how to display pdf file in picturebox in c# : Erase text from pdf software Library project winforms asp.net .net UWP Final_algae_biodiesel_report10-part477

98 
 
 
Figure 18: Relevant Documents Themescape Map - Title Abstract Claims
 
Erase text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
export highlighted text from pdf to word; get text from pdf into excel
Erase text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copying text from pdf to excel; extract text from pdf file
99 
 
 
Figure 19: Relevant Documents Themescape Map - DWPI Title Abstract 
 
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. How to Use C# Code to Erase PDF Text in C#.NET. Add necessary references:
copy text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf java open source
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
copy text from pdf in preview; copy paste text pdf file
100 
 
VIII. Appendices 
APPENDIX A: Non-Patent Literature 
1.  GuanHua Huang, Feng Chen, Dong Wei, XueWu Zhang, Gu Chen, 
Biodiesel Production by 
Microalgal Biotechnology
, 87 A
PPLIED 
E
NERGY
38–46 (2010). 
Abstract: 
“Biodiesel has received much attention in recent years. Although numerous reports are 
available on the production of biodiesel from vegetable oils of terraneous oil-plants, such as 
soybean,  sunflower  and palm  oils,  the  production  of  biodiesel  from  microalgae  is  a  newly 
emerging  field.  Microalgal  biotechnology  appears  to  possess  high  potential  for  biodiesel 
production because a significant increase in lipid content of microalgae is now possible through 
heterotrophic cultivation and genetic engineering approaches. This paper provides an overview 
of the technologies in the production of biodiesel from microalgae, including the various modes 
of cultivation for the production of oil-rich  microalgal biomass, as well as the subse-  quent 
downstream processing for biodiesel production. The advances and prospects of using microalgal 
biotechnology for biodiesel production are discussed.” 
2.Randor  Radakovits,  Robert  E.  Jinkerson,  Al  Darsins,  Matthew  C.  Posewitz, 
Genetic 
Engineering of Algae for Enhanced Biofuel Production
, 9(4) E
UKARYOTIC 
C
ELL
486–501 (Apr. 
2010). 
Abstract: 
“There are currently intensive global research efforts aimed at increasing and modifying 
the accumulation of lipids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, and other energy storage 
compounds in photo- synthetic organisms, yeast, and bacteria through genetic engineering. Many 
improvements  have  been  realized,  including  increased  lipid  and  carbohydrate  production, 
improved H2 yields, and the diversion of central metabolic intermediates into fungible biofuels. 
Photosynthetic microorganisms are attracting considerable interest within these efforts due to 
their  relatively  high  photosynthetic  conversion  efficiencies,  diverse  metabolic  capabilities, 
superior  growth rates, and  ability to  store or secrete energy-rich hydro  carbons. Relative  to 
cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae possess several unique metabolic attributes of relevance to 
biofuel production, including the accumulation of significant quantities of triacylglycerol; the 
synthesis of storage starch (amylopectin and amylose), which is similar to that found in higher 
plants; and the ability to efficiently couple photosynthetic electron transport to H2 production. 
Although the application of genetic engineering to improve energy production phenotypes in 
eukaryotic  microalgae  is  in  its  infancy,  significant  advances  in  the  development  of  genetic 
manipulation tools have recently been achieved with microalgal model systems and are being 
used to manipulate central carbon metabolism in these organisms. It is likely that many of these 
advances can be extended to industrially relevant organisms. This review is focused on potential 
avenues of genetic engineering that may be undertaken in order to improve microalgae as a 
biofuel  platform  for  the  production  of  biohydrogen,  starch  derived  alcohols,  diesel  fuel 
surrogates, and/or alkanes.” 
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document. • Erase PDF text. • Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous.
extract text from pdf using c#; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Redact tab on viewer empower users to redact and erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online. Miscellaneous. • RasterEdge XDoc.
how to copy and paste pdf text; copy text from protected pdf
101 
 
3.  Brian J. Schmidt, Xiefan Lin-Schmidt, Austin Chamberlin, Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani, Jason A. 
Papin, 
Metabolic  Systems  Analysis  to  Advance  Algal  Biotechnology
,  5  Biotech.  J.  660–670 
(2010). 
Abstract: 
“Algal  fuel  sources  promise  unsurpassed  yields  in  a  carbon  neutral  manner  that 
minimizes resource competition between agriculture and fuel crops. Many challenges must be 
addressed before algal biofuels can be accepted as a component of the fossil fuel replacement 
strategy.  One  significant  challenge  is  that  the  cost  of  algal  fuel  production  must  become 
competitive with existing fuel alternatives. Algal biofuel production presents the opportunity to 
fine-tune  microbial  metabolic  machinery  for  an  optimal  blend  of  biomass  constituents  and 
desired fuel molecules. Genome-scale model-driven algal metabolic design promises to facilitate 
both goals by directing the utilization of metabolites in the complex, interconnected metabolic 
networks to optimize  production  of  the  compounds  of  interest. Network  analysis  can  direct 
microbial development efforts towards successful strategies and enable quantitative fine-tuning 
of the network for optimal product yields while maintaining the robustness of the production 
microbe.  Metabolic modeling yields  insights into  microbial function, guides experiments by 
generating  testable  hypotheses,  and  enables  the  refinement  of  knowledge  on  the  specific 
organism. While the application of such analytical approaches to algal systems is limited to date, 
metabolic network analysis can improve understanding of algal metabolic systems and play an 
important role in expediting the adoption of new bio-fuel technologies.” 
4.  Inna Khozin-Goldberg, Zvi Cohen, 
Unraveling Algal Lipid Metabolism: Recent Advances in 
Gene Identification
, 93 B
IOCHEMIE
91–100 (2011). 
Abstract: 
“Microalgae are now the focus of intensive research due to their potential as a renewable 
feedstock for biodiesel. This research requires a thorough understanding of the biochemistry and 
genetics  of  these  organisms’ lipid biosynthesis pathways. Genes  encoding lipid-biosynthesis 
enzymes can now be identified in the genomes of various eukaryotic microalgae. However, an 
examination of the predicted proteins at the biochemical and molecular levels is mandatory to 
verify  their  function.  The  essential  molecular  and  genetic  tools  are  now  available  for  a 
comprehensive characterization of genes coding for enzymes of the lipid-biosynthesis pathways 
in some algal species. This review mainly summarizes the novel information emerging from 
recently obtained algal gene identification.” 
5.  Qiang  Hu, Milton  Sommerfeld,  Eric  Jarvis,  Maria  Ghirardi,  Matthew  Posewitz,  Michael 
Seilbert,  Al  Arzins, 
Microalgal  Triacylglycerols  as  Feedstocks  for  Biofuel  Production: 
Perspectives and Advances
,54
T
HE 
P
LANT 
J. 621–639 (2008). 
Abstract: 
“Microalgae represent an exceptionally diverse but highly specialized group of micro-
organisms adapted to various ecological habitats. Many microalgae have the ability to produce 
substantial amounts (e.g. 20–50% dry cell weight) of triacylglycerols (TAG) as a storage lipid 
under photo-oxidative stress or other adverse environmental conditions. Fatty acids, the building 
blocks for TAGs and all other cellular lipids, are synthesized in the chloroplast using a single set 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
setting PDF file permissions. Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images and pages online in ASP.NET. RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5
get text from pdf c#; copy text from scanned pdf to word
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
redaction API to redact PDF images. Same as text redaction, you can specify custom text to appear over the image redaction area. How to Erase PDF Images in
export text from pdf; erase text from pdf
102 
 
of enzymes, of which acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is key in regulating fatty acid synthesis 
rates. However, the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis is poorly understood in 
microalgae.  Synthesis  and  sequestration of  TAG  into  cytosolic  lipid  bodies  appear  to  be  a 
protective mechanism by which algal cells cope with stress conditions, but little is known about 
regulation of TAG formation at the molecular and cellular level. While the concept of using 
microalgae as an alternative and renewable source of lipid-rich biomass feedstock for biofuels 
has been explored over the past few decades, a scalable, commercially viable system has yet to 
emerge. Today, the production of algal oil is primarily confined to high-value specialty oils with 
nutritional value, rather than commodity oils for biofuel. This review provides a brief summary 
of the current knowledge on oleaginous algae and their fatty acid and TAG biosynthesis, algal 
model systems and genomic approaches to a better understanding of TAG production, and a 
historical  perspective  and  path  forward  for  microalgae-based  biofuel  research  and 
commercialization.” 
How to C#: Special Effects
Erase. Set the image to current background color, the background color can be set by:ImageProcess.BackgroundColor = Color.Red. Encipher.
extract text from pdf acrobat; copy text from pdf without formatting
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Include crop, merge, paste images; Support for image & documents rotation; Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function;
copy and paste pdf text; edit pdf replace text
103 
 
APPENDIX B: Patents Unable to be Coded as Relevant or Irrelevant 
The following is a list of patents that were unable to be coded as either irrelevant or relevant in 
regards to the genetic transformation of algae for use in the production of biodiesel.  A short 
explanation as to why they were unable to be coded is also included. 
I.
CN101892091A 
a.
Original Title: Method for Expressing FAEES and producing biodiesel in new 
type body through recombined algae 
b.
Machine translated 
II.
US20020045232A1 
a.
Original Title: Production of conjugated linoleic and linolenic acids in plants 
b.
DWPI Title: Nucleic acids which encode a conjugase and its related enzyme a 
delta desaturase to be used for the large scale production of conjugated linoleic 
acid and linolenic acid in plants 
c.
Method for producing fatty acids in plans by genetic transformation.  Technology 
may be relevant to algae, but unsure. 
III.
US20110003360A1 
a.
Original Title: Delta-6 Desaturase and Uses Thereof 
b.
DWPI Title: New delta 5 desaturase of delta 6 desaturase polypeptides, useful for 
producting polyunsaturated fatty acids, desaturases polyunsaturated fatty acids at 
carbon 5 and carbon 6, respectively 
c.
Method for producing a vector to be used in genetic transformation of a host cell.  
Algae is not specifically mentioned. 
IV.
EP1794290A1 
a.
Original Title: Synthetase Enzymes 
b.
DWPI Title: Novel transgenic cell e.g. yeast or plant cell comprising nucleic acid 
molecule encoding polypeptide having acyl-CoA synthetase activity, useful for 
esterification of long chain fatty acid substrate to coenzyme A to form acyl-CoA 
c.
No claims, but abstract looks relevant 
V.
US20090191599A1 
a.
Original Title: Engineered Light-Harvesting Organisms 
b.
DWPI Title: New engineered cell comprises at least two engineered nucleic acids, 
e.g.  light  capture  nucleic  acid  and  NADPH  pathway  nucleic  acid,  useful  for 
producing carbon products, e.g. biological sugars, and hydrocarbon products 
c.
Host cell used is a bacteria, but the technology may also be relevant to algae. 
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Provide basic transformation functions, like Crop, Rotate, Resize, Flip and more; Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc.
delete text from pdf preview; find and replace text in pdf
104 
 
APPENDIX C: Description of Patent Databases & Platforms Used in this Report 
Platform Name – Thomson Innovation 
I.
General Information 
a.
Thomson Innovation is a Thomson Reuters product 
b.
Data Coverage 
i.
US Grants & Applications 
ii.
European Grants & Applications 
iii.
German Grants & Applications 
iv.
German Utility Models 
v.
WIPO/PCT Applications 
vi.
British Applications 
vii.
French Applications 
viii.
Japanese Grants & Applications 
ix.
Chinese Utility Models & Applications 
x.
Korean Grants & Applications 
xi.
INPADOC 
xii.
Derwent World Patents Index 
xiii.
Non-Patent Literature 
xiv.
Business Information and News 
II.
Searches and Views 
a.
Quick/Number searching and Boolean searching are available 
b.
Corporate tree shows a user how an Assignee name fits into a corporate hierarchy 
which takes into account mergers and acquisitions and then lets you search for 
patents by selecting Assignee names from that corporate hierarchy 
c.
Cross Search enables you to search the Patent, Literature and Business content 
sets in a single search 
d.
Patent images can be viewed in both high and low resolution 
e.
Saved Searches saves queries for frequently used searches.  Searches can be saved 
directly from a result set.  Two or more existing Saved Searches can be merged 
f.
Users can create Alerts for later automated searches 
g.
Work files save, organize, annotate and share personalized lists of patents.  Work 
files can save up to 20,000 patent documents.  Users can share Work Files with 
coworkers or clients. 
h.
Data Extract exports key bibliographic fields in common formats 
III.
Analysis and Mapping 
a.
Charts & Graphs 
b.
Thomson  Innovation  provides  a  collection  of  standard  templates,  each  one 
designed to illustrate a different aspect of your list of records 
c.
Citation maps 
i.
Using citation mapping, you analyze your own patent and choose to look 
at forward only citations to focus just on other patents citing yours 
ii.
To support the patent’s validity, you use citation mapping to review the 
reference cited in your client’s patent, as well as the references cited by 
those, to establish the state of the art at the time of the invention 
105 
 
d.
Text Clustering 
i.
Clustering organizes results in a hierarchical format for easy drill-down to 
enable  refinement  of  search  strategies  and  identification  of  new  links 
between subject matter and assignees 
e.
Themescape Maps 
i.
Themescape  creates  content  maps  from  Thomson  Innovation  full  text 
patent  data,  enhanced  patent  data  from  DWPI,  and  scientific literature 
content 
ii.
Common conceptual terms are displayed in a two-dimensional map, with 
peaks representing a concentration of documents and showing the relative 
relationship of one record to another 
iii.
The thematic topographical map enables “at a glance” assessments and is 
searchable 
Platform Name – Westlaw 
I.
General Information 
a.
Westlaw is a Thomson Company product 
b.
Flexible pricing plans (i.e., large company or single attorney) 
c.
The  Westlaw  database  contains  full  text  information  of  patents  before  1972, 
whereas other services just have bibliographic information 
II.
Searching 
a.
The value-added services can be accessed from the “Patent Practitioner” tab of the 
user’s account after login.  This tab includes links useful to facilitate research in 
patent  literature,  cases,  statutes  and  regulations,  court  records  and  litigation 
tracking.  It also provides information on recent developments, litigation practice 
guides, prosecution practice guides, and forms 
b.
“KeyCite” covers all patent granted by the USPTO since 1976.  “KeyCite” also 
offers access to reissued patents, defensive publications, and statutory invention 
registrations.  To view KeyCite information for a document, users can click a 
status flag on the document or click “Full History” or “Citing References” links 
on the “Links” tab 
c.
Citing references provide relevant previous patent literatures 
d.
Citing references are available for US patents only 
e.
Provides access to the Derwent World Patent Index as well as relevant sources, 
including  cases  and  statutes,  patents  and  patent  treatises,  and  post  issuance 
information, such as KeyCite for patents 
f.
Includes a  link  to Delphion which provides access to the  full text of US and 
European patents and patent applications, PCT applications, and abstracts from 
Japanese patents and patent applications 
g.
Has ability to search full-text patent documents, each has a link to display the full 
original patent, including drawings in PDF format 
h.
US patent file histories are available in PDF format, with handwritten comments 
and time stamps intact 
i.
Using  certain  truncations  and connectors is difficult when  using  the  Westlaw 
database 
106 
 
j.
Hybrid searches often generate a large number of irrelevant results 
Platform name – TotalPatent™ 
I.
General Information 
a.
TotalPatent™ is a LexisNexis® product 
b.
2008 CODiE Award winner for “Best Online Science or Technology Service” 
c.
Data Coverage 
1.
Africa  Regional  Intellectual  Property  Organization  (Application  and 
Granted) 
2.
Argentina (Applications and Granted) 
3.
Austria(Applications, Granted and Utility) 
4.
Australia (Applications and Granted)  
5.
Bosnia and Herzegovina (Applications and Granted) 
6.
Belgium(Applications and Granted) 
7.
Bulgaria (Applications, Granted and Utility) 
8.
Republic of Bolivia (Applications, Granted and Utility) 
9.
Brazil (Application Granted and Utility) 
10.
Canada (Application and Granted) 
11.
Swiss confederation ((Application and Granted) 
12.
China (Application, Granted and Utility) 
13.
Chile (Application and Utility) 
14.
Columbia (Application) 
15.
Costa Rica (Applications)  
16.
Czechoslovakia (Application and Granted) 
17.
Cuba (Application and Granted) 
18.
Cyprus(Application and Granted) 
19.
Czech Republic ((Application and Granted) 
20.
German(Application, Granted, and Utility) 
21.
Denmark (Application and Granted) 
22.
Dominican Republic (Application and Granted) 
23.
Algeria (Application and Granted) 
24.
Ecuador (Application and Utility Models) 
25.
Estonia (Application and Granted) 
26.
Egypt (Application) 
27.
Finland (Application and Granted) 
28.
Great Britain (Application and Granted) 
29.
Gulf States (Granted) 
30.
Hellenic Republic (Applications, Granted and Utility) 
31.
Gautemala (Applications) 
32.
Hong Kong (Application and Granted) 
33.
Honduras (Applications) 
34.
Croatia (Application and Granted) 
35.
Hungary (Application, Granted and Utility) 
36.
Indonesia(Application and Granted) 
37.
Ireland (Application and Granted) 
107 
 
38.
Israel (Application) 
39.
India (Application and Granted) 
40.
Italy (Application, Granted and Utility) 
41.
Japan (Application, Granted and Utility) 
42.
Kenya (Applications) 
43.
Korea (Application, Granted and Utility) 
44.
Morocco (Applications)\ 
45.
Monaco (Applications) 
46.
Moldova (Applications, Granted and Utility) 
47.
Mongolia(Application) 
48.
Malta (Applications) 
49.
Malwai (Applications) 
50.
Mexico(Applications, Granted and Utility) 
51.
Malaysia (Applications and Granted) 
52.
Nicaragua(Applications) 
53.
Netherlands((Application and Granted) 
54.
Norway (Applications and Granted) 
55.
New Zealand (Applications) 
56.
African Intellectual Property Organization (Applications) 
57.
Panama (Applications) 
58.
Peru (Appplications and Utility) 
59.
Phillipines (Applications, Grated and Utility) 
60.
Poland(Applications, Grated and Utility) 
61.
Portugal (Applications, Grated and Utility) 
62.
Paraguay (Applications) 
63.
Romania(Applications and Granted) 
64.
Russia(Applications) 
65.
Sweden(Applications and Granted) 
66.
Singapore (Applications) 
67.
Slovak (Applications and Granted) 
68.
San marino(Applications and Granted) 
69.
USSR (Appliations) 
70.
El Savador (Applications) 
71.
Tajikistan (Applications, Granted and Utility) 
72.
Turkey (Applications and Utility) 
73.
Trinidad (Granted) 
74.
Taiwan(Granted and Utility) 
75.
Ukraine(Application, Granted and Utility) 
76.
US (Applications, Granted, utility, Design and Plant Applications) 
77.
Uruguay (Applications) 
78.
WIPO (Applications) 
79.
Yugoslavia (Applications and Granted) 
80.
South Africa(Applications) 
81.
Zambia (Applications) 
82.
Zimbabwe (Applications) 
II.
Searches 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested