how to display pdf file in c# : C# extract text from pdf control software system azure windows asp.net console excel1024-part247

University of Salford 241 
Recording a Macro 
A macro is a series of Excel commands and instructions 
that are recorded so that they can be executed as a single 
command. Instead of manually performing a series of 
time-consuming, repetitive actions in Excel yourself, you 
can create a macro to perform the task for you.  
There are two ways to create a macro: by recording them 
or by writing them in Excel’s Visual Basic programming 
language. This lesson explains the easy way to create a 
macro
by recording the task(s) you want the macro to 
execute for you. 
When you record a macro, imagine you’re being 
videotaped; everything is recorded
all your commands, 
the data you enter, even any mistakes you make. Before 
recording a macro, it’s helpful to write down a script that 
contains all the steps you want the macro to record. 
Practice or rehearse your script a couple times, to make 
sure it works, before you actually record it. If you do 
make a mistake while recor
ding a macro, don’t worry—
you can always delete the existing macro and try again or 
edit the macro’s Visual Basic source code to fix the 
mistake.  
1. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button list arrow in the Macros group. Select 
Record Macro
The Record Macro dialog box appears. 
Tip: If you click the Macros button list arrow and 
select Use Relative References, actions are 
recorded relative to the initially selected cell. 
2. Enter a name for the macro and press <Tab>
Next you can enter a shortcut key that will allow you 
to run the macro by pressing the <Ctrl> + <shortcut 
key>. 
3. Enter a shortcut key, if desired. 
Now you can tell Excel where to store the macro. 
You have three choices: 
Personal Macro Workbook: If you want a macro 
to be available whenever you use Microsoft 
Excel, store the macro in your Personal Macro 
Workbook. 
New Workbook: Stores the macro in a new 
workbook. 
This Workbook: Stores the macro in the active or 
current workbook. 
Exercise 
Exercise File: WeeklySales13-1.xlsx 
Exercise: Create a macro that inserts the current date with 
Bold and Center Alignment formatting: 
Click cell B3. Open the Record Macro dialog box and name 
the new macro “DateStamp”. Assign the macro the shortcut 
<Ctrl> + <d>, make sure This Workbook is selected, and 
enter the descrip
tion “This macro inserts the current date”. 
Click OK. 
To record the macro, type =Today() and click the Enter 
button on the Formula Bar. Make sure cell B3 is selected, 
copy it, and use the Paste Special command to paste values 
only in cell B3. Apply bold and center formatting. Stop 
recording the macro. 
Save the workbook as a macro-enabled file type (.xlsm). 
Figure 13-1: The Record Macro dialog box. 
Working with Macros 
C# extract text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
export highlighted text from pdf; edit pdf replace text
C# extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy paste text pdf file; a pdf text extractor
242 
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
4. Click the Store macro in list arrow and select where 
you want to store the macro. 
5. Click in the Description box and enter a description 
for the macro, if desired. 
6. Click OK
Now comes the important part
recording the macro. 
7. Record the macro: perform the actions you want to 
include in your macro. 
Once all the actions have been recorded, stop 
recording. 
8. Click the Macros button list arrow in the Macros 
group and select Stop Recording. 
The macro is recorded and ready to use. 
Other Ways to Stop Recording: 
Click the Stop Recording button on the status 
bar. 
9. Save the workbook. Click No to save the file as a 
macro-enabled workbook. 
The Save As dialog box appears. 
10. Click the Save as type list arrow and select Excel 
Macro-Enabled Workbook (.xlsm) from the list. 
Click Save
The workbook is saved, and the macros will be 
available next time the workbook is opened. 
Figure 13-2: The Stop Recording button in the status bar 
indicates all your actions are being recorded in the macro. 
Click the Stop Recording button to stop recording the 
macro. 
Figure 13-3: This dialog box appears to warn you that 
macros must be saved in a different file type. 
Working with Macros 
Stop Recording 
button 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
delete text from pdf; acrobat remove text from pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
copy text from pdf to word; copy text from pdf online
University of Salford 243 
Playing and Deleting a Macro 
Once you’ve recorded a macro, you’re ready to view and 
play it. 
Tips 
If you see a Security Warning message beneath the 
Ribbon telling you that macros have been disabled, 
click the Enable Content button. 
Play a macro  
1. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button list arrow in the Macros group. Select 
View Macros
The Macro dialog box appears. Here you can see the 
macros that you have recorded.  
2. Select the macro you want to run and click the Run 
button. 
The macro runs, performing the steps you recorded. 
Delete a macro 
1. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button list arrow in the Macros group. Select 
View Macros
The Macro dialog box appears. 
2. Select the macro you want to delete and click the 
Delete button. 
3. Click Yes
The macro is deleted. 
Exercise 
Exercise File: WeeklySales13-2.xlsm 
Exercise: Run the DateStamp macro so that the current 
date appears in cell C3. 
Figure 13-4: Macros are usually disabled when the file is 
opened, even if the file is saved to be macro-enabled. 
Figure 13-5: Playing a macro in the Macro dialog box. 
Working with Macros 
Click the Enable Content button 
to enable macros. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
.net extract pdf text; extract text from pdf c#
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
copy formatted text from pdf; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
244 
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Adding a Macro to the Quick 
Access Toolbar 
To make macros fast and easy to access, you can add 
them as buttons on the Quick Access Toolbar.  
Tips 
It may seem obvious, but you must create a macro 
before you can add it to the Quick Access Toolbar. 
1. Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button 
next to the Quick Access Toolbar and select More 
Commands
The Quick Access Toolbar tab of the Excel Options 
dialog box appears. 
2. Click the Choose commands from list arrow and 
select Macros. 
A list of your macros appears. 
3. Select the macro you want to add to the Quick Access 
Toolbar and click the Add button. 
The macro now appears in the list on the right side of 
the dialog box. At this point, you can select a symbol 
to represent your macro on the toolbar. 
4. Click the Modify button. 
The Modify Button dialog box appears, displaying 
dozens of symbols to choose from. 
5. Select a symbol. 
You can also modify the display name that will 
appear when you hover over the button on the 
toolbar. 
6. (Optional) Enter a different name for the button in the 
Display name box. 
7. Click OK to close the Modify Button dialog box. 
Click OK to close the Excel Options dialog box. 
The macro appears as a button on the Quick Access 
Toolbar. Now you can click it to run the macro. 
8. Click the macro button on the Quick Access Toolbar. 
Tips 
To remove a macro from the Quick Access Toolbar, 
right-click the button and select Remove from Quick 
Access Toolbar
Exercise 
Exercise File: WeeklySales13-3.xlsm 
Exercise: Add the DateStamp macro to the Quick Access 
Toolbar, selecting the green triangle symbol to represent the 
macro on the Toolbar.  
Then remove the DateStamp macro from the Quick Access 
Toolbar. 
Figure 13-6: The Quick Access Toolbar with a macro 
button added. 
Figure 13-7: Adding the DateStamp macro button to the 
Quick Access Toolbar. 
Figure 13-8: Selecting a button symbol in the Modify 
Button dialog box. 
Working with Macros 
Macro button 
Customize Quick 
Access Toolbar 
button 
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
extract text from pdf java open source; copy text from protected pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
extracting text from pdf; copy text from pdf
University of Salford 245 
Editing a Macro’s Visual Basic 
Code 
This lesson introduces you to the Visual Basic (also called 
VB or VBA) programming language
the code Excel 
uses to record macros. Using the Visual Basic language 
and the Visual Basic editor you can make minor changes 
to your macros once you have recorded them. 
The best way to learn about Visual Basic is to view 
e
xisting code. In this lesson we’ll look at how to view and 
edit the code for an existing macro. 
1. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button list arrow in the Macros group. Select 
View Macros
The Macro dialog box appears. Here you can see the 
macros that you have recorded. 
2. Select the macro you want to edit and click the Edit 
button.  
The Microsoft Visual Basic Editor program appears. 
Those funny-looking words are Visual Basic
the 
language that was used by Excel to record the macro 
you created.  
You don’t have to learn Visual Basic to be prof
icient 
at Excel, but knowing the basics can be helpful if you 
ever want to modify an existing macro. If you take a 
close look at the code for your macro, some of the 
procedures should make a little sense to you. For 
example, if your macro contains a copy or paste 
command, you may see the text “Selection.Copy” or 
“Selection.Paste”.
You can delete sections of code to delete certain 
actions from the macro, or edit the code to change the 
macro’s actions.
3. 
Edit the macro’s code as desired, then click the 
Save 
button on the Standard toolbar.  
4. Click the Close button in the upper right-hand corner. 
The Visual Basic Editor window closes. 
Exercise 
Exercise File: WeeklySales13-4.xlsm 
Exercise: Open the DateStamp macro in editing mode. 
Edit the code so that the date is horizontally aligned to the 
left instead of on center.  
Run the macro in cell D3 to see that the macro enters the 
date so it is aligned to the left side of the cell. 
Figure 13-9: 
Editing a macro’s code using the Microsoft 
Visual Basic Editor. 
Working with Macros 
Edit code by finding the property you want to 
change, and changing its code. For example, 
this property controls if the text is aligned to 
the Left, Center, or Right side of the cell. 
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
delete text from pdf acrobat; get text from pdf online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
copy pdf text to word; c# extract pdf text
246 
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Inserting Copied Code in a 
Macro 
Unless you’re a programmer, it’s unlikely that you will 
ever learn many of Visual Basic’s hundreds of functions, 
statements, and expressions
—and that’s okay. 
A very useful technique you can use to edit and create 
macros is to insert code that has been copied, or 
plagiarized, from another macro. This technique lets you 
add steps to your existing macros by recording the steps 
you want to add in new macros, copying the appropriate 
code and inserting it into the existing macro.  
Display the Developer tab and enable 
macros 
Before copying code, we’ll display the Developer tab and 
enable macros by turning off macro security. 
1. Open any workbook, click the File tab on the Ribbon 
and select Options
The Excel Options window appears. 
2. Click the Customize Ribbon tab. Click Developer 
check box in the Customize the Ribbon column. 
Click OK
Next, enable all macros. 
3. Click the Developer tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macro Security button in the Code group. 
The Trust Center window appears, displaying the 
Macro Settings. 
4. Select the 
Enable all macros…
option and click OK
Tip: 
For security purposes, once you’re done 
working with macros you’ll want to disable them 
again in the Trust Center. 
Other Ways to Enable Macros for a Single 
Workbook: 
When a file that uses macros is open, click the 
Enable macros button in the Security Warning 
bar. 
Insert code in a macro 
1. Open the workbooks containing the macros you want 
to work with. 
This includes both the workbook with the macro to 
be copied from and the workbook with the macro to 
be pasted into. 
Exercise 
Exercise File: ExpenseReport13-5.xlsm 
Exercise: The object of the exercise is to copy the code 
that inserts today’s date from the DateStamp macro into the 
ExpenseFillin macro. 
First, open the ExpenseReport13-5 workbook, display the 
Developer tab and enable macros.  
Open the DateStamp macro and copy the block of code 
starting at the line 
ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = 
"=TODAY()"
and ending at the line
Selection.PasteSpecial Paste:=xlPasteValues
.
Paste this code into the ExpenseFillin macro under the line 
Range("C5").Select
Save the changes to the ExpenseFillin macro.  
Run the ExpenseFillin macro in cell A5. 
Figure 13-10: You can enable macros in the Trust Center 
so that macros are never blocked. Only do this if you are 
sure that files that you open that have macros are safe. 
Working with Macros 
University of Salford 247 
2. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button in the Macros group. Select the macro 
that contains the code you want to copy and click the 
Edit button.  
The Visual Basic Editor window opens. In the Project 
pane on the 
left side of the window you’ll see the 
macros associated with all the workbooks that are 
open. 
3. In the Project pane on the left side of the window, 
click the expand button to expand the source 
workbook’s project until you see the Modules folder. 
Expand this folder and double-click the module that 
contains the code you want to copy. 
The code for the selected module, or macro, appears 
in the window to the right. 
Tip: A module is just like a folder where Excel 
puts the code each time you record a macro. 
4. Scroll through the code until you see the code you 
want to copy, then select the code and click the Copy 
button on the Standard toolbar. 
The code is copied. 
Now open the macro in which you want to paste the  
copied code. 
5. In the Project pane along the left side of the window, 
open the module in which you want to paste the 
copied code. 
The code for the selected module, or macro, is 
displayed in the window. 
Tip: If the macros you want to copy and paste 
between are in the same workbook, they appear in 
the code part of the window together. They are 
simply separated by a line. 
6. Click where you want to paste the code and click the 
Paste button on the Standard toolbar. 
The copied code is inserted into the macro. 
7. Click the Save button on the Standard toolbar, then 
click the Visual Basic Editor window’s 
Close button. 
The Visual Basic Editor window closes. The macro 
with the newly inserted code is now ready to be run. 
Figure 13-11: The Macro dialog box. 
Figure 13-12: An example of copying code from one 
macro into another. The macros for the open workbook are 
displayed on the same screen. A line separates the 
macros. 
Working with Macros 
Navigate between 
macros in open 
workbooks in the 
Project pane. 
This code can be copied and pasted into 
the ExpenseFillin macro so that 
today’s 
date is inserted in cell C5. 
248 
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Declaring Variables and 
Adding Remarks to VBA Code 
You’ve probably heard that programming is a lot like 
algebra. In algebra you use variables, like r in the 
equation 
r2. Programming uses variables too. You 
should always declare any variables when you use them 
in code. Declaring a variable is like telling Excel “I’m 
going to be using a variable named r 
in my code.” 
This lesson explains how to declare variables and how to 
add remarks
or declare variables
in your code. 
Declare a variable (DIM statement) 
In Visual Basic, you use the DIM statement to declare 
variables, using the syntax DIM variablename As 
datatype
1. Open the workbook that contains the macro with the 
code you want to change. 
2. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button in the Macros group. 
The Macros dialog box appears.  
3. Select the macro that contains the code you want to 
work on and click Edit
The macro opens in the VBA window. 
4. Click where you want to add the statement in the 
code. Add a Dim statement at the beginning of the 
procedure, using the syntax Dim VariableName As 
DataType
Here’s what the arguments of the Dim statement 
mean: 
VariableName: The name of the variable. 
Example: EmployeeName. 
DataType: The type of data you want to use in 
the variable, such as a number, date, or text. See 
the table on the next page, Data Types used in 
DIM Statements for a list of data types that can be 
used.  
Make sure you add an As between the variable name 
and the data type. Example: As String. 
Exercise 
Exercise File: ExpenseReport13-6.xlsm 
Exercise: Open the ExpenseFillin macro in the Visual 
Basic Editor. Enter the following DIM and REM statements 
at the top of the macro’
s code: 
Dim EmployeeName As String 
‘Declares the EmployeeName variable as a text 
string 
Dim EmployeeNo as Long 
‘Declares the EmployeeNo variable as an 
integer
Figure 13-13: The syntax of a DIM statement. 
Figure 13-14: An example of DIM and REM statements. 
Working with Macros 
Dim Cost As Integer 
Dim 
Statement 
Variable Name 
The name of 
the variable
Data Type 
The type of 
data used in 
the variable
Notice how the colors help distinguish the statements. This is 
something the Visual Basic Editor automatically does to help you 
read code. 
University of Salford 249 
Add a remark to a procedure (REM 
statement) 
Code can be confusing, but you can make it easier to 
understand by adding explanatory remarks to it. These 
remarks are called REM statements. A REM statement 
doesn’t do anything—it’s just a way to add notes 
explaining the function of the code. 
1. Open the workbook that contains the macro with the 
code you want to change. 
2. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button in the Macros group. 
The Macros dialog box appears. 
3. Select the macro that contains the code you want to 
work on and click Edit
The macro opens in the VBA window. 
4. Click where you want to add the remark in the code. 
Type 
'
(an apostrophe) then type the rest of the 
remark. 
Table 13-1: Data Types used in DIM Statements 
Date Type 
Size 
Range 
Byte 
1 byte 
0 to 255 
Boolean 
2 bytes 
True or False 
Integer 
2 bytes  -32,768 to 32,767 
Long (Long 
Integer) 
4 bytes 
2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 
Date 
8 bytes  January 1, 1000 to December 31, 
9999 
String (Text) 
Varies 
Approximately 2 billion characters 
Working with Macros 
250 
© 2010 CustomGuide, Inc.
Prompting for User Input 
When creating macros and code it is often useful to 
prompt the user for information. You can then use this 
information in any number of ways
place it in a cell, use 
it in a calculation, or print it in a header or footer. 
This lesson explains one of the easiest ways to prompt the 
user for information
using the InputBox function. The 
InputBox function prompts the user for information by 
displaying a dialog box.  
The syntax for the InputBox function is 
InputBox(
Prompt
) 
where “
Prompt
is the message you 
want to display (usually enclosed in quotation marks). 
1. Open the workbook that contains the macro with the 
code you want to change. 
2. Click the View tab on the Ribbon and click the 
Macros button in the Macros group. 
The Macros dialog box appears. 
3. Select the macro that contains the code you want to 
work on and click Edit
The macro opens in the VBA window. 
4. Click where you want to add the InputBox function 
to the code. 
5. Add an Input statement using the syntax 
InputBox(“Prompt”)
 
Exercise 
Exercise File:  ExpenseReport13-7.xlsm 
Exercise: Open the ExpenseFillin macro in the Visual 
Basic Editor. Enter the following InputBox statements 
below the second REM statement: 
EmployeeName = InputBox("Enter the Employee Name.") 
EmployeeNo = InputBox("Enter the Employee Number.") 
Run the ExpenseFillin macro in A5, entering your name and 
employee number when prompted. 
(Note: The result of the macro will not be the data you 
entered when prompted because the macro is still set to 
enter Jeff Nelson and 45177 in B5 and C5.) 
Figure 13-15: An example of the InputBox code in a 
macro. 
Figure 13-16: An example of a dialog box prompting a 
user for information. 
Working with Macros 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested