarly, in
the formation of precipitates, nucleation convolves with crystal growth,
since no crystallite can grow before it has been nucleated. Yet another
example is the effect of time-dependent diffusion in cyclic voltammetry, as
described in section 6.12. In general, when more than one physical process
must be taken into account, chances are that a convolution is involved.
What, precisely, is convolution? It is an integral that contains both the
original signal (the true spectrum, the original music, the intrinsic fluores-
cent decay, the absorption spectrum of non-moving species, the growth
process apart from nucleation, the stationary current–voltage curve without
diffusion, etc.) as well as the ‘distorting’ effect. In the integral, the two are as
it were forced to slide past each other. The mathematical definition of the
convolution of two functions, x(t) and y(t), is
(7.5-1)
wheretisavariable (hereweusethesymboltbecauseitoftenrepresents
time), and
is a so-called dummy variable, which only has meaning
insidetheintegral.Adetaileddiscussionofthemathematicalpropertiesof
x(t) 
*
y(t)=
-∞
x(
) y(t-
) d
296
Fourier transformation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested