how to display pdf file in c# : Copy paste pdf text application Library utility azure .net winforms visual studio Excel37-part209

da
1
/dt=-k
11 
a
1
2-k
12
a
1
a
2
-k
13
a
1
a
3
+2 k
11
′a
2
+k
12
′a
3
+k
13
′a
4
(9.2-39)
da
2
/dt=-k
11
′a
2
-k
12
a
1
a
2
-k
22
a
2
2
+
1
2
k
11
a
1
2
+k
12
′a
3
+2 k
22
′a
4
(9.2-40)
da
3
/dt=-k
12
′a
3
-k
13
a
1
a
3
+k
12
a
1
a
2
+k
13
′a
4
(9.2-41)
da
4
/dt=-k
13
′a
4
-k
22
′a
4
+k
13
a
1
a
3
+
1
2
k
22
a
2
2
(9.2-42)
Proceeding as before, we replace the terms da
i
/dtby ∆a
i
/∆tin order to
obtain explicit expressions for the concentration changes ∆a
i
, and with
these we compute the new concentrations a
i
+∆a
i
.
Instructions for exercise 9.2-3
Open a new spreadsheet.
Reserve the area A1:H12 for the graph (which will contain four species).
In rows 13 through 16 place labels and initial values for the concentrations a
1
, a
2
, a
3
, a
4
,
the rate constants k
11
, k
12
, k
13
, k
22
, k
11
′, k
12
′, k
13
′, k
22
′, and ∆t.
In row 18 deposit labels for time tand for the concentrations a
1
through a
4
.
In column A calculate t, starting with t=0 in cell A20, and using the increment ∆t.
Starting in row 20 of columns B through E, compute a
1
, a
2
, a
3
, and a
4
based on (9.2-39)
through (9.2-42) after substitution of ∆a/∆tfor da/dt. For example, the value of a
1
in cell
B21 would be calculated as a
1
+∆a
1
=a
1
+(-k
11
a
1
2
-k
12
a
1
a
2
-k
13
a
1
a
3
+2 k
11
′a
2
+k
12
′a
3
+k
13
′a
4
) ∆t, where a
1
through a
are found in B20 through E20 respectively.
In column F check that the concentrations calculated obey the mass balance relation
a
1
+2 a
2
+3 a
3
+4 a
4
=constant.
Plot the various concentrations as a function of time t. Figure 9.2-7 illustrates the top of
such a spreadsheet.
The above illustrates that the explicit method provides a simple and
readily implemented approach to simulate the course of reaction kinetics,
even for rather complicated reaction mechanisms, as long as the initial con-
centrations of the reactants and products, and the rate constants, are
known. The problem need not have a known, closed-form mathematical
solution.  Non-linear  relations  are  no  impediment  to  the  simulation,
because the equations are linearized. Such linearization is an acceptable
approximation as long as the time increments ∆t are sufficiently small. In
section 9.2d we have seen how we can exploit a user-defined function to
make the increments ∆tsmaller, by moving some of the computations off
the spreadsheet, without having to change either the time range covered or
the column length used. In principle, the same method can of course be
9.2 The explicit method
357
Copy paste pdf text - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract text from pdf to excel; cut and paste pdf text
Copy paste pdf text - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
c# read text from pdf; delete text from pdf preview
used here, by using different functions for the various species. However, this
can slow down the computation considerably. In section 9.3 we will encoun-
ter more efficient ways to achieve a similar result.
In kinetic studies one typically encounters the opposite problem: how to
extract a mechanism and the corresponding rate parameters from the
experimental data. Numerical simulation cannot do that directly. What it
can do is test whether an assumed mechanism plus assumed rate parame-
ters will generate concentration profiles that agree with the experimental
observations.
358
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
Fig.9.2-7:The top of the spreadsheet for exercise 9.2-3. The curves are, from top to
bottom, for a
1
, a
2
, a
3
, and a
4
.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
copy text from pdf; delete text from pdf with acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
erase text from pdf file; extract text from scanned pdf
9.3
Implicit numerical simulation
The explicit method described in the previous section is very straight-
forward, since it only uses already available data. But that is also its Achilles
heel, because it can introduce a systematic biasas it uses, in each step ∆t, the
concentration(s) computed for the end of the previous time increment.
While the resulting errors can be made vanishingly small in principle, by
sufficiently reducing the time interval ∆tused, it is usually more effective to
use a more efficient algorithm.
When the concentration of a reagent is a continuously decreasing func-
tion of time, and the steps ∆tare not vanishingly small, the systematic bias
will lead to a small but consistent overestimate of that concentration. Over
many steps, even a rather small overestimate can accumulate to generate a
sizable composite error. Similarly, when the concentration of a product
increases, its concentration change in every interval ∆twill be computed on
the basis of its previous concentration, which again will lead to a small but
systematic (and often accumulating) error.
An improved simulation might therefore be obtained by using an estimate
of the averageconcentration value during the period ∆t. This is done in the
implicit method, which considers the previous data point as well as the next,
yet to be determined point in the computation. In fact, there are many
different implicit methods. Here we only illustrate the simplest of them,
which assumes that all variables change linearly over a sufficiently small
interval ∆t.
Let the dependent variable aat t=0 have the value a
0
, and let its value at
t=∆tbe a
1
=a
0
+∆a. Assuming that avaries in a linear fashion with tin the
small interval ∆t, we now use the averagevalue (a
0
+a
1
) / 2=(2a
0
+∆a) / 2=
a
0
+
1
2
∆aas an improved estimate of aduring the interval ∆t, and therefore
substitute it in the right-hand side of the differential equation (9.2.2). This
should be more realistic than the implication of (9.2-6) that, over the interval
∆t, the variable a retains the value it had at the beginning of that interval.
9.3a
First-order kinetics 
For the first-order unidirectional reaction (9.2-1) we therefore write the
difference equation as
∆a/∆t=-k(a+
1
2
∆a)
(9.3-1)
Equation (9.3-1) contains terms in ∆aon both sides of the equal sign. We
solve it for ∆aas
∆a=-ak ∆t/ (1+
1
2
k∆t)
(9.3-2)
so that
9.3 Implicit numerical simulation
359
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
export text from pdf to excel; copy text from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
copy text pdf; extract pdf text to word
a
1
=a
0
+∆a=a
0
(1-
1
2
k∆t) / (1+
1
2
k∆t)
(9.3-3)
a
2
=a
1
+∆a=a
1
(1-
1
2
k∆t) / (1+
1
2
k∆t)
=a
0
{(1-
1
2
k∆t) / (1+
1
2
k∆t)}
2
(9.3-4)
a
n
=a
0
{(1-
1
2
k∆t)/(1+
1
2
k∆t)}
n
(9.3-5)
which can be compared with (9.2-8) through (9.2-10) respectively.
Instructions for exercise 9.3-1
Modify the spreadsheet used for exercise 9.2-1, or open a new spreadsheet and model it
after Fig. 9.2-1.
Calculate ausing (9.3-3) instead of (9.2-8).
Again calculate the algorithmic error a
simul
-a
exact
by comparison with the exact result.
Comparison of the results for a
simul
-a
exact
obtained here with those of the
explicit method of section 9.2 indicates that the implicit method signifi-
cantly improves the accuracy of the computation. Moreover, by using (9.3-5)
to squeeze a number of small steps in one row, we can further reduce the
error, which now goes as (∆t)
2
. This is illustrated in Fig. 9.3-1, which com-
pares the results obtained for the first-order reaction A →with a
0
=1, k=1,
and a column length of 101 rows, i.e., for t=0 (0.01) 10. The message is clear:
while the implicit method takes more programming effort, it is much more
precise. Consequently, when we need only a qualitative (“quick-and-dirty”)
estimate, the explicit method will often do, while for quantitative analysis
the implicit method is the way to go.
9.3b
Dimerization kinetics 
For the reaction 2A
k
→the implicit method leads to
∆a /∆t=-k (a+
1
2
∆a)
2
=-k {a
2
+a ∆a+
1
4
(∆a)
2
}≈-k (a
2
+a ∆a)
(9.3-6)
where we neglect the higher-order correction term 
1
4
(∆a)
2
, thereby lineariz-
ing the expression. Once this is done, the remainder is straightforward:
∆a=-k a
2
∆t/ (1+a k∆t)
(9.3-7)
a
1
=a
/ (1+a
k ∆t)
(9.3-8)
a
2
=a
/ (1+a
k ∆t)=a
/ (1+2 a
k ∆t)
(9.3-9)
a
n
=a
/ (1+na
k ∆t)
(9.3-10)
360
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page.
pdf text replace tool; can't copy text from pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide C#.NET Demo Code: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. This C#
copy text from pdf without formatting; acrobat remove text from pdf
Calculate ausing (9.3-8) instead of (9.2-16).
Note that (9.3-10) is equivalent to the exactsolution a=a
0
/ (1+a
0
k t) of
equation (9.2-14) because t=n ∆t, so that, in this particular case, the
implicit method does not generate any error at all.
9.3c
Trimerization kinetics 
For the reaction 3A
k
→the implicit approach yields
∆a / ∆t=-k (a+
1
2
∆a)
3
=-k {a
3
+
3
2
a
2
∆a+
3
4
a (∆a)
2
+
1
8
(∆a)
3
}
≈-k a
2
(1+
3
2
∆a)
(9.3-11)
∆a=-a
3
k∆t/ (1+
3
2
a
2
k∆t)
(9.3-12)
a
1
=a
(1+
1
2
a
0
2
k∆t) / (1+
3
2
a
0
2
k∆t)
(9.3-13)
a
2
=a
(1+
1
2
a
1
2
k∆t) / (1+
3
2
a
1
2
k∆t) 
(9.3-14)
a
n
=a
n–1 
{1+
1
2
(a
n–1
)
2
k∆t} / {1+
3
2
(a
n–1
)
2
k∆t} 
(9.3-15)
Calculate ausing (9.3-13) instead of (9.2-22).
Also compute the inherent error of the simulation by calculating the difference with the
theoretical result, a=a
0
/ √(1+2 a
0
2
k t).
9.3 Implicit numerical simulation
361
Fig.9.3-1:The difference a
simul
– a
exact
for the explicit (top) and implicit (bottom)
method, from left to right using 1, 10, and 1000 steps per row.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to Text Using VB. VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Convert PDF to Text in .NET Project. Convert PDF to Text in VB.NET Demo Code.
extract text from pdf online; copy text from pdf with formatting
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
edit pdf replace text; find and replace text in pdf file
The above results (Fig. 9.3-2) again indicate that the implicit method
yields considerably better results than the explicit method; on the other
hand, it requires more effort to formulate the appropriate equations. This is
further illustrated in the two remaining examples.
9.3d
Monomer–dimer kinetics 
For the monomer–dimer reaction scheme (9.2-25) and the associated diffe-
rential equation (9.2-28) the implicit method yields the difference equation
∆a/∆t=-k(a+
1
2
∆a)
2
-k′(a+
1
2
∆a)+k″
≈-ka(a+∆a)-k′(a+
1
2
∆a)+k″
(9.3-16)
where we have neglected higher-order terms such as in (∆t)
2
. Consequently
∆a=(-k a
2
-k′a+k″) / {1/∆t+k a+
1
2
k′}
(9.3-17)
a
1
=a
0
+(-k a
0
2
-k′a
0
+k″) / (1/∆t+k a
0
+
1
2
k′)
(9.3-18)
a
2
=a
1
+(-k a
1
2
-k′a
1
+k″) / (1/∆t+k a
1
+
1
2
k′)
(9.3-19)
a
n
=a
n–1
+(-k (a
n–1
)
2
-k′a
n–1
+k″) / (1/∆t+k a
n–1
+
1
2
k′)
(9.3-20)
Instructions for exercise 9.3-2
Modify the spreadsheet used for exercise 9.2-2, or open a new spreadsheet and model it
after it.
Calculate ausing (9.3-20) instead of (9.2-32).
Calculate bfrom b=b
0
+
1
2
(a
0
-a).
Plot the reagent concentrations.
Compare the result obtained with the exact solution, as given by (9.2-33) and (9.2-34).
Alsocomparethemagnitudeoftheerrorsoftheimplicitandexplicitmethodinthiscase.
362
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
Fig.9.3-2:The simulation with the implicit method of the unidirectional trimerization
reaction (9.2-19) with a
0
=2 and k=1. Comparison with Fig. 9.2-4 shows that the abso-
lute algorithmic error is now more than two orders of magnitude smaller.
9.3e
Polymerization kinetics 
In the preceding case, with only two concentrations, aand b, the changes ∆a
and ∆bcan readily be found because, for two concentrations, we could use
the mass balance to express the change in one concentration in terms of that
of the other. However, when there are more than two reacting species, the
equations become more complicated, in which case it is usually simpler
(and often necessary) to use matrix algebra. Below we will illustrate that
approach for the reaction scheme (9.2-35) through (9.2-38).
Instead of (9.2-39) through (9.2-42) we now have
∆a
1
/∆t=-k
11 
a
(a
1
+∆a
1
)-k
12
(a
a
2
+
1
2
a
∆a
2
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)
-k
13 
(a
a
3
+
1
2
a
1
∆a
3
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)+2 k
11
′(a
2
+
1
2
∆a
2
)
+k
12
′(a
3
+
1
2
∆a
3
)+k
13
′(a
4
+
1
2
∆a
4
)
(9.3-21)
∆a
2
/∆t=-k
11
′(a
2
+
1
2
∆a
2
)-k
12
(a
1
a
2
+
1
2
a
1
∆a
2
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)
-k
22
a
2
(a
2
+∆a
2
)+
1
2
k
11
a
1
(a
1
+∆a
1
)+k
12
′(a
3
+
1
2
∆a
3
)
+2 k
22
′(a
4
+
1
2
∆a
4
)
(9.3-22)
∆a
3
/∆t=-k
12
′(a
3
+
1
2
∆a
3
)-k
13
(a
1
a
3
+
1
2
a
1
∆a
3
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)
+k
12
(a
1
a
2
+
1
2
a
1
∆a
2
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)+k
13
′(a
4
+
1
2
∆a
4
)
(9.3-23)
∆a
4
/∆t=-(k
13
′+k
22
′) (a
4
+
1
2
∆a
4
)+k
13
(a
1
a
3
+
1
2
a
1
∆a
3
+
1
2
a
∆a
1
)
+
1
2
k
22
a
(a
2
+∆a
2
)
(9.3-24)
where we have replaced (a
i
+
1
2
∆a
i
)
2
=a
i
2
+a
i
∆a
i
+
1
4
(∆a
i
)
2
by a
i
(a
i
+∆a
i
),
and (a
i
+
1
2
∆a
i
)(a
j
+
1
2
∆a
j
)=a
i
a
j
+
1
2
a
∆a
j
+
1
2
a
∆a
i
+
1
4
∆a
i
∆a
j
by a
i
a
j
+
1
2
a
i
∆a
j
+
1
2
a
∆a
i
, thereby removing all higher-order terms (∆a
i
)
2
and ∆a
i
∆a
j
.
After sorting (9.3-21) through (9.3-24) in terms of the various ∆a
i
’s we
obtain
(1/∆t+k
11 
a
1
+
1
2
k
12
a
2
+
1
2
k
13 
a
3
) ∆a
1
+(
1
2
k
12
a
1
-k
11
′) ∆a
2
+(
1
2
k
13 
a
1
-
1
2
k
12
′) ∆a
3
+(-
1
2
k
13
′) ∆a
4
=-k
11 
a
1
2
-k
12
a
a
2
-k
13 
a
a
3
+2 k
11
′a
2
+k
12
′a
3
+k
13
′a
(9.3-25)
(
1
2
k
12
a
-
1
2
k
11
a
1
) ∆a
1
+(1/∆t+
1
2
k
11
′+
1
2
k
12
a
1
+k
22
a
2
) ∆a
2
+(-
1
2
k
12
′) ∆a
3
+(-k
22
′) ∆a
4
=-k
11
′a
2
-k
12
a
1
a
2
-k
22
a
2
2
+
1
2
k
11
a
1
2
+k
12
′a
3
+2 k
22
′a
4
(9.3-26)
(-
1
2
a
2
k
12
+
1
2
a
3
k
13
) ∆a
1
+(-
1
2
a
1
k
12
) ∆a
2
+(1/∆t+
1
2
k
12
′+
1
2
a
1
k
13
) ∆a
3
+(-
1
2
k
13
′) ∆a
4
=-k
12
′a
3
-k
13
a
1
a
3
+k
12
a
1
a
2
+k
13
′a
4
(9.3-27)
(-
1
2
a
3
k
13
) ∆a
1
+(-
1
2
k
22
a
2
) ∆a
2
+(-
1
2
a
1
k
13
) ∆a
3
+(1/∆t+
1
2
k
13
′+
1
2
k
22
′)
∆a
4
=-(k
13
′+k
22
′) a
4
+k
13
a
1
a
3
+
1
2
k
22
a
2
2
(9.3-28)
which comprise four equations in four unknowns, ∆a
1
, ∆a
2
, ∆a
3
, and ∆a
4
. We
write these in the symbolic form C D=B, where Cis the 4×4 matrix of the
coefficients of the terms ∆a
i
,
9.3 Implicit numerical simulation
363
(1/∆t+k
11
a
1
+
1
2
k
12
a
2
+
1
2
k
13
a
3
) (
1
2
k
12
a
1
-k
11
′) …  -
1
2
k
13
1
2
k
12
a
-
1
2
k
11
a
1
…  -k
22
C=
-
1
2
k
12 
a
2
+
1
2
k
13
a
3
…  -
1
2
k
13
-
1
2
k
13
a
3
…1/∆t+
1
2
k
13
′+
1
2
k
22
(9.3-29)
while Dand Bare vectors,
∆a
1
-k
11 
a
1
2
-k
12
a
a
2
-k
13 
a
a
3
+2 k
11
′a
2
+k
12
′a
3
+k
13
′a
4
∆a
2
-k
11
′a
2
-k
12
a
1
a
2
-k
22
a
2
2
+
1
2
k
11
a
1
2
+k
12
′a
3
+2 k
22
′a
4
D=
∆a
3
, B=
-k
12
′a
3
-k
13
a
1
a
3
+k
12
a
1
a
2
+k
13
′a
4
∆a
4
-(k
13
′+k
22
′) a
4
+k
13
a
1
a
3
+
1
2
k
22
a
2
2
(9.3-30)
The concentration changes Dare then found as D=C
–1
C D=C
–1
B, i.e., by
inverting the matrix C, and by subsequently calculating the product C
–1
B.
Note that both Band Ccontain the concentrations a
1
through a
4
, which are
the concentrations at the start of the interval ∆t. At the beginning of the
computation these are the initial concentrations. Thereafter, these concen-
trations must be updated to their most recently computed values before the
concentration changes during the next interval can be computed. Clearly,
such a calculation is far too tedious and time-consuming to do on the
spreadsheet itself, where matrix inversion and matrix multiplication must
be initiated manually for every time step ∆t. Instead, this is the type of
problem that, on a spreadsheet, is best done with a function specifically
written for that purpose.
As an exercise, after you have familiarized yourself with the material in the
next chapter, you might want to try to write such a function. It should have
as its input the previous concentrations, the rate parameters, and the time
increment. It should then calculate (for this specific reaction scheme) the
concentrations at time t+∆t, and write these concentrations back onto the
spreadsheet. Use the matrix inversion subroutine for the hard work.
The examples in this section give you a taste of the implicit method. In
fact, they only illustrate its simplest form, in which we assume a linear
dependence of all concentrations during each interval ∆t, yielding results
that exhibit an algorithmic inaccuracy proportional to (∆t)
2
. More sophisti-
cated indirect methods are available, most prominently among them the
various higher-order Runge–Kutta schemes (the above examples illustrate
the second-order Runge–Kutta approach), and the Adams–Bashforth and
Adams–Moulton  formulas  that  also  take  earlier  points  into  account.
Obviously, numerical integration of differential equations is an area of spe-
cialized knowledge, of which we have given here only a few simple examples.
364
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
For more details the reader should consult one of the many specialized
books on that topic.
In section 9.2 we illustrated one explicit method, Euler’s forward method.
In the present section, we likewise used only one type of implicit method,
based on the trapezoidal or midpoint rule. All our examples have used con-
stant increments ∆t; higher computational efficiency can often be obtained
by making the step size dependent on the magnitudes of the changes in the
dependent variables. Still, these examples illustrate that, upon comparing
equivalent implicit and explicit methods, the former usually allow larger
step sizes for a given accuracy, or yield more accurate results for the same
step size. On the other hand, implicit methods typically require consider-
ably more initial effort to implement.
While the examples given here have dealt only with chemical reaction
kinetics,themethodillustrateshowonecan,ingeneral,solvesingleaswell
as coupled differential equations. Euler’s explicit method is useful as a
qualitative tool: it is easily implemented, and can provide a reasonably
closeresultwhen∆tissufficientlysmall.Thelatterrequirement,however,
maymaketheexplicitmethodimpracticalonaspreadsheet.Forquantita-
tive work, an implicit method is usually required, as it provides a better
approximation given the limited number of iterations practical on a
spreadsheet.
9.4
Some applications
This section will illustrate how one can use the implicit method to simulate
several interesting kinetic schemes, such as an autocatalytic reaction, and
heterogeneous catalysis. Then we will see the ramifications of an often used
(and sometimes  misused) simplification, the steady-state assumption.
Finally, we will simulate a prototypical oscillating reaction.
9.4a
Autocatalysis
In an autocatalytic reaction, a reaction product catalyzes the reaction, i.e.,
enhances its net rate. We will here assume a simple model sequence in
which the reaction A →C starts with the pure starting material, A. The reac-
tion product, C, catalyzes a second, faster reaction pathway, A+C →2C, so
that the reaction will speed up after some catalyst C has been formed:
A
k
1
→ C
(9.4-1)
A+C
k
2
→ 2C
(9.4-2)
The corresponding rate equations for the concentrations aand cof A and
C respectively are
9.4 Some applications
365
=-k
1
a-k
2
ac
(9.4-3)
=k
1
a+k
2
ac
(9.4-4)
with the mass balance a+c=a
0
+c
0
=a
0
since the initial concentration c
0
of
C is assumed to be zero. We can therefore use c=a
-ato convert (9.4-3)
into
=-(k
1
+k
2
a
0
)a+k
2
a
2
(9.4-5)
which can be formulated for the implicit method as 
=-(k
1
+k
2
a
0
)(a+∆a/2)+k
2
(a+∆a/2)
2
≈-(k
1
+k
2
a
0
)(a+∆a/2)+k
2
a(a+∆a)
≈-k′(a+∆a/2)+k
2
a(a+∆a)
(9.4-6)
where k′=a
0
k
1
+k
2
a
0,
so that
+(k
1
+k
2
a
0
)/2-k
2
a ∆a=-(k
1
+k
2
a
0
)a+k
2
a
2
(9.4-7)
a
1
=a
0
+∆a=a
(9.4-8)
a
n
=a
n–1 
(9.4-9)
which is in a form suitable for the simulation.
Instructions for exercise 9.4-1
Open a spreadsheet.
In its top row, specify values for a
0
, ∆t, k
1
, and k
2
, and calculate the resulting value of
k′=k
1
+k
2
a
0
.
Calculate ausing (9.4-8) and (9.4-9).
Plot aas a function of time t.
Vary the values of k
1
and k
2
(and thereby of k′) and observe that the reaction can exhibit
an induction period when k
1
<<k
a
0
.
Figure 9.4-1 illustrates the distinct time course of the concentration ain
this case, with a decomposition rate that starts slowly, then accelerates as
more catalyst C is formed. Higher-order autocatalytic reactions exhibit an
1/∆t-k′/2
1/∆t+k′/2-k
2
a
n–1
1/∆t-k′/2
1/∆t+k′/2-k
2
a
0
1
∆t
∆a
∆t
da
dt
dc
dt
da
dt
366
Numerical simulation of chemical kinetics
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested