how to display pdf file in picturebox in c# : Copy highlighted text from pdf SDK application service wpf html web page dnn FloodplainActivationFlow-Jan062-part512

Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
16
5.2.2  Assumptions
The  FAF  approach  as  explored  in  the  current  study  entails  several  assumptions  with  regards  to  the 
hydrologic data sources  and  methodology.   The key hydrologic assumptions included in our  study  are 
listed below:  
1.  The period of record used in the analysis is representative of current conditions of the system. We 
chose Water Year 1968 as the beginning of our analysis period because this is the year when the 
last  major  modification  to  the  hydrologic  system  of  the  Sacramento  River  occurred,  with  the 
completion of the Oroville Dam. 
2.  The stage at the primary station is a good predictor of the stage at the paired station.  Due to the 
proximity  of  the  primary  and  paired  stations,  we  assumed  that  the  lag  between  the  stations  is 
insignificant. 
3.  Three  of  the  primary  stations  had  discharge records only,  which  were  then  converted  to  stage 
using rating curves available from the USGS or the DWR. Therefore it was assumed that where 
only discharge data is available, current stage-discharge relationships are sufficiently accurate to 
predict associated stages. 
5.2.3  Annual
Peak
2-year
Flood
Flow
Analysis
The  2-year  floodplain  is  the  floodplain  inundated  by  the  flood  event  that  has  a  50-percent  chance  of 
occurring in any given year (or a recurrence interval of 2 years). Because the 2-year flood is commonly 
understood  to be  indicative  of  minimal  functional  floodplain  conditions,  the  2-year  annual  peak  flood 
elevations  for  the  primary  stations  were  derived  using the  program PEAKFQ  (v4.1) developed  by  the 
USGS. This program performs flood-frequency analysis based  on  guidelines discussed in Bulletin  17B 
(Interagency  Advisory  Committee  on  Water  Data,  1982)  and  uses  the  method  of  moments  to  fit  the 
Pearson Type III distribution to the logarithms of annual flood peaks. The Bulletin 17B skew was used 
for the analysis.  Peak flow measurements for each station were downloaded from the following website: 
ɷ http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/peak
Further information on PeakFQ is available from the following website: 
ɷ 
http://water.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/man_wrdapp?peakfq
The  three  pairs  of  gauging  stations  along  the  Sacramento  River  and  one  pair  along  the  Yolo  Bypass 
stations were used in the analysis (Figure 2) (Table 1). 
Copy highlighted text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from scanned pdf; extract text from pdf java
Copy highlighted text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
export text from pdf to word; delete text from pdf preview
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
17
5.3 
RESULTS 
Discharge (Q
FAF
) and elevation values for the floodplain activation flow  and the annual-maximum series 
peak flood event with a recurrence interval of 2 years (Q
2
) are summarized for each station in Table 2 and 
Table 3, respectively. The floodplain activation flow or discharge for the Sacramento River at Vina (VIN) 
was 12,450 cfs (167.6 feet), while the corresponding discharge for the Sacramento River at Hamilton City 
(HMC) was 17,500  cfs (131.5 feet). The floodplain activation flow for the Sacramento River  at Colusa 
(COL) was 12,000 cfs (47.0 feet),  while the corresponding  stage for the Sacramento River at Meridian 
Pumps (MPS) was 44.0 feet.  The  floodplain activation stage for the Sacramento  River at I Street (IST) 
was 6.9 feet, while the corresponding discharge for the Sacramento River at Freeport (FPT) was 24,000 
cfs (4.9 feet).  The floodplain activation flow for the Yolo Bypass near Woodland (YBY) was 2,000 cfs 
(17.4 feet), while the floodplain activation stage for the Yolo Bypass at Lisbon (LIS) was 9.5 feet. 
Comparatively, the 2-year peak flood discharges were nearly an order of magnitude higher than the FAF 
discharges  for  all  of  the  paired  stations.  However,  because  records  were  relatively  short  for  several 
stations,  the discharge levels at only  a few stations could be compared. The 2-year peak flood  event at 
VIN was 94,000 cfs (182.3  feet).   By comparison,  HMC was 90,600 cfs (138.8  feet). The  2-year peak 
flood event for COL was 40,250 cfs (67 feet); MPS data were not available.  Similarly, FPT was 70,650 
cfs  (14.2  feet); IST  data  were  also  not  available.  The 2-year peak  flood  event at YBY  was 26,750  cfs 
(25.9 feet); LIS data were not available.   
Table 2.  Discharge Values in cfs for the FAF and the 2-year Peak Flood  
Pair  Station 
ID 
Q
FAF
Q
2.0
Sacramento River at Vina 
VIN 
12,450 
94,000 
Sacramento River at Hamilton City 
HMC
17,500 
90,600 
Sacramento River at Colusa 
COL 
12,000 
40,250 
Sacramento River at Meridian Pumps 
MPS 
n.a. 
n.a. 
Sacramento River at I Street 
IST 
n.a. 
n.a. 
Sacramento River at Freeport 
FPT 
24,000 
70,650 
Yolo Bypass near Woodland 
YBY 
2,000 
26,750 
Yolo Bypass at Lisbon 
LIS 
n.a. 
n.a. 
Table 3.  Stage Elevations in feet NGVD for the FAF and the 2-year Peak Flood 
Pair  Station 
ID 
Q
FAF
Q
2.0
Sacramento River at Vina 
VIN 
167.6 
182.3 
Sacramento River at Hamilton City 
HMC
131.5 
138.8 
Sacramento River at Colusa 
COL 
47 
67 
Sacramento River at Meridian Pumps 
MPS 
44 
n.a. 
 Sacramento River at I Street 
IST 
6.9 
n.a. 
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
etc. Able to remove highlighted text in PDF document in C#.NET. Support to change PDF highlight color in Visual C# .NET class. Able
copy pdf text to word document; delete text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text in any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters are easy to be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR
copy text from protected pdf to word; extract text from pdf c#
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
18
Pair  Station 
ID 
Q
FAF
Q
2.0
Sacramento River at Freeport 
FPT 
4.9 
14.2 
Yolo Bypass near Woodland 
YBY 
17.4 
25.9 
Yolo Bypass at Lisbon 
LIS 
9.5 
n.a. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Plain text can get from any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters. Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET.
delete text from pdf file; a pdf text extractor
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
To help users quickly locate what you are looking for, all results will be highlighted with specific color. Annotate. Text Select, Copy & Paste.
delete text from pdf online; how to copy and paste pdf text
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
19
6. TOPOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS 
The topographic analysis consisted of superimposing the results of the hydrologic analysis on the surface 
model of the selected reaches of the Sacramento River and the Yolo Bypass to quantify the extent of the 
FAF floodplain in these reaches. 
6.1 
DATA SOURCES 
As  a  part  of the  Sacramento-San Joaquin Comprehensive Flood Study  or CFS, the  US  Army Corps  of 
Engineers,  Sacramento  District  has  conducted  hydrographic  and  photogrammetric  surveys  of  the 
Sacramento  Basin.  The  survey  area  consists  primarily  of  the  mainstem  and  immediately  adjacent 
floodplains of  the Sacramento River and  includes reaches of  the major tributaries,  distributary  sloughs, 
and the flood bypasses.  
All of our study reaches, except the most upstream reach on the Sacramento River, were mapped to an 
accuracy suitable for development of 2-foot contours above the waterline. Our most upstream reach was 
surveyed with an accuracy suitable to produce 5-foot contours.  The CFS data for the Yolo Bypass is not 
complete and is missing a 5-mile section in the middle part (approximately 5,300 acres between I Street 
and  1.7  miles  north  of  Lisbon).  The  Sacramento  District  is  currently  acquiring  the  missing  data  by 
processing 1997 stereo photographs of the Yolo Bypass and is obtaining additional bathymetric surveying 
of the low flow channels between Cache Slough and a point above the north end of Shag Slough in order 
to complete the Yolo Bypass topography. The complete Yolo Bypass topography will be available after 
March 2005.   
We used the 2-foot contour interval topographic map developed using photogrammetric techniques along 
the Sacramento River from Colusa to Meridian Pumps and from Freeport to I Street, and along the Yolo 
Bypass  from  Woodland  to  Lisbon  except  the  missing  reach  in  the  middle  section.    For  the  Vina  to 
Hamilton City reach along the Sacramento River, the 5-foot contour interval map was used.  
The  topographic  data  were developed  for  use  in Microstation  and InRoads.  A  digital  elevation  model 
(DEM) of the ground surface was constructed using the contour files (in DGN format). All project files 
were  set to the NAD83,  California State Plane, Zone 2 (in feet) projection.  Water surface DEMs were 
derived from USGS and DWR data discussed in Section 5.2.  Except where provided by the Sacramento 
District,  georeferenced  aerial  images  and  USGS  contour  maps  were  downloaded  using  Microsoft’s 
TerraServer (http://www.terraserver.com
) from Global Mapper (v6.05).   
6.2 
METHODOLOGY 
The methodology and assumptions implicit in the study are detailed in the following sections. 
6.2.1  Topographic
Analysis
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
20
Digital elevation models (DEMs) of the channel bed and water surface were constructed from contours 
using  3-D  Analyst  in  ArcMap  9.  Bed  surface  DEMs  were  constructed  by  using  linear  Delaunay 
triangulation of 2-foot elevation contours derived from Microstation (DGN) contour files provided by the 
Sacramento  District.  DGN  files  were  processed  in  AutoCAD  Land  Desktop  3  (LD3)  and  exported  to 
ESRI line shapefiles (SHP). Ground surface DEMs were constructed using natural land surface features 
as  well  as  artificial  topographic  features  (e.g.,  levees  and  roads).  The  DEMs  were  developed  using 
irregular outer boundaries to minimize development of spurious facets along DEM edges. 
Characterization of DEM uncertainty is rare (Wechsler, 2000).  The hydrographic and photogrammetric 
surveys of the Sacramento Basin from the CFS study were reported as accurate to 2-feet in elevation for 
subaerial  and  submerged  topography  for  the  215  river  miles  investigated  in  the  study.  However, 
validation of the DEMs in 3-D was not possible, since this assessment requires a second, more accurate 
surface  (Wechsler,  2000).    However,  visualization  of  the  DEMs  against  USGS  quadrangles  indicated 
relatively  high  horizontal  resolution,  and  surface  visualizations  of  the  DEMs  (such  as  river  meander 
scouring and localized levees) indicated relatively high vertical resolution. 
Subsequent to constructing ground surface DEMs, water surface DEMs were constructed using a simple 
assumption  of  a  tilted  water  surface  plane  between  each  pair  of  gauging  stations.  Contours  were 
constructed  using  three-dimensional  cross  sectional  transects  at  each  gauging  station.  Water  surface 
elevations  were set  based on values derived from the hydrologic analysis defined in  Section 5.2. In the 
highly meandering Vina to Hamilton City section, the water surface plane of the Sacramento River was 
constructed using  cross  sections  at  Vina  and  Hamilton  City  as  well  as  a  cross  section at the midpoint 
distance between the two gauging stations. The midpoint was determined using the linear distance of the 
river  thalweg  derived  using  aerial  images  and  USGS  7.5-minute  quadrangles.  The  cross  section  was 
oriented normal to the thalweg derived from the aerial imagery. 
Inundation area for the gauging stations was derived by explicitly differencing the water surface DEMs 
from the ground surface DEMs using 3-D Analyst in ArcMap 9.  To optimize computational time, a raster 
grid size of 20 feet was used for differencing for each pair of gauging stations. Typically, several ground 
and water surface DEMs had to be differenced for each station pair.   
6.2.2  Assumptions
The  FAF  approach  as  explored  in  the  current  study  entails  several  assumptions  with  regards  to  the 
topographic data sources and methodology.  The key assumptions included in our study are listed below:  
1.  The CFS topography is a reasonable representation of land surface conditions generally. 
2.  Linear  interpolation  of  stage  between  the  stations  is  an  adequate  representation  of  the  water 
surface profile at the FAF. 
3.  Surface  features  other  than  recognizable  levees  adjacent  to  the  channel  were  not  assumed  to 
provide complete flow containment. 
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
21
6.3 
RESULTS 
The  topographic  analysis  indicates  relatively  little  inundation  for  the  floodplain  adjacent  to  the  main 
Sacramento River channel at the FAF. Inundation acreage between Vina to Hamilton City was primarily 
confined to backwater areas, with out-of-channel indundation estimated at 220 acres (Table 4) (Figure 5). 
The river was entirely confined to the channel between Colusa and Meridian Pumps (Figure 6) as well as 
between I-Street and Freeport (Figure 7). Unlike the Sacramento River stations, inundation acreage was 
relatively  high  for  the  Yolo  Bypass  to  Lisbon  section,  which  had  8,500+  acres  of  FAF  floodplain 
inundation (Figure 8). 
Table 4.  Inundation Acreages for the Sacramento River and Yolo Bypass Reaches During the FAF 
Paired Gauging Station 
Total Inundation Acres With 
River Flow Area (acres) 
Estimated Floodplain 
Inundation (acres) 
1. Vina to Hamilton City 
1,380 
220 
2. Colusa to Meridian Pumps 
360 
3. I Street to Freeport 
1,660 
4. Yolo Bypass to Lisbon 
8,500+ 
8,500+ 
To better understand the implications of our analysis, we sought to evaluate the FAF at study reach cross 
sections. The bathymetry of the Sacramento River and a number of its tributaries were surveyed as a part 
of the CFS. Together with the topographic mapping conducted for the CFS, these surveys were used to 
develop a UNET hydraulic model of the system as part of the CFS. For a separate study, MBK Engineers 
then  refined  the hydraulic model  to  assess  different flow  conditions in the  system.  We extracted  cross 
sections  of  the  gauging  stations of interest from  MBK’s model. The  UNET  hydraulic  model  does not 
identify all the major landmarks or river miles. As a result, extracted cross sections from the model do not 
necessarily reflect the topography precisely at the selected gauging stations; however they are located in 
the  vicinity  of  the  gauging  stations  of  interest  and  may  reflect  the  topography  somewhat  upstream  or 
downstream of the stations. These cross sections were used to assess the FAF stage at each station relative 
to the channel and floodplain elevations. Figure 9 through Figure 16 show the FAF stage for each of the 
gauging  stations  analyzed in the  current  study,  as well  as the  stage  for the 2-year return  interval flood 
event, where available.    
The  relationship  between  FAF  stage  and  the  adjacent  floodplain  elevation  on  the  Sacramento  River 
reaches  and  in  the  Yolo  Bypass  is  significantly  different.  The  FAF  stage  is  well  below  the  adjacent 
floodplain along the Sacramento River study reach, by 3 to 18 feet (Figure 9 through Figure 14).  On the 
Yolo Bypass, the FAF inundates the floodplain surface.  
We also included the 2-year peak flood elevation on the cross-section graphs for the primary stations for 
comparison purposes, as this flow is commonly assumed to define an ecologically-functional floodplain. 
The 2-year peak flow, an instantaneous event that occurs less frequently than the longer duration FAF, is, 
Frequently Active Floodplain 
01/17/06 
22
by  statistical  necessity,  greater  than  the  FAF  flow  and  as  a  result  has  a  higher  stage.  Our  analysis 
demonstrated,  however, that  the  2-year peak  flow  stage  is  substantially  higher  in our  study  reaches  -- 
approximately 7 to 20 feet.  The 2-year peak flood stages at the cross sections for the primary stations are 
above the adjacent floodplain elevation everywhere except the lowest Sacramento River reach examined, 
from I Street to Freeport. 
PWA
FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River
between Vina-Woodson Bridge and Hamilton City
igu r e
f
5
PWA Ref#: 1744
N
SFO/1744/report/figures/ETF_Floodplain_SacRvr_VinaBrdg.cdr
vina
PWA
FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River
between Colusa and Meridian Pumps
igu r e
f
6
PWA Ref#: 1744
N
SFO/1744/report/figures/ETF_Floodplain_SacRvr_ColusaMerid.cdr
N
PWA
FAF Floodplain along the Sacramento River
between I Street and Freeport
igu r e
f
7
PWA Ref#: 1744
SFO/1744/report/figures/ETF_Floodplain_SacRvr_I-StFreeport.cdr
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested