how to display pdf file in c# : Copying text from pdf into word Library application API .net windows html sharepoint Excel5-part223

lines, and Se
t as default chart. Even better, you can define the format of the
default chart. Say that you make a number of logarithmic concentration dia-
grams, with pH from 0 to 14 as your horizontal axis, and pc from 10 (at the
bottom) to 0 (on top) in the vertical direction. Make such a graph, with axis
labels, then (while the chart is activated, so that the C
hart button is accessi-
ble in the menu toolbar) click on C
hart ⇒ Chart T
ype, select the Custom
Types tab, click on the U
ser-defined radio button, then on A
dd. In the next
dialog box, specify its N
ame, give an (optional) D
escription, Se
t as default
chart, and exit with OK. Then, the next time you highlight a block and invoke
I
nsert ⇒Ch
art you get the selected format just by pushing the F
inish button
on step 1 of the Chart Wizard. Or, faster, highlight the area involved, and type
Alt+ i, Alt+ h, Alt+f, or /+i, /+h, /+f. The details of the graph may differ
from those of the sample, but even so this can be a time saver.
1.17
Summary
In this introductory chapter you have encountered some of the basic manip-
ulations of Excel. The first time around you may feel overwhelmed by it, but
don’t worry: as you practice, you will quickly become familiar with the rules
of spreadsheets, and with their internal logic. A spreadsheet not only allows
you to perform repeated calculations (such as computing values for a sine
wave) and to print them as a graph, but to perform many much more sophis-
ticated operations, such as data analysis and mathematical simulation. The
main attributes of a spreadsheet such as Excel are:
1 Lay-out: the highly intuitive organization of a spreadsheet displays all
initial, intermediary, and final results in tabular form, making it very easy to
see precisely what is being done.
2 User-friendliness: when you perform an ‘illegal’ operation, such as dividing
by zero or taking the logarithm of a negative number, the spreadsheet does
notcome to a punishing halt but, instead, flags the problem area. Then it
goes on with its task, and performs the operation wherever it can do so.
3 Automatic updating: with the exception of macros and some functions, all
computations are adjusted automatically any time that you enter a new
number or instruction in the spreadsheet, thereby keeping it up-to-date.
4 Precision: all calculations are performed in so-called ‘double precision’, that
is, to a precision of about 1 in 10
15
, even when only a few digits are shown.
Truncation and round-off errors are therefore seldom a problem in spread-
sheet calculations.
5 Graphing: a picture is often much more informative than a table of numbers.
The spreadsheet makes it very convenient to display data in graphical form.
Graphs are readily made. By placing them directly on the spreadsheet the
user can immediately see the results of the calculations. And you will not
need any other software to make publication-quality graphs.
1.17 Summary
37
Copying text from pdf into word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy and paste text from pdf to word; c# get text from pdf
Copying text from pdf into word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf acrobat; copying text from pdf to excel
6 Competence: modern spreadsheets contain a large number of functions,
thereby facilitating rather complicated calculations.
7 Data analysis: modern spreadsheets contain several convenient data-
analysis aids, such as Excel’s Trendline, a flexible linear least-squares tool,
and Excel’s Solver, a powerful multi-parameter non-linear least-squares
fitting routine. Both of these are described in detail in chapter 3, and are
used throughout the remainder of this book. Excel also contains a large
number of tools for statistical data analysis.
8 Flexibility: repeated tasks can easily be customized, and default settings
adjusted, to suit the user.
9 Expandability: starting with version 5, Excel has the added feature that the
user can write or import entire BASIC programs to perform even more com-
plicated tasks. Chapter 10 will discuss this capability in considerable detail
and with many examples.
In the next chapters we will illustrate some applications of spreadsheets to
common problems of analytical chemistry. Once you have become familiar
with the spreadsheet, you may want to use it for many other tasks, such as
for plotting your experimental data for lab reports as well as for publica-
tions, or in quite different areas, such as to visualize theoretical expressions
in physical  chemistry.  As  with  many  modern  computer  tools,  ultimately
your imagination is the limit. 
38
How to use Excel
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
etc. High quality image can be saved after cutting, copying and pasting into PDF page in .NET console application. Guarantee high
extract text from pdf with formatting; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is
extract text from pdf; copy text from pdf with formatting
part ii: statistics and related methods
chapter
2
in t r od u ct i o n  to
stat i s t i c s
2.1
Gaussian statistics
Analyzing  a  number of observations, each  subject  to  some experimental
error, in an effort to obtain a more reliable answer from a multitude of meas-
urements than can  presumably be obtained from  a single observation,  is
part of statistics. For example, while the age at which you, my dear reader,
will die, is usually not well known in advance, the commercial providers of
life insurance need only know the average life expectancy of your cohort (the
group of persons of comparable age, gender, socioeconomic group, etc.) in
order to compute a profitable premium, on the assumption that they will
insure a large enough group so that the effects of early and late deaths will
cancel each other out.
The underlying assumption in statistical analysis is that the experimental
error is not merely repeated in each measurement, otherwise there would be
no gain in multiple observations. For example, when the ‘pure’ chemical we
use as a standard is contaminated (say, with water of crystallization), so that
its  purity  is less  than 100%, no  amount of  chemical calibration with that
standard will show the existence of such a bias, even though all conclusions
drawn  from  the measurements  will  contain consequent, determinate  or
systematic  errors.  Systematic  errors  act  uni-directionally,  so  that  their
effects do not ‘average out’ no matter how many repeat measurements are
made. Statistics  does  not deal with  systematic  errors, but  only with  their
counterparts, indeterminate or random errors. This important limitation
of what statistics does, and what it does not, is often overlooked, but should
be kept in mind. Unfortunately, the sum-total of all systematic errors is often
larger than that of the random ones, in which case statistical error estimates
can be very misleading if misinterpreted in terms of the presumed reliability
of  the  answer. The insurance companies know  it well, and  use  exclusion
clauses for, say, preexisting illnesses, for war, or for unspecified ‘acts of God’,
all of which act uni-directionally to increase the covered risk.
39
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. High quality image can be saved after cutting, copying and pasting into PDF page. Empower to cut, copy
export highlighted text from pdf; extract text from pdf java
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C# source code is available for copying and using in PDF file and maintains the original text style (including The magnification of the original PDF page size.
delete text from pdf online; find and replace text in pdf file
40
Introduction to statistics
In this chapter we will illustrate some properties of Gaussian statistics.
Such statistics are often (but by no means always) applicable to experiment-
al data. Examples where Gaussian statistics do not apply are the throwing of
dice (or, more generally, when we use a discrete number of trials and each
trial has a discrete outcome), which is described by binomial statistics, and
the disintegration of radioactive nuclei (for a continuous trial with discrete
outcomes)  which  obeys  Poissonian statistics.  However,  for  a  sufficiently
large  number  of  independent  observations,  all  observations  tend  to
approach  Gaussian  statistics,  which  is  why  the  Gaussian  distribution  is
often  (including in Excel) but  somewhat misleadingly  called the  normal
one. We will come back to the uses and misuses of Gaussian statistics in sec-
tions 2.8 and 2.9.
In a Gaussian distribution, errors of any size are allowed. The probability
that a measurement deviates from its ‘true’ value is assumed to depend on
the square of that deviation; a positive or negative deviation of the same size
is  therefore  assumed  to  be  equally  likely. Within  Gaussian  statistics,  the
usual procedure to calculate the ‘best’ answer from a multitude of measure-
ments is called the method of least squares; it consists of minimizing the
sum of the squares of these deviations. However, since the true answer is not
known (if it were, we would not need statistics!) we usually substitute the
measured  average  for  the  true  value,  and  then  minimize  the  sum  of
the squares of the differences between the individual observations and the
average of these observations. In this context, in using the term average, we
may simply mean the sum of all the measurements, divided by the number
of  those  measurements,  as  defined  in  equation  (2.2-1),  or  some  more
sophisticated quantity, such as a weighted average, in which some measure-
ments are given more credence than others.
In this workbook we will often use Gaussian ‘noise’ to simulate the meas-
urement imprecisions associated with experimental data, and it will there-
fore be useful to familiarize ourselves with such noise. This is the purpose of
the first spreadsheet exercise of this chapter.
Instructions for exercise 2.1
Open an Excel spreadsheet.
Point with the mouse pointer to the tab labeled Sheet1, and right-click to get the prop-
erties of the label. Click on Rename. In Excel 97, just type a new name, say ‘Gauss’, then
depress the enter key. In earlier versions of Excel, you get a Rename Sheet dialog box.
Replace the generic name Sheet1 in the Name box by the new name, then click OK.
Now fill column A with data containing Gaussian noise. Click on T
ools D
ata
Analysis. In the resulting Data Analysis dialog box, double-click on Random Number
Generation. In order to find it, you may have to grab the scrollbar inside the dialog box
with your mouse pointer, and move it downwards.
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction functions. Enable or disable copying and form filling functions.
cut and paste text from pdf document; c# extract text from pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Copying and Pasting Pages. PDF file; you can also copy and paste pages from a PDF document into
get text from pdf file c#; extract text from pdf java open source
Place the mouse pointer over the down arrow inside the D
istribution window, click on
it, then select the Normal distribution by clicking on it.
Below it, under the heading ‘Parameters’, click inside the window labeled Me
an (a ver-
tical bar should appear in the window to show you that it is ready for your input), and
enter the value 10. Do not use the Enter key, or depress the OK button; keep away from
them until you are done with the entire dialog box.
Move the pointer to the window defining the S
tandard deviation, and set it at 1.
Click on the round radio button for the O
utput Range, then specify it in the window to
the right of the label as A1:A10000. (If you wish, you may also fill the entire column A,
which contains 16384 cells. In that case you can specify the range as either A1:A16384
or as $A:$A, which Excel interprets as the entire column A.)
Leave all other windows blank, and click on OK or press the Enter key. The computer
will now take some time to calculate 10000 (or 16 384) data with an average value of 10
plus Gaussian noise of standard deviation 1. (It will show you that it is busy with the
message Calculating Random Number Generation … on the status bar, just above the
Start button.)
Now that a data set has been generated, we will analyze it. To that end we will specify
sorting binsthat define a range of data values. Place the value 6.2 in cell B3, in B4
placethe instruction=B3+0.2, then copy this instruction all the way down to B41.
This will generate bins for counting how many data fall in the range<6.2, between
6.2 and 6.4, between 6.4 and 6.6, etc., with the last bin for data between 13.6 and
13.8. Although the average is 10 and the standard deviation is 1, we cast a much
wider net, anticipating that there may be data well outside the range from 10 -1=9 to
10+1 =11.
10 Now call the Histogram tool, which will count how many of the data fit in each of the
bins. To simplify matters we will first analyze the first ten data.
11 Select T
ools  D
ata Analysis, and in the Data Analysis dialog box double-click on
Histogram.
12 In the Histogram dialog box specify the I
nput Range as A1:A10 (or of any other set of 10
adjacent data, such as A469:A478), and the B
in Range as B3:B41.
13 Click on the radio button for the O
utput Range, and in its window specify the top
leftcorner of the histogram output as E2. Leave all other fields blank, and click 
on OK.
14 The results of the analysis of the first 10 data will now appear in columns E and F:
column E repeats the bins, while column F lists how many of the analyzed data have a
value within the interval specified by the various bins. Any values greater than 13.8 will
be listed in cell F42 under ‘More’.
15 Verify that the total data count is indeed 10, e.g., by depositing in cell F1 the instruction
=SUM(F3:F42).
2.1 Gaussian statistics
41
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction functions. Enable or disable copying and form filling functions
c# read text from pdf; cut and paste text from pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF Pages Extraction, Copying and Pasting. a specific page of PDF file; you are also able to copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF
copy text from pdf; copy paste text pdf
16 Since we only consider 10 data, and sort them into 40 bins, the majority of these bins
will be empty (and therefore show a 0). Most of the remaining bins will contain a 1,
while one or a few may show a larger number.
In order to compare the resulting frequency distribution in column F with
a Gaussian distribution, we recall that the latter is given by
(2.1-1)
where Pis the probability density, and P(x) dx is the corresponding probabil-
ity of  finding a particular value in the range  between x and  dx when  the
average is  and the standard deviation is 
σ
.
17 For the sake of comparing the data in column F with the prediction of eq. (2.1-1), we
now deposit in cell C3 the value 6.1, in cell C4 the instruction =C3+0.2, and copy this
down to cell C42. The resulting values are precisely 0.1 less than those in column B.
(Alternatively you can use the instruction=B3-0.1 in C3, and deposit the value 13.9
in cell C42.) We do this in order to specify the midpoints of the bin ranges, whereas the
Histogram routine uses the upper limits of their ranges.
18 In cells D3:D42 calculate the frequency of finding data in a given range as the product
of the total number of data considered (here: 10), the bin width (0.2), and the probabil-
ity P according to (2.1-1). For instance, the instruction in D3 should read=
(2/SQRT(2*PI()))*EXP(-0.5*(C3 -10)^2) because 10×0.2=2, 
σ
=1 and  =10.
19 In order to make a graph of columns C, D and F, first highlight C3:D42 (use the Shift
key), then release the Shift key and depress the Control key, use the mouse to move the
pointer to cell F42, release Ctrl and re-engage Shift, and go up in column E with either
End ↑, Page Up, or with the ↑ key to E3. The non-adjacent blocks C3:D42 and F3:F42
will now be highlighted, and therefore activated.
20 Select I
nsert Ch
art, and complete the ChartWizard. You should get a result looking
somewhat like Fig. 2.1-1, although the specific details will look different because every
data set is different. Note the discrete nature of the count, with frequencies of 0, 1, 2, 3
etc. Not surprisingly, the agreement is quite poor: a highly discrete distribution such as
obtained here cannot be represented very well by a continuous expression such as
(2.1-1).
21 Now repeat the same procedure for a 100-data set, such as A1:A100. Use the same bins
as before; the only changes you need to make are to specify in the Histogram dialog box
the Input Range A1:A100 and, in the comparison with (2.1-1), to change the multiplier
of Pto 100 ×0.2=20 (instead of 2). Make these calculations in new columns. The result
should look like Fig. 2.1-2.
x
x
P=
1
σ
2
π
exp 
-(x-x
)
2
2
σ
2
42
Introduction to statistics
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
protect PDF document from editing, printing, copying and commenting Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images multiple file formats or export PDF to Word
copy text pdf; extract text from scanned pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Merge, combine, and consolidate multiple PDF files into one PDF file. PDF page extraction, copying and pasting allow users to move PDF pages; PDF Text Process.
copy and paste pdf text; copy text from locked pdf
22 The agreement between the data and equation (2.1-1) is still quite poor. However, it
clearly shows that quite a few data fall outsidethe average plus or minus one standard
deviation: for a sufficiently large sample, approximately one-third of all data will do so
when the fluctuations are Gaussian.
23 The larger the data set we examine, the better the agreement with (2.1-1) will be.
Convince yourself of this by using a 1000-data set, then a 10 000-data set. Figures 2.1-3
and 2.1-4 illustrate the type of graphs you might obtain. The fit between your ‘experi-
mental’ data and the theoretical expression becomes quite good when the sample is
sufficiently large!
2.1 Gaussian statistics
43
Fig.2.1-1:Ten Gaussian data with mean 10 and standard deviation 1, sorted in 0.2-wide
bins.
Fig.2.1-2:100 Gaussian data with mean 10 and standard deviation 1, sorted in 0.2-wide
bins.
The  above figures  tell the story of statistics. When we  consider a  suffi-
ciently large data set, as in Fig. 2.1-4, the distribution fits the theory rather
closely.  In  the  much  smaller set  of  Fig.  2.1-1,  the  individual  fluctuations
dominate. As the sample size increases, the individual fluctuations become
less visible, and equation (2.1-1) gradually becomes a better descriptor of its
aggregate behavior. Statistics typically apply to large data sets, but are not
meant  to  describe  the  behavior  of  individual  data  points,  or  small  sets
thereof. If they are nonetheless pushed to do so, as in Fig. 2.1-1, they usually
fail miserably.
44
Introduction to statistics
Fig.2.1-3:1000 Gaussian data with mean 10 and standard deviation 1, sorted in 0.2-
widebins.
Fig.2.1-4:10 000 Gaussian data with mean 10 and standard deviation 1, sorted in 0.2-
wide bins.
2.2
Replicate measurements
When a measurement y is repeated N times under the same conditions, we
can calculate its average or mean value  as
(2.2-1)
The  standard  deviation is  a  measure  of  the  irreproducibility  in  the
average, again assuming that the experiment is repeated  under the same
conditions. It is usually given the symbol 
σ
, and is defined as
σ
=
(2.2-2)
Its  square 
σ
2
is called  the variance. The  next spreadsheet exercise will
illustrate the meaning of the standard deviation.
Instructions for exercise 2.2
Open an Excel spreadsheet.
Point with the mouse pointer to the tab labeled Sheet1, and rename it Average. (For
details, see instruction (2) of exercise 2.1.)
Deposit the label ‘n’ in cell A1, and the label ‘data’ in B1.
In cell A3 deposit the number 1, and in cell A4 the number 2.
Place the pointer in cell A3 (it should be a heavy cross), depress the mouse button,
move the pointer to cell A4, then release the button. Both cells (A3+A4) should now be
activated.
Grab the common handle of cells A3+A4 (when the mouse pointer has the shape of a
plus sign) and drag the cells by this handle down to cell 302. This will establish
N-values from 1 to 300 in column A. Or: in cell A4 use the instruction=A3+1, and copy
this down to cell A302.
Click on T
ools, then on D
ata Analysis, and in the Data Analysis dialog box select
Random Number Generation.
In the Random Number Generation dialog box that now appears, select ‘Normal’ as the
Distribution, 10 as the Mean, and 1 as the Standard Deviation. Furthermore, specify
the Output Range as B3:B302. Click OK.
Select block A3:B302, e.g., by first using the mouse pointer to activate a small block
such as A3:B6, and by then, while keeping the Shift depressed, keying in End followed
by ↓.
N
i=1
(y
i
-y
)
2
(N-1)
y
=
1
N
N
i=1
y
i
y
2.2 Replicate measurements
45
10 Select I
nsert Ch
art, and use the ChartWizard to select an XY plot, showing individual
data points without a connecting line. Complete the graph; Figure 2.2-1 suggests what
it might look like.
11 We notice that the data all cluster around a Y-value of about 10, but that individual
points can lie quite a bit farther from that average value: occasionally a point will lie
more than 2 or 3 standard deviations from the average. That shows the true nature of
such a distribution; if we consider a sufficiently large number of such data, we will find
that about 68% of them lie within one standard deviation from the mean, but that the
remainder, about one-third of all points, lie further away.
12 Click on the numbers with the X- or Y-axis, right-click, choose Format Axis, and select
the Font and Scale to your liking. In our example we have used 16 point regular Times
New Roman, and restricted the Y-scale to the range from 7 to 13, but please make your
own decisions. We have also deleted the series marker (which usually appears in a sep-
arate box to the right of the graph) by clicking on it to highlight it, and by then using the
Delete key to remove it.
13 Activate cell C4, and deposit in it the instruction=AVERAGE(B3:B5) which is equiva-
lent to the instruction=(B3+B4+B5)/3. Verify in an empty cell that the instruction
indeed calculates the average, then erase your verification lest it will show as an odd
point in one of the graphs you will make.
14 Activate cell D4, and make it carry the instruction=STDEV(B3:B5), which calculates
the standard deviation according to eqn. (2.2-2). Again verify that STDEV indeed cal-
culates correctly, then erase that test.
15 Highlight the area C3:D5, grab its common handle, and pull that handle all the way
down to cell D302. Column C should now have 100 data, each the average of three suc-
cessive data points in column B, while column D will now contain the corresponding
standard deviations.
46
Introduction to statistics
Fig.2.2-1:300 replicate data with Gaussian noise.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested