how to display pdf file in c# : .Net extract pdf text SDK control project wpf web page winforms UWP Excel35-part207

parabola y=a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x
2
, the extremum (maximum or minimum) occurs
at dy/dx=a
1
+2a
2
x=0 or x=-a
1
/2a
2
.
Fourier transformation can also be used for interpolation, provided that
the data are equidistant, and the sought values are located at fractions of ∆x
that are integer multiples of 1/2
n
where nis, again, an integer, see Fig. 7.2-4.
8.11
Matrix manipulation
Inthissectionwewillbrieflyreviewthemostsalientaspectsofmatrixalgebra,
insofarastheseareusedinsolvingsetsofsimultaneousequationswithlinear
coefficients. We already encountered the power and convenience of this
methodinsection6.2,andwewillusematricesagaininsection10.7,where
wewillseehowtheyformthebackboneofleastsquaresanalysis.Herewe
merelyprovideashortreview.Ifyouarenotalreadysomewhatfamiliarwith
matrices,thediscussiontofollowismostlikelytooshort,andyoumayhaveto
consultamathematicsbookforamoredetailedexplanation.Forthesakeof
simplicity,wewillrestrictourselvesheretotwo-dimensionalmatrices.
A two-dimensional matrix is a rectangular arrayof symbols, called coeffi-
cients, which are given double indices to specify their position in the array,
as in this example of an m-by-nmatrix
(8.11-1)
where mdenotes the number of rows, and nthe number of columns. (You
should memorize the order: first rows, then columns. As a mnemonic device,
just think of the basic electrical RCcircuit of a resistor and a capacitor.) We
usually denote the entire array by a single, bold-printed capital, such as A,
and then refer to its individual coefficients as a
ij
. In general, a matrix coeffi-
cient can be a number, an equation, a mathematical operator, a text string,
whatever.
With each matrix we can associate a determinant, which contains only
corresponding numbers. Determinants are typically shown within vertical
lines rather than brackets. A determinant is a matrix, but not necessarily the
other way around, just as a cow is a mammal, but not all mammals are cows.
In the type of numerical problems encountered in chemical analysis we
often deal with determinants rather than matrices (and this certainly
applies to the examples in this book), but we will use the more general
matrix notation here.
The size of the above matrix Ais specified as m×n, which is pronounced
as m-by-n. Matrices can be added and subtracted as long as they have the
A=
a
11
a
21
a
31
a
m1
a
12
a
22
a
32
a
m2
a
13
a
23
a
33
a
m3
a
14
a
24
a
34
a
m4
·
·
·
a
1n
a
2n
a
3n
a
mn
8.11 Matrix manipulation
337
.Net extract pdf text - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract pdf text to excel; copy text from pdf with formatting
.Net extract pdf text - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
get text from pdf file c#; copy pdf text with formatting
same size (by which we mean that they have identical m- and n-values, not
just identical products m×n), in which case we merely add or subtract all
coefficients with identical indices, i.e., C=A+Bimplies that all c
ij
are given
by c
ij
=a
ij
+b
ij.
Since a
ij
+b
ij
=b
ij
+a
ij
it follows that A+B=B+A, and the
same holds for the difference, A -BB -A, i.e., matrix addition and sub-
traction are commutative.
The rules for matrix multiplication are more complicated, because matrix
multiplication is notcommutative, that is, ABBA. The product C=A Bof
the m×nmatrixAand the p×qmatrix Bis defined only when the number n
of columns in Ais equal to the number pof rows in B, i.e., n=p. In that case
the coefficients of the product matrix are given by
(8.11-2)
Similarly, the product BAis defined only when the number qof columns
in Bequals the number mof rows in A, i.e., q=m, in which case the coeffi-
cients of the product matrix D=BAare
(8.11-3)
Consequently there are two products, C=A B and D=B A which, in
general, are quite different.
An important special matrix is the unit matrix, which is a squarematrix
(i.e., it has equal numbers of rows and columns) with coefficients that are all
0, except that they are 1 on its main (top-left to bottom-right)diagonal
(where the coefficients have equal indices, i.e., where i=j). For the appro-
priately chosen unit matrix (i.e., of such size that the product is defined) we
have the property
AI=IA=A
(8.11-4)
Moreover, for any squarematrix Awith non-zero determinant we can also
define a unique inverse matrixA
–1
such that
A
–1
A=AA
–1
=I
(8.11-5)
Determining the inverse of a matrix by hand is a fairly complicated matter.
Fortunately, Excel has a built-in function, MINVERSE, that will perform the
inversion. It also has a matrix multiplication function, MMULT, that will cal-
culate the product of two matrices. In order to let the spreadsheet know that
your instructions concern an entire block or array rather than an individual
cell, these two functions require that you first highlight the entire block to
which the instruction applies, and then enter the instruction while simulta-
neouslydepressing Ctrl, Shift, and Enter.
Somewhat inconsistently, a third matrixoperation, TRANSPOSE, is a
standardExceloperation.Transpositionofamatrixissimplytheexchange
ofrowsandcolumns,i.e.,whenAhasthecoefficientsa
ij
,thenitstranspose
A
T
hasthecoefficientsa
ji.
Totransposeamatrixyouhighlightit,copyitto
d
ij
=
m
k=1
b
im
a
mj
c
ij
=
n
k=1
a
in
b
nj
338
Standard mathematical operations
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
export text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf file using java
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
extract text from image pdf file; copy text from scanned pdf to word
theclipboardwithCtrl+c,andselectthetopleftcorneroftheblockwhere
youwantthetransposetoappear.OnlythenselectE
ditPasteS
pecial,in
thePasteSpecialdialogbox(onitsbottomrow)selectTranspose
,andclick
OK.Thatwilldoit.
The values of mand nin matrix Aof (8.11-1) must be positive integers, i.e.,
members of the set 1, 2, 3, …. When m=1 and n>1 we have a horizontal
vector, as in
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
…a
n
(8.11-6)
where the index mhas been dropped as unnecessary, while m>1 and n=1
defines a vertical vector,
a
1
a
2
a
3
(8.11-7)
a
m
in which case the index n has been deleted. All rules for matrix operations
apply to vectors, so that we need not consider them as special. For m=1 and
n=1 we have a 1×1matrix, which is simply a scalar. In Excel, vectors are
represented as matrices with one index 1, such as M(1,n) or M(m,1).
So far we have described the mechanics of matrix operations, but we have
yet to demonstrate its power. We already illustrated this in section 6.2, where
we took a set of simultaneous equations of the form
y
i
=a
i1
x
1
+a
i2 
x
2
+a
i3 
x
3
+
+a
im 
x
m
(8.11-8)
which we rewrote in matrix notation as
Y=AX
(8.11-9)
and then solved for Xthrough left-multiplication by A
–1
,
A
–1
Y=A
–1
AX=IX=X
(8.11-10)
where we have used (8.11-5) and (8.11-4) respectively.
Instructions for exercise 8.11
Open a new spreadsheet.
In column A, starting with cell A1, enter the numbers 1, 3, 2, and 1.
Likewise, in column B enter the numbers 6, 16, 24, 15; in column C the sequence 4, 10,
13, 4; and in column D the numbers 4, 14, 17, and 8.
8.11 Matrix manipulation
339
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
pdf text replace tool; extract text from pdf c#
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
This page is mainly designed to tell you how to read or retrieve field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in VB.NET project.
get text from pdf online; copy and paste text from pdf to word
The resulting array should occupy the block A1:D4, and look like
1
6
4
4
3
16
10
14
2
24
13
17
1
15
4
8
This will be our test array, a 4×4 matrix.
Matrix inversion. In order to invert this matrix, we first select a location for its inverse,
by selecting the top left corner cell of where you want the inverse to appear, say F1.
Highlight the space required for the result. The inverse of a 4×4 matrix is also a 4×4
matrix, so in this example you need to highlight the block F1:I4.
Type=MINVERSE(A1:D4) but don’t press the Enter key yet.
Now hold down the Control and Shift keys, and with both of these down press the Enter
key. That will do it: you should see the inverse in block F1:I4.
Matrix multiplication. As our second exercise we will now multiply the two matrices
we already have on the spreadsheet. Since one is the inverse of the other, their product
should of course be the unit matrix. The procedure is analogous to that of steps (5)
through (8).
10 Go to the left top corner of where you want the product to appear, say A6. Highlight the
required area, say A6:D9. Type=MMULT(A1:D4,F1:I4), and hold down Ctrl+Shift
while depressing Enter.
11 You should indeed obtain the unit matrix, although the zeros may have some round-
offerrors, though typically less than ±10
–15
.
12 Verify that the product F1:I4 times A1:D4 also yields the unit matrix by calculating that
product in F6:I9.
13 Note that the spreadsheet deals with arrays as entire blocks rather than with individual
cells. This is perhaps best illustrated by trying to erase partof an array. Highlight A6:D8
and press Delete. Nothing will be deleted; instead you will get an error message,
“Cannot change part of an array”. Acknowledge the message box and highlight A6:D9.
Now you will have no problem erasing it.
14 The determinant. This is an easy one, because the determinant of a matrix is a scalar (a
single number) so you need not use the Ctrl+Shift+Enter trick. Just go to any empty
cell, deposit the instruction=MDETERM(A1:D4) and (yes) press Enter. The answer,
–196, will appear.
15 Try the same for the determinant of F1:I4. Then multiply the two determinants: their
product should be 1.
In summary, then, only for matrix inversion and multiplication do you need to high-
light the entire block where the result should appear, and then enter the instruction
while holding down Ctrl+Shift.
340
Standard mathematical operations
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
extract formatted text from pdf; extract text from pdf java open source
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with
copy highlighted text from pdf; delete text from pdf
8.12
Overflow
So far we have relied on the double precision of the spreadsheet to hold our
computed quantities. However, we occasionally encounter situations in
which we seem to be limited by the finite number of digits (corresponding to
about 15 decimal figures) the spreadsheet uses to represent any measure.
Here we will use factorials to illustrate this problem, and a way around it.
The factorial n! of a positive integer nis defined as n×(n -1)×(n -2)×(n
-3)×
×2×1. Factorials often occur in statistics. For example, given the
probability pof observing a given result in a single trial, the binomial prob-
ability of P
N,p
(n) of obtaining that same result ntimes in a set of Nexperiments
is p
n
(1-p)
N–n
N! / {(N-n)! n!}. Many scientific derivations involve statistics,
not just for data analysis, but at a much more fundamental level, as demon-
strated, e.g., by the chromatographic plate theory described in sections 6.5
through 6.8.
As illustrated in exercise 8.11, it is very simple to compute factorials of
positive integers. The factorial N! of an integer Nis, by definition, an integer.
But factorials grow so quickly with Nthat, beyond N=20, N! can no longer
be represented as an integer. Of course, the spreadsheet can still represents
factorials of numbers larger than 20 in scientific notation, to 15 significant
digits, which is usually more than enough.
Instructions for exercise 8.12
Open a new spreadsheet.
In cells A1 and B1 enter labels N and N! respectively.
In cell A4 deposit the number 1, in cell A5 the instruction=A4+1, and copy this
instruction down to row 203.
In cell B4 deposit the value 1, in cell B5 the instruction=A5*B4, and also copy this
instruction down to row 203.
Take a look at row 174. From there on, N! is no longer computed, because
it is just too big to be represented by the software. The spreadsheet fails us
because 172! is of the order of 10
309
, which exceeds the ability of the spread-
sheet to represent the number at all: the limit lies at 2
1024
-1, or just above
1.797×10
308
). The spreadsheet uses the error message #NUM! to warn us
that it cannot represent such a large number, a situation called overflow.
(The same error message is also used in case of underflow, when a number is
smaller than 2
–1024
.) Here, then, is a rather common problem: many calcula-
tions involving factorials require N!/{(N-n)! n!}, which is a much smaller
8.12 Overflow
341
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Using this VB.NET PDF text conversion API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save it as new txt file.
extract text from pdf java; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document. Add necessary references: C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From PDF File in C#.NET.
copy text from locked pdf; copy text from pdf
342
Standard mathematical operations
number than N!. But how can we evaluate N!/{(N-n)!n!} when N! itself is
beyond the reach of the spreadsheet? Or when both N! and (N-n)! n! exceed
the capacity of the spreadsheet?
While we will seldom encounter numbers greater that 1.797×10
308
in our
measurements, a number such as 180! in a calculationis not at all uncom-
mon. We therefore investigate alternative ways to compute N!.
The standard approximation for N! is the Stirling formula,
exp
(8.12-1)
which is often truncated after the first term in the exponential, i.e., to
exp[-N]
(8.12-2)
In cells C4:C203 compute N! using (8.12-2).
The result is not encouraging: now the calculation already stops at N=143
(rather than at N=171) because of numerical overflow in the term N
N+
1
2
of
the Stirling formula. While we might want to improve on the numerical
accuracy of N! by using additional terms in the exponent of (8.12-1), we will
still be limited to N142. Obviously, the Stirling approximation runs into
overflow problems before the exact formula does.
Fortunately there is a simpler method that does not let us down so quickly.
It merely requires that we go back to the definition of N! as a product of
terms, and therefore compute ln(N!) as
ln(N!)=ln(N)+ln(N-1)+ln(N-2)+ln(N-3)++ln(2)+ln(1)
(8.12-3)
In cell D4 deposit the instruction=ln(A4).
In cell D5 deposit=D4+ln(A5), and copy this instruction all the way down to row 203.
Notice how easy it is to use (8.11-3) on the spreadsheet. Similarly, when we
want to calculate the binomial coefficient N!/{(N-n)! n!}, we might as well
compute its logarithm first, because even when N! is too large to be calcu-
lated on the spreadsheet, the coefficient N!/{(N-n)! n!} may not be so large.
To demonstrate that this approach indeed works, pick a value for n, say
n=24, and calculate the binomial coefficient N!/{(N-n)! n!}.
In cell E27 deposit the instruction=EXP(D27-D3-$D$27), and copy it down all the
way to row 203.
1
2
N!≈√2
π
N
N+
-N+
1
12N
-
1
360N
3
+
1
1260N
5
-
1
1680N
7
+
1
2
N!=√2
π
N
N+
We see that the binomial coefficient N!/{(N-24)! 24!} can be computed as
far as the column will go in Excel, certainly far beyond where N! itself would
be too large for the spreadsheet. This, then, is the approach we have used in
section 6.6.
8.13 
Summary
In this chapter we have gathered some of the standard methods of numeri-
cal analysis, especially those that are useful for computations on experi-
mental data, and for numerical simulations of differential equations. A short
chapter obviously cannot do justice to them, and for more details the inter-
ested reader might want to consult books on numerical analysis and chemo-
metrics.
In the first sections we have illustrated a number of mathematical
methods that are often used in chemical analysis, or are commonly imple-
mented in chemical instrumentation: signal averaging and lock-in amplifi-
cation (synchronous detection); data smoothing, peak fitting, interpolation,
and root finding; non-linear least-squares fitting; integration, and differen-
tiation. Several of these methods were already introduced in earlier chap-
ters, and therefore need only a brief discussion. By now it will be obvious
that some methods, such as Savitzky–Golay smoothing and differentiation,
lend themselves admirably to even the simplest of spreadsheets, while other
techniques, such  as Fourier transformation and general  least-squares
fitting, require a macro. Excel not only includes a number of useful macros,
but also makes it relatively easy to insert one’s own, as will be shown in
chapter 10. In chapter 9 we will encounter an intermediate situation, where
the spreadsheet can be augmented by user-defined functions. These act as
small-scale macros, because they operate on the contents of a single spread-
sheet cell.
In section 8.11 we reviewed some of the rules of matrix algebra, which will
become more and more important as analytical methods become more
sophisticated. We already encountered some applications of matrix algebra
in sections 6.2 and 6.3, and there are more in chapter 10, since least-squares
methods also rely on matrix algebra, although this may not be visible to the
user. In general, matrix algebra is the method of choice whenever multiple
simultaneous equations must be solved, as in almost all problems of
mixture analysis. Moreover, many problems in physics and chemistry
involve the solution of simultaneous equations, which is why matrix
methods are ubiquitous in modern science. Spreadsheets make their use
fast and convenient, by automating their manipulations. All you need to do
is understand what matrices are, and how to use them to your advantage.
There is an analogy here with the use of a pocket calculator, although the
dimensionality is different. Once you understand what the square root of a
8.13 Summary
343
number is, or its logarithm, you can relegate the actual computation to your
pocket calculator, because it has built-in programs to calculate such func-
tions of singlenumbers. In a similar sense, the two-dimensional spread-
sheet allows you to manipulate entire blocksof data, using mathematics
appropriate for such arrays, namely matrix algebra.
Finally, in section 8.12, we focused briefly on some of the consequence of
representing mathematical quantities in a finite number of digits, and saw
how we can often get around some of the resulting difficulties.
344
Standard mathematical operations
chapter
9
numerical
simulation of
chemical kinetics
9.1
Introduction
Inmostoftheexamplesusedintheprecedingchapters,aclosed-formsolu-
tionwasavailabletodescribethephenomenonconsidered,andthespread-
sheetwasusedeithertovisualizetheresultingbehavior,ortomanipulate
andanalyzeconsequent,experimentaldata.However,moreoftenthanwe
care to admit, we can formulate a problem in mathematical terms, but
cannotfindacorresponding,mathematicalsolution.Thatusuallyleavesus
withtwooptions:eithersimplifythemathematicalmodeluntilitbecomes
solvable,oruseacomputertofindanumericalsolution.Neitheroptionis
ideal.Insimplifyingamathematicalmodel,thereisalwaystheriskthatone
ormoreimportantaspectsoftheproblemwillbemissed.Ontheotherhand,
numericalsolutionsapplyonlyforthespecificparametervaluesused,and
the results may therefore be difficult to generalize. Still, more and more
problemsinscience and technology are solved by numerical simulation,
includingthedesignofcameralenses,cars,andjetairplanes.Inthisshort
chapterwewillusetherateexpressionsofchemicalkineticstoillustratehow
onecanusespreadsheetsforthenumericalsimulationofdifferentialequa-
tions.
Much of chemistry involves kinetics. The equilibrium behavior we dis-
cussed in chapters 4 and 5 can only be observed because the underlying
chemical reactions are sufficiently fast. In other cases, however, the reac-
tions involved may be relatively slow, and their rates can be observed and
measured. In practice, large numbers of chemical analyses are based on
kinetic measurements, especially the many routine analyses performed by
multichannel autoanalyzers in clinical and industrial laboratories. Such
kinetic methods of analysis often derive their selectivity from the use of
345
enzymes or other catalysts. They can be relatively fast because one need not
wait for the establishment of equilibrium.
For the simplest of kinetic schemes, such as for unidirectional reactions,
straightforward mathematical expressions exist that describe the rates at
which the reagents are consumed in the process. In order to illustrate how
digital simulation works, we will first tackle such simple examples, since
they allow us to calibrate the method, and to discuss its constraints and limi-
tations.
Among the various possible approaches we will illustrate the explicit
method in section 9.2, and the implicit method in section 9.3. The explicit
method is conceptually simpler, and is easier to implement; the implicit
method is more accurate. Both methods are, therefore, useful: the former if
one requires only a rough idea of the kinetics, the latter for more quantita-
tive considerations.
9.2
The explicit method 
9.2a
First-order kinetics 
We start with the first-order reaction
A
k
(9.2-1)
In what follows we will assume that there are a sufficiently large number of
reacting particles to make the kinetics a deterministic process. We can then
describe the course of reaction (9.2-1) by the simple first-order differential
equation
da/dt=-ka
(9.2-2)
where adenotes the concentration of the chemical species A. The mathe-
matical solution of (9.2-2) consistent with the initial condition a
t=0
=a
0
is
a=a
0
exp[-kt]
(9.2-3)
where t=0 is usually defined as the time at the beginning of the experiment,
or at the initiation of the reaction.
We now consider (9.2-2) while pretending not to know its closed-form
mathematical solution, (9.2-3). How can we simulate the resulting kinetics
without solving the differential equation? Recalling that the differential quo-
tient is really just the limit of a difference equation,
=lim
∆t→0
(9.2-4)
where ∆a=a
t+∆t
-a
t
, we replace the differentialequation (9.2-2) by the cor-
responding differenceequation,
da/dt≈∆a/∆t
(9.2-5)
∆a
∆t
da
dt
346
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested