how to display pdf file in c# : Copy pdf text to word SDK Library service wpf asp.net winforms dnn Excel4-part212

1.8
Naming and annotating cells
You can assign descriptive names to cells, such as Ka1 and Ka2 to refer to the
two acid dissociation constants of a diprotic acid. It is usually much easier to
write and read formulas that contain descriptive names rather than cell
addresses such as $B$2 and $C$2. Names can be used only to refer to indi-
vidual absoluteaddresses. Names must start with a letter, may contain only
letters, numbers, periods and underscores, and cannot be R, C, or possible
cell addresses. Consequently, C1 and Ca1 are not valid names, but Ca, caa3
and (in all current versions of Excel) Ka1 are, since the rightmost column
label is IV; in future versions of Excel you might have to use Kaa1and Kaa2
instead.
Assigning names to constants is easy: highlight the cell you want to be
named, then click on the address box in the formula bar, type the name, and
press enter. Alternatively, you can use I
nsert N
ame D
efine, then use the
resulting Define Name dialog box. After you have named a cell, you can refer
to it either by its regular address or by its given name. To delete a name, use
the Define Name dialog box (via I
nsert N
ame D
efine). When you erase a
name that is used in a formula, that formula will become invalid, and will
show the error message #NAME?
InrecentversionsofExcelitispossibletoattachadescriptiveorexplana-
torynote toa cell,remindingyouofitssource,explaining itsfunction,
givingaliteraturereference,expressingdoubtsaboutthecorrectnessofthe
answer,orwhatever.Inordertoattachsuchanote,useI
nsertNot
e,in
theresultingCellNotedialogboxenterthetextofthenote,thendepositit
byclicking on OK.Thecellwill have asmallred squarein itsrighttop
cornertoindicatethatanoteisattached.Thetextofthenotewillshow
whenyouusethemousetopointtothecell.Ifyouwanttoseewhatnotes
areattached,againuseI
nsertNot
ewhichliststhemallinthecolumn
NotesinS
heet.
1.8 Naming and annotating cells
27
Table 1.7-1:Excel’s error messages.
Error message e Problem
#DIV/0!
Division by zero or by an empty cell
#NAME?
Excel does not recognize the name; perhaps it has been deleted
#N/A
Some needed data are not available
#NULL!
The formula refers to a non-existing intersection of two ranges
#NUM!
The number is of incorrect type, e.g., it is negative when a positive number is
expected
#REF!
The reference is not valid; it may have been deleted
#VALUE!
The argument or operand is of the wrong type
Copy pdf text to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf with formatting; extract text from image pdf file
Copy pdf text to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
edit pdf replace text; extract text from pdf online
1.9
Viewing the spreadsheet
The monitor screen may display only a part of a spreadsheet, perhaps the
first 10 columns and 20 or so rows. In order to get an overview of a much
larger spreadsheet you may want to display a larger area, but then the cell
contents may then become unreadable. Or you may want to zoom in on a
smaller area so that you can examine a graph in detail. In all those cases you
can use the Zoom Control, which allows you to enlarge all distances on the
screen up to four times (to 400%), thereby showing only one-sixteenth
(
1
4
×
1
4
) of the usual area, or to reduce the display to provide a larger (but less
detailed) overview, reducing all linear distances to a minimum of 10%, in
which case the screen displays a (10×10=) 100 times larger spreadsheet
area. The Zoom Control is found as a window on the right-hand side of the
Standard Toolbar. Click on the arrow to the right of that window, and click on
any of the fixed percentages shown. Or enter any integer between 10 and
400, then deposit it with the Enter key. If the Standard Toolbar is not dis-
played, use V
iew Z
oom instead.
In order to move the zoomed area use the scroll bars (to the right and at
the bottom of the spreadsheet, for vertical and horizontal movement
respectively) or the associated arrows. The arrows let you move one cell
height (or cell width) at the time; clicking on the gray areas where the sliding
bar moves lets you move in bigger steps, of about one screen height or screen
width.
When you anticipate that a spreadsheet will be too large to keep on screen,
it is best to organize it in such a way that all important information is in one
area, say at its top. Still, it may sometimes be desirable to view different part
of the spreadsheet simultaneously. This can be done in several ways. You can
copy the worksheet with E
dit M
ove or Copy Sheet, then display both
copies as multiple views with W
indows N
ew Window. Each window can
then be manipulated independently. Or you can divide the screen into two
(and even four) separate parts that can be moved individually with the scroll
bars, so that you can keep different parts of the spreadsheet on the screen,
using the command W
indow S
plit. The location of the pointer determines
how many pieces will show: if the pointer is in the top row, it will cause a ver-
tical split at that position; a horizontal split is made with the pointer in the
first column; you will get a four-way split when the pointer is somewhere
else. You can grab the dividing bars and drag them to change their positions.
To undo the split, use W
indow  Remove S
plit. Alternatively, you can
double-click on the tiny rectangular space just above the top arrow of the
vertical scroll bar to generate a split of the screen into a top and bottom part.
Again, the position of the split will be determined by the position of the
active cell, except when the active cell sits in the top row, in which case the
split is half-way down. Double-clicking on a dividing bar will undo the split.
28
How to use Excel
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
extract text from pdf file using java; c# extract text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file.
copy formatted text from pdf; copy and paste text from pdf
Similarly, double-clicking on the small rectangular space to the right of the
arrow in the right-hand corner of the horizontal scroll bar will generate a
split screen with a right- and left-hand part.
When you need to work with long columns, it is often useful to keep the
column headings visible. To do so, place the pointer in the cell below and to
the right of the area you want to keep; make sure that this cell is empty. Then
use W
indow F
reeze. When you now scroll through the column, the head-
ings stay in place. To undo, use W
indow Unf
reeze.
1.10
Printing
An important aspect we have not yet described so far is how to print, assum-
ing of course that you have a printer attached to the computer, and that it is
turned on. The simplest way is to click on the printer icon on the toolbar,
usually just under the V
iew menu command. In our case, the spreadsheet is
somewhat too complicated for that, so we will use the mouse to select, from
the menu, the F
ile Print Prev
iew. This will show us the first page; by clicking
on the Next button we can see the next page; to return to page 1 click on
Previous. Clearly, the spreadsheet could use some cleaning up before we
print it. Close the preview (this time the C
lose button is on the icon bar) to
return to F
ile, then click outside the menu to go back to the spreadsheet.
If the spreadsheet is just a little too large to fit on one page, you may want
to scale it down to fit the paper. If the spreadsheet is too long, activate the
row numbers (in the gray cells to the left of column A) which will highlight
the corresponding rows. Then right-click, select R
ow Height, and reduce the
row height appropriately. (You may have to reduce the font size to keep the
cell contents from being decapitated.) Likewise you can change the column
widths by highlighting the column letters, right-clicking to get C
olumn
Width, and changing that to suit your needs. Incidentally, this is also an easy
way to scale figures displayed on the sheet, especially when you have several
of them and want to fill the page with them as efficiently as possible.
Say that your spreadsheet only contains a few long columns, so that
changing the column height would not be practical. In that case you may
want to reorganize the spreadsheet layout. Note where the page break
occurs, then go to the first cell past that page break in column A. (For the
sake of convenience we will call that cell A52, even though, on your spread-
sheet, the page break may not occur between rows 51 and 52.)Now go to cell
E20, deposit the instruction =A52, and copy this instruction to block
E20:G51. Now that the entire information is on page one, select P
rint from
the F
ile menu. APrint dialog box will pop up, in which, under the heading
Page Range (near the bottom), you select Pag
es (rather than A
ll) and then
specify f
rom 1 t
o 1. Finally, click on OK to start the printing process.
Please don’t forget that you also have a graph stored as Chart1; move to
1.10 Printing
29
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
delete text from pdf file; extract text from scanned pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
erase text from pdf file; copy text from scanned pdf
that chart (by clicking on its tab), and make the graph more presentable now
that you know how to do so, e.g., by using the French curve rather than
straight-line segments to connect the few widely spaced points, with Format
Data Series ⇒Patterns ⇒Sm
oothed Line. Then print the graph.
1.11
Help!
Excel is a rather complex program, that can be used at various levels of
sophistication. In this book we will mostly stay with the basic operations
common to most spreadsheets, although we will occasionally exploit some of
Excel’s specific capabilities, as when we use functions from the add-in menu
or special macros. Because printing manuals is expensive, and many users
do not consult them anyway, Excel has an extensive, built-inhelp library that
can be called while you are working on a spreadsheet. Call it by clicking H
elp,
then find your way to the topic you want. For example, let us assume that you
want to use the Analysis ToolPak, but cannot find it under T
ools. Apparently it
was not installed. How would you find out how to install it?
In Excel 97 and later versions you would click on H
elp, then select
C
ontents and Index. This will give you three tabbed options; first select
Index, and type ‘Analysis ToolPak’ (without the quotes). A number of choices
appear, from which you can select ‘general information’. You are now offered
three options: Install and use Analysis ToolPak, Supplemental information
about statistical methods and algorithms, and Ways to analyze statistics.
Click on the first choice, and find out how to install the Analysis ToolPak. The
same information would be available from Ways to analyze statistics.
Say that you don’t remember the name of the Analysis ToolPak, but instead
look under ‘data analysis’. You will find a choice labeled Data analysis tools in
the Analysis ToolPak, and from there the path to the information is the same.
Or assume that you have selected the Contents instead of the Index. Browse
the options (and use the vertical scroll bar to see more of them than can be
displayed in the window) till you come across something that might fit. In
this case, you will find the item ‘Analyzing Statistical Data’, which will again
lead you to ‘Install and use the Analysis ToolPak’. In other words, with a little
persistence you can find the required information almost no matter where
you start: there are many roads that lead to Rome.
Similarly, in Excel 5 and 95, H
elp gets you to Microsoft Excel H
elp Topics
and to the Answer W
izard. Click on either one, and you will see four tabs:
Contents, Index, Find, and Answer Wizard. When you select the Answer
Wizard, type ‘data analysis’ in the top window, then select an appropriate
item from the list that appears in window 2. In this example, select ‘Tell Me
About Analyzing Statistics’. Or you type ‘analysis toolpak’, and find ‘How Do I
Enable the Analysis ToolPak’. Even ‘How Do I Use the Analysis ToolPak’ will
get you to the installation instructions.
30
How to use Excel
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
copy text from pdf in preview; extract text from pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
copy and paste text from pdf to excel; extract text from pdf acrobat
You could also have used Index, Find, or even Contents. Typing ‘data
analysis’ in the Index would get you there via data analysis tools Analysis
ToolPak Analyzing Statistics, which gives you a hypertext-like button to
Enable the Analysis ToolPak. With Find your trail might also lead to
Analyzing Statistics. And in Contents, a direct path to the required informa-
tion might be Retrieving and Analyzing Data Statistical Analysis of Data 
Enable the Analysis ToolPak.
This is not to suggest that there are not an equal number of plausible
options that won’t get you there: when you navigate without a road map,
some streets will turn out to be dead ends. But you get the idea: try a reason-
able keyword, and if that does not work try another, until you succeed. You
will usually find an answer faster than it would take to use the index in a
book.
For mathematical functions use the button labeled f
x
in the standard
toolbar; in Excel 95 it is called the Function Wizard; in Excel 97 the Paste
Function. Both will give you two side-by-side columns, one for Function
C
ategory, the other for Function N
ame. Pick a category, then in that category
the name of the function you want to use. (Since there are so many functions
listed under, say, Math & Trig, you most likely will need to use the vertical
scroll bar to find your function.)
Once you have selected your function, you will not only find it described,
but you will also get help in placing the arguments. For example, when you
look under Math & Trig SUMX2MY2, a function we will often use when
computing least-squares fits, you will get two windows in which you can
place the addresses of the two columns or rows you want to use for X and Y.
1.12
The case of the changing options
There is one aspect of Excel that initially may confuse you; it is the problem
of changing options, i.e., of menu items that appear or disappear depending
on prior action on the spreadsheet. While this can greatly enlarge the useful-
ness of the spreadsheet, it can be quite unsettling to the novice, hence this
alert. Below we will illustrate it with Trendline, a very useful feature of Excel
(to be described in more detail in chapter 2) that allows you to draw a
number of least-squares lines or curves through graphed data.
The shorthand instruction for using Trendline in Excel 95 might read
I
nsert Tr
endline, but if you look in the pull-down menu under I
nsert you
may not find Tr
endline. The problem is that the Trendline option appears
only after you have activated the graph (by double-clicking on an embedded
chart, or by clicking on the tab of a separate chart). Even then, it shows but
cannot be used; for the latter, you must first select the particular data set in
the graph to which you want it to apply. Only then can you select Tr
endline
(or, for that matter, Error B
ars).
1.12 The case of the changing options
31
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
export highlighted text from pdf; extract text from pdf c#
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF
extract text from pdf using c#; copy pdf text to word document
A similar situation applies to Excel 97. Here, Tr
endline is part of the C
hart
menu, and the shorthand instruction might read C
hart Tr
endline. But you
will usually not find C
hart on the menu bar. It only appears there, instead of
D
ata, after you have activated the chart, and again becomes accessible only
after you have selected a particular data set.
In any case, consulting H
elp and asking for Trendline will give you a box
with precise road instructions. As long as you know the proper name of the
procedure, H
elp will get you there.
1.13
Importing macros and data
Spreadsheets are created to facilitate computation. Commonly used mathe-
matical operations (such as SIN, LOG, SQRT, and MINVERSE) are built-in as
functions, and some more complicated procedures (e.g., Solver, Random
Number Generation, Regression)are provided as macros. However, no
spreadsheet maker can anticipate the needs of all possible users, and Excel
therefore allows the introduction of so-called user-defined functions and
macros. In section 9.2d we will describe some user-defined functions, while
chapter 10 deals extensively with user-defined macros. However, beyond
the simple exercises of section 10.1, it makes no sense to enter long macros
by hand, and they are therefore provided in a web site from which they can
be downloaded and stored onto your own computer disk or diskette. The
web site also contains a sample file that is, likewise, larger than you might
want to enter manually.
Alternatively, you may have data or macros on a diskette, or receive them
as e-mail attachments. In all such cases, the questions are (1) where and how
to install the macros in Excel, and (2) how to enter the data in the spread-
sheet.
The macros find their home in a modulethat becomes part of the spread-
sheet. We therefore need to make the module first, then import the macros
into that module. The procedures are slightly different for earlier versions
(through Excel 95) and for more recent ones (starting with Excel 97), and are
therefore described separately. For the sake of simplicity we will assume that
the macros and data are stored in either a computer file (i.e., on a ‘hard’ disk)
or a diskette.
1 To make a module in Excel 5 or Excel 95, move the pointer to the tab at the
bottom of your spreadsheet, and right-click on it. A small menu will pop up.
Click on the first item, Insert, which will give you several options. Highlight
or double-click on Module, and click OK. You will now see a blank sheet,
with a tab carrying the name Module1 (or, if the spreadsheet already con-
tains modules, ModuleNwhere Nis a sequence number Excel assigns auto-
matically).
32
How to use Excel
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter assembly and PDF to PNG converter control. C#.NET DLLs: Use PDF to Text Converter Control
erase text from pdf; find and replace text in pdf
2 If your macro is in the form of a text file on diskette, insert it into the diskette
drive. Go to the Open File icon (the second from the left on the standard
toolbar, depicting an opening manila folder) or select F
ile O
pen. In either
case you will see the Open dialog box. Click on the arrow on the right-hand
side of the window labeled Look i
n:, select the file location, such as
Systemdisk (C:) or 3
1
2
Floppy (A:), or whatever suits the configuration of
your computer).
3 Now highlight the name of the file, or go to the bottom of the dialog box,
click on the arrow in the window for File n
ame, and type that name. Then go
to Files of t
ype:, and select All Files (*.*). Push the O
pen button.
4 In Excel 97 or later versions, start from the spreadsheet with Alt+F11, then
use I
nsert M
odule, F
ile I
mport File. The resulting Import File dialog
box is equivalent to the Open dialog box in Excel 95, as described above
under points (2) and (3). Select the disk or diskette in Look i
n:, and proceed
as indicated above. Switch back to the spreadsheet with Alt+F11.
5 In either case, the macros will now be stored in the module, where you may
see that they have interesting colors: the macro labels and comment lines
will show in dark green, the actual instructions in black and dark blue. Once
you see those colors (which are sometimes hard to distinguish, depending
on the monitor used) you can be sure that the spreadsheet has accepted
thetext as genuine macro instructions, and that they are available for your
use.
6 For data, the approach is similar, except that these go directly into the
spreadsheet rather than in a module. Therefore, in Excel 95, delete step (1)
above, but proceed directly to steps (2) and (3), except that you now import
the file called Data. Similarly, for Excel 97, there is no need to find the
module, and in fact the procedure is now the same for Excel 97 and Excel 95.
Make sure that the mouse pointer points to the top of an empty column or,
better yet, the left-top corner of an empty spreadsheet, so that the imported
data will not overwrite anything in the spreadsheet.
7 Usually (though not for our exercise data files), importing data into the
spreadsheet will involve the Text Import Wizard. This asks you about the
nature of the data file (e.g., whether and how the data are delimited, i.e.,
how the various data points are separated from each other) and then helps
you along. But that is beyond what we need to learn now; it may become rel-
evant if you want to import a long file with experimental data from some
instrument.
1.14
Differences between the various versions of Excel
This book was originally written for Excel 95 and Excel 97, but can also be
used with the subsequent Excel 98 and Excel 2000, and with the earlier Excel
5. Versions 1 through 4 are notrecommended because they do not use VBA
1.14 Differences between the various versions of Excel
33
but, instead, use a different, much more restricted macro language. Even so,
only programs in chapters 3, 7, and 10 use such macros; all other chapters
should give no problems even with earlier versions of Excel. Similarly, users
of Macintosh computers can use it, with some minor modifications, pro-
vided they have Excel version 5 (for System 7) or more recent versions.
The most important difference is that Excel version 5 runs in Windows 3.1,
whereas Excel 95 and later versions require at least Windows 95. There are
major differences between Windows 3.1 and Windows 95, but they hardly
affect Excel, which provides its own environment. As far as Excel is con-
cerned, the differences between Windows 95 and Windows 98 are rather
insignificant.
The differences between Excel 5 and subsequent versions are mostly
trivial and cosmetic. The look of several features and dialog boxes is some-
what different in the two versions. There are some minor changes in conven-
ience; for example, in Excel 5, cell notes (mentioned in section 1.9) are not
displayed automatically when you point to the cell. Excel 5 also has some-
what less extensive Help features, and provides less online VBA help.
However, none of these will seriously affect the spreadsheet exercises in this
book.
The differences between Excel 95, Excel 97, and Excel 2000 are even
smaller, except that Excel 97 introduced an improved Chart Wizard, which is
why we split the discussion in section 1.3. Starting with Excel 97, macros are
also stored in a quite different way, to be described in chapter 10. Other
major changes in Excel 97 and, especially, Excel 2000, include built-in facil-
ities to address World Wide Web sites, and the use of the Office Assistant,
both of which are of no consequence to the applications described in this
book. Starting with Excel 97, the spreadsheet has a higher capacity, of 65530
rows, and allows graphs to contain 32000 rather than 4000 points.
Furthermore, printing is made somewhat easier in Excel 97 and later ver-
sions, and creating dialog boxes has been simplified. Thanks to backward
compatibility, you can import Excel 95 spreadsheets into Excel 97, but of
course not the other way around.
For users of Macintosh computers the main differences (which are still
rather minor) stem from differences in mouse and keyboard. The Macintosh
mouse has only one button, so that the equivalent of right-clicking on a
Windows machine is achieved by the combination CTRL+click. Many oper-
ations performed on a Windows machine with the CTRL button instead use
the COMMAND button on the Macintosh keyboard, or sometimes the
OPTION or Apple key. The Microsoft Excel User’s Guide nicely juxtaposes
the corresponding Windows and Macintosh keystrokes where these are
different. But, again, these are only superficial, easily learned differences:
the underlying spreadsheets appear to be identical.
34
How to use Excel
1.15
Some often-used spreadsheet commands
To move around quickly in the spreadsheet (rather than with mouse or
arrow keys):
PageDown
Goes down one ‘page’ (typically a screenful of about 20 lines)
PageUp
Goes up one ‘page’
Ctrl+Home Goes to the upper left corner of the sheet, i.e., to cell A1
Ctrl+End
Goes to the bottom of the sheet
To move quickly to the end of a continuouscolumn or row of numbers or
instructions:
End ↑
Goes to the top cell of the column
End →
Goes to the right-most cell of the row
End ↓
Goes to the bottom cell of the column
End ←
Goes to the left-most cell of the row
To enter something (labels, numbers, formulas) in a cell, move the pointer
to that cell (using the arrow keys, or by moving the mouse and then clicking
on the cell), type what you want to enter, then either use the Enter key or
click to deposit the information in that cell.
All cell contents starting with a letter are considered to be labels, all cell
contents starting with a number are treated as data, and all cell contents
starting with an equal sign as formulas. Formulas often have a special
syntax, such as SIN(), where the brackets must enclose an argument, or PI(),
where the brackets should be left empty. Excel does not mind whether you
use lower-case and capital letters, but always displays them in the formula
window as capitals for better readability.
For copying data or formulas down short columns it is often convenient to
grab a handle and pull them down. For longer columns it is usually faster to
copy and paste.
To copy: Ctrl+c
Places active area in Clipboard, leaves original in
place.
To cut:
Ctrl+x
Places active area in Clipboard, but erases the original.
To paste: : Ctrl+v
Places contents of Clipboard in active area of the
spreadsheet.
When you want to copy the valuesrather than the formulas of cells or blocks
of cells, use special paste values instead of paste: following Ctrl+c click on
E
dit Paste S
pecial , then click on V
alues OK.
To save: : Ctrl+s s Saves it in the same place from where it was opened.
To save a file in a different place, use E
dit Save A
s … and specify the new
location before using OK or the Enter key, ↵.
1.15 Some often-used spreadsheet commands
35
1.16
Changing the default settings
In Excel, as in Windows, almost anything can be changed. It is useful to have
default settings, so that you need not specify everything every time you start
up Excel. Moreover, to the novice, it is also helpful to have fewer choices to
confuse you. However, when you become familiar with Excel, you may want
to make changes in the default settings to make the spreadsheet conform to
your specific needs and taste. Here are some of the common defaults, and
how to change them.
By default, Excel displays the standard and formatting toolbars. Excel has
many other toolbars, which you can select with V
iew ⇒T
oolbars. You can
even make your own toolbar with V
iew ⇒T
oolbars ⇒C
ustomize. An exist-
ing toolbar can be positioned anywhere on the spreadsheet simply by drag-
ging the two vertical bars at its left edge (when it is docked in its standard
place) or by its colored top (when not docked).
Many aspects of the spreadsheet proper can be changed with Fo
rmat ⇒
S
tyle ⇒M
odify, including the way numbersare represented, the fontused,
cell borders, colors, and patterns.
Many Excel settings can be personalized in T
ools ⇒O
ptions ⇒General.
Here you can specify, e.g., the number of files listedupon clicking on F
ile,
and change the Sta
ndard font(e.g., from Arial to more easily readable serif
fontsuch as Times New Roman) to perhaps a different font Siz
e. Here you
can also set the D
efault file location(from C:\My Documents) and even
define another Alternate startup file l
ocation.
Under the View tab (i.e., under T
ools ⇒Op
tions ⇒View) you can toggle the
appearance of spreadsheet G
ridlineson or off. Under the Edit tab (T
ools ⇒
O
ptions ⇒E
dit) you can (de)select to E
dit directly in the cell, which allows
you to edit in the cell (after double-clicking) rather than in the formula bar.
Here you can also Allow cell d
rag and dropor disallow it, and M
ove selection
after enterin case you prefer the cursor to stay put or move sideways rather
than move down one cell after each data, text, or formula entry.
Excel does not make back-up filesby default. If you wish to change this,
use F
iles ⇒Save A
s ⇒O
ptions and select Always create b
ackup.
When you print with the Print button on the Standard Toolbar, you use the
default printing settings. F
ile ⇒Page Setu
p provides many alternatives,
including paper sizeand orientation, as well as margins.
In Excel 97 and later versions, browse in T
ools ⇒C
ustomize to see (and
select) your Toolb
ars and their C
ommands. You can click on a command and
then use the button to get its Descrip
tion.
Likewise, in Excel 97 and beyond, the default settings for graphs are acces-
sible after you activate a chart to make the C
hart menu available. Now select
C
hart ⇒Chart T
ype, under C
hart type pick your choice, such as XY(Scatter),
select a Chart sub-t
ype such as with all data points connected by smoothed
36
How to use Excel
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested