how to export rdlc report to pdf without using reportviewer c# : Copy highlighted text from pdf software Library project winforms .net asp.net UWP FuBA-manual0-part635

FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
The Fill-able FuBA:   
A comprehensive digital model for teachers and parents to efficiently identify, 
evaluate, and change challenging behavior. 
Superheroes social skills training, Rethink Autism internet interventions, parent training, EBP 
classroom training, functional behavior assessment:  An autism spectrum disorder, evidence 
based (EBP) training track for school psychologists. 
U.S. Office of Education Personnel Preparation Project:  H325K120306 
Principal Investigators: 
Dr. William R. Jenson, Ph.D. 
Dr. Elaine Clark, Ph.D. 
Grant Director: 
Dr. Julia Hood, Ph.D. 
University of Utah 
Department of Educational Psychology 
School Psychology Program 
Copy highlighted text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
c# read text from pdf; extract highlighted text from pdf
Copy highlighted text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy highlighted text from pdf; c# extract pdf text
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
Contents 
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3 
Brief Introduction to Fillable Forms .............................................................................................................. 4 
1.  Behavioral Identification Forms ............................................................................................................ 5 
Easy Steps:  Form #1- Behavioral Identification ....................................................................................... 7 
2.  Data Tracking and Graphing .................................................................................................................. 8 
Easy Steps:  Form #2.1-2.4- Tracking Data using Frequency, Ratio, Intensity, or Duration ..................... 9 
3.  Antecedent-Behavior-Consequence (ABC’S) ...................................................................................... 11 
Easy Steps:  Form #3- Antecedent-Behavior-Consequence .................................................................... 12 
4.  Functional Behavior Assessment ........................................................................................................ 14 
Easy Steps:  Form #4- Functional Behavior Assessment ......................................................................... 15 
5.  Identifying Replacement Behaviors .................................................................................................... 16 
Easy Steps:  Form #5- Replacement Behaviors ....................................................................................... 17 
6.  Creating Behavioral Goals ................................................................................................................... 18 
Easy Steps:  Form #6- Behavioral Goals .................................................................................................. 19 
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
etc. Able to remove highlighted text in PDF document in C#.NET. Support to change PDF highlight color in Visual C# .NET class. Able
delete text from pdf file; export highlighted text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text in any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters are easy to be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR
cut and paste text from pdf document; c# extract text from pdf
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
Introduction 
The aim of the Fill-able FuBA is to provide parents and teachers with an all-in-one product that 
breaks down the same steps used by Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Special Education teams to 
identify, evaluate and change challenging behaviors.  Fill-able FuBA includes a concise manual that 
provides an overview of applied behavior analysis, behavioral monitoring, and how to increase the 
potential for behavior change written specifically for parents and teachers.  This manual is based upon 
both seminal and cutting edge research in the field of behaviorism so that consumers will be up-to-date 
on the most recent evidence-based practices.   
Fillable FuBA was created with a liner sequence in mind, beginning with identification of the 
target behavior, accurate and reliable measurements and data collection, investigation into antecedents 
and consequences of behavior, and development of replacement behaviors.  This will allow the user to 
gain a basic understanding of the underlying causes of the behavior in the aim of determining 
appropriate methods to enact behavioral change.  Additionally, there is a section designed to help 
formulate meaningful and measurable goals that are very similar to those found on student 
individualized education programs (IEPs).  By including this section there is an increased potential to 
improve continuity between school-based and home-based behavior change programs.   
Each of the steps outlined has a digital Fillable Form that can be accessed through Microsoft 
Office.   Users that have a windows-based tablet (e.g. HP, Surface) will be able to input data directly onto 
the form with the touch of a button.  The completion of the fillable forms will be explained in detail 
under the ‘Easy Steps’ sections.  These forms have been designed to be user-friendly and easy to use 
while still including the same important data fields utilized by behavioral analysts.  Because each form is 
completely fillable, it is easy to save and create a digital portfolio that monitors all stages of behavioral 
change in an accessible location.  These can then be e-mailed, printed, and even shared on a cloud-
based server to provide the maximal amount of utility and convenience to each form.  This can be 
especially useful for communication between the home, school, and additional service providers.   
FILLABLE FORMS 
1.
Behavior Identification Form 
2.
Data Tracking and Graph Forms 
3.
Antecedent Behavior Consequence Form 
4.
Functional Behavior Assessment Form 
5.
Replacement Behavior Identification Form 
6.
IEP Goal Forms  
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Plain text can get from any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters. Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET.
delete text from pdf acrobat; copying text from pdf to word
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
To help users quickly locate what you are looking for, all results will be highlighted with specific color. Annotate. Text Select, Copy & Paste.
extract text from pdf to word; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
Brief Introduction to Fillable Forms 
The Fillable FuBA can be an amazing tool, especially when you can use it as intended.  Each form is 
completely fillable, meaning that the fields have been created to incorporate the most commonly used 
information.  There are multiple types of fields, and this introduction will provide a brief overview. 
Developer Tab: 
All forms have been created in Microsoft Word using the Developer tab.  All forms will work 
without you needing to use Developer, but if you want to make adjustments or modifications you will 
need to have this tab open.  The default for most computers is to hide this tab, so in order to access it 
you will need to enter your Word settings, customize the ribbon (toolbar), and include the Developer 
tab.   
Open Text:  Click here to enter text. 
These fields are simply created so that you can enter as much or as little text as you like.  Simply 
click on the field and begin typing.  The field will automatically adjust to the amount of text you input, 
and there are no restrictions.   
Date:  Click here to enter a date. 
These fields include a drop-down calendar for you to simply select a date.  You can also choose 
the ‘today’ button if the form is being completed that day.  For dates that occurred many years ago 
(date of birth), it might take a long time to scroll through the calendar.  Alternatively, you can delete the 
field and write in the correct date.   
Drop Downs:  Choose an item. 
This is another drop down field, but instead of a calendar it will have multiple options for you to 
choose from.  I have tried to include the most common options that would be appropriate, but there 
may be answers that I have forgotten.  If this is the case, you can delete the field and write in the correct 
response.  Alternatively, you can modify the options by selecting the field, and then opening the 
properties menu in the Developer tab.   
Boxes:  ☐ and ☒ 
The forms use boxes for fields that are easily expressed in yes/no format.  For these, simply 
press or click the box to change it from blank to marked.   
Graph Wizard:  Microsoft Excel  
The Fillable FuBA Graph Wizard has been protected to maintain its functioning.  All the user 
needs to do is open the file, copy and paste the data, and the Graphing Wizard will create a graph 
automatically.  If the user is familiar with Excel and would like to make modifications, the password to 
unprotect the sheet is “FuBA”   
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
1.
Behavioral Identification Forms 
Many times in life we get so excited about a new project or idea that we end up putting the cart 
before the horse; the realm of behavior is no different.  Often we get so caught up in moving forward 
with a new behavioral plan that we gloss or skim over the most important part:  identifying the target 
behavior.  Skimming over the groundwork happens all of the time, but it is imperative to understand 
that we must lay the correct groundwork by clearly and precisely defining what it is we are hoping to 
accomplish. 
There is a reason that we tend to bypass some of the nitty gritty details of a target behavior:  we 
tend to believe we already know exactly what the problem is and that our definition adequately 
captures it!  For example, a common problem for parents and teachers is student responsibility, or when 
a child refuses to accept consequences.  This makes sense, doesn’t it?  If I could just get my child to take 
responsibility with their behavior, we wouldn’t have any problems!  Why wouldn’t this be a good target 
behavior?  Let’s come back to that. 
Target behaviors were given the name ‘target’ because they are the focus of an intervention.  
This means that those are the behaviors we want to change the most.  But how do you know if the 
behavior is actually changing?  In order to know the answer to this, the target behavior must be 
OBSERVABLE.  If the target behavior is an underlying cognitive process (i.e. a memory deficit) or some 
other unobservable state, we cannot know with confidence that the target behavior is actually changing.  
Moreover, we would not be able to rule out alternative explanations.  Here is a scenario to illustrate: 
Sally is a 3
rd
grade student who just moved into a new school district.  During the first week, her 
teacher notices that she has a big problem with listening to directions when she is supposed to be 
working, which is causing her to fall behind the class.  She decides to implement a behavioral 
intervention for Sally’s listening to instruction.  She finds is that Sally does a great job listening during 
the lesson when she stands right by her desk, and even does a great job with independent seat work.  
The problem occurs when Sally is not expecting instruction.  As it turns out, Sally has a substantial 
hearing impairment and is not able to hear unless she is looking at the teacher and there is minimal 
background noise.  Knowing this, it would not make sense to spend hours and hours designing an 
intervention where none is needed! 
The next critical component of a target behavior is that it must be MEASUREABLE.  Without 
some form of data, there really is no way to know how much (or if) the behavior is improving.  This goes 
far beyond a guessing game or simple anecdotal report.  There is a place for these types of 
measurement, but it is not in the realm of behavior change.  There are a number of ways to measure a 
behavior, and this is another important consideration.  Specifically, a behavior can be measured in 
frequency (how often it occurs), duration (for how long it occurs), intensity (to what extent does it 
occur), and ratio (for what percentage of time it occurs).  Although each behavior has all of these 
components, it is best to determine a single measurement for each single target. 
Determining the most appropriate measurement warrants careful deliberation.  Consider what 
it is about the behavior that is most problematic, and focus on that single area.  For example, behaviors 
related to impulsivity such as interrupting may be most appropriate for frequency measurements, 
whereas a tantrum may be more readily measured by duration.  Behaviors that occur for a portion of 
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
time (e.g. out of seat during class) can be measured using a ration and converted into a percent.  Finally, 
although more subjective, intensity can be an appropriate measurement for a behavior that has variable 
levels, such as screaming.  If you choose to use an intensity based system of measurement, it is often 
recommended that you combine specific descriptions of the behaviors with a consecutive level system 
to increase the objectivity of the measurement.  In some classrooms, teachers even use a sound-meter 
to convert noise into measureable decibels!   
This increase of specificity brings us to the final quality of a good target behavior.  The target 
behavior must be WELL-DEFINED.  The enemy of any behaviorist is a vaguely defined goal.  Goals that 
are well-defined are more easily observed and more easily measured.  Moreover, many children may 
not be developmentally advanced to the point of understanding general behavioral expectations.  “Be 
good” and “That’s not okay” are used far too often, and are much less understood.  To make any 
behavioral program successful, the child must know precisely what is expected, and that means the 
behavior must be precisely defined.   
One commonly used term among behaviorists is “operational definition.”  This implies that the 
behavior is explicitly defined so that it can be consistently measured, is clearly understood across 
multiple observers, and is easily identified in multiple settings.  A behavior that is well-defined will 
appear the same to both teachers and parents and occurs in a similar fashion at school as well as home.  
It is important to remember that at this step, we are not trying to determine why the behavior occurs:  
this is just a very clear description of the single behavior we would like to see change.  
Let’s return to the behavior of ‘taking responsibility.”  This goal presents a problem for all three 
fronts.  First, it is not easily OBSERVABLE because responsibility can happen in multiple settings and it 
can be hard to notice when a student is doing what is already expected.  Second, this behavior is not 
easily MEASURABLE because there is no easily identified metric to track generalized responsibility.  
Third, this behavior is not WELL-DEFINED because what is responsible to one observer may be very 
different than another, and responsibility at school can be very different than responsibility at home or 
in other settings.   
To make this an appropriate target behavior, we need to create an operational definition.  For 
the student who consistently avoids taking responsibility, we could imagine that one component of his 
or her behavior might be denial of misbehavior.  An operational definition might look like:  When caught 
breaking one of the classroom rules at school, the student avoids responsibility by verbally stating “I 
didn’t do it” and blaming someone else.    This behavior is OBSERVABLE because anyone could hear and 
see when the behavior occurs.  This behavior is MEASURABLE in that it lends itself to a frequency count 
of how often this specific behavior occurs.  Finally, this behavior is WELL-DEFINED based on the clarity of 
the situation and the contextual cues that are incorporated.  As it is written, this target is focused upon 
at the classroom level, but this could be generalized to other settings that have clear rules and 
expectations.  You would not want to say ‘When caught misbehaving…’ because that introduces another 
level of vagueness and subjectivity across people and settings.   
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
Easy Steps:  Form #1- Behavioral Identification 
on 
1.
Demographic Information 
a.
Complete as much demographic information as appropriate.  In general, the more 
information you can enter, the more meaningful the data will be, but YOU MUST BE 
CAREFUL!!  If you are planning on sharing this information with others, you may not 
want to include a student’s personal information.  You can either leave it out, or simply 
delete sensitive fields prior to sharing the document (either electronically or physically). 
b.
The student’s educational placement can be helpful to note here for professionals who 
may be interested in a basic understanding of the level of support the child is currently 
receiving.  Typically, educational placements range from a general education classroom 
to a functional skills or cluster classroom, with a variety of levels in between.  Further, 
including this field provides an awareness of future possibilities of educational 
placement.   
c.
Educational classifications and diagnoses are similar, but not exactly the same.  The 
purpose of this field is again to communicate information to other service providers who 
may be reviewing the case.  It is possible that this is the first evaluation for this student, 
or perhaps the student is receiving Section 504 services and there is a consideration of a 
special education diagnosis.  In any case, the more information given to service 
providers, the greater the transparency and consistency of potential wrap-around 
services.  
2.
Data Sources 
a.
For this section, simply check all data sources that apply.  The more informants and 
sources of data, the more reliable the data will be.  If you are only able to check one or 
two boxes, consider this a threat to the reliability of the data since there are very few 
informants.  Consider utilizing school records as well as information from the family.   
3.
Description of the Behavior 
a.
This section details the specifics of the behavior in question.  In general, you want to be 
as thorough as possible while still using precise wording.  Why is this behavior a 
concern?  How will it impact the student’s development?  What is the single target 
behavior you are interested in examining?  Consider writing to the extent that a 
stranger, who has never met the student, would be able to enter a room and identify 
the student based on their behavior.   
4.
Settings in which the Behavior Occurs 
a.
Check all settings that you feel are appropriate, but also consider any patterns you see.  
Perhaps the behavior occurs in a very specific setting in response to that environment; 
or, perhaps the behavior occurs in many general domains and is not apparently linked to 
any one setting.  All of these elements of data are clues that can help piece together the 
puzzle of complex behavior.   
5.
Measurement Paradigm 
a.
This will be largely dependent upon the Target Behavior.  Review each of the 
measurement systems carefully, and select a single method with deliberation.  This 
system will be critical in the objective assessment of the behavior, as well as in 
determining the effectiveness of any behavioral intervention.   
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
2.
Data Tracking and Graphing 
The primary reason that we make our target behaviors measureable is so that we can do just 
that:  Measure them!  It is critical to measure the behaviors so that we can make informed decisions 
about a number of domains:  How big of a problem is this behavior?  Is everyone aware of how often 
this behavior is occurring?  Does the student recognize when and how much they are doing this?  Is the 
intervention making a difference? 
Data tracking is arguably the most time-consuming and burdensome component of a behavioral 
assessment system.  Appropriate tracking requires either extensive one-on-one time with the student or 
thorough consultation with someone who does.  Moreover, taking mountains of data will only inform 
the next steps of a functional assessment, and may not tell you directly why a student is engaging in that 
behavior firsthand.  And a final point of frustration with data tracking is that all the while you are taking 
scrupulous notes, the student isn’t making any progress.  Wouldn’t it be better to focus on helping the 
student right away, rather than to watch them fail while you take data on them? 
The answer to this question is as complex as the behaviors you are attempting to change.  First, 
no one would ever want a child to fail.  If there is a straightforward intervention that you think will help 
your student, don’t hesitate to put it in place.  However, most behaviors that reach this stage of 
consideration are likely to be very resistant to change and varied in their presentation.  For these tough 
behaviors, it is important to put the supports in place that you feel are beneficial, and then continue to 
take data to record a clear and objective assessment of the behavior.  In addition, many times we 
believe we can put interventions in place to help a behavior, but we forget to consider the long-term 
sustainability of those services.  Tracking the data, even with the interventions, can reveal more 
precisely how pervasive a student’s challenging behavior is, and the challenges it can create for parents 
and teachers.   
The importance of good data tracking can be seen in nearly every field and profession.  Consider 
the stock market:  people would not be satisfied if their broker simply informed them that the stocks did 
‘fairly well’ or ‘pretty good’ that quarter.  We desire data and numbers to track as precisely as possible 
what our investments are doing, often with the more detail the better.  Or, consider the medical field.  A 
patient would not want to hear that their white blood cell count is ‘probably stable,’ or that their blood 
pressure ‘could be going up.’  These vague responses become even more upsetting in the presence of 
instruments that can track objective data, and the decisions based thereupon become infinitely more 
informative.   
Consider, for example, a student whose behavior warrants immediate intervention.  With 
services and supports in place, the behavior is no longer a problem.  So, why continue to track data?  
Perhaps without the supports in place, the behavior regresses to its previous levels.  If you have clear 
data that show this trend, there could not be a better argument for those services.  On the other hand, 
perhaps the behavior gets worse, even with the services in place.  Having a sound collection of data can 
help elucidate the response of the behavior to the intervention, and is very strong evidence when 
considering the level of behavioral difficulty observable at present and desirable in the future.  
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
Easy Steps:  Form #2.1-2.4- Tracking Data using Frequency, Ratio, Intensity, or Duration  
ation  
1.
General Steps  
a.
The number of times the behavior occurs will help you to determine the interval you 
should use.  If the behavior occurs less than 10 times per day, it will be appropriate to 
use the date.  If the behavior occurs at least 10 or more times per day, it may be better 
to break each row into either a part of the day (e.g. morning, noon, evening) or use a 
specific time.   
b.
Be sure to include the operationally defined target behavior at the top of each page.  
This will serve as a reminder of what behavior you are specifically tracking and will 
decrease false positives (behavior that is similar, but not exactly the same). 
c.
If the behavior occurs fairly infrequently (<10 times/day), simply add the date to each 
row of the first group of columns and then the number of times the behavior occurred 
in the next column.   
d.
For more frequent behaviors, split the day up as mentioned above.  To change this in 
the column, simply delete the fields marked ‘Click here to enter a date.’ and write in the 
time of day the behavior occurred, followed by the number of target behaviors 
observed. 
e.
Once you have filled in the date and number of target behaviors, move DOWN the page.  
DO NOT MOVE ACROSS.  When you have completed the first group of columns on the 
left, go on to the next group of columns (on the right side of the page).  This will make 
graphing much easier in Step 6 of this Easy Steps section. 
2.
Frequency (Form 2.1) 
a.
The variable ‘# of Target Behaviors’ observed has been defined in number from 1-15.  If 
you are observing more than 15 target behaviors per day, you will need to break the day 
up into smaller periods or modify the drop-down properties in the Developer tab.   
b.
For those behaviors that occur very often, it may be easier to record a tally on a slip of 
paper or notecard and then input the data into the form at a convenient time. 
3.
Duration (Form 2.2) 
a.
The variable ‘Min. of Target Behavior’ has been defined in minute-based intervals, 
ranging from .25 (15 seconds) to 30.  If you feel that there is not an appropriate interval, 
please delete the field ‘Choose and item.’ and replace with an interval of your choosing, 
or modify the drop-down menu properties in the Developer tab. 
b.
Whatever interval you decide upon, you must keep that interval for the entire data 
sheet.  This is so that when we graph the data it will not be skewed by variable intervals 
and the graph will reflect more accurately what was observed.   
c.
It may be helpful to use a stopwatch to record the duration, especially over a long 
interval (such as all day).  When doing this, do not reset the stopwatch during the 
interval; simply continue to add time as the behavior occurs.  
4.
Intensity (Form 2.3) 
a.
This form will require more operational definitions than the others.  This is necessary so 
that the target behavior can be accurately measured across different times, settings, 
and with different people. 
FILLABLE FuBA 
UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 
b.
To operationally define levels of intensity, determine what constitutes both the most 
mild and most severe forms of the target behavior.  The most severe form would be a 5, 
and the mildest would be a 1.  From there, determine how you can objectively state the 
behaviors that would make up a rating of 2, 3, and 4.  Record these operational 
definitions on page 1 of Form 2.3.   
c.
When the target behavior occurs, determine the most fitting level of intensity.  Record 
this and the date on page 2 of form 2.3.  This type of measurement paradigm is more 
open to subjectivity than duration and frequency, but may capture some behaviors in a 
more appropriate way.   This would also include behaviors that are very unlikely to ever 
be eliminated and where a goal of a “1” would be appropriate.   
5.
Ratio (Form 2.4) 
a.
Using a ratio is another method of analyzing behavior duration.  The difference here is 
that the data tracker would want to complete all intervals instead of only completing 
intervals in which the behavior occurred.  For example, when using a ratio tracking 
system, you should have an entry for every interval, ranging from 0-100%.  With other 
systems, you can only record data when the behavior occurs.  With a ratio tracking 
system, each interval must be recorded.  
b.
This system requires a high degree of consistency and a rater who is able to monitor the 
student objectively.  Because this is often completed in relative hindsight (at the 
conclusion of each interval) and with a fair amount of subjectivity, the rater must 
exercise extreme caution in assigning percentages of the target behavior.   
6.
Graphing (any sheet) 
a.
Now comes the fun part!  Once you have completed a form (the left, right, or both 
groups of data points), it is ready to be graphed.   
b.
Open the Fillable FuBA Graph Wizard in Microsoft Excel.   
c.
For electronic data: 
i.
Select (highlight) both columns of one group (the date/time column and the 
target behavior column). 
1.
Do not include the cells that say DATE/TIME and TARGET BEHVIORS 
ii.
Copy the data by using the right-click on the mouse and selecting ‘copy’ or by 
pressing “CTRL+C” 
iii.
Open the graph wizard and paste the data into the specified columns by using 
right-click and selecting ‘paste’ or by pressing “CTRL+V” 
d.
For hand-written data: 
i.
Input the data (date/time and target behaviors) into the specified columns 
e.
The graph will open in a new sheet entitled:  Graph 1 (1
st
group) and Graph 2 (2
nd
group).  This can be found on the bottom left corner of the excel workbook.   
f.
Save this excel workbook under a new name (we recommend the students initials and 
the date).  With this workbook, you can print the students’ progress, review with 
parents and educators, and even share this via email!  Transforming raw data into a 
graph has been shown to help both parents and teachers understand the progress that 
their student is making, or can also emphasize the lack of responsiveness to a specific 
intervention.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested