how to display pdf file in asp.net c# : Extract text from pdf to word software application dll windows winforms asp.net web forms Excel34-part206

associated with dividing zero by zero; we therefore use the series expansion
ln [1+s(x-B)/C]≈s(x-B)/C-
1
2
[s(x-B)/C]
2
+
to obtain the limit for s
→0 as y=Aexp[(x-B)
2
/C
2
], which is indeed Gaussian.) For -2<s<2 the
area under this curve is finite, and is given by (AC √
π
) exp[s
2
/(4 ln 2)].
For more information on fitting model expressions to peak-shaped
experimental curves you might want to consult the review by Fraser &
Suzuki in J. A. Blackburn, ed., Spectral Analysis:Methods and Techniques,
Dekker, 1970, from which some of the above discussion was abstracted.
8.6 Peak fitting
327
Fig.8.6-3:Curves with adjustable asymmetry according to 8.6-5, computed with A=1,
c=5, and a=b=2 (thick black curve), a=3, b=1 (colored curve), and a=3.5, b=0.5
(thin black curve).
Fig.8.6-4:A skewed ‘Gaussian’ curve with s=-1.5 (colored) together with the
symmetrical Gaussian and Lorentzian curves (black), all with A=1, B=5, C=1.
Extract text from pdf to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
cut and paste text from pdf document; extract text from pdf
Extract text from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
acrobat remove text from pdf; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
8.7
Integration
Integration of peak areas is often used to obtain precise values for the con-
centrations of sample components. Many elegant methods have been
devised to integrate analytical functions, but few of these are readily trans-
ferable to discrete, experimental data points. Fortunately, integration by
summation of the areas of trapezoids of height (y
i
+y
i+1
)/2 times width
(x
i+1
-x
i
) often suffices, and is readily implemented on a spreadsheet. When
the signal is available in Fourier-transformed form, integration can be
implemented by multiplying all components of the Fourier transform by j
before inverse transformation.
We will now use the last part of spreadsheet exercise 6.7 to illustrate some
of the practical problems of integration. In exercise 6.7 we computed the area
A, retention time t
r
, and standard deviation 
σ
r
of a simulated chromato-
graphic peak, based on (6.7-1) through (6.7-3). For 
μ
=0.2, the simulated
peak had its maximum value at a retention time of about 120, and its long-
time tail (where the response still made a significant contribution to the inte-
gral) reached well beyond t=200. Since the calculation did not extend
beyond t=200, some of that tail was missed, and the integral was too low. As
a consequence, we found t
r
=119.90 instead of 120. Once we understand the
origin of this problem, its possible remedy is clear: extend the computation
to larger values of t. Indeed, by extending the spreadsheet of Fig. 6.5-1 to row
306 (i.e., to t=200) we obtain A=1.00, t
r
=120.00, 
μ
t
r
=24.00, 
σ
r
=21.90, and
N
p
=23.99. Even longer times twould be needed for, say, 
μ
=0.1, where the
peak maximum (at t
r
=240) already fell outside the earlier-used time range.
For large values of 
μ
we encountered another difficulty: the number of
simulated points was too small to use a simple trapezoidal integration. For
example, at 
μ
=0.9, we had only about ten points that make a significant
contribution to the peak. Even though this was a simulation, we could not
increase the point density, because t=1 is the smallest step size of the
model; in many practical integrations, the step size may be limited by
instrumental factors and likewise be fixed. In computing the standard devi-
ation this difficulty was exacerbated because we calculated 
σ
r
2as the differ-
ence between two larger numbers.
When we have too few points to justify linearizing the function between
adjacent points (as the trapezoidal integration does) we can use an algo-
rithm based on a higher-order polynomial, which thereby can more faith-
fully  represent  the  curvature  of  the  function  between  adjacent
measurement points. The Newton–Cotes method does just that for equidis-
tant points, and is a moving polynomial method with fixed coefficients, just
as the Savitzky–Golay method used for smoothing and differentation dis-
cussed in sections 8.5 and 8.8. For example, the formula for the area under
the curve between x
1
and x
n+1
is
328
Standard mathematical operations
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
extract pdf text to word; find and replace text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
extract pdf text to excel; c# get text from pdf
8.7 Integration
329
Table 8.7-1:The coefficients for Newton–Cotes integration of equidistant
points.
Order n Coefficients c
i
Denominator
1
1, 1
∑c
i
=2
2
1, 4, 1
6
3
1, 3, 3, 1
8
4
7, 32, 12, 32, 7
90
5
19, 75, 50, 50, 75, 19
288
6
41, 216, 27, 272, 27, 216, 41
840
7
751, 3577, 1323, 2989, 2989, 1323, 3577, 751
17280
8
989, 5888, -928, 10496, -4540, 10496, -928, 5888, 989
28350
f(x)dx=n
 
c
i
f(x
i
)
c
i
(8.7-1)
where the function f(x) is defined at n+1 equidistant x-values in terms of
the coefficients c
i
, and 
is the spacing of adjacent points on the x-axis. For
example, the integral for a five-point fit (so that n=5-1=4) of data with an
x-spacing of 0.1 is
f(x)dx=4×0.1×[7f(x
1
)+32f(x
2
)+12f(x
3
)+32f(x
4
)+7f(x
5
)]/90 (8.7-2)
where  the  coefficients  are  7,  32,  12,  32,  and  7,  with  a  sum  of
7+32+12+32+7=90. This is a very convenient form for spreadsheet use.
Other Newton–Cotes coefficients are listed in Table 8.7-1. Exercise 8.7 illus-
trates its application.
Note that the trapezoidal rule is the first-order member of this method. In
the above example, fourth-order Newton–Cotes integration for 
μ
=0.9
yields A=1.00, t
r
=26.67, 
μ
t
r
=24.00, 
σ
r
=1.72, and N
p
=24.00. In fact,
almost equally accurate results can already be obtained with a second-order
Newton–Cotes fit.
Instructions for exercise 8.7
Open a new spreadsheet.
In A1 enter the label k=, in B1 a value such as 0.3, in C1 the label 
=, and in D1 a corre-
sponding numerical value, e.g., 1.
In row 3 enter the labels t, exp, integral, n=1, and n=4 respectively.
5
1
n+1
i=1
n+1
i=1
n+1
1
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
copy text from scanned pdf to word; extract highlighted text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
get text from pdf into excel; copy text from pdf reader
330
Standard mathematical operations
In A5 deposit a zero, in A6 the instruction =A5+$D$1, in B5 the instruction
=EXP($B$1*A5), and in B6 the instruction =EXP($B$1*A6).
In C6 compute the integral, =(1/$B$1)*(B6-$B$5).
In D6 integrate by the trapezoidal rule as =D5+(A6 -A5)*(B6+B5)/2.
Copy the instructions to cells in A6:D6 down to row 25.
Now go to E9 and deposit there the instruction =4*$D$1*(7*B5+32*B6
+12*B7+32*B8+7*B9)/90.
In cell E13 deposit the instruction =E9+4*$D$1*(7*B9 +32*B10+12*B11
+32*B12+7*B13)/90, then copy this instruction to cells E17, E21, and E25.
10 Compare the results of the integration in D25 and E25 with the exact result in C25.
11 Change the value of 
in D1 to 0.1, and verify that result of the integration remains
correct upon changing the x-spacing.
12 Change the value of 
to 10, in order to see the limitations of approximating an expo-
nential in terms of a fourth-order polynomial y=a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x2+a
3
x3+a
4
x4.
A third common source of difficulties in numerical integrations is trunca-
tion error, observed when parameters are carried through the computation
to an insufficient number of digits. Fortunately, the automatic double preci-
sion of the spreadsheet greatly reduces the importance of truncation errors,
so that they only seldom need to be considered. When the integration is per-
formed off-screen, in a function or in a macro, the computation should be
specified to use double precision.
Integration is relatively insensitive to noise, but is very sensitive to bias or
offset, such as may result from an incorrect zero setting of the measuring
instrument, or from some other phenomenon affecting the baseline. That
integration is relatively insensitive to noise is readily seen when we consider
noise in terms of its Fourier-analyzed components, i.e.,
[F(t)+noise+offset]dt=
[F(t)+
sin(
t+
)+
cos(
t+
)+C]dt
=
[F(t)dt-
cos(
t+
)+
sin(
t+
)+C dt
(8.7-3)
where we have replaced the offset by a constant, C, and neglected the inte-
gration constants of the noise components sin(
t+
) and cos (
t+
),
assuming that the noise averages out to zero. We see from (8.7-3) that the
effect of noise on the integral is attenuated by a factor 
, the angular fre-
quency of that particular noise component. Consequently, the higher the
noise frequency with respect to the dominant frequencies in the function
F(t), the less it will affect the integral. For most experimental data encoun-
1
1
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
get text from pdf online; extracting text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
copy text from pdf; copy text from pdf without formatting
tered in chemical analysis, the noise is mostly at frequencies higherthan the
dominant frequencies of the signal, in which case integration reduces their
relative importance. However, we have no such luck with baseline correc-
tions, instrumental offset and baseline drift, and so-called “pink noise”, all of
which typically occur at frequencies belowthose of the signal. These often
contribute to the integral in direct proportion to the integration interval,
even when parts of that interval may not contain much signal. Therefore the
integration interval is often taken as small as possible, although this might
introduce systematic errors in functions with a ‘wide footprint’, such as
Lorentzian peaks, see the top panel in Fig. 3.3-2.
Even more severe problems arise when we need to integrate areas under
overlapping peaks. In that case, it is often not the mechanics of integration
that limit the reliability of the results, but the applicability of models that
describe the underlying peak shapes, see section 8.6. On the other hand,
separating adjacent integration domains by using as domain boundary the
minimum in a saddle point between two partially overlapping peaks, can
lead to serious systematic errors in both integrals.
8.8
Di≈erentiation
Differentiation is the counterpoint of integration: it is less sensitive to drift
and offset at frequencies below those of the signal, but is more strongly
affected by noise at frequencies above those of the signal itself. This follows
directly from the model used in section 8.6, because
[F(t)+noise+offset]=
F(t)+
sin(
t+
)+
cos(
t+
)+C
=
+
cos(
t+
)-
sin(
t+
) (8.8-1)
where the effect of the constant offset has disappeared (because dC/dt=0)
but that of the various noise components is magnified by the multipliers 
.
As a consequence, differentiation of experimental data must usually be
combined with noise filtering, and then suffers from the signal distortion
resulting from such filtering.
The Savitzky–Golay method combines filtering with single or multiple
differentiation in one operation. Moreover, as we have already seen in
section 8.5, it is very convenient for spreadsheet use. In the spreadsheet
exercise we will differentiate a noisy sine wave and compare the result with
its analytical derivative, a cosine. Then we will compute the second deriva-
tive, and again compare the result with the theoretical second derivative, an
inverted sine wave. We could also compute that second derivative stepwise,
as the derivative of the derivative, but the present route is simpler and loses
fewer points at the edges.
dF(t)
dt
d
dt
d
dt
8.8 Di≈erentiation
331
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract single or multiple pages from adobe The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors
copy and paste text from pdf; delete text from pdf preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to copy and paste pdf text; extract text from pdf java
332
Standard mathematical operations
Instructions for exercise 8.8
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 enter labels for the increment ∆x, and for the noise amplitude na.
In row 2 enter corresponding numbers, e.g., 0.02
π
and 0.
In row 4 deposit labels for x, sin(x), cos(x), -sin(x), noise, the sum s+n of the sine wave
and the noise, the first derivative, and the second derivative. (When you try to enter
-sin(x), Excel will interpret this as a number. In order to make it a label, highlight the
cell, and use Fo
rmat Cells Number Text, or precede the instruction by an apos-
trophe.)
In cells A6:A117 calculate x=0 ( increment ) 6.974.
In columns B through D compute sin(x), cos(x) and -sin(x), in column E deposit
‘normal’ noise of unit standard deviation and zero mean, and in F calculate sin(x) plus
the product of the noise amplitude (in B2) and the noise (in E6:E117).
For the first derivative, using a five-point quadratic as our moving polynomial, the
tables list the convoluting integers as -2, -1, 0, 1, and 2, and the normalizing factor as
10 times the increment ∆x. In cell G8 therefore deposit the instruction=(-2*F6-F7
+F9+2*F10)/(10*$B$2), and copy this down to G115.
For a second derivative, calculated using a five-point quadratic, we have the convolut-
ing integers 2, -1, -2, -1, 2, with a normalizing factor 7(∆x)
2
. Therefore, in cell H8,
use=(2*F6-F7-2*F8-F9+2*F10)/(7*$B$2*$B$2) and copy this instruction down
to H115.
Plot rows D through H versus A.
10 Figure 8.8-1 illustrates that the second derivative will be much noisier than the first,
which in turn is much noisier than the data set in column D.
11 The noise can be reduced by using a longer polynomial, such as a 15-point or even a
25-point polynomial. The filtering is stronger, but artificial waves appear, with a period
of the polynomial length, as illustrated in Fig. 8.8-2.
As can be seen in Fig. 8.8-1, a hardly noticeable amount of noise in a func-
tion can lead to quite dramatic fluctuations in its second derivative.
When the experimental data are not equidistant, a moving polynomial fit
can still be used, but the convenience of the Savitzky–Golay method is lost.
In that case you may have to write a macro to fit a given data set to a poly-
nomial, and then change the cell addresses to make the polynomial move
along the curve. Consult chapter 10 in case you want to write your own
macros.
In chapter 7 we saw that Fourier transformation can also be used to differ-
entiate data. Just as the Savitzky–Golay method, Fourier transformation
8.8 Di≈erentiation
333
Fig.8.8-1:A sine wave with added noise (colored circles), its first derivative (black
circles) and its second derivative (black triangles), calculated using a five-point qua-
dratic. Noise amplitude used, from top to bottom: 0, 0.0003, 0.001, and 0.003.
334
Standard mathematical operations
Fig.8.8-2:A sine wave with added noise (colored circles), its first derivative (black
circles) and its second derivative (black triangles), calculated using a 15-point qua-
dratic. Noise amplitude used, from top to bottom: 0.003, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.10. 
needs equidistant data. Moreover, the FFT routines provided require that
the number of data points be an integer power of 2, and that the two ends
match in their values and derivatives. When those additional requirements
are met, FFT is a very powerful and efficient method, which provides com-
plete control over the noise filtering while differentiating. Moreover, with
FTT one does not lose any points near the edges of the data set.
However, no matter what method you will use, when you anticipate
having to differentiate experimental data, make sure that they have minimal
noise to start with, because differentiation always enhances noise, and all
noise reduction methods introduce distortion, which you will want to keep
to a minimum.
8.9
Semi-integration and semi-di≈erentiation
As our final example we will here describe a rather specialized method
useful in problems involving signal, heat, and mass transport, insofar as
these can be described by a partial differential equation of the type
y/t=a
2
y/x
2
where tis time, xis distance, and ais a constant. Depending
on the field, such equations are known as the telegraphers equation in com-
munication theory (where yis voltage or current, and ais the product of the
distributed resistance and the distributed capacitance along a transmission
line), the equation for heat conduction in physics (where yand arepresent
temperature and thermal conductivity respectively), or Fick’s law in chem-
istry and biology (where y stands for concentration, and a for diffusion
coefficient). Here we will specifically apply this method to planar diffusion
of electroactive species in solution.
In many electroanalytical experiments, diffusion is essentially planar and
semi-infinite, i.e., the equi-concentration planes are planar rather than
curved, and the concentration cat a sufficiently large distance from the elec-
trode, c
x→∞
, remains essentially constant during the experiment. If, more-
over, the experiment starts at a well-defined time t=0 with a uniform
concentration  throughout  the  cell,  then  the  interfacial concentration
difference u=c-c
x→∞
is the convolution of the diffusional flux J (the
amount of material passing per unit time through a unit cross-sectional
area) and 
, i.e.,
(8.9-1)
where the asterisk denotes a convolution (not to be mistaken for the pro-
grammer’s use of the same symbol for multiplication). The faradaic current
i
f
is directly proportional to the flux Jof the electroactive species at the elec-
trode/solution interface, the proportionality constant being nFA, where nis
the number of electrons involved in the electrode reaction, Fis the Faraday,
u=J*
1
π
Dt
1/
π
Dt
8.9 Semi-integration and semi-di≈erentiation
335
and Ais the electrode area. An equivalent way to describe (8.9-1) is in terms
of a semi-integral,
(8.9-2)
where the notation d
y/dt
of semi-integrationis the counterpart of
semi-differentiation, d
½
y/dt
½
, hence the name.
In their book Fundamentals of electrochemical science(Academic Press
1994) Oldham and Myland list two different algorithms for semi-integration,
of which we have used the more efficient one in section 10.10.
Semi-integration can be used to transform a linear sweep voltammo-
gram into the corresponding stationary current–voltage curve. Likewise,
semi-differentiation can be used for the inverse process, i.e., to convert a
stationary current–voltage curve into the corresponding linear sweep volt-
ammogram. Consequently, the extensive existing theory for the shapes of
polarographic waves for a variety of reaction mechanisms is readily applica-
ble to cyclic voltammetry.
8.10
Interpolation
Interpolating in a data set can often be done by fitting the existing data
points around the sought value to an appropriate function, and by then
using the parameters of that function to calculate the desired value. For
example, when the interpolation is to data within a segment that can be
described approximately by a parabola, you can fit the data to the parabola
y=a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x
2
, and then interpolate the value at the desired x-value x
1
as
y=a
0
+a
1
x
1
+a
2
x
1
2
. It is convenient to use a polynomial, since it will allow
you to use a least-squares routine.
Alternatively, you can use Solver to fit data to any analytical function of
your fancy, then use the fitting parameters to compute the function at any
given point within the range covered.
Whenyouhavemanydatatointerpolate,itisusuallymostconvenientto
fittheentiredatasetinthe regionofinteresttoanappropriateanalytical
expression,fromwhichyoucanthencalculateallrequireddata.Ifyouhave
noideawhatwouldbeanappropriatefunction,oryoucannotobtainarea-
sonably closefittothedata, asmall slidingpolynomialcrawlingoverthe
experimentaldatasetmayhavetobeusedinstead.TheInterpolatemacroof
section10.2allowsyoutofitamovingpolynomialof2n+1equidistant data
toaparabola.
In either case, make sure that you use more experimental data points than
adjustable parameters, and many more when the data are very noisy.
Locating the position of a peak maximum uses a similar approach, and only
differs in that one then does not prescribe the x-value but, instead, deter-
mines from the calculated parameters where the maximum occurs. For the
d
J
dt
u=
1
√D
336
Standard mathematical operations
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested