how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : C# extract text from pdf control application system azure web page winforms console Excel32-part204

7.6 Deconvolution
307
Fig.7.6-2:The power spectrum 1
2
log (Re
2
+Im
2
) vs. f of the original spectrum (left) and
that of the same with added Gaussian noise, na=0.001 (middle panel) or na=0.01
(right). The bottom panels show the same with an enlarged vertical scale. Large solid
circles: the power spectrum; small open circles: the power spectrum of the noise-free
signal. Color is used to indicate those data points that are mostly ‘signal’, while black sig-
nifies mostly ‘noise’. As indicated by a few points in the middle panels, that distinction is
somewhat ambiguous.
Fig.7.6-3:Deconvolution of the noisy spectrum of Fig. 7.6-1b (with na=0.01) while fil-
tering out the contributions at the intermediate, Fourier-transformed signal for the top
25 (left panel), 26 (middle), or 28 (right) frequencies. The thin colored line shows the
original, noise-free function.
C# extract text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract pdf text to word; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
C# extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
delete text from pdf online; cut text from pdf document
points are predominantlysignal or noise, and even that distinction is not
unambiguous. The deconvolution macro is set up to select those contiguous
frequencies where the noise is predominant, and zero out the correspond-
ing contributions before the final inverse Fourier transformation. Other
arrangements, in which, e.g., the ambiguous data are given an intermediate
weight, are of course possible. Here we merely illustrate the principle by
using an easily implemented scheme. The bottom right panel in Fig. 7.6-2
suggests that, in that case, only six (of the total of 32) frequencies are worth
keeping.
Here is another example. In laser-excited fluorescence, the fluorescence
typically decays exponentially, and can then be characterized by a time con-
stant 
. When that time constant is much larger than the length of the laser
pulse, the resulting fluorescent signal is a simple exponential. However,
when 
is not much larger than the time the laser light excites the sample, the
resulting signal (assuming the fluorescence is a linear function of excitation
light intensity) will be the convolution of the two. Figure 7.6-4 illustrates this
with a simulated sequence in which the fluorescence signal xis convoluted
with the laser intensity yto generate the measured output x 
*
y. When the
laser intensity is known, the measured signal can be deconvoluted to recre-
ate the underlying fluorescent decay curve. As before, the method can
readily be overwhelmed by the presence of noise. In experiments where sub-
sequent use of deconvolution is anticipated, one should therefore strive for
minimal noise levels in both the signal and the window fraction.
Instructions for exercise 7.6-2
Open a new spreadsheet.
In column A enter the label time, and values for a time scale of 2Nnumbers, such as -32
(1) 31.
308
Fourier transformation
Fig.7.6-4.From left to right, the various stages in exercise 7.6-2: the assumed fluores-
cence decay signal x, the assumed laser intensity curve y, the resulting measured signal
*
y, and the recovered ‘true’ fluorescence decay signal after deconvolution of x 
*
y
withy.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
copy text from protected pdf to word; copy text from pdf to word
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
get text from pdf image; copy text from protected pdf
In column B , below the label x, enter a hypothetical fluorescence decay curve, such as
x=e–0.3tfor t>0 (and x=0 for t<0, x=0.5 for t=0).
In column C, under the label y, enter a hypothetical laser intensity curve. In the example
shown in Fig. 7.6-4 we have used the most asymmetric curve shown in Fig. 8.6-3, given
by y=1/(e–3.5x+e0.5x).
In column D we then use the macro to compute the convolution x 
*
y.
In column E copy the corresponding contents of column A.
Likewise, in column F copy x 
*
y, and in column G the function y.
Deconvolution of the contents of columns E:G will now generate x.
The take-home message of this section is that, as long as the signals
involved are relatively noise-free, deconvolution is possible. In that case we
can correct our observations for artifacts that are reproducibly measurable
or theoretically predictable.
7.7
Summary
Fourier transformation has become a ubiquitous method in chemical meth-
odology and instrumentation. Molecular structures are solved by Fourier
transformation of their X-ray diffractograms, and when you see a scanning
tunneling microgram in which the atoms or molecules look like smooth
balls, you are almost surely looking at a picture that has been filtered by two-
dimensional Fourier transformation. Virtually all modern NMR instruments
are based on Fourier transformation, and the same applies to most infrared
spectrometers. Outside chemistry, Fourier transformation plays a role in
many other areas, e.g., in the solution of partial differential equations, the
design of antennas, and the processing of satellite pictures. We have devoted
this entire chapter to Fourier transformation because of its general impor-
tance to modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis.
The concept of Fourier transformation is the representation of a time-
domain function f(t) in the frequency domain as F(f), and vice versa. Such
transformations are firmly based on human experience: for instance, we
hear sound as a sequential phenomenon (i.e., a function of time), yet the
brain also analyzes it in terms of pitch, i.e., as a function of frequency. In our
description of Fourier transformation we have kept the mathematics to a
minimum, but instead have used graphics to demonstrate some of its main
principles. Consider this, therefore, as a visual introduction to the topic, as a
means to whet your appetite for it, to demonstrate its power, and to alert you
to its limitations. With a fast and convenient Fourier transform macro, the
method is now so easy to implement that we can use the spreadsheet to
7.7 Summary
309
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
copy text from pdf with formatting; copying text from pdf into word
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
how to copy and paste pdf text; cut and paste text from pdf document
learn about Fourier transformation and its properties in an intuitive, non-
mathematical way. This can then be followed by a more formal description if
and when we are ready for that.
In using Fourier transformation one should be aware that there are several
conflicting conventions. For example, many engineering texts (as well as the
Numerical Recipes) use conventions for forward and inverse transforms that
are the opposite from those used in mathematics and physics; the latter con-
vention is used here. Likewise, there are different conventions for how to
distribute the scale factors between the forward and inverse transform, and
for whether the time and frequency axes should be centered around zero (as
used here) or start at zero. (The Fourier transform macro will accept either
input format).
When the use of Fourier transformation in data analysis is anticipated, it is
best to design the experiment such that 2
N
data points will be taken, in order
to take advantage of the speed of 2
N
-based Fourier transform algorithms.
Also make sure that the data can be represented as a segment of an infinitely
repeating chain, otherwise you may introduce artifacts in the transform. In
practice, the latter requires that the underlying function and its first few
derivatives at the beginning and end of the sample match each other to
within experimental error. For transient phenomena this can most readily
be achieved by taking a sufficiently long sample so that, at the end of the
sampling interval, the signal has fully returned to its baseline value.
310
Fourier transformation
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
copy and paste pdf text; copy text from scanned pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
get text from pdf into excel; export text from pdf to excel
chapter
8
standard
mathematical
operations
In this chapter we will encounter a number of standard mathematical oper-
ations that are conveniently performed and/or illustrated on a spreadsheet.
We start with a brief description of the logic underlying the Goal Seek and
Solver methods of Excel. Then we consider two methods often encountered
in  spectroscopy,  viz.  signal  averaging  and  lock-in  amplification.
Subsequently the focus shifts toward numerical methods, such as peak
fitting, integration, differentiation, and interpolation, some of which we
have already encountered in one form or another in the context of least
squares analysis and/or Fourier transformation. Finally we describe some
matrix operations that are easy to perform with Excel.
8.1
The Newton–Raphson method
The Newton–Raphson method is often used to solve problems involving a
single variable, and is implemented in Excel as T
ools  G
oal Seek. The
method requires that a function F(x) can be formulated as an explicit mathe-
matical expression in terms of a variable x. We now want to know for what
value of xthe function F(x) has a particular value, A. The Newton–Raphson
approach then searches for a value of xfor which F(x) is equal to A. Often one
selects A=0, in which case the corresponding value of xis called a rootof
the function F(x).
The Newton–Raphson algorithm must start with a reasonably close first
estimate, x
0
, of the desired value x
A
for which F(x
A
)=A. If the function F(x)
were linear between x=x
0
and x
A,
we could find x
A
simply from
or
(8.1-1)
In general, of course, F(x) will not be linear in the interval from x
0
to x
A
, but
as long as the non-linearity is not too severe, we can use (8.1-1) as a first step
x
A
=x
0
-
F(x
0
)
dF(x)/dx
dF(x)
dx
=
F(x
0
)
x
0
-x
A
311
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
acrobat remove text from pdf; c# get text from pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
extract text from pdf; copy text from pdf reader
in an iterative procedure, obtaining an improved estimate, x
1
, that we can
then use as the starting point for further refinement, etc. As we move closer
to the value x
A
the linearity of the function will usually improve (since, over a
sufficiently  small  interval,  most  physically  well-behaved  functions
approach linearity) so that we will quickly home in on the correct answer.
The first three steps in such a sequence are depicted in Fig. 8.1-1.
Equation (8.1-1) contains the derivative dF(x)/dx, but the spreadsheet
does not need to determine that derivative in a formal, mathematical way:
instead, it uses ∆F(x)/∆x, just as we did in exercise 2.3.
When the initial estimate is far off, the Newton–Raphson method may not
converge; in fact, when the initial value is located at an x-value where F(x)
goes through a minimum or maximum, the denominator in (8.1-1) will
become zero, so that (8.1-1) will place the next iteration at either+∞or-∞.
Furthermore, the Newton–Raphson algorithm will find only one root at a
time, regardless of how many roots there are. On the other hand, when the
method works, it is usually very efficient and fast. Exercise 8.1 illustrates how
the Newton–Raphson algorithm works.
Instructions for exercise 8.1
Open a new spreadsheet.
In column A deposit x-values in the range 0 (0.2) 8.
In column B compute sin(x).
Plot the sine wave; it will serve you as reference.
312
Standard mathematical operations
Fig.8.1-1:The Newton–Raphson algorithm finds the root of an equation through itera-
tion, of which the first three steps are shown here.
In cell C1 deposit an x-value, say, 2.
In cell D1 deposit=sin(C1).
Select T
ools G
oal Seek… and in the Goal Seek dialog box specify to S
et cell: D1 To
v
alue: 0 By c
hanging cell: C1 OK.
Note that the cell to be changed should contain a numerical value, not an instruction,
because the latter will prevent Goal Seek from adjusting the value.
Cell C1 should now show a value close to 
π
(≈3.141593), and D1 a value close to 0.
10 The agreement may not be very good. This will happen when the algorithm does not
use a sufficiently high precision. In that case, click on T
ools Options…, select the
Calculation tab, then in I
teration see what is listed for Maximum C
hange. If it is some-
thing like 0.001, add a few zeros behind the decimal point, click on OK, and try
GoalSeek again. You should now get a much closer approximation of the true zero
crossing.
11 Instead of 2, place other values in C1 and try Goal Seek again. Make a crude map of the
results obtained for a handful of initial values. What do they show?
8.2
Non-linear least squares
The operation of the Solver is much harder to illustrate, because it is a multi-
parameter adjustment. Moreover, it is a much more sophisticated routine,
capable of using several different optimizing algorithms. It can even include
constraints on the variables. In the previous chapters we already used Solver
extensively, and we will here only add a few comments about it.
Solver finds a minimum in the sum of the squares of the residuals very
much like precipitation on mountains finds its way to the ocean: it does not
know where to go, but just follows the local slope down. And just as some of it
may end up in a lake without outlet to the ocean, Solver may end up in a local
(rather than the global) minimum. Which way the solution will go depends,
for both running water and non-linear least squares, on the point of depar-
ture. When the initial conditions in Solver are close to the final ones, chances
of getting stuck in a local minimum are greatly reduced.
The sum of squares of the residuals makes a multi-dimensional surface,
with mountain tops and valleys. The most popular algorithm to slide down
that surface and find its lowest point is associated with the names of
Levenberg and Marquardt, and is described in detail in, e.g., chapter 14 of
the Numerical Recipes.
In Solver you can assign up to two constraints per cell, and up to 100
additional constraints. The constraints are<=(for),>=(for),=(for
equality), int (for integer), and bin (for binary). Constraints are useful to
8.2 Non-linear least squares
313
avoid physically unrealistic solutions, such as those with negative concen-
trations or equilibrium constants.
As a practical matter, with more than a few adjustable parameters it is
often advisable to use Solver incrementally, starting with just a few variables,
and successively adding more of them. In either case you need reasonable
guess values for all parameters. We illustrated this guided, gradual approach
in section 4.11.
Unlike water that flows smoothly from high to low, a computer must take
discrete steps. The step size in Solver is determined by the largest adjustable
variables. When the smaller variables are of a quite different magnitude,
such as the K
a
’s in many polyprotic acids, use their pK
a
’s instead as the
adjustable parameters, in order to make a more even playing field. The same
can be achieved when you U
se Automatic Scaling in the Solver O
ptions.
Whether Solver performs a weighted or unweighted least-squares optimi-
zation is under full control of the user. In case you want Solver to do a
weighted least squares, simply multiply each of the squares of the residuals
by their individual weights before adding them as SRR, in which case you
minimize the sum of the squares of the weighted residuals. Weighting can be
applied for various reasons: (1) you may know the variances of the various
points, (2) you may want to correct for some earlier transformation, or (3)
you may want to downplay some parts of the data set, and emphasize others.
While the latter is rather arbitrary, it may sometimes be necessary to reduce
the effect of some extreme points which otherwise might overwhelm all
other data.
You can interrupt Solver by pressing the Escape button on your keyboard.
This will abort the calculation being done at that time, and show the previ-
ous result calculated by Solver. H
elp  Answer W
izard contains a large
number of useful comments and hints concerning Solver, as does the
Answer Wizard Index. Consult these if you want to know more about it.
Solver provides values for the parameters of a non-linear least-squares fit,
but no estimates of their precision. The latter can be obtained with the
macro SolverAid described in chapter 10.
8.3
Signal averaging
In pushing an experimental method to its maximum sensitivity, one often
runs into random noise as the limiting factor. When such noise is indeed
random, and is not correlated with the signal, one can sometimes use signal
averaging(also called co-addition) to reduce the effect of the noise. Below
we will illustrate the method, using as our example a set of Gaussian peaks
with added Gaussian noise.
314
Standard mathematical operations
Instructions for exercise 8.3
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 deposit labels for nine constants, Athrough I, plus a noise amplitude na, and
(in cell K1) an offset for plotting the results.
Use row 2 for the corresponding numerical values.
In A6:A106 deposit the numbers 1 (1) 100.
In B110:Q210 deposit Gaussian noise (“normal” D
istribution) of zero Me
an and unit
S
tandard deviation.
In B6 deposit an expression for the sum of three Gaussians, of the form Aexp[-B
(x-C)
2
]+Dexp[-E(x-F )
2
]+Gexp[-H(x-I )
2
], and to this add some noise ampli-
tude natimes the Gaussian noise stored in cell B110.
Copy the instruction from B6 to the entire block B6:Q106.
In S6 deposit the instruction=(B6+C6+D6+E6)/4+$K$2, where $K$2 contains the
offset constant. Copy this instruction to all cells in S6:S106.
Similarly, in columns T, U, and V compute the averages of columns F through I, J
through M, and N through Q respectively, plus the same offset.
10 Likewise, in column X, calculate the average of columns S through V, again together
with the offset $K$2.
11 In column Z calculate the noise-free function Aexp[-B(x-C)2]+D exp[-E(x-F )2]
+Gexp[-H(x-I )
2
], to which you add an offset, such as+3*$K$2.
12 Plot B6:B106, S6:S106, X6:X106, and Z6:Z106 versus A6:A106 to display, in sequence, a
noisy curve, the average of four or sixteen of such curves, and the original, noise-free
function. Figure 8.3-1 shows such a graph.
At best, signal averaging yields an improvement of the signal-to-noise
ratio proportional to √N, where N is the number of signals averaged.
Consequently, the method is rather inefficient and time-consuming, except
when the entire curve can be obtained in a very short time, as with fluores-
cence transients following a short laser pulse.
Successful signal averaging also requires that the experimental conditions
are very reproducible. When some measurement parameters experience
appreciable drift from one sample to the next, averaging them may not lead
to any improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio.
8.3 Signal averaging
315
8.4
Lock-in amplification
The terms lock-in amplification and synchronous detection describe a
correlation method commonly used in spectrometry. It requires that the
light source be modulated at a given, known frequency. The signal is then
analyzed for the component of the same frequency and the same phase, or
with a fixed phase shift. In this way, random fluctuations, even those at the
same measurement frequency, will be attenuated, because random fluctua-
tions will also be random with respect to the phase of the signal source.
Lock-in amplification is also used to distinguish, say, atomic absorption
from atomic emission, since only the absorption signal will be encoded by
modulating the amplitude of the external light source.
Lock-in amplification can be understood mathematically in terms of the
multiplication of a sine wave and a square wave. Below we will use a graphi-
cal approach, which illustrates rather than derives the result.
316
Standard mathematical operations
Fig.8.3-1,from top to bottom:A simulated sample with noise, the average of four and
sixteen such samples, and the noise-free signal.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested