how to display pdf file in c# : Copy paste text pdf file software control project winforms web page windows UWP excelfileformat3-part315

3.1 Common Formula Structure
3.1.6 Additional Token Data
A few tokens contain additional data that does not follow the token identifier, but is appended to the token array. Its size 
is not contained in the leading field containing the token array size. Affected tokens are the tArray token (
3.8.7), the 
tMemArea token (
3.9.4), and a few subtypes of the the tNlr token (
3.10.4). The additional data of each token is 
appended in the same order the tokens are located in the token array.
Example: The formula ={1}+A1:A2 A2:A3+{2} contains 3 tokens with additional data: 2 tArray tokens 
representing the contant arrays, and a tMemArea token containing the result of the intersection operator (the cell 
reference A2). The detailed example below applies for BIFF8.
The RPN representation of the formula is: {1}, A1:A2, A2:A3, “ ”, +, {2}, +.
Written in Excel token notation, this is (the term A1:A2, A2:A3, “ ” is led by a tMemArea token):
tArrayV({1}), tMemAreaV(A2), tAreaR(A1:A2), tAreaR(A2:A3), tIsect, tAdd, tArrayV({2}), tAdd.
Offset
Size
Token name Description
0
2
Size of the following formula data (44 bytes), without the additional 
data following the last tAdd token
2
8
tArrayV
Placeholder for first constant array {1}
10
7
tMemAreaV Constant reference subexpression follows in next 19 bytes (until and 
including the tIsect token)
17
9
tAreaR
Cell reference A1:A2
26
9
tAreaR
Cell reference A2:A3
35
1
tIsect
Intersection operator
36
1
tAdd
Addition operator
37
8
tArrayV
Placeholder for second constant array {2}
45
1
tAdd
Addition operator
46
12
Constant value array (
2.5.8) containing the values of the constant 
array {1}: contains width 1, height 1, value 1
58
10
Cell range address list (
2.5.15) containing the result of the 
reference subexpression A1:A2 A2:A3: a one-element list with the 
cell address A2
68
12
Constant value array (
2.5.8) containing the values of the constant 
array {2}: contains width 1, height 1, value 2
31
Copy paste text pdf file - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
acrobat remove text from pdf; delete text from pdf with acrobat
Copy paste text pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
get text from pdf image; delete text from pdf preview
3 Formulas
3.2 Token Classes
3.2.1 Classified Tokens
All function operators and most operand tokens exist in 3 different versions: as reference class token, value class token, 
and array class token. The token class depends on which type of data the involved operator expects. Sometimes only 1 
or 2 token classes are valid for a token (for example, array class tokens cannot exist as reference class tokens, but they 
can exist as value class tokens).
Reference class token: The reference address itself, independent of the cell contents.
Value class token: A value (a constant, a function result, or one specific value from a dereferenced cell range).
Array class token: An array of values (array of constant values, an array function result, or all values of a cell range).
The structure of the 8-bit identifier of a classified token is described in the following table.
Bit
Mask
Contents
4-0
1F
H
Basic token identifier
6-5
60
H
01
2
= Reference class token (token range 20
H
-3F
H
)
10
2
= Value class token (token range 40
H
-5F
H
)
11
2
= Array class token (token range 60
H
-7F
H
)
7
80
H
0
2
(zero)
The token class is marked in the names of the tokens. The names of reference class tokens contain a trailing “R”, value 
class tokens contain a trailing “V”, and the names of array class tokens a trailing “A”.
Example: The tArea token (
3.9.3) is no specific token, but refers to the three tokens tAreaR (25
H
), 
tAreaV (45
H
), and tAreaA (65
H
).
The tAreaR token represents the cell range address itself.
The tAreaV token represents one value in the cell range (for example the value in the current row or column).
The tAreaA token represents the entire array of values in the cell range.
3.2.2 Operand Classes
Each operator and operand has a default token class, called operand class. For operands itself, the operand class is 
dependent on the data the token represents. The operand class of operators is determined from its return value. For 
functions (tokens tFunc, 
3.7.1, and tFuncVar, 
3.7.2), the operand class is dependent on the value the function 
returns. Classified tokens can represent their operand class, other tokens cannot.
Examples for operand classes:
Term
Operand class Token identifier
Description
A1
Reference
tRefR
Reference to cell A1
A1 A1
Reference
tIsect
Return value of the intersection operator
INDEX(A1,1,1)
Reference
tFuncVarR
Return value of the INDEX function
2
Value
tInt
The constant 2
2+3
Value
tAdd
Return value of the addition operator
SUM(2,3)
Value
tFuncVarV
Return value of the SUM function
{2,3}
Array
tArrayA
The constant array {2,3}
TREND({2,3})
Array
tFuncVarA
Return value of the TREND function
32
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The portable document format, known
extract text from pdf c#; extract text from pdf image
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Help to extract single or multiple pages from adobe PDF file and save into a new PDF file. Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file.
copy pdf text with formatting; copy text from pdf reader
3.2 Token Classes
3.2.3 Expected Parameter Classes
Function parameters expect operands of specific operand classes. The expected token classes of all function parameters 
are specified in the list of built-in functions (
3.11). The result of the whole formula is handled as a parameter, called 
the root level parameter (the parameter of the equality sign). The root level also expects a specific token class.
Examples for function parameter classes:
Reference class:
ROW(A1) (the first parameter of the function ROW expects reference class, ROW(1) would produce an error).
Value class:
ABS(A1) (the first parameter of the function ABS expects value class, it dereferences the cell reference to a 
value).
Array class:
MDETERM(A1:C3) (the first parameter of the function MDETERM expects array class, it dereferences the 
cell range to an array of values).
Root level:
=A1 (parameter is on formula root level, expected class is dependent on formula type).
3.2.4 Token Class Transformation
The final class of a token depends on the combination of the operand class of the token and the expected parameter 
class. Furthermore it is dependent on the type of the formula. There are 3 different types of formulas:
Formula type
Examples
Cell type formula
Cell formulas (
4.7), shared formulas (
4.8)
Array type formula
Array formulas (
4.8), conditional formatting (
4.12), data validity (
4.14)
Name type formula
Defined names (
4.10), reference lists (for example chart source range, form control links)
Token class transformation is done in several steps. All steps have to be performed for each classified token in a formula.
Step 1: Value Operators
If the token has reference operand class, and if it is a direct operand of a unary or binary value operator (tAdd, tSub, 
tMul, tDiv, tPower, tConcat, tLT, tLE, tEQ, tGE, tGT, tNE, tUplus, tUminus, or tPercent – the binary reference 
operators tRange, tList, and tIsect are not included here), its class will be changed to value class, and further handling is 
done regarding this new class (for example it may be changed to array class later).
Example: In the formula =SUM(A1,B1+1), the cell addresses A1 and B1 are represented by tRefR tokens. 
Because the second tRefR token containing B1 has reference operand class, and it is an operand of the addition 
operator, it will be changed to value class (tRefV). As described below, in array type formulas this token will be 
changed to array class then, while the reference class of the first tRefR(A1) token is retained.
33
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
PDF document images. Allow to copy an image from existing PDF file and paste it into another one. Guarantee high performance image
copy text from protected pdf to word; copy text from pdf in preview
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
Allow to copy an image from existing PDF file and paste it into another one. Easy to zoom and crop image for adjusting image size.
extract highlighted text from pdf; copying text from pdf into word
3 Formulas
Step 2: Forced Array Class
If the token is part of a function parameter (directly or indirectly, for example nested in another function), transformation 
of the token class is dependent on the expected token classes of all involved functions. For this purpose, a Boolean state 
“forced array class” is carried, and it will be updated whenever processing of a new function parameter is started. If this 
state is set to true already, nothing will be changed (the state is still true). If the state is false, it will be changed to true, 
if one of the following conditions is met:
In cell type formulas: if the parameter expects array class, or
In array type formulas: if the parameter expects reference class or array class, or
In name type formulas: if the parameter expects reference class or array class, or if the function returns a value with 
value class or array class.
The forced array class state will be restored, when the entire function parameter is processed. The state starts with false 
at root level of all formula types.
As described below, the cell formula =ABS(A1) changes its tRefR token to value class (tRefV). The formula 
=MDETERM(ABS(A1)) behaves differently: The first parameter of the MDETERM function expects array 
class. Therefore the “forced array class” state is set to true, when the parameter (the term SUM(A1)) is started. 
This state is the reason that the tRefR token will be changed to array class (tRefA), regardless that the ABS 
function does not indicate this. When the parameter is completed, the forced array class state is restored to its 
old value (false).
Step 3: Token Class Transformation
Token class transformation is dependent on the expected token class of the current position in the formula.
Current position is a function parameter expecting a reference class token (for example the parameters of the SUM 
function), or it is the root level of a name type formula (for example the return value of the outer function in a defined 
name):
▪ Reference class tokens are not modified.
▪ Value class tokens will be changed dependent on further conditions. In array type functions and name type 
functions, or if the forced array class state is set, it is changed to array class. In all other cases (cell type formula 
without forced array class), value class is retained.
▪ Array class tokens are not modified.
Examples for reference class tokens, when reference class is expected:
In the formula =SUM(A1), the tRefR token is not modified (function parameter expects reference class).
In the defined name =Sheet1!A1, the tRef3dR token is not modified (root level of a name type formula).
Examples for value class tokens, when reference class is expected:
In the cell formula =SUM(PI()), the tFuncV(PI) token is not modified (cell formula, no forced array class).
In the array formula {=SUM(PI())}, the tFuncV(PI) token is set to array class (array type formula).
In the cell formula =MDETERM(SUM(PI())), the tFuncV(PI) token is set to array class (forced array 
class in MDETERM function parameter).
Examples for array class tokens, when reference class is expected:
In the formula =SUM({1}), the tArrayA token is not modified.
In the defined name ={1}, the tArrayA token is not modified (root level of a name type formula).
34
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET Project. A Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library, able to perform image extraction from multiple page adobe PDF file in VB.NET.
copying text from pdf to excel; copy text from protected pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
edit pdf replace text; extracting text from pdf
3.2 Token Classes
Current position is a function parameter expecting a value class token (for example the parameter of the ABS 
function), or it is the root level of a cell type formula or an array type formula (for example the return value of the 
outer function in a cell formula, a shared formula, or an array formula):
▪ If the forced array class state is set, all tokens will be changed to array class, otherwise to value class.
Examples for token transformation, when value class is expected without forced array class state:
In the cell formula =ABS(A1), the tRefR token is changed to value class (tRefV), and the tFuncV(ABS) 
token keeps its value class (root level of a cell function).
In the cell formula =ABS(PI()), the tFuncV(PI) token keeps unchanged.
In the cell formula =ABS({1}), the tArrayA token is changed to value class (tArrayV).
Examples for token transformation, when value class is expected with forced array class state:
In the name formula =ABS(A1), the tRefR token is changed to array class (tRefA, a name type formula sets 
the forced array class state for all parameters of functions returning a value).
In the cell formula =MDETERM(ABS(A1)), the tRefR token is set to array class (tRefA, forced array class 
in MDETERM function parameter).
Current position is a function parameter expecting an array class token (for example the parameter of the MDETERM 
function):
▪ All tokens are changed to array class.
Examples for token transformation, when array class is expected:
In the formula =MDETERM(A1), the tRefR token is changed to array class (tRefA).
In the formula =MDETERM(PI()), the tFuncV(PI) token is changed to array class (tFuncA).
In the formula =MDETERM({1}), the tArrayA token keeps unchanged.
3.2.5 Binary Reference Operators
The binary reference operators tIsect (
3.6.13), tList (
3.6.14), and tRange (
3.6.15) are always encapsulated into 
reference subexpression tokens (for instance tMemArea, 
3.9.4, or tMemFunc, 
3.9.7). These tokens will change their 
token class, but the operands of the reference operators will not be changed. Because these operators require reference 
operands (constant references or functions returning a reference), the actual operands of these operators always have 
reference class.
Example: The ABS function in the cell formula =ABS(A1 A1) expects value class for its parameter. The inter-
section operator tIsect and its operands are encapsulated into a tMemAreaR token, which is changed to value 
class in cell formulas. The tRefR tokens of the intersection operator are not changed.
The resulting token array of this formula is:
tMemAreaV, tRefR(A1), tRefR(A1), tIsect, tFuncV(ABS).
35
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
copy paste text pdf; c# get text from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
copy text from pdf without formatting; copy highlighted text from pdf
3 Formulas
3.3 Cell Addresses in Tokens
All tokens containing cell addresses (with the two components row and column) store them in the same format. There are 
differences in storing relative components of an address.
3.3.1 Absolute and Relative Components of a Cell Address
An absolute component of an address (for example the row in B$6) points always to the same fixed row or column. It is 
stored with its zero-based index (the value 0 refers to row 1 or column A).
To store a relative component (for example the column in B$6), there are two different ways used in an Excel file:
In method [A], the reference component is stored equally to absolute components (with its zero-based index), together 
with the information, that the component is relative.
In method [B], a signed offset is stored for the reference component. The resulting address can be calculated later from 
the position in the current context (for example the cell position in which a defined name is used).
The following table shows which formula type in Excel uses which method to store relative components:
Method
Formula type
[A]
Cell formulas (
4.7), array formulas (
4.8)
[B]
Shared formulas (
4.8), conditional formatting (
4.12), data validity (
4.14), defined names (
4.10)
Example for method [A]: The reference in the cell formula =C4 is stored in a tRef token (
3.9.2). Regardless of 
the position of the formula, the token always contains the row index 3 (zero-based index for row 4) and the 
column index 2 (zero-based column index for column C), together with two flags, that row and column indexes 
are relative. These flags are used for example when the cell is copied to another position (to adjust the relative 
reference components), but they do not influence the evaluation of the formula.
Example for method [B]: The reference in the condition =C4 in a conditional formatting, entered in cell A7, is 
stored in a tRefN token (
3.9.10). The token does not contain the address C4 itself, but the difference to the 
base cell A7, therefore it contains the row offset –3 (three rows up) and the column offset +2 (2 columns to the 
right). If the same conditional formatting is copied, the token will not be modified, because it only contains 
offset values, and not an explicit cell address. If it is copied for example to cell B8, the condition will refer to 
cell D5 (three rows up and 2 columns to the right from cell B8).
36
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
copy text pdf; copy and paste text from pdf
3.3 Cell Addresses in Tokens
3.3.2 Reference Token Replacement
In formulas using method [B], several tokens are replaced by similar tokens that have the letter “N” appended to their 
name. Other tokens do not have such a counterpart and are used in both types of formulas (for example, tRef always uses 
method [A], tRefN always uses method [B], and tRef3d uses either method, dependent on the formula type). The 
following tables show the details.
Reference token replacement, BIFF2-BIFF4:
Cell formulas, array formulas [A]
Defined names [B]
tRef/tArea
tRefN/tAreaN
tRefErr/tAreaErr
tRefErr/tAreaErr
tMemArea
tMemAreaN
tMemNoMem
tMemNoMemN
tMemFunc
tMemFunc
tMemErr
tMemErr
Reference token replacement, BIFF5-BIFF8:
Cell formulas, array 
formulas [A]
Defined names [B]
Shared formulas [B]
Conditional formatting, data 
validity [B] (BIFF8)
tRef/tArea
tRef3d/tArea3d
tRefN/tAreaN
tRefN/tAreaN
tRefErr/tAreaErr
tRefErr3d/tAreaErr3d
tRefErr/tAreaErr
tRefErr/tAreaErr
tRef3d/tArea3d
tRef3d/tArea3d
tRefErr3d/tAreaErr3d
tRefErr3d/tAreaErr3d
tMemArea
tMemFunc
tMemNoMem
tMemFunc
tMemFunc
tMemFunc
tMemErr
tMemErr
In BIFF5-BIFF8, the tRefN and tAreaN tokens do not occur, if all components of the contained cell address or cell 
range address are absolute. In this case, the respective tRef or tArea tokens are used.
Example: The shared formulas =A1, =$A1, and =A$1 (shared formulas use method [B]) use a tRefNV token. 
But the shared formula =$A$1 uses a tRefV token instead.
37
3 Formulas
3.3.3 Cell Addresses in BIFF2-BIFF5
In the file format versions up to BIFF5, it is possible to use 16384 (2
14
) rows. A cell address contains the row index as a 
14-bit value, the column index as an 8-bit value, and two flags. The flags, encoded into the row index, specify whether 
the row or column index is absolute or relative. The differences in interpreting relative indexes are described in 3.3.1.
Index to row or row offset, with embedded relative flags (16-bit value), BIFF2-BIFF5:
Bit
Mask
Contents
13-0
3FFF
H
Index to row (0…16383) or row offset (method [B], -8192…8191)
14
4000
H
0 = Absolute column index
1 = Relative column index, or column offset
15
8000
H
0 = Absolute row index
1 = Relative row index, or row offset
Cell address, BIFF2-BIFF5:
Offset
Size
Contents
0
2
Index to row or row offset, with relative flags (see table above)
2
1
Index to column (0…255) or column offset (method [B], -128…127)
Cell range address, BIFF2-BIFF5:
Offset
Size
Contents
0
2
Index to first row or offset of first row, with relative flags (see table above)
2
2
Index to last row or relative offset of last row, with relative flags (see table above)
4
1
Index to first column (0…255) or offset of first column (method [B], -128…127)
5
1
Index to last column (0…255) or offset of last column (method [B], -128…127)
Example for a reference in a cell formula (method [A], token tRef): The reference B$6 consists of the absolute 
row index 5 and the relative column index 1. The value of the encoded row index is 4005
H
(row 6, column is 
relative). The value of the column index is 01
H
(column B). Though the column is relative, the fixed index to 
column B is stored in cell formulas.
Example for a relative reference in a shared formula (method [B], token tRefN): The reference “decrease column 
by 1, absolute row 6” (which would evaluate to the address B6, if used in cell C1) consists of the absolute row 
index 5, and (in shared formulas) the relative column offset –1. The value of the encoded row index is 4005
(row 6, column is relative). The value of the column index is FF
H
(the signed offset –1).
38
3.3 Cell Addresses in Tokens
3.3.4 Cell Addresses in BIFF8
From BIFF8 on, 65536 (2
16
) rows are available. A cell address contains the row index as a 16-bit value, the column 
index as an 8-bit value, and two flags. The flags are encoded into the column index (which therefore needs 2 bytes), and 
specify whether the row or column index is absolute or relative. The differences in interpreting relative indexes are 
described in 3.3.1.
Index to column or column offset, with embedded relative flags (16-bit value), BIFF8:
Bit
Mask
Contents
7-0
00FF
H
Index to column (0…255) or column offset (method [B], -128…127)
14
4000
H
0 = Absolute column index
1 = Relative column index, or column offset
15
8000
H
0 = Absolute row index
1 = Relative row index, or row offset
Cell address, BIFF8:
Offset
Size
Contents
0
2
Index to row (0…65535) or row offset (method [B], -32768…32767)
2
2
Index to column or column offset, with relative flags (see table above)
Cell range address, BIFF8:
Offset
Size
Contents
0
2
Index to first row (0…65535) or offset of first row (method [B], -32768…32767)
2
2
Index to last row (0…65535) or offset of last row (method [B], -32768…32767)
4
2
Index to first column or offset of first column, with relative flags (see table above)
6
2
Index to last column or offset of last column, with relative flags (see table above)
Example for a reference in a cell formula (method [A], token tRef): The reference B$6 consists of the absolute 
row index 5 and the relative column index 1. The value of the row index is 0005
H
(row 6). The value of the 
encoded column index is 4001
H
(column B, column is relative). Though the column is relative, the fixed index 
to column B is stored in cell formulas.
Example for a relative reference in a shared formula (method [B], token tRefN): The reference “decrease column 
by 1, absolute row 6” (which would evaluate to the address B6, if used in cell C1) consists of the absolute row 
index 5, and (in shared formulas) the relative column offset –1. The value of the row index is 0005
H
(row 6). The 
value of the encoded column index is 7FFF
H
(the signed 14-bit offset 3FFF
H
= –1, and the column relative flag).
39
3 Formulas
3.4 Token Overview
Following a list of all tokens, separated into the several token types and ordered by token identifier.
3.4.1 Unary Operator Tokens
Token ID
Token name
Description
12
H
tUplus
Unary plus
13
H
tUminus
Unary minus
14
H
tPercent
Percent sign
3.4.2 Binary Operator Tokens
Token ID
Token name
Description
03
H
tAdd
Addition
04
H
tSub
Subtraction
05
H
tMul
Multiplication
06
H
tDiv
Division
07
H
tPower
Exponentiation
08
H
tConcat
Concatenation
09
H
tLT
Less than
0A
H
tLE
Less than or equal
0B
H
tEQ
Equal
0C
H
tGE
Greater than or equal
0D
H
tGT
Greater than
0E
H
tNE
Not equal
0F
H
tIsect
Cell range intersection
10
H
tList
Cell range list
11
H
tRange
Cell range
3.4.3 Function Operator Tokens
Token ID
Token name
Description
21
41
61
H
tFunc
Function with fixed number of arguments
22
42
62
H
tFuncVar
Function or macro command with variable number of arguments
38
58
78
H
tFuncCE
Macro command with variable number of arguments (BIFF2-BIFF3)
40
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested