how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Acrobat remove text from pdf SDK software project winforms windows .net UWP million-acre-feet-technical-document1-part2031

11 
Landscape replacement programs will save the most water in areas with high landscape water 
demand. While the report only includes the results of landscape replacement programs in six 
counties, we have developed estimates of water demand and potential savings for every zip code 
in the state (Figure 4). To develop an average for each county in the state (Table 8), we have 
taken a weighted average based on the population of each zip code. This approach gives more 
influence to areas with greater numbers of residents.  
Figure 4 
Average annual theoretical irrigation requirement for lawn by zip code for California 
Acrobat remove text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf online; get text from pdf file c#
Acrobat remove text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
delete text from pdf file; extract text from pdf to word
12 
Table 8. Potential average annual water savings from converting lawn to water-efficient landscaping, 
by county. 
County 
Gallons per 
square foot 
County 
Gallons per 
square foot 
Alameda 
13.4 
Orange 
15.7 
Alpine 
14.8 
Placer 
17.7 
Amador 
16.7 
Plumas 
15.9 
Butte 
16.5 
Riverside 
19.5 
Calaveras 
15.7 
Sacramento 
19.0 
Colusa 
18.6 
San Benito 
16.4 
Contra Costa 
15.5 
San 
Bernardino 
19.4 
Del Norte 
7.2 
San Diego 
15.8 
El Dorado 
16.8 
San Francisco 
11.2 
Fresno 
19.9 
San Joaquin 
19.0 
Glenn 
18.9 
San Luis 
Obispo 
15.4 
Humboldt 
7.9 
San Mateo 
13.2 
Imperial 
30.2 
Santa Barbara 
14.7 
Inyo 
22.5 
Santa Clara 
16.4 
Kern 
22.5 
Santa Cruz 
11.0 
Kings 
23.4 
Shasta 
16.2 
Lake 
15.2 
Sierra 
15.0 
Lassen 
17.0 
Siskiyou 
15.2 
Los Angeles 
16.5 
Solano 
16.3 
Madera 
19.1 
Sonoma 
13.6 
Marin 
12.6 
Stanislaus 
19.5 
Mariposa 
16.0 
Sutter 
18.4 
Mendocino 
12.7 
Tehama 
18.2 
Merced 
20.1 
Trinity 
16.1 
Modoc 
14.2 
Tulare 
19.4 
Mono 
20.3 
Tuolumne 
15.5 
Monterey 
14.5 
Ventura 
16.3 
Napa 
15.1 
Yolo 
19.2 
Nevada 
15.7 
Yuba 
18.3 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
export text from pdf to word; how to copy and paste pdf text
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. If you need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to
extract text from pdf open source; copying text from pdf to word
13 
Discussion and Limitations 
One shortcoming of our analysis is that it is based on a theoretical average year, rather than any 
actual year in the climatic record. Actual irrigation needs in a given year may be lower or higher 
due to changes in precipitation, temperature, cloud cover, or other climate variables. We 
recommend future work to repeat this analysis using actual monthly data from the climate record 
to back-cast actual irrigation demands for the past. This would give a better estimate of the 
variability of water demand, and how it responds to dry and wet years. Further, a more 
sophisticated analysis might look at how urban outdoor demand will respond to climate change 
in the future.  
The input datasets are of limited spatial resolution and accuracy. As climate researchers and 
meteorologists produce more detailed datasets in the future, this analysis should be expanded and 
refined. Inaccuracy also comes from the limitations of our modeling technique. Our simplified 
monthly water balance model does not include the complexities of snowfall, runoff, deep 
percolation, or irrigation system management (e.g., distribution uniformity, pump efficiency). 
The advantages of this technique are its ease of use, and that it does not require calibration. A 
more sophisticated model could more explicitly account for soil moisture, perhaps relying on 
GIS soils datasets for input data.  
Energy Savings 
Many of the water conservation and efficiency devices reduce the amount of water that requires 
heating in homes and businesses, thereby providing substantial end use energy savings. 
Additionally, capturing, treating, and conveying water also requires energy, referred to as 
embedded energy. Thus, saving water produces embedded energy savings as well. We calculate 
the end use and embedded energy savings from the water conservation and efficiency measures 
identified in this analysis. Below, we describe our methodology for each calculation. 
End-Use Energy Savings 
Table 6 provides estimates of the end-use energy savings for each measure. For the residential 
measures that save hot water, electricity and natural gas savings were estimated using the 
following equations: 
electricity savings (kWh per gallon per degree F)  =  ((1 kWh/3,412 BTUs) x (8.34 lbs per 
gallon) x 1 BTU/lb ºF))/(90% efficiency) = 0.002707 kWh per gallon per ºF 
natural gas savings (therms per gallon per degree F) = ((1 therm/10
5
BTUs) x (8.34 lbs per 
gallon) x 1 BTU/lb ºF))/(55% efficiency) = 0.000152 therms per gallon per ºF 
For showerheads, we assume that temperatures are raised from 60ºF to 105ºF. For faucets we 
assume temperatures are raised 60ºF to 80ºF. For clothes washers, we assume that 40% of the 
water savings are from hot water with temperatures that were raised from 60ºF to 130ºF. Energy 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
.net extract text from pdf; can't copy text from pdf
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
extract text from scanned pdf; copy text from pdf to word
14 
savings for the measures from the commercial and industrial sectors were based on various 
reports, as indicated in Table 9.  
Table 9. Device end-use energy savings. 
Notes/Sources:  
(1)
Calculated. Assume raising temperature from 60ºF to 105ºF. 
(2)
Calculated. Assume 40% of water savings is hot water and that the temperature of this water is raised from 60ºF 
to 130 ºF. 
(3)
Calculated. Assume raising temperature from 60ºF to 80ºF. 
(4)
Energy savings based on estimates provided in CUWCC 2005.  
(5)
Energy savings based on estimates provided in EPA 2009a. 
(6)
EPA 2010 
(7)
We assume water heating uses 0.00271 kWh per gallon per ºF for an electric water heater with a 90% efficiency 
level. 
(8)
We assume heating requires 0.000152 therms per gallon per ºF for a natural gas heater with a 55% efficiency 
level. 
Embedded Energy Savings 
Energy requirements for capturing, treating, and conveying water are referred to as embedded 
energy. Water conservation and efficiency reduces the volume of water that must be pumped and 
Measure 
Annual End-Use Energy Savings  
(per device) 
Notes 
If Water Heated by 
Electricity
7
If Water Heated 
by Natural Gas
8
(kWh) 
(therms) 
Residential toilet (1.28 gpf) 
Showerhead (1.5 gpm) 
539 
30 
Residential front-loading clothes 
washer 
774 
37 
Faucet aerator (1.5 gpm) 
34 
Pre-rinse spray valve (1.0 gpm) 
7,600 
330 
Connectionless food steamer 
4,419 
334 
Commercial dishwasher 
13,950 
608 
Commercial front-loading clothes 
washer 
2,880 
138 
Commercial urinal (0.5 gpf) 
Commercial toilet (1.28 gpf) 
Cooling tower pH controller 
Pressurized water broom 
Replace lawn with low-water-use 
plants 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
copy pdf text with formatting; copy and paste text from pdf to word
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
extract text from pdf image; copy paste pdf text
15 
treated, thereby providing significant embedded energy savings. In order to quantify these 
savings, we multiplied the volume of water conserved by the energy intensity of water. Energy 
intensity is defined as the total energy requirements for a given volume of water or wastewater 
and is often expressed in units of kWh per million gallons or, for natural gas, in units of therms 
per million gallons.  
Table 10 provides energy intensity estimates for various segments of the water and wastewater 
cycle in Northern and Southern California. Energy intensity is higher for water in Southern 
California because much of this water is imported across long distances and over steep terrain. 
Note that the energy intensity of water used indoors is higher than that used outdoor because it is 
subject to wastewater treatment. For this analysis, we assume that water used indoors has an 
energy intensity of 5,400 kWh per million gallons in Northern California and 13,000 kWh per 
million gallons in Southern California. Water used outdoors has an energy intensity of 3,500 
kWh per million gallons in Northern California and 11,100 kWh per million gallons in Southern 
California.  
Table 10. Energy intensity estimates (in kilowatt-hours per million gallons) for Northern and Southern 
California. 
Indoor Uses (kWh/MG) 
Outdoor Uses (kWh/MG) 
Northern 
California 
Southern 
California 
Northern 
California 
Southern 
California 
Water Supply and 
Conveyance 
2,117 
9,727 
2,117 
9,727 
Water Treatment 
111 
111 
111 
111 
Water Distribution 
1,272 
1,272 
1,272 
1,272 
Wastewater 
Treatment 
1,911 
1,911 
Regional Total 
5,411 
13,022 
3,500 
11,111 
Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc. 2006.  
We use 2008 regional population estimates for Northern and Southern California to produce a 
population weighted statewide energy intensity estimate. Based on this calculation, we estimate 
that the average energy intensity of water used outdoors is 8,100 kWh per million gallons, while 
that used outdoors is 10,100 kWh per million gallons (Table 11). To determine the embedded 
energy savings, we multiply the indoor and outdoor water savings by the appropriate statewide 
energy intensity estimates (Table 12). 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
copy pdf text to word document; export highlighted text from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
copy paste text pdf; extracting text from pdf
16 
Table 11. Population weighted average energy intensity estimates (in kilowatt-hours per million 
gallons) for California. 
Population 
Indoor Water 
(kWh/MG) 
Outdoor Water 
(kWh/MG) 
Northern California 
14,334,052 
5,411 
3,500 
Southern California 
22,422,614 
13,022 
11,111 
State 
36,756,666 
10,054 
8,143 
Source: Population estimates for July 1, 2008 from U.S. Census Bureau 2009. 
Table 12. Embedded energy savings (in million kWh per year). 
Measure 
Indoor Water 
Savings (AF) 
Outdoor Water 
Savings (AF) 
Embedded Energy 
Savings (million 
kWh per year) 
Residential Toilet (1.28 gpf) 
93,500 
306 
Showerhead (1.5 gpm) 
47,500  
156 
Residential front-loading clothes washer 
13,300  
43.6 
Faucet aerator (1.5 gpm)  
6,750  
22.1 
Pre-rinse spray valves 
3,070  
10.1 
Connectionless food steamer 
3,440  
11.3 
Commercial dishwasher 
1,300 
4.27 
Commercial clothes washer 
10,500  
34.3 
Commercial urinal (0.5 gpf) 
51,800  
170 
Commercial toilet (1.28 gpf) 
31,300  
103 
Cooling tower pH controllers 
21,900  
71.8 
Pressurized water brooms 
7,670 
20.3 
Replace lawn with low-water-use plants 
28,400 
75.4 
Note: All numbers rounded to three significant figures. 
Total Energy Savings 
Table 13 summarizes the embedded and end-use energy savings. Based on US Census Bureau 
(2007), we assume that 44% of water heaters are electric and the remaining 56% are natural gas. 
We estimate that the water conservation and efficiency measures described in this analysis would 
save 2,300 million kWh and 86.8 million therms of natural gas each year (Table 10). This is 
equivalent to the annual electricity requirements of 309,000 average California households. 
Nearly 55% of these savings are a result of end use savings and the remaining 45% are a result of 
reductions in embedded energy. 
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. speed for TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF file's vector
a pdf text extractor; copy highlighted text from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete text from pdf preview; get text from pdf into excel
17 
Table 13. Embedded and end-use energy savings.  
Measure 
Embedded Energy 
Savings  
(million kWh per 
year) 
End Use Energy 
Savings  
(million kWh 
per year) 
End Use Energy 
Savings  
(million therms 
per year) 
Residential Toilet (1.28 gpf) 
306 
Showerhead (1.5 gpm) 
156 
830 
59.3 
Residential front-loading clothes 
washer 
43.6 
145 
8.86 
Faucet aerator (1.5 gpm)  
22.1 
52.4 
3.75 
Pre-rinse spray valves 
10.1 
66.8 
3.70 
Connectionless food steamer 
11.3 
13.6 
1.31 
Commercial dishwasher 
4.27 
52.1 
2.90 
Commercial clothes washer 
34.3 
114 
6.98 
Commercial urinal (0.5 gpf) 
170 
Commercial toilet (1.28 gpf) 
103 
Cooling tower pH controllers 
71.8 
Pressurized water brooms 
20.3 
Replace lawn with low-water-use 
plants 
75.4 
Total Savings  
1,030 
1,270 
86.8 
Note: All numbers rounded to three significant figures. We assume 44% of water heaters are electric and the 
remaining 56% are natural gas based on U.S. Census Bureau 2007. 
Cost Effectiveness Analysis 
Economists use cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the unit cost of alternatives, for example, 
in dollars spent to obtain an additional acre-foot of water supply. Because each water 
conservation measure is an alternative to new or expanded water supply, conservation measures 
are considered cost-effective when their unit cost 
called the cost of conserved water 
is less 
than the unit cost of the lowest-cost option for new or expanded water supply. 
Our cost-effectiveness analysis is done from a combined utility and customer perspective. We 
calculate the cost of conserved water based on the total investment required and any changes in 
operation and maintenance costs resulting from the investment.
1
We adopted this approach 
because it captures both the costs and benefits to the water supplier, which are eventually passed 
on to customers, as well as costs and benefits customers experience aside from what they pay for 
water service. This approach thus takes a broader view of the potential costs and benefits of 
water conservation and efficiency improvements than the agency perspective alone.  
1
Savings on water bills are not included as the volume of water conserved is the denominator for the cost of 
conserved water calculation. 
18 
The cost parameters that affect our estimates of the cost of conserved water are the cost of the 
device, nominal and real interest rates, useful lifetime, changes in operation and maintenance 
(O&M) costs, and the average annual quantity of water conserved. For water conservation 
devices that reduce indoor water use, changes in O&M costs are related to reductions in water-
related heating requirements and reductions in wastewater flows.
2
Ultimately, these reductions 
save the customer money through lower wastewater and energy bills. Changes in energy and 
wastewater costs are shown in Table 14. Note that energy savings are shown for customers with 
a gas or an electric water heater. To determine the average energy savings, we calculate a 
weighted average based upon the fraction of the population with gas or electric water heater. 
Table 14. Changes in customer energy and wastewater costs per device. 
Efficiency Measure 
Changes in O&M Costs (per device) 
Device 
Lifetime 
(years) 
Wastewater 
($/yr) 
Energy 
If Water Heated 
by Electricity 
($/yr) 
If Water 
Heated by 
Natural Gas 
($/year) 
Residential Toilet (1.28 gpf) 
$0.66 
   
   
25 
Showerhead (1.5 gpm) 
$0.76 
$14.27 
$6.43 
  
Residential front-loading 
clothes washer 
$6.44 
$74.92 
$28.93 
16 
Faucet aerator (1.5 gpm)  
$0.62 
$5.17 
$2.33 
  
Pre-rinse spray valves 
$39.60 
$998.26 
$370.92 
Connectionless food 
steamer 
$158.40 
$621.31  
$375.22    
12   
Commercial dishwasher 
$49.50 
$1,961.37 
$683.39 
Commercial clothes washer 
$15.70 
$48.09 
$16.86    
11   
Commercial urinal (0.5 gpf) 
$2.32 
25 
Commercial toilet (1.28 gpf) 
$13.48 
25   
Cooling tower pH 
controllers 
$1,284.60 
Pressurized water brooms 
  
Replace lawn with low-
water-use plants 
15 
Note: For residential customers, we assume a price of $1.22 per therm for natural gas (EIA 2010a) and $0.15 per 
kWh for electricity (EIA 2010b). For commercial customers, we assume a price of $1.12 per therm for natural gas 
(EIA 2010a) and $0.14 per kWh for electricity (EIA 2010b). We assume an average wastewater rate in California of 
$0.99 per thousand gallons (Fisher et al. 2008). 
2
See Chapter 5 of Gleick et al. 2003 for a detailed discussion of the economics of water conservation and efficiency 
improvements. 
19 
For most devices, we assume that the customer was in the market for a new device, and thus the 
cost is the cost difference between a new standard and new efficient device. For some devices, 
including faucet aerators, cooling tower pH controllers, water brooms, replacing lawn with low-
water-use plants, and all of the agricultural measures, however, we assume that the customer 
would not have made the investment otherwise, and thus the cost is the full cost of the device. 
We conducted a literature review to estimate the device lifetime and cost. We also include the 
administrative cost for running a rebate program, which typically varies from about 10% to 30% 
of the rebate cost, depending on the measure under consideration (Table 15).  
Table 15. Cost data for selected urban water conservation and efficiency measures 
Conservation Measure 
Device Cost ($/device) 
Incremental 
Cost  
Incremental 
Plus 
Administrative 
Cost 
Efficient  
Standard 
Residential toilet (1.28 gpf) 
$  200  
 150  
 50  
 63  
Showerhead (1.5 gpm) 
 40  
 20  
 20  
 25  
Residential front-loading clothes 
washer  
$ 750  
 492  
$ 258  
$  323  
Faucet aerator (1.5 gpm)  
 8  
 -    
 8  
$ 10 
Restaurant pre-rinse spray valve 
(1.0 gpm) 
 70  
 50  
 20  
$ 25  
Connectionless food steamer 
 6,000  
$2,500 (elec.); 
$3,800 
(natural gas)  
$  3,228  
$ 4,035  
Commercial dishwasher 
$  9,000 
$  6,950 
$  2,050 
$  2,563 
Commercial front-loading 
clothes washer  
$  750  
$ 492  
$ 258  
$  323  
Commercial urinal (0.5 gpf) 
$ 550  
  540  
$ 10  
 13  
Commercial toilet (1.28 gpf) 
$  200  
 150  
$ 50  
 63  
Cooling tower pH controller 
$ 2,250  
$   -    
$  2,250  
$  2,813  
Pressurized water broom 
$ 250  
$   -    
$ 250  
$ 313  
Replace 1 acre of lawn with low-
water-use plants 
$ 43,560  
$   -    
$ 43,560  
$ 54,450  
Note: Costs shown for showerheads and faucet aerators are based upon replacing all devices within a 
single home. We assume that there are two devices per household. 
20 
References 
Allen, R.G., L.S. Pereira, D. Raes, M. Smith. (1998). Crop Evapotranspiration: Guidelines for 
Computing Crop Water Requirements. FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56. United 
Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome.  
Brouwer, C., K. Prins, and M. Heibloem. (1989). Irrigation Water Management: Irrigation 
Scheduling. FAO Training Manual No. 4.  
Brown and Caldwell Consultants. (1984). Residential Water Conservation Projects: Summary 
Report. Prepared for U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy 
Development and Research. Report HUD-PDR-903. Washington, D.C. 
California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC). (2010). MOU Compliance Policies 
and BMP Guidebook. Savings approved at the August 13, 2010 Board meeting. 
California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC). (2009). MOU Compliance Policy and 
BMP Guidebook. Savings approved at the August 13, 2009 Board meeting. 
California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC). (2005). Rinse & Save: Final Report 
Summary. 
http://www.cuwcc.org/Uploads/product/CPUC_Reports/CPUC_Phase_I_Final_Report.pdf 
Chow, V.T. (1964). Handbook of Applied Hydrology, McGraw Hill. 
Costello, L.R. and K.S. Jones. (1994). Water Use Classification of Landscape Species. 
University of California Cooperative Extension. Retrieved on August 29, 2010, from 
http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/filelibrary/1726/15359.pdf 
Daly, C., M. Halbleib, J.I. Smith, W.P. Gibson, M.K. Doggett, G.H. Taylor, J. Curtis, and P.A. 
Pasteris. (2008). Physiographically-sensitive mapping of temperature and precipitation across the 
conterminous United States. International Journal of Climatology, 28: 2031-2064. 
DeOreo, W.B., P.W. Mayer, L. Martien, M. Hayden, A. Funk, M. Kramer-Duffield, R. Davis, J. 
Henderson, B. Raucher, P.H. Gleick, H. Cooley, and M. Heberger. (2010). California Single 
Family Water Use Efficiency Study. Draft report. Aquacraft, Stratus Consulting, and the Pacific 
Institute. 
Department of Water Resources (DWR). (2009). Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance. 
Sacramento, California. Retrieved on August 25, 2010, from 
http://www.water.ca.gov/wateruseefficiency/landscapeordinance/. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested