how to open a .pdf file in a panel or iframe using asp.net c# : .Net extract text from pdf SDK software API .net windows azure sharepoint Graduate-Catalogue-2014-2015-with-bookmarks24-part795

Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Master of Healthcare Administration/M.S. in Physician Assistant   241
Accreditation-Continued is an accreditation status granted 
when a currently accredited program is in compliance with 
the ARC-PA Standards.
Accreditation remains in effect until the program closes 
or withdraws from the accreditation process or until 
accreditation is withdrawn for failure to comply with the 
Standards. The approximate date for the next validation 
review of the program by the ARC-PA will be March 2017. 
The review date is contingent upon continued compliance 
with the Accreditation Standards and ARC-PA policy.
Admission
The curriculum of the Physician Assistant Program is 
rigorous, and the admissions process is extremely selective. 
In reviewing applications, the Admissions Committee 
considers academic performance, performance on the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), healthcare experience, 
and letters of recommendation as outlined below. Special 
admissions consideration is given to students enrolled in 
the dual-degree program at Seton Hall University and other 
affiliated dual-degree programs at the College of Saint 
Elizabeth, Monmouth University, and St. Peter’s College.
Academic Requirements for Admission
Application to the program is open to individuals who:
•  possess a baccalaureate degree* from an accredited 
institution and have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or greater
•  have a 3.2 GPA in the following prerequisite courses, 
with no grade lower than a “C.” 
Course   
Credits
Chemistry I with Lab 
4
Chemistry II with Lab 
4
General Biology I with Lab 
4
General Biology II with Lab 
4
Microbiology with Lab 
4
Precalculus, Calculus, or Statistics 
3
Psychology 
3
Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab 
4
Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab 
4
OR
Human Anatomy with Lab 
4
Human Physiology with Lab 
4
As noted above, prerequisite science courses listed 
above must include a laboratory component and must have 
been completed within 10 years prior to matriculation. 
Prerequisite courses must be completed at an accredited 
institution of higher education. College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement (AP), and 
International Baccalaureate (IB) credits cannot substitute for 
prerequisite courses required for admission. Students with 
incomplete prerequisites may apply; however, they must 
state how they will satisfy the prerequisites by June 1st prior 
to the start of the program. 
*Individuals who do not possess a baccalaureate degree 
should consult the Undergraduate Catalogue for the Dual-
Degree program (BS/MS) with the College of Arts and 
Sciences - Department of Biological Sciences.
Standardized Testing
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of 
all applicants. While the program does not use a strict cutoff 
score, most competitive applicants will have scores at or 
above the fiftieth percentile in each test area. Candidates who 
have already earned a graduate degree in a science or health- 
related field may request that the GRE be waived. Such 
requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is 
required of any applicant who is not a native speaker of 
English. A score report must be forwarded documenting a 
paper-based score of 550 or above, a computer-based score 
of 213 or above, or an Internet-based score of 79 or above. 
All international transcripts must be evaluated by a member 
agency of the National Association of Credential Evaluation 
Services (NACES).
Letters of Recommendation
Applicants are required to obtain three letters of 
recommendation from sources able to attest to an applicant’s 
academic ability and character. It is recommended that letters 
be obtained from course instructors and clinical supervisors. 
Letters from family members and casual acquaintances are 
not acceptable. 
Healthcare Experience Requirement
Applicants are required to complete a minimum of 100 
hours observing or participating in the delivery of healthcare 
in a clinical environment. This requirement may be met 
through paid or volunteer experiences. While shadowing a 
physician assistant or physician will meet this requirement, 
priority consideration is given to experiences where the 
applicant has assumed responsibility for patient care. Past 
experiences that students have used to meet this requirement 
include but are not limited to: shadowing a PA or physician 
in an office or hospital; volunteering or working as an 
emergency medical technician; working as a nurse, nurse’s 
aide, respiratory therapist, paramedic, athletic trainer or 
other healthcare provider, or volunteering in a healthcare 
facility. The healthcare experience is intended to strengthen 
interpersonal skills and to develop an understanding of the 
role of healthcare provider. 
Interviews
All applicants being considered for admission will be 
invited to campus for an interview. The interview is used to 
assess an applicant’s knowledge of the physician assistant 
profession, their motivation for becoming a physician 
assistant and communication and interpersonal skills. 
Meeting the minimum standards for admission does not 
guarantee that an applicant will be invited for an interview. 
.Net extract text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract text from pdf to excel; copying text from pdf into word
.Net extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
export text from pdf to word; extract formatted text from pdf
242   School of Health and Medical Sciences
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Advanced Standing and Transfer Students
Regardless of previous educational or work experience, 
all students are required to complete the entire physician 
assistant curriculum. No advanced placement, transfer credit, 
or credit for experiential learning will be granted.
Application Deadlines
Applicants may apply online at the Seton Hall University 
website: www.shu.edu  Seton Hall University does not 
participate in CASPA. Seats fill quickly, and applicants are 
encouraged to apply as early as possible.
Early Review: Applicants with a superior academic record 
• 
(GPA>3.4) and who have successfully completed all 
prerequisite coursework are encouraged to apply by 
August 15 for an early admissions decision. 
General Admission: Applications for general admission 
• 
are accepted from September 1
st
through a deadline of 
March 31
st
. Students with incomplete prerequisites may 
apply; however, they must state how they will satisfy 
the prerequisites by June 1
st
prior to the start of the 
program. Applicants may be asked to provide proof 
of enrollment in any outstanding prerequisite courses. 
Information regarding application procedures and 
deadlines may be obtained from the School of Health 
and Medical Sciences, (973) 275-2596.
Employment During the Academic Year
Training to become a physician assistant demands a 
full-time commitment. Due to the rigorous nature of the 
curriculum, it is recommended that students not engage in 
outside employment. If a student chooses to work during the 
academic year, the work schedule must not interfere with 
class performance or clinical rotation schedules.
Curriculum Requirements
Professional Year I
Fall Semester
GMPA 6001   Human Anatomy
GMPA 6111   Human Physiology
GMPA 6104   Psychiatry
GMPA 6108   Health Maintenance and Education
GMPA 6203   Introduction to Clinical Medicine I
Spring Semester
GMED 6102   Neuroscience
GMPA 6107   Pathophysiology
GMPA 6112   Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics
GMPA 6205   Introduction to Clinical Medicine II
GMPA 6206 
Electrocardiography
GMPA 6207   Diagnostic Imaging
GMPA 6208 
Laboratory Diagnostics
Professional Year II
Fall Semester
GMPA 7313  
Clinical Transitions
GMPA 7312  
Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine
GMPA 8510 
Biostatistics
Two clinical rotation blocks
Spring Semester
GMPA 7404  
Research Methods I
Six clinical rotation blocks
Professional Year III
Fall Semester
GMPA 6102 
Principles of Epidemiology
GMPA 7303  
Biomedical Ethics
GMPA 8509 
Research Methods II
Four clinical rotation blocks
Spring Semester
GMPA 8511  
Research Methods III
GMPA 8603  
Healthcare Policy
Four clinical rotation blocks
Clinical Rotations
Students shall not be permitted to begin clinical rotations 
until they have successfully completed all preceeding 
didactic coursework. Students are required to complete a 
minimum of 16 clinical rotation blocks. Required clinical 
experiences include the following: outpatient medicine 
(three blocks), internal medicine (two blocks), surgery (two 
blocks), pediatrics (two blocks), obstetrics/gynecology (one 
block), behavioral/mental health (one block), geriatrics (one 
block), emergency medicine (one block), elective rotations 
(three blocks). 
Graduation Requirements
Students will not be eligible for graduation until all 
didactic coursework and required clinical rotations have 
been successfully completed. Successful completion of 
clinical rotations requires that students document exposure 
to patients across the lifespan and across a variety of 
required diagnoses. Specific documentation requirements 
may be found in the Program Handbook and Policy Manual. 
Students who fail to meet documentation requirements will 
be required to register for additional rotation blocks at the 
current graduate tuition schedule. Students who are required 
to complete additional rotation blocks may experience a loss 
of vacation time and/or delayed graduation.
As required by the Accreditation Review Commission 
on Education for the Physician Assistant, the Department 
conducts summative assessments during the final semester 
of the program. A variety of measures are used to assess 
clinical knowledge, patient skills and professional 
development. No student will be  eligible for graduation 
until all summative assessments have been successfully 
completed.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
copy pdf text to word with formatting; export highlighted text from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
extract text from pdf open source; get text from pdf file c#
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
M.S. in Physician Assistant/Doctor of Physical Therapy   243
Doctor of Physical Therapy 
(DPT)
The Doctor of Physical Therapy is the post-baccalaureate 
degree conferred upon successful completion of a 
professional entry-level physical therapy educational 
program. Physical therapy is a dynamic profession with 
an established theoretical base and widespread clinical 
application in the preservation, development and restoration 
of optimal physical function. This Doctor of Physical 
Therapy program is intended to prepare physical therapists 
to be employed within the healthcare delivery system. 
Upon graduation, these practitioners will be able to provide 
a broad range of patient care services as well as perform 
research, teaching and administrative responsibilities. 
The curriculum also provides graduates with the skills to 
assume leadership roles in rehabilitation services, prevention 
and health maintenance programs, and professional and 
community organizations.
The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy 
Education (CAPTE) grants specialized accreditation status 
to qualified entry-level education programs for physical 
therapists and physical therapist assistants. CAPTE is 
listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the 
U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation (CHEA). The Doctor of Physical 
Therapy program at Seton Hall University is accredited 
by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy 
Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, 
Virginia 22314; Telephone: 703-706-3245; email: 
accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org. 
The program’s accreditation has been granted for a period of 
ten (10) years effective November 17, 2010.
Mission
The mission of the program is to educate individuals to 
become competent and autonomous Doctors of Physical 
Therapy who possess the depth and breadth of knowledge 
to support the best practice of Physical Therapy. Through 
diverse academic and clinical experiences, graduates are 
prepared to advance the field of physical therapy and assume 
leadership roles within the profession and health care 
environment. As a program within a Catholic university, 
graduates learn to provide care with sensitivity and respect 
for all individuals within the communities they serve.
The shared missions of physical therapy and the other 
professional entry programs within the School of Health 
and Medical Sciences provide opportunities for mutual 
support, sharing of resources and interactive development of 
programs.
This is a four-year academic program that includes 
academic courses and clinical practica and internships in 
physical therapy. Students develop the skills they need to 
perform as entry-level practitioners and to grow and adapt 
to the rapid changes in the profession and the healthcare 
delivery system. Upon completion, graduates will be 
thoroughly prepared for the National Physical Therapy 
Examination.
Admission
The curriculum of the Doctor of Physical Therapy 
Program is rigorous, and the admissions process is 
extremely selective. Applicants holding a bachelor of 
science degree must complete an application through 
the Physical Therapist Centralized Admissions Service 
(PTCAS); this is located at www.ptcas.org. In reviewing 
applications, the Admissions Committee will determine 
candidates’ eligibility upon review of the following: 
undergraduate academic performance, performance on the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and non-quantifiable 
items such as letters of recommendation, healthcare 
experiences, professional and community activities, and 
essay review. Special admissions consideration is given to 
students enrolled in the dual-degree program at Seton Hall 
University, who do not participate in the PTCAS process 
Admission
Admission to the program requires:
official transcripts from all colleges and universities 
• 
attended; 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with 
• 
a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a 
four-point scale;
completion of the following prerequisite courses with 
• 
a GPA of 3.0; and a grade of “C” or better in each 
course;
Human Anatomy and Physiology (8 credits);
• 
Physics (8 credits);
• 
Chemistry (8 credits);
• 
College Math or Statistics (3 credits);
• 
English/Communication (6 credits);
• 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits);
• 
General Psychology (3 credits);
• 
a minimum of 50 hours of clinical observation with a 
• 
licensed physical therapist in the delivery of physical 
therapy services in a clinical environment;
three letters of recommendation, one from a physical 
• 
therapist;
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Seton Hall 
• 
PTCAS GRE Code is 3886; 
a written essay; and
• 
completion of the essential functions statement.
• 
As noted above, prerequisite science courses listed above 
must include a laboratory component (online laboratories are 
not accepted) and must have been completed within 10 years 
prior to matriculation. Students with incomplete prerequisites 
may apply; however, they must state how they will satisfy 
the prerequisites by June 1st prior to the start of the program. 
Individuals who do not possess a baccalaureate degree 
should consult the Undergraduate Catalogue for the Dual 
Degree program (BS/DPT) with the College of Arts and 
Sciences - Department of Biological Sciences.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
acrobat remove text from pdf; .net extract pdf text
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in VB.NET project.
extract text from image pdf file; extract text from pdf with formatting
244   School of Health and Medical Sciences
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Standardized Testing
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of 
all applicants. A minimum of 150 (400 on older version) 
on the verbal portion and a cumulative score of at least 310 
(900 older version) on the verbal and quantitative reasoning 
portions are required. Candidates who have already earned a 
graduate degree may request that the GRE be waived. Such 
requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
If English is not the native language, a student must 
submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
Score Report documenting a paper-based score of 550 
or above, a computer-based score of 213 or above, or 
an Internet-based score of 79 or above. All international 
transcripts must be evaluated by a member agency of the 
National Association of Credential Evaluation Services 
(NACES).
Advanced Standing and Transfer Students
Regardless of previous educational or work experience, 
all students are required to complete the entire doctor of 
physical therapy curriculum. No advanced placement, 
transfer credit, or credit for experiential learning will be 
granted.
Information regarding the application deadline may be 
obtained from the School of Health and Medical Sciences, 
(973) 275-2051.
Curriculum Requirements
The Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is a full-time lock-
step program and requires continuous enrollment throughout 
the four years of study. Students who have interrupted 
enrollment will be required to register for  
a 1 credit Independent Study course prior to beginning 
courses with clinically related experiences. This independent 
study will emphasize continued mastery of previously 
learned knowledge and skills. Permission of the department 
chairperson is required. The following courses must be taken 
in the predetermined sequence.
Professional Year I
GDPT 4030  
Clinical Skills I
GDPT 4031  
Clinical Skills II
GDPT 6123  
Physical Therapy Roles in Health Care
GDPT 6311  
Embryology and Genetics
GDPT 6321  
Psycho-Social Concepts in Health Care
GDPT 6001  
Functional Human Anatomy
GDPT 6009  
Surface Anatomy and Palpation
GDPT 6012  
Kinesiology
GDPT 6013  
Therapeutic Modalities
GDPT 6101  
Human Physiology
GDPT 6102  
Neuroscience
GDPT 6108  
Motor Control Principles
Professional Year II
GDPT 6433 
Orthotics and Prosthetics/Functional 
Assistance
GDPT 6434  
Life Span Development
GDPT 6445  
Therapeutic Exercise
GDPT 6534  
Clinical Integration Seminar I
GDPT 6551  
Research Project I
GDPT 6552  
Exercise Physiology and Nutrition 
GDPT 6659  
Clinical Practicum I
GDPT 6660  
Clinical Practicum II
GDPT 6661  
Clinical Internship I (6 weeks)
GDPT 7134  
Clinical Integration Seminar II
GDPT 6007  
Research Methods and Biostatistics
GDPT 6015  
Pharmacology
GDPT 6016  
Orthopedic Clinical Medicine
GDPT 6017  
Clinical Imaging
GDPT 6019  
Management of Musculoskeletal  
Problems I: Extremities
GDPT 6020  
Management of Musculoskeletal  
Problems II: Spine
GDPT 6109  
Internal Clinical Medicine
Professional Year III
GDPT 6004  
Biomedical Ethics 
GDPT 6122  
Principles of Teaching and Learning
GDPT 7131  
Management of Neuromuscular Problems
GDPT 7141  
Neurological Clinical Medicine
GDPT 7142  
Cardiopulmonary Clinical Medicine
GDPT 7152  
Research Project II
GDPT 7231  
Management of Pediatric Problems
GDPT 7232  
Management of Geriatric Problems
GDPT 7235  
Management of Cardiopulmonary 
Problems
GDPT 7251  
Research Project III
GDPT 7359  
Clinical Practicum III
GDPT 7360  
Clinical Practicum IV
GDPT 7361  
Clinical Internship II (6 weeks)
GDPT 7362  
Management of Special Problems
GDPT 7562  
Clinical Integration Seminar III
GDPT 7563  
Clinical Integration Seminar IV
GDPT 7565  
Service Learning Seminar
Professional Year IV
GDPT 7421  
Health Care Organization and 
Administration (3 weeks)
GDPT 7461  
Clinical Internship III (12 weeks)
GDPT 7522  
Curriculum Integration Seminar (3 weeks)
GDPT 7561  
Clinical Internship IV (12 weeks)
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
extract highlighted text from pdf; extract all text from pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
c# extract text from pdf; c# read text from pdf
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Doctor of Physical Therapy/M.S. in Occupational Therapy   245
M.S. in Occupational Therapy
The Master of Science in Occupational Therapy 
(M.S.O.T.) professional program is designed to develop 
occupational therapists who are practitioners, contributors, 
and managers. As practitioners, occupational therapists 
establish, restore, maintain or enhance health and wellness 
through engagement in activities and occupations, and 
participation in lifestyles that are satisfying to clients. As 
contributors, occupational therapists advocate for their 
profession and clients, use current research to inform 
practice, and participate in the development of occupational 
therapy scholarship. As managers, occupational therapists 
plan, establish, supervise and evaluate occupational therapy 
services, promote occupational therapy services, collaborate 
with other professionals.
This 84-credit program consists of two years of didactic 
learning and two Level II fieldwork rotations. The program 
contains courses specific to occupational therapy practice 
that are intended to provide students with the theoretical 
knowledge and technical skills necessary to perform as 
entry-level practitioners in a rapidly changing global society. 
All students must complete Level II fieldwork within 24 
months following completion of academic preparation.
The occupational therapy program is accredited by 
the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy 
Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy 
Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, 
Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone 
number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its web address 
is www.acoteonline.org
Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National 
Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapist 
administered by the National Board for Certification 
in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful 
completion of this examination, the individual will be an 
Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). Most states 
require licensure to practice; however, state licenses are 
usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification 
Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s 
ability to sit for the NBCOT certification or attain state 
licensure.
Admission
Admission to the program requires: 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution 
• 
with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0;
completion of the following pre-requisite courses with 
• 
a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of “C” or better in 
each course; and
three letters of recommendation, one from a registered 
• 
occupational therapist (OTR).
Course  
Credits
Human Anatomy and Physiology (with Lab)  
8
English  
3
Statistics  
3
Introduction to Sociology 
3
Introduction to General Psychology  
3
Abnormal Psychology  
3
Developmental Psychology (Across the Life Span) 
3
Anatomy and Physiology must include a laboratory. 
Students with incomplete prerequisites may apply; however, 
they must state how they will satisfy the prerequisites prior 
to the start of the program. All prerequisite courses must be 
completed within 10 years of the application date. College 
Level Examination program (CLEP), Advanced Placement 
(AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits cannot 
substitute for prerequisite courses required for admission.
Applicants are required to perform a minimum of 50 
hours of volunteer work with an occupational therapist 
(OTR). One letter of recommendation must be from 
an occupational therapist (OTR). The Committee on 
Admissions will determine candidates’ eligibility upon 
review of the following: GPA; non-quantifiable items, 
including letters of recommendation, occupational therapy 
volunteer experiences, employment experiences, healthcare 
experiences, professional and community activities, 
and a written essay demonstrating understanding of and 
commitment to the profession. If English is not the native 
language, a student must submit a Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) Score Report documenting a 
paper-based score of 550 or above, a computer-based score 
of 213 or above, or an Internet-based score of 79 or above. 
Information regarding the application deadline may be 
obtained from the School of Health and Medical Sciences, 
(973) 761-7145 or email shms@shu.edu
Curriculum Requirements
First Year
Fall Semester
GMOT 6150   Functional Anatomy & Kinesiology
GMOT 6412   Introduction to Occupational Therapy
GMOT 6170   Occupational Therapy Practice Skills
GMOT 6160 
Neuroscience for Occupational Therapy
GMOT 6100 
Professional Formation I
Spring Semester
GMOT 6250 
Group Process in Occupational Therapy
GMOT 6260 
Cognition, Perception, Vision and Function
GMOT 6270 
The Occupational Therapy Process
GMOT 7303 
Research Methods I
GMOT 6200 
Professional Formation II
Summer Session
GMOT 6301 
Health and Medical Complexities of Older 
Adults
GMOT 6303 
Evaluation of Older Adults
GMOT 6305 
Interventions for Older Adults
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Using this VB.NET PDF text conversion API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save it as new txt file.
cut text pdf; get text from pdf c#
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document. Add necessary references: C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From PDF File in C#.NET.
cut text from pdf document; copy text from pdf reader
246   School of Health and Medical Sciences
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Second Year
Fall Semester  
GMOT 6750 
Health and Medical Complexities of 
Adults
GMOT 6760 
Evaluation of Adults
GMOT 6770 
Interventions for Adults
GMOT 6780 
Professional Ethics in Occupational 
Therapy 
GMOT 6700 
Professional Formation III 
Spring Semester
GMOT 6850 
Health and Medical Complexities of 
Children/Adolescents
GMOT 6860 
Evaluation of Children/Adolescents 
GMOT 6870 
Interventions for Children/Adolescents
GMOT 6880 
Wellness and Entrepreneurship I
GMOT 7320 
Research Methods II
GMOT 6800 
Professional Formation IV 
Summer Session
GMOT 6980 
Wellness and Entrepreneurship II
GMOT 6960 
Health Care Policies and Organizations
Third Year
Fall Semester
GMOT 7013   Level II Fieldwork I
Spring Semester
GMOT 7023 
Level II Fieldwork II
GMOT 7000 
Professional Formation V
Summer Semester (optional)
GMOT 7033 
Level II Fieldwork III (optional)
M.S. in Speech-Language 
Pathology
The mission of the Master of Science in Speech-Language 
Pathology program is to prepare students as independent 
professionals with a broad knowledge base, competency 
in clinical service delivery, and a strong foundation in the 
principles of evidence based practice. Aligned with the 
Catholic mission of Seton Hall University and the School 
of Health and Medical Sciences, students will be prepared 
with the skill set to assume servant leadership roles in a 
global society. The program promotes a culture of life-long 
learning, collaboration, creation of new knowledge, and 
contribution to the profession and the community. 
This comprehensive 65-credit, five-semester program 
includes academic courses, experiential learning 
opportunities, and clinical practica in speech-language 
pathology that are intended to provide students with the 
necessary skills to perform as entry-level practitioners and 
enable students to grow and adapt to the rapid changes in the 
profession and the health care service delivery system.
Accreditation
The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology 
program received full accreditation for an eight- year period 
by the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) of the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) 
effective May 1, 2006 through April 30, 2014. In order for 
an individual to be eligible to apply for national certification 
with ASHA, a student must initiate and complete coursework 
and clinical practicum at a CAA-accredited institution.
Admission
A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with 
a cumulative GPA of no less than 3.0 on a four-point scale is 
required for all applicants. Admission to the program is open 
to individuals who have an undergraduate degree in speech-
language pathology or who have completed a minimum of 
18 credits of pre-professional coursework in communication 
sciences and disorders with a grade of “B” or better that 
must include the six courses listed below. The Department 
of Speech-Language Pathology offers the following 
undergraduate pre-professional courses:
Credits
GMSL 5001  
Phonetics  
3
GMSL 5003  
Introduction to Language Development   3 
GMSL 5004  
Introduction to Audiology  
3
GMSL 5005 
Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech 
and Swallowing Mechanism 
3
GMSL 5006 
Fundamentals of Sound and the 
Auditory System 
3
GMSL 5007  
Introduction to Communication Disorders  3
The Committee on Admission determines a candidate’s 
eligibility upon review of all academic transcripts, Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) scores within the past five 
years, a personal statement of professional goals, three 
letters of recommendation, and 25 hours of observation of 
a professional holding a certificate of clinical competence 
(CCC) in Speech-Language Pathology. 
In accordance with ASHA’s knowledge and skills 
acquisition (KASA) guidelines for certification in Speech-
Language Pathology, completion of at least one course with 
a grade of “C” or better in each of the following areas is 
required for admission:
English Composition
• 
Statistics
• 
Social or Behavioral Science (Typically a course in 
• 
psychology, sociology, or cultural anthropology)
Biological Science (Typically a course in biology, general 
• 
human anatomy, physiology, genetics, or zoology)
Physical Science (Preferably physics or chemistry)
• 
Please note that pre-professional coursework in Speech-
Language Pathology cannot be used to fulfill the course 
requirements in the above mentioned areas (i.e., English 
composition, statistics, social or behavioral science, 
biological and physical science). Further, all prerequisite 
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology/M.S. in Athletic Training   247
courses must be completed no more than 10 years prior to 
the application date. If English is not the native language, a 
student must submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) score report documenting a paper-based score 
of 550 or above, a computer-based score of 213 or above, 
or an Internet-based score of 79 or above. Information 
regarding the application process may be obtained from the 
Department of Speech-Language Pathology at (973) 275-
2825 or e-mail shms@shu.edu
Curriculum Requirements
Professional Year I
GMSL 6007  
Physiologic and Acoustic Phonetics
GMSL 6009  
Diagnostic and Clinical Principles
GMSL 6010  
Child Language Development and 
Disorders
GMSL 6011 
Speech Intelligibility and its Disorders in 
Children
GMSL 6012 
School Age Language and Literacy
GMSL 6022 
Biomedical Ethics and Professional Issues 
in Speech-Language Pathology
GMSL 6141  
Neuroscience
GMSL 6518  
Acquired Disorders of Language & 
Cognition
GMSL 6521  
Dysphagia
GMSL 6522 
Early Intervention
GMSL 6523  
Fluency Disorders
GMSL 6524 
Augmentative and Alternative 
Communications
GMSL 7002  
Research Methods I
GMSL 7003 
Research Methods II*
GMSL 7010 
Traumatic Brain Injury
GMSL 7039 
Research Project I*
GMSL 7041  
Clinical Practicum/Clinical Seminar I
Professional Year II
GMSL 6013  
Adult Neuromotor Disorders of 
Communication
GMSL 6525  
Voice Disorders
GMSL 7001 
Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation for the 
Speech-Language Pathologist
GMSL 7013  
Craniofacial Disorders
GMSL 7040 
Research Project II *
GMSL 7102  
Clinical Practicum/Clinical Seminar II
GMSL 7103  
Clinical Externship
* To meet the research requirements of the program, 
students have the option of enrolling in GMSL 7003 
Research Methods II (offered in professional year I) or 
enrolling in a research project sequence [GMSL 7039 
Research Project I (offered in professional year I) & GMSL 
7040 Research Project II (offered in professional year II)]. 
M.S. in Athletic Training
The Master of Science in Athletic Training program 
(MSAT) is intended to prepare graduates to critically analyze 
and convey information to patients, colleagues and other 
health professionals. These clinicians will be able to provide 
a broad range of patient care services and perform research 
and administrative responsibilities. This is accomplished 
through students and faculty building collaborations, 
participating on professional organizations in athletic 
training, and administering athletic training services.
The mission of the Master in Science in Athletic Training 
Program is to prepare students to become competent and 
independent clinicians who will enhance the quality of 
patient health care and to advance the profession of athletic 
training. The program teaches and provides practical 
experiences to enable graduates to assume leadership roles 
both within the field of athletic training, and within the 
community.
This is a two year, 64-credit, six-semester Entry-Level 
Master of Science Degree Program. Students develop the 
knowledge and skills needed to perform as entry-level 
athletic training clinicians and to grow and adapt to the rapid 
changes in the profession and health care. Upon program 
completion, students will be thoroughly prepared for the 
Board of Certification Examination (BOC) and prepared to 
enter the profession as entry-level athletic training clinicians. 
Additionally, the curriculum prepares students for the 
Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination.
Accreditation
The Master of Science in Athletic Training is a fully 
CAATE accredited entry-level graduate program. The 
Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education 
(CAATE), maintain educational standards for accredited 
athletic training education programs.
Admission
• Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution
• Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a 
four-point scale. However, applicants not meeting the 
cumulative 3.0 GPA requirement are encouraged to apply 
and will be seriously considered
• Completion of the following pre-requisite courses with a 
grade of “C” or better:
Human Anatomy & Physiology*  
8 credits
Biological or Exercise Science*  
3 credits
Physics*  
4 credits
English  
3 credits
College Math or Statistics  
3 credits
Social Sciences    
6 credits
* Courses must include a laboratory. All prerequisite 
courses must be completed no longer than ten years prior to 
application date.
248   School of Health and Medical Sciences
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
•  Fifty (50) hours of clinical observation with a certified 
athletic trainer
•  Official transcripts from all colleges and universities 
attended
•  Current certifications in CPR/AED for the Professional 
Rescuer
•  Letter of recommendation from a certified athletic trainer
•  Two additional letters of recommendation required
•  Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required
•  Completion of applicant essay question
•  Student must read, sign, understand and meet the 
Standards of Essential Functions of the School of Health 
and Medical Sciences and the MSAT program.
•  If English is not the native language, a student must 
submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
Score Report documenting a paper-based score of 550 
or above, a computer-based score of 213 or above, or an 
Internet-based score of 79 or above.
Qualified students are admitted without regard to race, 
color, religion, age, disability, natural origin, sexual 
orientation, ancestry or gender. Students with incomplete 
prerequisites may apply; however, they must state how 
they will satisfy the prerequisites by the end of the Spring 
semester prior to the start of the program. All prerequisite 
courses must be completed no longer than 10 years prior to 
the application date.
Curriculum Requirements 
Professional Year I
GMAT 6010   Athletic Training Principles I ***
GMAT 6011 
Athletic Training Principles II 
GMAT 6115 
General Medical Conditions
GMAT 6907   Research Methods***
GMAT 7007   Research Project I
GMAT 7107 
Research Project II
GMAT 7400 
Clinical Practicum I
GMAT 7402   Clinical Practicum II
GMED 6001   Functional Human Anatomy
GMED 6004 
Biomedical Ethics
GMED 6009   Surface Anatomy & Palpation
GMED 6012 
Kinesiology
GMED 6013 
Therapeutic Modalities
GMED 6022 
Basic Rehabilitation Procedures
GMED 6101   Human Physiology
GMED 6104   Exercise Physiology and Nutrition
*** Classes begin late July/early August.
Professional Year II
GMAT 6113 
Sports Psychology
GMAT 6116 
Health Care Administration
GMAT 7207   Research Project III
GMAT 7403   Clinical Practicum III
GMAT 7404 
Clinical Practicum IV
GMAT 6015 
Pharmacology
GMED 6016   Orthopedic Clinical Medicine
GMED 6017   Clinical Imaging
GMED 6018   Therapeutic Exercise
GMED 6019   Management of Musculoskeletal Problems: 
Extremities
GMED 6020   Management of Musculoskeletal Problems: 
Spine
GMED 6021   Exercise Pharmacology
Course Descriptions
GDPT 6001 (PTFY 4001) Functional Human Anatomy
This course provides the student with knowledge of 
functional human anatomy using a regional approach with 
emphasis placed on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, 
respiratory, and nervous systems and review of the 
gastrointestinal system. Anatomical models, computer 
programs, and cadaveric dissection complement didactic 
classroom activities. 3 credits
GDPT 6004 (PTFY 4004) Biomedical Ethics
A study of the application of human and professional 
values, judgment, and choices to selected ethical dilemmas 
that arise in practice. Emphasis on various traditional 
and contemporary approaches to normative ethics within 
decision-making models applicable to resolving professional 
dilemmas in the delivery of health care. 2 credits
GDPT 6007 Research Methods and Biostatistics
This course is designed to provide students with a working 
knowledge of the research process. The importance of 
research in the practice of physical therapy will be covered. 
Students will learn about the variety of research publications 
in physical therapy and how to critically appraise these 
publications. Evidence-based practice will be emphasized 
and covered, including how to find and appraise systematic 
reviews of the literature. Students will also complete a 
systematic review of the literature. A variety of research 
designs will be covered including experimental, quasi-
experimental, and non-experimental designs. Methods for 
gathering representative samples and controlling experiments 
will also be covered. Students will gain experience collecting 
and performing elementary statistics on data, and reviewing 
published research articles. Students will learn about the 
various sources of research findings in physical therapy.  
3 credits
GDPT 6009 (PTFY 4009) Surface Anatomy and 
Palpation
This course introduces the student to the application of 
palpation and observation as part of the physical examination 
process. Emphasis is placed on identification and location of 
superficial anatomical structures. Attention is paid to manual 
identification of selected musculoskeletal structures. 1 credit
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
M.S. in Athletic Training/Course Descriptions   249
GDPT 6012 (PTFY 4012) Kinesiology
This course presents the application of physics, anatomy, 
and physiology to the understanding of human movement. 
Emphasis is on the study of the development and function 
of bone, muscle, and ligaments in contributing to normal 
motion. Attention is paid to synovial joints as key linkage 
in the human mechanical system and how their movements 
are created and governed.  The laboratory component of 
this course reviews the theory and application of physical 
examination and evaluation through the use of selected 
biomechanical instruments. Gait and activity analysis are 
included. 3 credits
GDPT 6013 (PTFY 4013) Therapeutic Modalities
This course emphasizes the use of heat, cold, compression, 
traction and electrotherapeutic techniques in the management 
of patients with impairments and functional limitations 
due to a variety of orthopedic, neurological and medical 
conditions.  Management strategies and techniques to 
promote healing in dermal wounds and burns will also 
be discussed.  This course will stress a problem solving 
approach for the selection and application of appropriate 
procedures to manage pain, edema, and limitations in 
motion, muscle weakness and wound healing.  Clinical 
decision-making will be practiced through the course to 
develop appropriate treatment strategies and applications 
for the use of these physical agents for initial treatment as 
well as treatment modification based on the assessment of 
physiological and physical responses to those interventions.  
3 credits
GDPT 6015 Pharmacology
Problem oriented approach to examining the most commonly 
used pharmacologic agents seen in clinical practice. Basic 
principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, 
along with pertinent physiology are presented. Practical 
aspects of dosing schedules, therapeutic effects, interactions 
and adverse reactions emphasized, especially as they apply 
to physical performance and safety. 2 credits
GDPT 6016 Orthopedic Clinical Medicine
This  course presents the orthopedic pathological processes, 
conditions and manifestations in relationship to their 
influences on the patient across the lifespan. This course 
presents an in-depth analysis of the muscle, bone, and 
joint structures, with emphasis on the orthopedic surgeon 
evaluation and medical management in the presence of 
illness, disease, trauma, overuse, and developmental and 
aging processes. Topics include medical musculoskeletal 
evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis. Issues of soft tissue 
and fracture management as well as surgical and basic 
rehabilitation management for orthopedic concerns of the 
spine and extremities. Emphasis on clinician-physician/
practitioner communication is stressed.  Case studies will 
emphasize the clinician’s role in clinical decision-making, 
communication, individual and cultural differences, 
screening, examination, diagnosis, and prognosis, prevention 
and wellness, and the development of a plan of care.  
2 credits
GDPT 6017 Clinical Imaging
This course emphasizes the theory and utilization of basic 
clinical imaging in the management of patients with various  
neuromusculoskeletal , peripheral vascular, cardiopulmonary, 
and selected medical conditions. Emphasis is placed on the 
uses of basic radiological techniques for multiple biological 
systems and organs of the human body. 2 credits
GDPT 6019 Management of Musculoskeletal  
Problems I – Extremities
The management of musculoskeletal dysfunction 
is examined with emphasis on the development of 
analytical knowledge necessary to evaluate and treat 
musculoskeletal dysfunction. Normal musculoskeletal 
physiology of peripheral joints is the basis for understanding 
pathophysiology and therapeutic intervention. A problem 
solving model for intervention of peripheral joint 
dysfunction including medical screening, physical evaluation 
and goal setting will be stressed. Students will develop 
skill in manual therapy techniques and integration of these 
techniques with therapeutic exercise and physical modalities. 
3 credits
GDPT 6020 Management of Musculoskeletal  
Problems II – Spine
The management of musculoskeletal dysfunction is 
examined with emphasis on the development of analytical 
knowledge to evaluate musculoskeletal dysfunction 
related to the spine and temperomandibular joint. Normal 
musculoskeletal physiology of spinal joints is the basis for 
understanding pathophysiology and therapeutic intervention. 
A problem-solving model for intervention of spinal joint 
dysfunction includes medical screening, physical evaluation 
and goal setting will be stressed. Students will develop 
skill in manual therapy techniques and integration of these 
techniques with therapeutic exercise and physical modalities. 
3 credits
GDPT 6030 (PTFY 4030) Clinical Skills I
This course facilitates skills acquisition in basic elements 
of patient services and professional practice. Emphasis is 
placed on basic physical handling skills, health care record 
information collection and documentation, elementary 
physical examination, general screening for all systems, and 
essentials of patient-practitioner interaction. 2 credits
GDPT 6031 (PTFY 4031) Clinical Skills II
The course promotes skills acquisition in basic elements 
of patient services. Emphasis is placed on basic patient 
handling skills, physical  examination and intervention 
techniques, health care record information collection and 
documentation, general screening, and essentials of patient-
practitioner interaction. 3 credits
GDPT 6101 (PTFY 4101) Human Physiology
Analysis of normal physiological function in the presence 
of disease or trauma affecting all systems. Information is 
presented at the tissue, organ and system level. Discussion 
will address changes in response to disease or trauma over 
the entire lifespan. 3 credits
250   School of Health and Medical Sciences
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
GDPT 6102 (PTFY 4102) Neuroscience
This course will cover the basic structure, organization, and 
function of the central nervous system (CNS). Lectures and 
laboratories focus on understanding localization of function 
within specific structures and pathways of the brain and 
spinal cord, and typical syndromes associated with vascular 
accidents, trauma or diseases of the various parts of the 
CNS. 3 credits
GDPT 6108 (PTFY 4108) Motor Control Principles
This introductory course has been designed to assist students 
in the understanding and integration of the principles of 
motor control and learning into practice for the advancement 
of motor skill acquisition. Learning is an essential feature 
of human perceptual-motor behavior. This course provides 
an introduction to the principles of learning skills, as well 
as a preliminary application of the principles to therapeutic 
practice. Theory is explored as it relates to learning, 
performance and skill acquisition. Principles of learning as 
they pertain to task analysis and characteristics of learner 
and learning environment are also addressed. 2 credits
GDPT 6109 Internal Clinical Medicine
Survey of major classes of problems or diagnoses involving 
pathology of general medical conditions includes the 
presentation of patterns of practice in the specialties of 
general medicine. Use of clinical cases to present standard 
patterns of physician evaluation, diagnosis, intervention and 
communication/referral with other health care practitioners. 
2 credits
GDPT 6122 Principles of Teaching and Learning
This course presents the basic concepts and principles 
underlying teaching and learning in the cognitive, 
psychomotor and affective domains. Emphasis is placed 
on the ability to assess the educational needs of varied 
audiences (patients, caregivers, students, peers, and 
other professionals) and apply traditional and alternative 
teaching strategies to facilitate learning in a professional 
and culturally sensitive manner. The impact of learning 
preference on teaching style will be addressed. Course 
experiences will be guided by a spectrum of teaching 
methods: a framework that delineates options in teaching 
and learning. 2 credits
GDPT 6123 (PTFY 4123) Physical Therapy Roles in 
Health Care
This is an introductory course into the field of physical 
therapy taken by entry-level students. The focus of this 
course is to introduce the student to professional issues 
related to physical therapy; the professional organization; the 
concepts of evidence based medicine; the Guide to Physical 
Therapist Practice; and medical terminology. Foundational 
skills in communication, professional behavior, evidenced-
based practice, self and peer assessment, and cultural 
competency. 2 credits
GDPT 6311 Embryology and Genetics
Discussion of normal fetal development. Analysis of genetic, 
timing/sequencing, and environmental mechanisms, which 
control patterns of development. Discussion of potential out-
of-sequence modification of post-fetal structure and function 
through genetic manipulation. Introduction to major classes 
of developmental disorders. 2 credits
GDPT 6321 Psycho-Social Concepts in Healthcare 
Delivery
This course addresses the complex psycho-social issues 
relative to the health care provider. It will provide the 
student with the opportunity to actively reflect upon the 
socialization process, beginning and ending with the 
key player, oneself. Additionally, it will emphasize to 
the physical therapists a responsibility to create a role 
consistent with the patient/client management model in 
both a competent and compassionate delivery system. This 
course will also provide students with necessary insights 
and techniques for handling a variety of psycho-social and 
cultural factors in the clinical settings. This course will 
integrate the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice in relation 
to issues in contemporary clinical practice. 2 credits
GDPT 6433 Orthotics and Prosthetics/Functional 
Assistance
Clinical problem-centered discussion providing integration 
of concepts of physical therapy management of patients/
clients including the description, prescription, training in 
the use of, and evaluation of prostheses, orthoses,  and 
functional assistance. Students will discuss clinical case 
studies integrating the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice 
and evidenced-based practice into the current doctoral level 
of physical therapy practice. 2 credits
GDPT 6434 Life Span Development
Overview of human development across the life span.  
Changes in physical, cognitive, and social development are 
explored using a framework that highlights the contribution 
of multiple interacting systems to behavior and performance. 
Emphasis on the application of the Guide to Physical 
Therapist Practice. Elements of patient/client management 
and application of the Guide’s framework of tests and 
measures will be stressed. 3 credits
GDPT 6445 Therapeutic Exercise
This course provides a foundation of knowledge and skills 
used to manage motor problems using appropriate exercise 
principles and techniques. Student will learn to design a 
program of therapeutic exercise to address specific patient 
problems and goals. Students will develop skill in the 
performance and teaching of therapeutic exercises based on 
examination results. 3 credits
GDPT 6534 Clinical Integration Seminar I
Clinical problem-centered discussions and assignments 
providing integration of concepts of physical therapy 
practice. Students will discuss clinical cases integrating 
the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, evidence-based 
practice guidelines, and contemporary professional practice 
standards and procedures. 1 credit
GDPT 6551 Research Project I
This course is a continuation of the principles of research 
design and statistics begun in Research Methods. Principles 
of statistics are reviewed and expanded, so that the basic 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested