how to display pdf file in picturebox in c# : Acrobat remove text from pdf Library application component .net html wpf mvc FloodplainActivationFlow-Jan060-part510

THE FREQUENTLY ACTIVATED FLOODPLAIN: 
QUANTIFYING A REMNANT LANDSCAPE  
IN THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY 
Prepared for  
University of California at Davis 
Prepared by 
Philip Williams & Associates, Ltd. 
With 
Jeff Opperman, Ph.D. 
UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences 
January 2006 
Acrobat remove text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract text from image pdf file; extract text from pdf with formatting
Acrobat remove text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf c#; .net extract pdf text
Frequently Active Floodplain  
1/17/06
PWA REF. #1744  
Services provided pursuant to this Agreement are intended solely for the 
use and benefit of the University of California at Davis. 
No other person or entity shall be entitled to rely on the services, 
opinions, recommendations, plans or specifications provided pursuant to 
this agreement without the express written consent of Philip Williams & 
Associates, Ltd., 720 California Street, 6
th
Floor, San Francisco, CA  
94108. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
cut and paste text from pdf; extract text from pdf using c#
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. If you need to get text content from PDF file, this C# PDF to
delete text from pdf with acrobat; delete text from pdf online
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page No.
1.  
INTRODUCTION 
1
1.1
Purpose 
1
1.2
Approach 
2
2.  
FINDINGS 
3
3.  
SELECTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE FLOOD 
5
3.1
Criteria to Define the floodplain activation flood (FAF) 
7
3.2
Other Floodplain Identifiers 
7
4.  
STUDY AREA 
9
5.  
HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS 
11
5.1
Data Sources 
11
5.2
Methodology 
12
5.2.1
Hydrologic Analysis 
12
5.2.2
Assumptions 
16
5.2.3
Annual Peak 2-year Flood Flow Analysis 
16
5.3
Results 
17
6.  
TOPOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS 
19
6.1
Data Sources 
19
6.2
Methodology 
19
6.2.1
Topographic Analysis 
19
6.2.2
Assumptions 
20
6.3
Results 
21
7.  
DISCUSSION 
35
7.1
Interpretatation 
35
7.2
Sensitivity Analysis 
37
7.3
Implications For Floodplain Restoration Opportunities 
41
8.  
NEXT STEPS 
43
9.  
REFERENCES 
44
10.  
LIST OF PREPARERS & ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
46
LIST OF APPENDICES 
Appendix A.  Hydrologic Analysis Methodology Figures 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
copy text from pdf to word with formatting; extract pdf text to excel
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
copy pdf text to word document; extract highlighted text from pdf
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
ii
LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1.  Information on the Sacramento River and Yolo Bypass Paired Gauges 
11
Table 2.  Discharge Values in cfs for the FAF and the 2-year Peak Flood 
17
Table 3.  Stage Elevations in feet NGVD for the FAF and the 2-year Peak Flood 
17
Table 4.  Inundation Acreages for the Sacramento River and Yolo Bypass Reaches During the FAF 
21
LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure 1.    Conceptual Model of the Relationship of Representative Floods to Stage  
Figure 2.    Study Area and Paired Gauges 
Figure 3.    Hydrologic Analysis Methodology for the Primary Gauges 
Figure 4.    Hydrologic Analysis Methodology for the Paired Gauges 
Figure 5.    FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River between Vina-Woodson Bridge and 
Hamilton City 
Figure 6.    FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River between Colusa and Meridian Pumps 
Figure 7.    FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River between I Street and Freeport 
Figure 8.    FAF Floodplain along the Yolo Bypass between Woodland and Lisbon 
Figure 9.    FAF and 2-year Annual Peak Flow Stages for Sacramento River at Vina-Woodson 
Bridge (RM 215) 
Figure 10.    FAF and 2-year Annual Peak Flow Stages for Sacramento River at Hamilton City 
(RM 199) 
Figure 11.    FAF and 2-year Annual Peak Flow Stages for Sacramento River at Colusa (RM 143) 
Figure 12.    FAF Stage for Sacramento River at Meridian Pumps (RM 131) 
Figure 13.    FAF Stage for Sacramento River at I Street (RM 60) 
Figure 14.    FAF and 2-year Annual Peak Flow Stages for Sacramento River at Freeport (RM 46) 
Figure 15.    FAF and 2-year Annual Peak Flow Stages for Yolo Bypass near Woodland (RM 51) 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
c# extract pdf text; delete text from pdf acrobat
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
copy highlighted text from pdf; extract text from pdf to word
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
iii
Figure 16.    FAF Stage for Yolo Bypass at Lisbon (RM 36) 
Figure 17.    Comparison of Sacramento River Water Surface Profiles 
Figure 18.    Comparison of Yolo Bypass Water Surface Profiles 
Figure 19.    Sensitivity Analysis for Sacramento River at Colusa 
Figure 20.    Sacramento River Flows at Red Bluff 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
copy paste pdf text; extract text from pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark that consists of text or image (such And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
copying text from pdf into word; acrobat remove text from pdf
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
1
1. INTRODUCTION 
Dr. Peter Moyle of the University California, Davis was provided with CALFED funding to hold a series 
of  workshops  to  help  articulate  the  floodplain  restoration  objective  described  in  the  Ecosystem 
Restoration Program Plan: 
The Strategic Objective  for natural floodplains  and flood processes  is  to reestablish 
floodplain  inundation  and  channel-floodplain  connectivity  of  sufficient  frequency, 
timing, duration, and magnitude to support the restoration and maintenance of functional 
natural floodplain, riparian and riverine habitats (p.92, Ecosystem Restoration Program 
Plan, Volume 1, July 2000). 
As a part of this effort, Dr. Moyle assembled the Floodplain Working Group (FWG), a panel of experts in 
the field, to debate and to improve understanding of hydrologically connected and ecologically functional 
floodplains. The FWG met initially in Davis on May 11, 2004, with a follow-up meeting on January 28, 
2005. One of the key questions that this group considered was the definition of “ecologically functional 
floodplain” for purposes of CALFED’s floodplain restoration objective, as well as the characteristics of 
functional floodplains that might serve as indicators of their presence. This group acknowledged that the 
loss of historic floodplain functions in the Central Valley had been tremendous, if poorly quantified, and 
that  it  would  be  useful  to  understand  just  how  much  functional  floodplain  remains  under  present 
conditions.  A measure of ecologically functional floodplain could be used to gauge how much habitat 
must  be  added  to  meet  CALFED’s  broad  ecosystem  enhancement  objectives,  and  as  a  means  of 
measuring progress in increasing the quantity of this habitat.  
Philip Williams & Associates, Ltd. (PWA) was asked by Dr. Moyle to carry out a pilot project to develop 
information about current quantities of functional floodplain within the Central Valley.   
1.1 
PURPOSE 
Hydrological  variability  is  essential  for  the  creation  and  maintenance  of  riverine  and  floodplain 
ecosystems.  A wide range of flows, resulting in spatially nested areas of inundation, have ecological 
significance and, thus, there is no single ecologically functional floodplain.  In this analysis, we chose to 
examine the floodplain corresponding to a specific subset of the range of ecologically significant flows.  
The  selected  flows  are  characterized  by  having  high  frequency  and  long  duration  and  produce  a 
characteristic set of ecological functions.  Some of the key or at least most measurable components of this 
set of functions include: (1) production of organic matter and invertebrates to fuel food webs both on and 
downstream of the floodplains, (2) habitat for spawning and rearing of native fishes, particularly splittail, 
and (3) habitat that promotes rapid growth and increases survival of juvenile Chinook salmon.  In this 
report we  refer to this selected flood as  the  ‘floodplain activation flood’ (FAF) and  the  floodplain 
inundated by this flood is referred to as ‘FAF floodplain.’  In this analysis we identify and quantify 
current extent of FAF floodplain in sample areas within the Sacramento Valley, the northern part of 
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. speed for TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF file's vector
delete text from pdf file; export text from pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS free hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
copy text from pdf; find and replace text in pdf
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
2
California’s Central Valley.  The criteria used to identify FAF flows and corresponding floodplain may be 
relevant only for lower gradient parts of the river system.  However, these frequently-flooded areas 
probably constituted the largest areal component of floodplains historically and are also readily defined in 
terms of ecological function.  
The project scope, developed in collaboration with Dr. Moyle and Dr. Jeffrey Opperman, was designed to 
accomplish the following: 1) test draft definitions of a representative ecological flood on the interpretation 
of what constitutes functional floodplain; 2) apply a simple method to identify and quantify existing areas 
of floodplain in representative reaches in the lower Sacramento Valley that are inundated during this 
representative  flood;  3) interpret  the  results  with  respect  to  the  extent  of  floodplain  active  at  the 
representative flood that is present today within the study area; and 4) articulate any guidance provided by 
the findings in terms of the opportunities for floodplain restoration within the study area. 
The results of this project provide insights to the inundation patterns of the Sacramento Valley floodplains 
in relation to their ecological function. These insights should assist in the overall assessment of the state 
of lowland river floodplains in Central California, provide a basis to guide CALFED’s future restoration 
efforts, and help to gauge our progress towards ecologically-meaningful floodplain restoration.  
1.2 
APPROACH  
To  delineate  and  quantify  ecologically  functional  floodplain  in  the  Lower  Sacramento  Valley,  we 
developed  criteria  to  define  parameters  of  a  representative  flood,  which  we  characterized  as  the 
“floodplain activation flood,” or FAF: a small-magnitude flood during which large increases in potential 
ecologically  functioning  floodplain  start.  A  FAF  inundates  hydraulically  connected  floodplain  and 
supports a range of ecological processes that depend on seasonal and prolonged inundation.  
We developed criteria for flood frequency, duration, and timing to identify the FAF. The criteria were 
developed based on available literature, PWA’s previous studies of Central Valley floodplain systems, 
and discussions with the FWG. The criteria were applied to stage or discharge records of gauging stations 
along selected reaches to identify the stage or discharge that met these criteria at each location. The 
reaches were defined by pairs of stations providing adjacent stage data. Each pair of stations consisted of 
a primary station with a long hydrologic record and a paired station with an overlapping period of record 
that was often much shorter. The hydrologic record was reviewed to identify sample representative floods 
at the primary station; the typical simultaneous flood stage at the paired station was then identified. In this 
way, a representative flood stage was identified for each gauge. Paired stage data was then used to 
develop a simple planar description of water surface that was applied to the Sacramento-San Joaquin 
Comprehensive Flood Study (CFS) topography to estimate inundated area during a flood meeting the 
representative flood criteria. We conducted subsequent analyses to test the sensitivity of results to the 
criteria used.  
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
3
2. FINDINGS 
Key findings of our analysis and developed in the body of the report are summarized below: 
Results 
1.  Ecologically  functional floodplains  are a product of  several  interdependent processes,  including 
hydrologic  stochasticity  and  connectivity,  which  promote  ecological  responses  and  habitat 
heterogeneity. Even though the  vital role of  these hydrological  processes in creating  functional 
floodplains has been articulated for specific parts of the Central Valley, no effort has yet been 
undertaken to quantify the extent of ecologically functional floodplain in the system based on where 
critical processes still occur. 
2.  The methodology we developed here to define specific floodplains based on hydrological processes 
(FAF floodplain) appears viable where linear interpolation of the water surface profile is reasonable 
and stage data are available. 
3.  If FAF criteria have been appropriately defined, then under present conditions there is negligible FAF 
floodplain along the Sacramento River in the study reaches; significantly more FAF floodplain is 
present in the Yolo Bypass study reach. 
4.  No trend was apparent in the relationship between the FAF flood elevations and that of the adjacent 
floodplain from the most upstream reach of the Sacramento River to the downstream reaches 
5.  The stage of FAF flow appears to be most sensitive to the season and frequency criteria, based on the 
analysis at a single station. The next greatest sensitivity was to duration, if shorter than 7 days. 
Implications 
1.  The amount of FAF floodplain is probably far less extensive than the commonly assumed present 
extent of fully ecologically functional floodplain. 
2.  Although  setback  levees can provide multiple benefits—including improved riparian habitat, 
channel dynamics, and reduced flood risk and maintenance—anthropogenic changes have so 
altered system hydrology that levee setbacks or removal alone may rarely be sufficient to recreate 
FAF floodplain.   
3.  Sacramento River floodplain restoration projects within the study reaches would likely require 
flow releases, changes to hydraulic control structures, and/or floodplain excavation to increase the 
extent of the FAF floodplain. 
4.  Together with levee modifications, spring flow releases on the order of one hundred thousand 
acre-feet may be sufficient to increase the area of FAF floodplain along the Sacramento River 
study reaches, and therefore the area of floodplains that are potentially ecologically functional 
across a full range of flood flows. 
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
4
5.  The  Yolo  Bypass,  already  recognized  for  its  floodplain  values,  likely  provides  the  best 
opportunity to maximize the ecological benefits associated with prolonged, frequent flooding in 
the Sacramento Valley without altered flow regimes.  
Recommendations 
1.  Floodplains should be characterized based, in part, on the hydrological processes that create and 
maintain  them  (e.g.,  frequency,  duration,  magnitude,  and  seasonality  of  processes).    The 
“representative flood” concept (e.g., the FAF) can be used to identify and quantify floodplains 
upon  which  certain hydrological processes, associated with specific ecological  benefits, still 
occur. 
2.  Identification of the floodplain lands inundated by representative floods, such as the FAF, using a 
method such as was applied in this analysis, should be extended to other parts of the Central 
Valley’s lowland alluvial rivers.   
3.  A representative  flood analysis should  also  be conducted  for specific  floodplain restoration 
projects (e.g., a levee setback project) to better understand the range of ecological benefits that 
can be provided by the site given current flows and topography.   
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
5
3. SELECTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE FLOOD 
Floods come in a wide range of sizes, shapes, and seasons, and the floodplains and ecological benefits 
created by them vary accordingly.  No single size or type of flood is sufficient to create floodplain 
integrity or generate all floodplain ecological values. In fact, variability in the characteristics of flood 
events both within and among years is desirable from an ecological point of view.  For example, periods 
of prolonged inundation allow sufficient time for native fish to spawn and rear on floodplains, while rare 
high magnitude  events conduct the necessary geomorphic work  to maintain and  create topographic 
heterogeneity, and consequently ecological diversity, on the floodplain.    Yet to assess the ecological 
condition of the floodplains of California’s Sacramento Valley, some means of identifying the most 
ecologically significant floodplains across a range of floods must be established. There is no straight-
forward method that will identify all such floodplains in all parts of the region.  
We therefore explored the identification of representative floods for this purpose. These floods must 
occur with a given depth, duration, and timing to produce identifiable ecological benefits and with a 
sufficient  frequency  to  make  those  benefits  meaningful  over  the  long  term.  Other  floodplain 
characteristics (e.g., erodible banks, specific land uses) may also be appropriate criteria to include to 
further delimit the potential ecological value in addition to the hydrologic characteristics that are used to 
delineate floodplain area. These representative floods and floodplain characteristics identify different and 
overlapping  floodplains  that  serve  different  ecological  roles,  supporting  different  sets  of  ecologic 
functions to varying degrees. Collectively, these identified floodplains define the most ecologically-
significant floodplains in the system, allowing us to gauge the quantity of such floodplains as a rough 
approximation of the level of floodplain ecologic function.  
Ecologically significant floodplains are likely spatially nested. Floodplains that are flooded frequently but 
shallowly  are  nested  within  spatially  larger  floodplains  that  are  inundated  less  frequently.  Thus, 
frequently flooded floodplain will also be flooded under less frequent flood conditions and therefore 
includes floodplain that is active at a range of ecologically significant floods.   
For the purpose of our initial study, we therefore identified a small magnitude, spring-time flood that 
could provide  significant ecological benefits, which we termed a “floodplain activation flood.” The 
floodplain activation flood, or FAF, is characterized by the flood stage at which large increases in 
expected ecological flood benefit begin to accrue. It is defined by a given frequency, duration, and timing 
to produce identifiable ecological benefits. It is called an activation flood in recognition that floodplain 
ecological functions occur over a range of flood conditions but there is some minimum level at which 
significant  floodplain  ecological  function  benefits  begin  to  accrue  (Figure  1).      Further,  the  FAF 
incorporates a range of flows at which aquatic ecosystems on the floodplain become ‘activated;’ below 
this level floodplains are either primarily dry or the duration of inundation is not sufficiently long for 
aquatic  ecosystems  and  related  processes  to  develop  (e.g.  successful  spawning,  development  of 
phytoplankton blooms).    
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested