how to display pdf file in c# : C# get text from pdf Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax Excel6-part224

16 Take a look at the averages and the standard deviations: they will show considerable
fluctuations, even though all numbers were calculated from Gaussian noise with a
constant standard deviation.
17 The easiest way to ‘take a look’ at these averages and their standard deviations is, of
course, to plot them. Activate cell A3, then drag the pointer to A302, depress the Ctrl
key, move the mouse pointer over to cell C302, and drag the pointer to cell C3. This will
highlight the data in columns A and C you want to graph.
18 Click on I
nsert  Ch
art, and answer the ChartWizard to make the graph showing the
three-point averages. Plot it; it might look somewhat like Fig. 2.2-2.
19 Click on the chart, then on one of the data points in it, then right-click, and select
Format Data Series. In the resulting dialog box go for the Y Error Bars tab, under 
D
isplay select Both, and push the radio button for C
ustom. Then deposit in the two
boxes labeled + and - the identical instruction:=AVERAGE!D3:D302, and use the OK
button to enter these instructions. You should now obtain a graph resembling Fig.
2.2-3, in which all three-point averages are specifically labeled with their correspond-
ing standard deviations.
Let’s take a moment to consider what we have so far. Although all data in
column B were generated with Gaussian noise, with a standard deviation of
1, we see that the three-point averages fluctuate rather wildly. Just look at the
data in Fig. 2.2-3a (an enlargement of the first part of Fig. 2.2-3) around
n=64, where there are several sets of three consecutive data that lie close
together and therefore have quite small standard deviations, of the order of
0.1, so that the error bars of successive data triplets do not overlap at all. To
the right of these is a data triplet with a standard deviation of almost 2. And
as the averages of points 22 through 24 and 28 through 30 show, this is not an
isolated occurrence;  similar  (though  somewhat less dramatic) cases are
visible elsewhere in Fig. 2.2-3. You will, of course, have different data, but
2.2 Replicate measurements
47
Fig.2.2-2:Three-point averages of the data set of Fig. 2.2-1.
C# get text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf without formatting; extract pdf text to excel
C# get text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf to word; copy pdf text to word
they will illustrate the same general phenomenon, viz. that statistics don’t
apply to small data sets, such as triplicates. This is the same point made in
exercise 2.1.
20 Activate cell E8 and let it calculate the average of the 10 consecutive data in B3:B12.
21 Similarly, in cell F8, compute the corresponding standard deviation.
22 Highlight block E3:F12, grab it by its handle, and copy it down to F302. You should now
have 30 averages of 10 points each, with their standard deviations.
23 Use columns A and E to make a graph, on a new sheet.
24 Add error bars to the averages plotted, using as before the Format Data Series dialog
box, where you select the Y Error Bars tab, then specify the Error Amount under
C
ustom as=AVERAGE!F3:F302 in both directions, and compare with Fig. 2.2-4.
25 In column G calculate the averages of 30 consecutive data points, and in column H the
corresponding standard deviations. Plot the resulting thirty-point averages, with their
individual error bars. Figure 2.2-5 shows an example.
48
Introduction to statistics
Fig.2.2-3:Three-point averages with error bars of ±
σ
for the data set of Fig. 2.2-1.
Fig.2.2-3a:Detail of Fig. 2.2-3, with some points emphasized in color.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
try this C# demo. // Open a document. String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Get a text
copy paste pdf text; extract formatted text from pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field Learn how to retrieve all annotations from PDF file in C# project. // Get PDF document
export text from pdf to excel; extracting text from pdf
Again we step back for a moment. By taking the average over a sufficiently
large number of data we see their statistics emerge: the ten-point averages
have more uniform values for the averages and the standard deviations,
while the thirty-point averages are a further improvement over the ten-point
ones, but still exhibit some variability. None of these averages is exactly
10.000, nor do the standard deviations have the value 1.000, but the trend is
clear: statistical averages do apply to these data provided the samples used
are sufficiently large, and they are the more reliable the larger the data set
that is used. A balance must be struck between the need for higher data pre-
cision and the time and effort needed to achieve it. In statistics, as in all
other aspects of quantitative analysis, we encounter the law of diminishing
returns: here, a twofold increase in precision usually requires a fourfold
increase  in  the  number  of  data  (and  hence  in  the  experimental  time)
needed.
2.2 Replicate measurements
49
Fig.2.2-4:Ten-point averages of the data set of Fig. 2.2-1.
Fig.2.2-5:Thirty-point averages of the data set of Fig. 2.2-1.
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
On this Visual C# tutorial page, you will see how SDK in your application to extract and get text from Tiff Extracted text can be output to Word or PDF document
extract text from pdf open source; pdf text replace tool
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C# Project: DLLs for PDF Image Extraction.
delete text from pdf with acrobat; export highlighted text from pdf to word
26 Finally, calculate the average and standard deviation of all 300 data points. For the data
set shown in Fig. 2.2-1 the result is 10.04±0.96, quite close to 10.00±1.00 we might
obtain for, say, a data set containing a million points. But there is no gain in taking that
many data: thirty points was plenty for this (synthetic, and therefore highly idealized)
data set to find the average as about 10± 1, while three was statistically inadequate.
At the risk of being repetitive (which this exercise is all about anyway), let
us look once more at some of these data. (You will, of course, have different
data, but you will most likely have comparable regions from which you can
draw similar conclusions.) The data in B61:B63 just happen to be very close
to each other, and to the true average. (In this case we know the true average
to be 10.00 because we have used a synthetic data set; in a more realistic situ-
ation the true average is not known.) The data in the next triplet, B64:B66, lie
even closer together, and therefore have an even smaller standard deviation.
However, that high average value of about 11, with its very small standard
deviation, would be quite misleading!
The triplet B70:B72 just happened to contain one  fairly high  reading,
12.79. Should we have thrown out that high point as an outlier? Absolutely
not: the high point is a perfectly legitimate member of this Gaussian distri-
bution. The conclusion we can draw from this or similar experiments is that,
even for such an ideal case of a synthetic Gaussian distribution of errors,
triplicate measurements are  statistically  inadequate  to yield  a  standard
deviation. The only benefit of a triplicate determination lies in the value of
its average, which can be assumed to be somewhat more reliable than the
value of an individual measurement.
Since the value ofanystandard deviationcomputed fromjust three replicas
can vary wildly, such ‘statistical estimates’ have little scientific standing. A
sufficientlylargenumberofobservationsisrequired tojustifytheuseofstatis-
ticalanalysis –otherwisewemisuse statistics as anemptyritual, merelygoing
throughthemotions,andgivingourresultsasemblanceofstatisticalrespect-
abilitytheydonotdeserve.Infact,onecanestimatetherelativestandarddevia-
tion of the standard deviation, which comes to 1/√(2N–2) where N is the
numberofrepeatmeasurementsused,seeJ.R.Taylor,Anintroductiontoerror
analysis, University Science Books, 2nd ed. 1997. Consequently the standard
deviationofatriplicate measurement has, itself,arelative standard deviation
of50%! Anditwouldrequiresome5000repeatexperimentstoreducethatvalue
to 1%.The moralof allthis is: use statistics wherevertheiruse is justified, and
thenusethemwell–butdon’tdegradethembyapplyingthem,inappropriately,
tosmalldatasets,orbyover-specifyingtheprecisionofthestandarddeviation.
A picture is worth a thousand words, which is why we have used error bars
to make our point. However, there is another, simpler way to demonstrate
that, for our limited sample, the standard deviations we obtain are only esti-
matesof the true standard deviation.
50
Introduction to statistics
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and
erase text from pdf; can't copy text from pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction In addition, C# users can append a PDF file get PDFDocument object from one file String inputFilePath1
cut text pdf; copy pdf text to word document
27 Determine the smallest value of the standard deviations in the three-point samples
with the instruction=MIN(D3:D302), and for the corresponding largest value with
=MAX(D3:D302). Likewise find the extreme values for the standard deviations of the
ten-point samples in column F, and for the thirty-point samples in column H.
28 Record these values, then save the spreadsheet, and close it.
In our particular example we find for the 100 three-point samples a
minimum standard deviation of 0.12, and a maximum of 1.91, quite a
spreadaround thetheoretical valueof 1.00! (The specific numerical values
youwillfindwillof coursebedifferent fromtheexamplegiven here,butthe
trendsare likely to be similar.) For the 30 ten-point sampleswe obtain the
extreme values 0.35 and 1.45, and for the 10 thirty-point samples 0.73 and
1.23.Whiletakingmoresamplesimprovesmatters, evenwiththirtysamples
our estimate of the standard deviation can be off by more than 20%. And
this is for by-the-book, synthetic Gaussian noise. From now on, take all
standarddeviations you calculatewithan appropriate grain of salt: for any
finite data set, the standard deviations are themselves estimates subject to
chance.
2.3
The propagation of imprecision from a single parameter
Experimental data are often used to calculate some other, derived quantity
F. When we have taken enough data to make a statistically significant esti-
mate of its standard deviation, one can ask what will be the resulting stan-
dard  deviation  in  the  derived  quantity.  In  other  words,  how  does  the
standard deviation of the measured, experimental data Xpropagate through
the calculation, to produce an estimate of the resulting standard deviation
in the derived answer F? Such an estimate of experimental imprecision is
often called the ‘error’ in the answer, and the method considered below is
then called a ‘propagation of errors’. However, the true errors will almost
always be much larger, since they will also contain any systematic errors
(‘inaccuracy’, ‘determinate error’ or ‘bias’), including those due to inadver-
tent changes in experimental conditions when the experiment is repro-
duced at another time or place. In the example below, we will consider how
the standard deviation, which measures random error (and is therefore a
measure of the imprecision of the data rather than of their inaccuracy) prop-
agates through a calculation.
Simple rules suffice in a number of simple cases, such as addition and
subtraction (where the standard deviations add), or multiplication and divi-
sion (where the relativestandard deviations add). Simple rules also apply to
a few transforms, such as exponentiation or taking logs, where the nature of
the variance changes from absolute to relative, or vice versa. However, those
2.3 The propagation of imprecision from a single parameter
51
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
annotating features, provides developers with a great .NET solution to annotate .pdf file with both text & graphics. From this page, you will get a simple VB
copy text from encrypted pdf; copy paste text pdf file
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Able to find and get PDF text position details in C#.NET application. Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole document.
extract pdf text to word; get text from pdf image
rules leave us stranded in many other cases, where we therefore must use a
more general approach.
Say that we measure the cross-section of a sphere, and then calculate its
volume. Given a standard deviation in the cross-section, what is the result-
ing standard deviation in the volume of the sphere? Or we might make a pH
reading, then use it to compute the corresponding hydrogen ion concentra-
tion [H
]. Again, based on the standard deviation of the pH measurement,
what is the resulting standard deviation in [H
]?
There are several ways to approach such problems. When you are uncom-
fortable  with  calculus,  it  may  initially  be  the  simplest to  use  algebraic
expressions or series expansion. For example, the volume V of a sphere,
expressed  in  terms of  its  diameter  d, is  (4/3)
π
(d/2)
3
=
π
d
3
/6. When  the
measurement  produces  a  diameter  d±∆d,  where  ∆d is  an  estimate  of
the experimental imprecision in d, then the volume  follows as V±∆V=
π
(d ± ∆d )
3
/6 = (
π
/6) × (d
3
±3d
2
∆d + 3d(∆d )
2
±(∆d )
3
)≈(
π
/6) ×
(d
3
±3d
2
∆d)=(
π
d
3
/6)×(1±3∆d/d) when we make the usual assumption
that ∆d<< d, so that all higher-order terms in ∆d can be neglected. In other
words, the relative standard deviation of the volume, ∆V/V, is three times the
relative standard deviation ∆d/d of the diameter, a result we could also have
obtained  from  the  above-quoted  rules  for  multiplication,  because  r
3
=
r×r×r.
Using calculus we can obtain the same result as follows: again assuming
that the deviations ∆yare small relative to the parameters y themselves, we
have  ∆V/∆d≈dV/dd=d(
π
d
3
/6)/dd=3
π
d
2
/6=3V/d or  ∆V/V=3∆d/d.  In
general, when we have a function F of a single variable x, then the standard
deviation 
σ
F
of Fis related to the standard deviation 
σ
x
of xthrough
(2.3-1)
This is where the spreadsheet comes in, because we can use it to compute
the numerical value of the derivative dF/dxeven when you, my reader, may
be uncomfortable (or even unfamiliar) with calculus. Here is the definition
of the derivative:
(2.3-2)
Consequently we can find the numerical valueof the derivative of F with
respect to xby calculating the function F twice, once with the original para-
meter x, and once with that parameter slightly changed (from x to x+ ∆x),
and by then dividing their difference by the magnitude of that change, ∆x.
When ∆x is sufficiently small, this will calculate the value of dF/dx without
requiring formal differentiation. Here goes.
dF
dx
=lim
∆x→0
∆F
∆x
=lim
∆x→0
F(x+∆x)- F(x)
∆x
σ
F
=
dF
dx
σ
x
52
Introduction to statistics
Instructions for exercise 2.3
Open an Excel spreadsheet, and name it (by renaming its label) Propagation.
Deposit the label ‘d=’ in cell A1, ‘sd=’ in A2, ‘V=’ in A3, ‘dV/dd=’ in A4 and ‘sV=’ in A5,
where we use s instead of 
σ
.
Optional: if you want to spend the extra effort on appearance, activate cell A2, use the
function key F2 to select the editing mode, in the formula window highlight the letter s,
then use the down-arrow next to the font listing (to the left of the formula window) to
select the Symbol font, click on it, then click somewhere in the spreadsheet area. You
can do the same for sV in A5, etc. Since such beautification of the text is more decora-
tive than functional, we will not spend time on it, but instead use equivalents such as s
for 
σ
, and S for ∑.
In cells B1 and B2 deposit numerical values for d and sd respectively.
Activate cell B1, and click on Insert Name Define. In the resulting Define Name dialog
box, the top window (under Names in Workbook:) will now show the d (otherwise type
it in), while the bottom window (under Refers to:) will show=PROPAGATION!$B$1
(and, again, make it so if it is not so). Click on OK. Similarly, give the (future) contents of
cell B2 the name sd. Note that Excel guesses the correct name (when already used in
the cell to the left of that being named) and thereby reduces the amount of typing you
need to do. Naming cells can only be done when we use absolute addressing of these
cells, i.e., when they represent constants.
In cell B3 place the formula=PI()*(d^3)/6.
In cell B4 now calculate the derivative as=(PI()*((d+sd)^3)/6–B3)/sd.
In cell B5 calculate the final result, sV, as=ABS(B4)*sd.
In order to compare this with the theoretical result 
σ
V
=(dV/dd) 
σ
d
we use cell B6 to
calculate ∆V=(3V/d) ∆d. Convince yourself that the result in B6 is the same as that in
B5 as long as sd<<d. Note that, in cell B4, you have performed a numerical
differentiation without using calculus!
10 Save the spreadsheet, then close it.
As our second example, we will estimate the standard deviation in [H+]
when the concentration of hydrogen ions is calculated from a pH reading p
with a corresponding imprecision 
p. In order to see how the imprecision
propagates, we now use the relation [H+]=10–pH =10–(p±
p)=10–p(1±
p/p)=
10
–p
×10
±
p/p
. There does not exist a closed-form expression for  10
±
p/p
analogous to that which we used for (d+∆d)
3
in our earlier example, but
instead we can use the series expansion
a
=1+
ln(a)+(
ln(a))
2
/2!+(
ln(a))
3
/3!+(
ln(a))
4
/4!+≈ 1+
ln(a)
when 
<< 1
2.3 The propagation of imprecision from a single parameter
53
where we  will again  assume  that 
p/p is  much  smaller than 1,  so that
10
±
p/p
≈1±(
p/p)  ln(10)  and  [H
+
]=10
–p
×10
±
p/p
=10
–p
×[1±(∆p/p)
ln(10)]. Consequently the hydrogen ion concentration [H
+
] has a relative
standard deviation of (
p/p) ln(10), and an absolute standard deviation of
(
p/p)×10
–p
×ln 10=[H
+
]×ln(10)×
p/pH .
Calculus again provides a much more general and direct approach to this
problem. The calculation from pH to [H
+
] converts the measured parameter
x(here: the pH) into the derived function F (here: [H
+
]=10
–pH
). We have
d(a
–x
)/dx=-a
–x
ln(a) so that d([H
+
])/d(pH)=d(10
–pH
)/d(pH)=-10
–pH
×
ln(10)=-[H
+
] ln(10). Consequently, 
σ
H
=|d[H
+
]/d(pH)|
σ
pH
=[H
+
] ln(10)×
σ
pH
, and the resulting standard deviation in [H
+
] is 
σ
pH
×ln(10).
Below we will again use the spreadsheet to bypass series expansion as well
as differentiation when we only need a numerical (rather than a general,
algebraic) result. When we deal with experimental imprecision, numerical
rather than algebraic results are usually all that is required.
11 Reopen the spreadsheet Propagation, and deposit the label ‘pH=’ in cell D1, ‘spH=’ in
D2, ‘[H]=’ in D3, ‘dH/dpH=’ in D4 and ‘sH=’ in D5.
12 In cells E1 and E2 deposit numerical values for pH and spH respectively, and name
their contents.
13 In cell E3 place the formula=10^-pH .
14 In cell E4 calculate the derivative as=(10^–(pH+spH)–E3)/spH.
15 In cell E5 calculate the final result, sH, as=ABS(E4)*spH, and compare this with the
theoretical result by calculating the latter, [H
+
] ln 10×
σ
pH
.
16 Save the spreadsheet again, and close.
2.4
The propagation of imprecision from multiple parameters
When the derived result is a function of several independent parameters,
each with its own experimental imprecision, computing the propagation of
such imprecision becomes more complicated when we attempt to do it with
algebraic expressions and series expansions. However, the answer remains
straightforward when we use partialderivatives, i.e., when we consider sep-
arately the effects of each of the input parameters. Given a function F(x
1
, x
2
,
x
3
, … , x
N
)of Nvariables x
i
, where each x
i
has an associated standard devia-
tion 
σ
i
, the resulting standard deviation 
σ
F
in the function F will be given by
σ
F
=
(2.4-1)
N
i=1
F
x
i
2
σ
i
2
54
Introduction to statistics
While the standard deviation 
σ
F
is the desired final result, since it has the
same dimension of the function F, the corresponding variances 
σ
F
yield
somewhat simpler equations:
(2.4-2)
Again, in order to use these equations numerically, one need not know
howto takepartial derivatives(althoughthat certainly would not hurt), but
merely realizethat thepartialderivativeofthefunctionFwithrespecttox
i
is
definedas
(2.4-3)
Therefore, one can calculate the partial derivative of Fwith respect to x
i
by
calculating the function Ftwice, once with the original parameters and once
with just oneof these parameters slightly changed (from x
i
to x
i
+∆x
i
), and
by then dividing their difference by the magnitude of that change, ∆x
i
. When
∆x
i
is sufficiently small, this will calculate F/x
i
without requiring formal
partial  differentiation.  Below  we  will  compare  the  calculus-based  and
numerical method, using one of the examples given by Andraos (J. Chem.
Educ. 73 (1996) 150) as a test function, namely
F=log(xy+z
2
) –x/z
3
where
F/x=y/
(
(xy+z
2
) ln(10)
)
-1/z
3
F/y=x/
(
(xy+z
2
) ln(10)
)
F/z=2z/
(
(xy+z2) ln(10)
)
+3x/z4
Instructions for exercise 2.4
Again reopen the spreadsheet Propagation.
Deposit the label ‘x=‘ in cell A7, ‘y=’ in A8, and ‘z=’ in A9.
In cell B7 deposit a value for x, in B8 a value for y, and in B9 a value for z.
Likewise, in cells D7:D9 deposit the labels ‘sx=’, ‘sy=’, and ‘sz=’, and in cells E7:E9 the
corresponding values for the standard deviations in x, y, and z respectively. The only
requirements are that the value for sx should be much smaller than that for x, and the
same applies for sy and sz. For example, you might use 4, 5, and 6 for x, y, and z, and 0.1,
0.2, and 0.3 for sx, sy and sz. Or use whatever other values suit your fancy, as long as the
standard deviations in a parameter are much smaller than the parameter itself. Use the
spreadsheet to find out what ‘much smaller’ means.
F
x
i
=lim
∆x
i
→0
F(x
1
,x
2
, …, (x
i
+∆x
i
), …, x
N
)-F(x
1
,x
2
, …, x
i
, …, x
N
)
∆x
i
σ
F
2=
N
i=1
F
x
i
2
σ
i
2
2.4 The propagation of imprecision from multiple parameters
55
Name cells B7:B9 and E7:E9.
In cell A10 deposit the label ‘F=’, and in cell B10 the formula=LOG(x*y+z^2)-x/z^3,
then name this cell F.
In cell A11 deposit the label ‘dF/dx=’, in cell A12 ‘dF/dy=’, and in A13 ‘dF/dz=’, in
order to denote terms in (2.4-3) such as F/x
i
.
After these preliminaries we are now ready to calculate the standard deviation 
σ
according to (2.4-3), using the given expressions for the partial derivatives.
In cell B11 calculate F/xas=y/((x*y+z^2)*LN(10))-1/z^3. Note how much easier
and more transparent it is to type the algebraic expressions rather than the corre-
sponding absolute cell addresses, i.e., x instead of $B$7, y instead of $B$8 etc.
Likewise in B12 calculate=x/((x*y+z^2)*LN(10)) to compute F/y, and enter the
corresponding expression for F/zin cell B13.
10 In cell A14 place the label ‘st dev=’, and in B14 calculate the properly propagated esti-
mate of the standard deviation in Fas=SQRT((B11*sx)^2+(B12*sy)^2+ (B13*sz)^2).
Now we will make the equivalent calculation without using the results of
calculus.
11 First, add a label (such as delx) and a corresponding value (say, 0.01) to the top of the
spreadsheet, and assign it a name, say delta.
12 Copy the contents of cell B10 to cell C11.
13 In order to compute the term F/x=[F(x+∆x,y,z)-F(x,y,z)]/∆x,edit the contents of
cell C11 as follows. Place a minus sign to the right of the contents of the cell, then copy
the expression LOG(x*y +z^2)-x/z^3, and paste it back after the minus sign. Then
replace x everywhere in the first half of the resulting expression by (x+delx). Finally,
place the entire expression inside brackets, and divide it by delx. It should now read=
(LOG((x+delx)*y+z^2)-(x+delx)/z^3-LOG(x*y+z^2)-x/z^3)/delx.
14 Verify that you obtain the same result for F/xas before.
15 Also verify that you obtain the same result for F/xwhen you use different values for
delx, such as 1E-6, as long as these values are very much smaller than x. Try out for
yourself what values of delx are acceptable, and record your observations.
16 In a similar vein, compute F/yas=(LOG(x*(y+dely)+z^2)-x/z^3-LOG(x*y+
z^2)-x/z^3)/dely in cell C12, and in cell C13 calculate F/zas (LOG(x*y+(z+
delz)^2)–x/(z+delz)^3–LOG(x*y+z^2)–x/z^3)/delz.
17 Finally, compute the resulting standard deviation of Fin cell C14 as=
SQRT((C11*sx)^2+(C12*sy)^2+(C13*sz)^2), an instruction you can obtain simply by
copying B14.
56
Introduction to statistics
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested