how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy text from pdf without formatting SDK software project winforms windows .net UWP Excel33-part205

Instructions for exercise8.4
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 deposit labels for 
π
, phase angle 
, offset ε, noise amplitude na, and average.
Use A2 through C2 for associated numerical values.
In row 4 deposit labels for x, ref. (for the reference sine wave), sqw(x) (where sqw is
shorthand for square wave), signal, and rect.signal.
Fill A6:A406 with 0 (0.01) 4 times 
π
, using 
π
as stored in $A$2.
In B6:B406 compute the sine of the angle listed in column A. This will simulate the ref-
erence signal.
In C6 calculate the corresponding reference square wave. Conceptually the simplest
way to do so would be with=B6/ABS(B6), but this may cause trouble at the zero-
crossings of the sine wave. It is therefore preferable to use=IF(ABS(B6)
<1E-10,0,B6/ABS(B6)) or=IF(B6>1E-10,1,IF(B6<-1E-10,-1,0)) instead.
Copy this down to row 406.
In column D deposit Gaussian noise.
In column E compute the simulated signal as sin(x+
)+ε(where 
is the phase angle
in $B$2 and εthe offset in $C$2) together with some added noise (of amplitude con-
trolled by nain $D$2).
10 In row F calculate the synchronously rectified signal as the product of the terms in
columns C and E.
11 In cell D2 compute the average of the synchronously rectified signal as=
SUM(F6:F406)/400.
12 Make a graph showing these various signals, such as Fig. 8.4-1.
13 Vary the phase angle 
, the offset ε, and the noise amplitude na, and record the result-
ing changes in the average, in cell E2.
You will notice that the average is maintained reasonably well even for a
signal-to-noise ratio of 1. When the  averaging  is done  over  a  far  larger
number  of  cycles,  synchronous  detection  can  pull  otherwise  invisible
signals out of noise. The average is directly proportional to the cosine of the
phase angle 
between the signal and the reference.
Typical analytical applications of lock-in amplification occur in atomic
absorption spectrometry, where it lets us discriminate between emission
and  absorption  at  the  very  same  wavelength,  and  in  classical  infrared
spectrometry, where the light sources are of low intensity, the detectors have
low sensitivity, and all surrounding materials radiate as well. By mechani-
cally chopping(i.e., interrupting) the beam from the light source at, e.g., 13
Hz, and by using a reference signal tied to the rotating chopper blades, an
8.4 Lock-in amplification
317
Copy text from pdf without formatting - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract pdf text to word; extract text from pdf online
Copy text from pdf without formatting - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract highlighted text from pdf; copy pdf text to word
infrared spectrometer ignores  the heat  emitted  by  its human  operator,
unless that operator can nimbly dance back and forth at 13 Hz, while also
staying in phase with the chopper blades.
8.5
Data smoothing
‘Noisy’ experimental data sometimes need to be smoothed. In this context,
smoothing is not meant to be the drawing of a continuous curve, with con-
tinuous derivatives, through all available points, as can be done in Excel
simply by double-clicking on a curve and using the command sequence
Format Data Series  Patterns  Sm
oothed Line. That method works well
for presenting an inherently smooth theoretical curve based on relatively
few data points, see Figs. 1.3-1 and 1.3-2, but is of little use for noisy experi-
mentaldata, because the curve goes through all points, and thereby tends to
emphasize the noise.
Instead, we mean here the use of experimental data that can be expected
to lie on a smooth curve but fail to do so as the result of measurement uncer-
tainties. Whenever the data are equidistant (i.e., taken at constant incre-
ments of the independent variable) and the errors are random and follow a
single Gaussian distribution, the least-squares method is appropriate, con-
venient,  and  readily  implemented  on  a  spreadsheet.  In  section  3.3  we
already encountered this procedure, which is based on least-squares fitting
of the data to a polynomial, and uses so-called convoluting integers. This
method is, in fact, quite old, and goes back to work by Sheppard (Proc. 5
th
318
Standard mathematical operations
Fig.8.4-1,from top to bottom:A reference sine wave, the same converted into a square
wave, a noisy sine wave signal, and the same as multiplied by the square wave. In this
example, the average value of the bottom curve (displayed in color) is within 3% of its
value in the absence of noise.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing formatting
cut and paste text from pdf document; erase text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
high-fidelity PDF to Word conversion without depending on All PDF pages can be converted to separate In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source
extract text from pdf with formatting; copy text from locked pdf
Congress of Math., Cambridge (1912) II p. 348; Proc.London Math.Soc. (2) 13
(1914) 97) and Sherriff(Proc.Roy.Soc. Edinburgh40 (1920) 112), which soon
thereafter found its way into the well-known textbook on numerical analysis
by E. Whittaker and G. Robinson, The Calculus of Observations,a Treatise on
Numerical Mathematics, Blackie & Sons, 2nd ed. (1924) p. 290. By and large,
however, the community of analytical chemists only became aware of this
method more than half a century later, through a paper by Savitzky & Golay
(Anal.Chem. 36 (1964) 1627).
Even though least-squares methods are sometimes considered to be
‘objective’, there are still two subjective choices to be made in this applica-
tion of data fitting to a moving polynomial: what length of polynomial to
use, and what polynomial order. Typically, the longer the polynomial, and
the lower its order, the more smoothing is obtained, but the larger is the
risk of introducing systematic distortion. For example, the Savitzky–Golay
tables for smoothing allow data sets up to 25 points long (only odd
numbers of data points are used, so that the smoothed data can replace
the noisy ones) and offer several choices for polynomial order, such as
quadratic & cubic or quartic & quintic. Sherriff already presented convo-
lutingintegersfor longer datasetsas well asfor higher-order polynomials.
The tables of convoluting integers listed by Savitzky and Golay contained
a large number of errors, and were subsequently corrected by Steinier et al.
(Anal.Chem. 44 (1972) 1906). Subsequently, Madden (Anal. Chem. 50 (1978)
1383) gave simple formulas for them, so that these numbers are now readily
calculated on a computer. Recently, Barak (Anal. Chem. 67 (1995) 2758)
extended the method by letting the program self-optimize the polynomial
order, so that the user only needs to select the length (i.e., the number of
data points) of the moving polynomial, and specify the upper limit of the
polynomial order. This program, kindly provided by Prof. Barak, is described
in section 10.9.
Below we will use a simple example to explain the principle of the stan-
dard, non-self-optimizing method. Say that we have five data pairs x,y such
that the x-values are equidistant, with a nearest-neighbor distance 
. For
any  odd-numbered set  of equidistant  data (such  as the five  considered
here), the x-value in the middle of the set is the average x¯ of the x-values in
the set. We now start by subtracting x¯ from all five x-values, so that the new
x-values will be –2
, –
, 0, 
, and 2
.
Now we are ready to use the least-squares analysis. In our example we will
fit the five data pairs (shifted as just explained in the x-direction by the
amount -x¯ ) to a parabola, i.e., to y= a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x
2
. The general formulas
for doing that were given in section 3.2, and are here repeated as:
x
4
x
3
x
2
y
a
0
=
x
3
x
2
xy

D
(8.5-1)
x
2
x
y
8.5 Data smoothing
319
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
copy text from pdf in preview; export text from pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting in C#.NET Class. Convert
extract pdf text to excel; cut and paste text from pdf
x
4
x
2
y
x
2
a
1
=
x
3
xy
x

D
(8.5-2)
x
2
y
N
x
2
y
x
3
x
2
a
2
=
xy
x
2
x

D
(8.5-3)
xy
x
N
x
4
x
3
x
2
D=
x
3
x
2
x
(8.5-4)
x
2
x
N
While these equations look rather formidable, they are readily simplified
for our set of equidistant data centered around x=0 (because we subtracted
). First we consider the expression for Din (8.5-4). It only contains terms in
x, and several of these are zero. Specifically, since the data are equidistant in
x, all sums of odd powers of xmust be zero, i.e., ∑x=-2
-
+0+
+2
=0
and ∑x
3
=(-2
)
3
+(-
)
3
+(
)
3
+(2
)
3
=0. Furthermore, since we know the
x-values (they are -2
, -
, 0, 
, and 2
), we can evaluate the remaining
sums as ∑x
4
=(-2
)
4
+(-
)
4
+(
)
4
+(2
)
4
=(16+1+1+16) 
4
=34
4
, ∑x
2
=(-2
)
2
+(-
)
2
+(
)
2
+(2
)
2
=(4+1+1+4)
2
=10
2
 and  N=5.  The
entire expression for D therefore reduces to (34
4
)×(10
2
)×(5)-(10
2
(10
2
) × (10
2
)=(1700-1000) 
6
=700
6
:
34
4
0
10
2
D=
0
10
2
0
=700
6
(8.5-5)
10
2
0
5
Now look at the expression for a
0
in (8.5-1). It has the same type of terms as
D, plus some terms with y, but the latter contain y only to unit power. As
before, ∑x=0, ∑x
3
=0, ∑x
4
=34
4
, and ∑x
2
=10
2
. That leaves three terms,
in the right-most column of (8.5-1), which we evaluate as follows: ∑y=y
–2
+
y
–1
+y
0
+y
1
+y
2
, ∑xy=(-2y
–2
-y
–1
+y
1
+2y
2
, and ∑x
2
y=(4y
–2
+y
–1
+y
1
+4y
2
2
. Thus, (8.5-1) becomes
34
4
0
(4y
–2
+y
–1
+y
1
+4y
2
)
2
a
0
=
0
10
2
(-y
–2
-y
–1
+y
1
+y
2
)

700
6
10
2
0
y
–2
+y
–1
+y
0
+y
1
+y
2
x
320
Standard mathematical operations
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from Excel in C#.NET framework.
extract all text from pdf; c# get text from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
copying text from pdf into word; get text from pdf file c#
(8.5-6)
Consequently we have simplified the entire expression for a
0
to a set of
integer coefficients with which to multiply the various y-values. Now, when
we need to smooth the data set, this is all we need. We simply replace the
y-value at the central; point, y
0
, by the value calculated at x=x
0
for the
parabola, i.e., by a
calc
=a
0
+a
1
x
0
+a
2
x
0
2
=a
0
since x
0
=0.
The same method that reduces (8.5-1) to (8.5-6) can be used to identify a
1
and a
2
. For example, we can find the value of the first derivative of the func-
tion  as  (dy
calc
/dx)
x=0
=(a
1
+a
2
x)
x=0
=a
1
 and  its  second  derivative  as
(d
2
y
calc
/dx
2
)
x=0
=2a
2
.
Consequently  there  are  separate  tables  of  convoluting  integers  for
smoothing to a quadratic, for finding the first derivative of a quadratic, and
for finding its second derivative, all with different entries for data sets con-
taining 5, 7, 9, 11, etc. points. Once the required value is computed, we drop
the first point of the data set, add a new one (i.e., we slide the five-point
sample past the original data set) and start again, using the same coeffi-
cients. This makes the method ideally suited for spreadsheet use. Note that,
in all these applications, we do not need the value of  . However, there are
also some cases where  is required, as when we use this method for interpo-
lation, see section 10.2.
Now that we understand how the method works, at least in principle, we
will take a sine wave, add Gaussian noise, and explore the result of least-
squares smoothing.
Instructions for exercise 8.5
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 enter labels for the increment ∆x, and the noise amplitude na.
In row 2 enter corresponding numbers, e.g., 0.02*Pi() and 0.2.
In row 4 deposit labels for x, sin(x), noise, and the sum s+n of the sine wave and na
times the noise.
Starting in cell A6 calculate x=0 (∆x) 7. For ∆x=0.02
π
the column will then extend to
A117.
x
x
=
-3y
–2
+12y
–1
+17y
0
+12y
1
-3y
2
35
=
(-60y
–2
+240y
–1
+340y
0
+240y
1
-60y
2
)
6
700
6
=
(34
4
) (10
2
) (y
–2
+y
–1
+y
0
+y
1
+y
2
)-((4y
–2
+y
–1
+y
1
+4y
2
)
2
)(10
2
)(10
2
)
700
2
8.5 Data smoothing
321
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
cut text from pdf document; copy text from protected pdf to word
In column B compute sin(x), in C deposit ‘normal’ noise of unit standard deviation and
zero mean, and in D calculate sin(x) plus the product of the noise amplitude (in B2)
and the noise (in C6:C117).
First we will use a five-point quadratic as our moving polynomial. For this, the tables
list the convoluting integers as -3, 12, 17, 12, and -3, and the normalizing factor as 35,
see (8.5-6). In cell E8 therefore deposit the instruction=(-3*D6+12*D7+17*D8+
12*D9-3*D10)/35, and copy this down to E115. We start in cell E8, and stop in cell
E115, because a five-point polynomial needs two points before, and two points past,
the midpoint where it computes its result.
In column F we will use a 15-point quadratic, for which the convoluting integers are
-78, -13, 42, 87, 122, 147, 162, 167, 162, 147, 122, 87, 42, -13, -78, with a normalizing
factor of 143. We therefore deposit the instruction=(-78*D6-13*D7+42*D8+
87*D9+122*D10+147*D11+162*D12+167*D13+162*D14+147*D15+122*D16+
87*D17+42*D18-13*D19-78*D20) /143 in cell F13. Copy this down to cell 110. Note
that, for a 15-point polynomial, we now must leave 7 points free on either side.
Likewise, in column G, use a 25-point quadratic, for which the convoluting integers are
-253, -138, -33, 62, 147, 222, 287, 342, 387, 422, 447, 462, 467, 462, 447, 422, 387, 342,
287, 222, 147, 62, -33, -138, -253, while the corresponding normalizing factor is
5175. Place the corresponding instruction=(-253* D6-138*D7-
-253*D30)/5175
in G18, then copy it down to cell 105, since we must leave 12 points free on either side
for a 25-point polynomial.
10 Plot graphs of B, D, E, F, and G versus A, or combine them in one graph by giving the
data in columns E, F and G an offset of, say, +1, +2, and+ 3 respectively, together with
reference curves which reproduce the data in B with the same offsets.
11 Figure 8.5-1 illustrates what you might see using separate plots. As it happens in this
example, the initial noise is mostly positive. Consequently, the smoothed curves start
too high. Remember: even perfectly random noise only averages out to zero for a suffi-
ciently large set. As you can see here, even a 25-point data set is clearly not large
enough. Of course, your noise data will be different.
Of the various methods described here, signal averaging does not intro-
duce distortion (as long as the instrumental settings don’t drift) and requires
no assumptions as to the nature of the noise. On the other hand, it is a rather
time-consuming way to remove noise, since each point is averaged individ-
ually.  Least-squares  smoothing  of  equidistant  data  assumes  a  relation
between neighboring data, and can therefore be much faster than signal
averaging, at the risk of distorting the underlying signal.
As described in chapter 7, Fourier transformation can provide another
way to smooth these equidistant data, by first transforming the data, then
setting the predominantly noise-related frequencies to zero, followed by
322
Standard mathematical operations
8.5 Data smoothing
323
Fig.8.5-1,from top to bottom:A sine wave with Gaussian noise (black circles), and the
same after filtering with a 5-, 15-, and 25-point quadratic polynomial. The noise-free
sine wave is shown in color.
inverse  transformation.  In  the  above  example,  Fourier  transformation
would be very easy indeed, because the noise-free signal is a single sine
wave. An advantage of this approach is that no points are lost at the edges; a
disadvantage (at least with the FFT macro provided here) is that the number
of data points must be an integer power of 2, e.g., 128.
8.6
Peak fitting
Many spectrometric peaks can be described reasonably well in terms of one
of two model peak shapes, those of a Gaussian and of a Lorentzian  (or
Cauchy) peak. Leaving out the  normalizing factors as immaterial in the
present context, the Gaussian peak can be described as
(8.6-1)
where A is the amplitude, B specifies the location of the peak center, and C
controls the peak width. The full width at half height of the peak is given by
w
1
2
=2C√ln2 ≈1.665
1
C, and the peak area by AC√
π
≈1.772
5
AC.
Likewise we can write the Lorentzian peak shape as
(8.6-2)
for which we find the peak height A, the center of the peak at x=B, the full
peak width at half height as w
1
2
=2C, and the peak area as 
π
AC.
Lorentzians are much wider at their base than Gaussian peaks of the same
area and height. Mixtures of them can be used to obtain a single peak with
variable profile, such as the weighted sum of a Gaussian and a Lorentzian,
(8.6-3)
where the weighting factor f is an additional, adjustable variable with a
value ranging from 0 to 1. Alternatively, one can use a weighted product of a
Gaussian and a Lorentzian. Other combinations are also possible; e.g., in the
theory of absorption of a Doppler-broadened line one encounters the con-
volution of a Gaussian and a Lorentzian.
Instructions for exercise 8.6
Open a new spreadsheet.
Enter labels for A, B, C and area in row 1, and enter corresponding values in row 2, such
as A=1, B=5, and C=1.
y=f A exp
-(x-B)
2
C
2
+
(1-f )A
1+(x-B)
2
/C
2
y=
A
1+(x-B)
2
/C
2
y=A exp
-(x-B)
2
C
2
324
Standard mathematical operations
In row 4 deposit the column headings x and Gaussian.
In A6:A106 place the numbers 0 (0.1) 10.
In column B calculate a Gaussian according to (8.6-1).
In cell D2 calculate the area as=0.1*SUM(B6:B106), and compare your answer with
the theoretical result AC√
π
≈1.772
5
AC.
Use two cells, A6 and B6, to determine the half-width w
1
2
using Goal Seek. First deposit
the value 4.5 in A6, call T
ools G
oal Seek, then Set cell B6 To value 0.5 By changing cell
A6. You will find x=4.167445 (had you started elsewhere, you might have found the
other value, x=5.832555) from which the half-width follows as 2×(5 -4.167445) or
2×(5.832555 -5)=1.6651.
In C6:C106 calculate a Lorentzian according to (8.6-2).
It is easy to verify that w
1
2
=2Cby inspection, since that implies that the function has
the value 0.5 at both B-Cand B+C.
10 It is not so easy to determine its area: merely determining 0.1×SUM (C6:C106) comes
up far short of 
π
=3.1416.
11 Make a graph of B6:C106 vs. A6:A106. This immediately shows why the area is not cal-
culated correctly: the Lorentzian peak has such wide tails that summation over merely
five half-widths is not enough.
12 Therefore extend the table to row 956, and then determine halfthe area as
0.1× SUM(C56:C1056). This time the answer is closer, 1.5608, but it is still not the
1.5708 one expects. Even going out to 100 half-widths is not quite enough for the
numerical integration of a Lorentzian!
Another expression with variable band shape is
(8.6-4)
y=
A
{1+(2
a
-1)(x-B)
2
/C
2
}
1/a
8.6 Peak fitting
325
Fig.8.6-1:A Gaussian curve (colored) and a Lorentzian curve (black), each with A=1,
B=5, and C=1.
where 0<a<2. This curve is Lorentzian for a=1, and is even wider at the
base than a Lorentzian for 1<a<2. It has a half-width of 2C, and an area of
AC
(1/a-1/2) /{
(1/a)}. For a2 the area under the curve is
infinite. Figure 8.6-2 shows this function for various values of a.
Not all experimental peaks are symmetrical around their center, and there
are various  schemes  to generate  skewed curves to  fit such  asymmetric
experimental data. For example, Losev (Applied Spectrosc. 48 (1994) 1289)
used a function of the form
(8.6-5)
where A, a, b, and care positive numbers. The parameters Aand cdetermine
the height and x-position of the peak respectively, while a and b control its
shape. The peak has a maximum of height aa/(a+b) bb/(a+b)/(a+b), at a dis-
tance  [ln(a/b)]/(a+b)  from  c,  and  an  area 
π
A/{(a+b)  cos[
1
2
π
(a-b)/
(a+b)]}. Figure 8.6-3 shows what it can look like. By exchanging the values of
aand bthe curves in Fig. 8.6-3 can be skewed towards the other side.
Figure 8.6-4 illustrates a curve calculated with another expression,
y=
for 1+s(x-B)/C>0
y=0
for 1+s(x-B)/C0
(8.6-6)
which has a skewness parameter s, where the sign of s determines in which
direction the curve is stretched. When s tends to 0, the curve approaches a
Gaussian.  (Setting  s equal  to  0  will  lead  to  the  well-known  problems
A exp
-
ln[1+s(x-B)/C ]
s
2
y=
A
exp[-a(x-c)]+exp[b(x-c)]
√2
a
-1
π
326
Standard mathematical operations
Fig.8.6-2:Curves with adjustable band shape according to 8.6-4, computed with
A=C=1, B=5, and a=1×10
–6
(black curve), 0.5 (colored), 1.0 (black), and 1.9
(colored) respectively. For reference, a Gaussian is shown as a thin black curve inside the
others (close to the curve for a=1×10
–6
).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested