how to open a .pdf file in a panel or iframe using asp.net c# : Export highlighted text from pdf SDK application API .net windows html sharepoint Graduate-Catalogue-2014-2015-with-bookmarks30-part802

Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology   301
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
General (Terminal) Option
Students selecting the M.A. in Theology, general option, 
must complete 36 credits of coursework, divided into 21 
credits in one of the major areas listed under “concentrations” 
and 12 credits in the other areas of concentration, divided 
as evenly as possible among them. Students concentrating 
in Biblical Studies also must complete 6 credits in Biblical 
Greek (BIBL 6006 and BIBL 6007) and 6 credits in Biblical 
Hebrew (BIBL 6113 and BIBL 6114). As close as possble to 
their final semester of studies, students also must complete 3 
credits in the M.A. Seminar (STHO 6999), a capstone course 
integrating their theological studies from among the various 
concentrations.
Research Option
The M.A. in Theology program, research format, 
consists of four components: coursework, language reading 
requirement, comprehensive examinations and thesis. These 
four components are divided as follows:
I. Coursework (36 credits)
Students must complete 36 hours of graduate coursework, 
divided into 21 credits in one of the major areas listed 
under “concentrations” and 15 credits in the other areas of 
concentration, divided as evenly as possible among them. No 
pastoral theology (PTHO) courses are applicable to the M.A. 
in Theology degree.
II. Language Reading Requirement
Students must demonstrate reading knowledge of French or 
German. This requirement should be met as early as possible; 
no student will be permitted to advance to comprehensive 
examinations without satisfying it. Substitution of other 
languages is generally not permitted unless the student 
demonstrates a compelling relationship between the proposed 
language substitute and his area of research. Students meet 
the language reading requirement by taking a one-hour 
translation examination administered and graded by a faculty 
member chosen by the associate dean. The exam may be 
taken during the Fall or Spring semester.
III. Comprehensive Examinations
Students must complete written comprehensive 
examinations in their areas of concentration, demonstrating 
relative mastery of the chosen area of concentration. 
Comprehensives are taken after coursework and the language 
reading requirement have been fulfilled. Exams may be taken 
during the Fall or Spring semester.
IV. Thesis
Students must submit an acceptable thesis of substantial 
length (80-100 pages) in the chosen field of concentration 
on a topic previously approved by the Educational Policy 
Committee, only after all other degree requirements have 
been met successfully. The thesis is read by a mentor and a 
reader, each of whom grades the thesis, with the final grade 
established as an average by the associate dean. The final 
thesis must be filed in the ICSST Library.
V. Additional Requirements for Biblical Studies Students
In addition to the requirements described in I-IV, students 
concentrating in Biblical Studies must successfully complete 
6 credits in Biblical Greek (BIBL 6006 and BIBL 6007) and 
6 credits in Biblical Hebrew (BIBL 6113 and BIBL 6114) 
prior to comprehensive examinations.
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry 
(M.A.P.M.)
The Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry program prepares 
students for competent leadership in a specialized ministry 
in the Catholic Church. The program strives to provide the 
student with both a theological education and specialized 
training in a chosen field of ministerial engagement.
Admission Requirements
In addition to the University’s admission requirements for 
graduate study and the general admission requirements for 
ICSST programs, M.A.P.M. applicants must:
•  submit the results of psychological testing, including the 
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), the 
Rorschach, the Autobiographical Sketch, the Gestalt Test 
and the Draw-a-Person Test, all taken at a center approved 
by ICSST; and
•  have a personal interview with the associate dean.
Note: At least two years of service to the Church is 
preferred.
Degree Requirements
The M.A.P.M. program consists of four components: 
coursework; field education and theological reflection; 
spiritual formation; and the Integration Seminar/Final 
Comprehensive Project, as follows. All students must take 
STHO 6020 Research Seminar in the first semester of study.
I. Coursework (42 credits)
Students complete coursework according to the 
distribution below, divided into 30 credits in a core 
theological curriculum and 12 credits in their area of pastoral 
specialization. Specific courses are selected in consultation 
with the student’s academic adviser.
A. Core Theological Curriculum
Students must complete 3 credits in each of the following 
core areas. The courses listed represent typical choices, not 
concrete requirements.
Core Areas  
Possible Course Choices
New Testament    
BIBL 6501, 6503, 6505
Old Testament    
BIBL 6201, 6203, 6205
Church History    
HSTD 6201, 6202, 6301
Liturgy  
STHO 6501
Christology or Trinity  
STHO 6203, 6204
Ecclesiology  
STHO 6207, 6208
Sacramental Theology  
STHO 6503, 6505, 6509
Moral Theology   
CETH 6105, 6306
Theological Foundations for Ministry  
STHO 6208, 6575
Export highlighted text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from protected pdf; copy text from protected pdf to word
Export highlighted text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract pdf text to excel; copy formatted text from pdf
302   Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
B. Concentration Area
Students must earn 12 credits in PTHO courses. The 
coursework should represent a coherent concentration in a 
particular area of pastoral ministry and be determined by the 
student’s present and prospective ministerial needs. Areas 
of concentration currently available include Seminary’s 
Theological Education for Parish Services (STEPS), Youth 
Ministry, Christian Spirituality and Great Spiritual Books.
II. Field Education and Theological Reflection
All M.A.P.M. students must complete the equivalent of 6 
credits of field education in professionally supervised settings 
approved by ICSST. Students may meet this requirement 
as follows: (1) by taking part in two single-semester field 
education experiences of six to eight hours weekly in a 
supervised setting; (2) by enrolling in clinical pastoral 
education; or (3) by other means approved by the associate 
deans.
Concomitantly with field education, students must enroll 
in a theological reflection group, which normally meets 
approximately 10 times over the course of an academic year. 
Registration for the group is made through the associate 
dean.
III. Spiritual Formation
The formation program has three components. The first 
is the “Foundational Spiritual Experience.” A cognitive and 
experiential introduction to the spiritual life, this year-long 
program explores movements in the spiritual life. Liturgy, 
instruction, faith-sharing and communal prayer are some of 
the elements.
The second component of formation is spiritual direction. 
A list of recommended directors, persons associated in some 
way with the School who are familiar with the program and 
its goals, is available from the associate dean.
The third formation component is a retreat of several days 
made at some time during the course of studies. When the 
retreat has been completed, the student should inform the 
associate dean.
IV. Integration Seminar and Final Comprehensive 
Project
All students must enroll in and successfully complete the 
3-credit Integration Seminar (PTHO 9101). Completion of 
this seminar involves successful preparation of an acceptable 
final comprehensive project in ministry, attesting to the 
student’s successful integration of theological knowledge 
and pastoral expertise with its appropriate application to 
a selected pastoral issue. Copies of the final project are 
submitted to the ICSST Library.
Master of Divinity (M.Div.)
The Master of Divinity program is the first professional 
degree program providing theological training for those 
preparing to undertake ministry in the Roman Catholic 
Church, primarily through ordination to the priesthood. The 
program meets all the requirements of the United States 
Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Program of Priestly 
Formation (Fifth Edition, 2005). While the M.Div. program 
is oriented toward seminarians preparing for the Roman 
Catholic priesthood, others may be admitted to this program, 
at the discretion of the rector and dean, provided that they 
meet all other requirements.
Admission Requirements
In addition to the University’s general admission 
requirements for graduate study and the special admission 
requirements for all ICSST programs, M.Div. applicants:
•  must undertake psychological testing, according to 
protocols issued by the Office of the Rector and Dean;
•  must have a personal interview with the rector and dean 
and/or Admissions Committee. Scheduling for such  
interviews is initiated by ICSST; and
•  should have earned at least 15 undergraduate hours in 
religious studies/theology and at least 30 undergraduate 
hours in philosophy as part of their undergraduate 
education, corresponding to the themes required by the 
Program of Priestly Formation (Fifth Edition, 2005). 
Further preparation will be provided through the Pre-
Theology program at ICSST.
Note: For seminarians already affiliated with a diocese or 
religious community, on-site testing at Seton Hall University 
for English language abilities (with possible additional 
requirements in ESL classes) might be substituted for the 
TOEFL, in consultation with the associate dean. 
Matriculation Requirements
M.Div. students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA on a 
4.0 scale. The M.Div. program should be completed within 
six years (exclusive of any Philosophy or Pre-Theology 
requirements) unless extension of time is granted upon 
petition to the ICSST Educational Policy Committee due to 
extenuating circumstances.
Degree Requirements
The M.Div. curriculum consists of four components: 
coursework; field education and theological reflection; 
spiritual formation; and the M.Div. Comprehensive Projects, 
as follows. All students must take STHO 6022 Graduate 
Research Seminar in the first semester of study.
I. Coursework (74 credits)
Students must complete academic coursework according to 
the following distribution:
A. Biblical Studies (12 credits)  
Credits
Select any two of the following three Old Testament courses:
BIBL 6201, 6203, 6205  
6
BIBL 6501  
Synoptic Gospels (or specific study  
of a Gospel)  
3
BIBL 6505  
Pauline Literature  
3
B. Historical Studies (6 credits):
HSTD 6201  
History of Christianity I  
3
Select any other HSTD course.  
3
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
etc. Able to remove highlighted text in PDF document in C#.NET. Support to change PDF highlight color in Visual C# .NET class. Able
copy and paste pdf text; delete text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text in any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters are easy to be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR
copy and paste text from pdf to excel; extract text from pdf file using java
Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology   303
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
C. Moral Theology (6 credits)
CETH 6105  
Fundamental Moral Theology  
3
Select any other CETH course.  
3
D. Pastoral Theology (27 credits)
Students preparing for priestly ordination must select the 
following courses:
PTHO 6109  
Introduction to Preaching  
2
PTHO 6112  
Preaching Practicum I  
2
PTHO 6113  
Preaching Practicum II  
2
PTHO 6203  
Pastoral Psychology & Counseling  
3
PTHO 6401  
General Canon Law  
3
PTHO 6405  
Canon Law of Marriage  
3
PTHO 6726  
History of Spirituality  
3
PTHO 6601  
Pastoral Ministry: Introduction 
3
PTHO 6608  
Ministry of Leadership: Priest and  
Minister in Service to the Community   2
PTHO 6609 
Ministry Synthesis 
1
Select a spirituality course in consultation with adviser.   3
Students who are not preparing for priesthood must 
complete 27 credits of PTHO courses selected in light of 
ministerial needs, in consultation with their academic adviser.
E. Systematic Theology (23 credits)
STHO 6022 
Graduate Research Seminar 
2
STHO 6202  
Revelation and Faith  
3
STHO 6203  
Christology  
3
STHO 6204  
Trinity  
3
STHO 6205  
Christian Anthropology  
3
STHO 6207  
Ecclesiology  
3
STHO 6503  
Sacraments of Initiation  
3
Select one of the following:  
3
STHO 6501  
Worship of the Church
STHO 6505  
Eucharist
II. Field Education and Theological Reflection
All students must complete the equivalent of 12 credits 
of pastoral field education accompanied by participation in 
a minimum of 10 sessions (two semesters) in a theological 
reflection group. Students preparing for priestly ordination 
meet these requirements during their second and third years 
of studies by taking PTHO 6602, 6603, 6604 and 6605 
(which, together with PTHO 6601 and 6608/9 make up a 
six-course pastoral sequence for priesthood). Students who 
are not preparing for priesthood, in consultation with the 
Office of the Associate Dean, can fulfill the requirements 
for pastoral field education and theological reflection in 
other ways, including: (1) four semesters of supervised 
field education experience of six to eight hours weekly at 
an approved site; (2) two such semesters and an internship 
of at least five days per week for at least six weeks; or (3) 
clinical pastoral education. ICSST must approve the proposed 
method of complying with the field education requirement.
III. Spiritual Formation
ICSST provides an integrated spiritual formation 
program for resident seminarians enrolled in the M.Div. 
program, based on the vision of St. John Paul II’s Apostolic 
Exhortation Pastores Dabo Vobis. The program includes: 
daily celebration of the Eucharist and the Liturgy of the 
Hours; a weekly group formational program, which includes 
distinguished speakers; a structure of regular personal 
mentoring and spiritual direction; days of reflection and 
organized retreats; and participation in a Summer program 
of enhanced spiritual formation after I and III Theology, 
in conjunction with the International Institute for Clergy 
Formation (Seton Hall University) and the Institute for 
Priestly Formation (Creighton University). Resident students 
are regularly reviewed and assessed by the formation 
faculty. Non-resident seminarians usually participate in the 
formation programs of their own communities, though they 
are welcome to avail themselves of formational opportunities 
at ICSST as may be beneficial to them. Students who are not 
preparing for priesthood participate in the formation program 
outlined under Spiritual Formation of the M.A.P.M. degree 
program.
IV. M.Div. Comprehensive Projects
Students must demonstrate successful integration of 
theological knowledge with application to specific pastoral 
issues. Students preparing for priestly ordination fulfill 
this requirement through a series of written comprehensive 
projects, which are part of the six-course pastoral sequence 
for priesthood (PTHO 6601, 6602, 6603, 6604, 6605 and 
6608/9). Students who are not preparing for priesthood 
fulfill this requirement through a seminar and M.Div. 
comprehensive project in consultation with the associate 
dean. Copies of the M.Div. project are submitted to the 
ICSST Library.
Academic Program for Priesthood 
Candidates
The 126-138 credit Academic Program for Priesthood 
Candidates is the prescribed curriculum at ICSST for all 
seminarians seeking ordination to the Roman Catholic 
priesthood. The program fulfills all the requirements of the 
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Program of 
Priestly Formation (Fifth Edition, 2005). Students meeting 
the requirements of this program automatically fulfill the 
requirements of the M.Div. program. The curriculum is as 
follows:
First Year
Credits
Fall Semester (16 credits) 
BIBL 6501  
Synoptic Gospels  
3
HSTD 6201  
History of Christianity I  
3
PTHO 6518  
Integrating Music and Liturgical  
Celebration  
2
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Plain text can get from any fonts, colors and sizes, or highlighted characters. Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR component in VB.NET.
copy text from pdf without formatting; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
304   Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
STHO 6202  
Revelation and Faith  
3
STHO 6501  
Worship of the Church  
3
STHO 6022  
Graduate Research Seminar  
2
Spring Semester (15 credits)
BIBL 6201  
Pentateuch  
3
HSTD 6202  
History of Christianity II  
3
PTHO 6601  
Pastoral Ministry: Introduction  
3
STHO 6205  
Christian Anthropology  
3
STHO 6503  
Sacraments of Initiation  
3
Second Year
Fall Semester (18 credits)
BIBL 6203  
Prophetic Literature  
3
CETH 6105  
Fundamental Moral Theology  
3
HSTD 6807  
American Christianity  
3
PTHO 6203  
Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
3
PTHO 6602  
Ministry of Healing  
3
STHO 6203  
Christology  
3
Spring Semester (17 credits)
BIBL 6503  
Johannine Literature  
3
CETH 6205  
Healthcare Ethics  
3
PTHO 6109  
Introduction to Preaching  
2
PTHO 6603  
Justice and Charity Ministry  
3
STHO 6207  
Ecclesiology  
3
Required Elective 1  
3
Third Year
Fall Semester (17 credits)
BIBL 6505  
Pauline Literature  
3
CETH 6306  
Catholic Sexual Teaching  
3
PTHO 6112  
Preaching Practicum I  
2
PTHO 6604  
Ministry of Sanctifying: Priest,  
Ministers and Congregation  
3
STHO 6204  
Trinity  
3
Required Elective 2  
3
Spring Semester (17 credits)
BIBL 6205  
Wisdom Literature and Psalms  
3
CETH 6407  
Catholic Social Teaching 
3
PTHO 6401  
General Canon Law  
3
PTHO 6503  
Liturgical Practicum 
2
PTHO 6605  
Ministry of Teaching  
3
Required Elective 3  
3
Fourth Year
Fall Semester (14 credits)  
PTHO 6113  
Preaching Practicum II  
2
PTHO 6405  
Canon Law Marriage  
3
PTHO 6608  
Ministry of Leadership:  
Priest and Minister in  
Service to the Community 
2
PTHO 6609 
Ministry Synthesis 
1
STHO 6505  
Eucharist  
3
Required Elective 4  
3
Spring Semester (12 credits)
PTHO 6726  
History of Spirituality  
3
STHO 6507  
Reconciliation and Anointing of the Sick  3
STHO 6509  
Christian Marriage  
3
STHO 6740  
Priesthood and Ministry  
3
Additional Requirements
Electives: The four required electives shown above must 
consist of one course each in: moral theology (CETH); 
Church history (HSTD); spirituality (PTHO); and systematics 
(STHO).
Spanish Language: Seminarians for whom English is 
their primary language and who are studying for dioceses 
that require Spanish language proficiency also take PTHO 
6017/8 Intermediate Pastoral Spanish and/or PTHO 6019/20 
Advanced Pastoral Spanish in their third and/or fourth year 
of theological studies. (Students should complete Elementary 
Spanish prior to beginning Pastoral Spanish).
Joint M.Div./M.A. Option
In the course of complying with the Academic Program 
for Priesthood Candidates, a student meets all requirements 
for the M.Div. degree. Because there are “surplus” credits 
in the Academic Program for Priesthood Candidates beyond 
what is applied toward the M.Div., a student may apply these 
additional credits toward the M.A. in Theology, either in the 
research or general format. Credits cannot serve “double-
duty.” That is, once credits have been applied toward one 
degree, they cannot be used toward the other. Assuming 
that a student has met all the requirements of the Academic 
Program for Priesthood Candidates, including successful 
completion of the four required electives, he needs the 
following additional credits in his concentration area to meet 
credit requirements of the M.A.: Systematic Theology – 6; 
Moral Theology – 6; Church History – 15; Biblical Studies – 
15 (plus the Greek and Hebrew requirements).
Remaining Requirements
(I) For students choosing the research format: language 
reading requirements, comprehensive examinations and 
thesis; (II) for students choosing the general format: the 
M.A. Seminar also must be completed successfully. In the 
four years of preparation for the priesthood, it is possible 
to complete all coursework requirements (in either degree 
format) and, where applicable, language requirements. 
Students choosing the research option often complete 
comprehensives and thesis after ordination. The M.A. 
is conferred one semester after the M.Div. For more 
information on the joint degree option, contact the Office of 
the Associate Dean at (973) 761-9633.
Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology   305
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Pre-Theology Program
For students preparing for priestly ordination who possess 
an undergraduate Bachelor’s degree or equivalent, but 
who do not have sufficient preparation in Philosophy and 
Theology, the Pre-Theology program provides a sequence 
of courses that satisfies all the preparatory requirements for 
admission to major seminary study in accordance with the 
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Program of 
Priestly Formation (Fifth Edition, 2005).
Students whose undergraduate preparation includes one 
or more of the courses in this sequence may be exempted 
from particular requirements. The normative duration of the 
program is two academic years, with the following course 
sequence:
First Year
Credits
Fall Semester (18 credits)
PLTL 1111  
History of Philosophy I  
3
PLTL 1242  
Philosophical Logic  
3
THEO 1501  
To Know God: Introduction to Roman 
Catholic Doctrine  
3
COST 1600  
Oral Communication  
3
LATN 1101  
Elementary Latin I  
3
English Proficiencies  
3
Spring Semester (18 credits)
PLTL 1112  
History of Philosophy II  
3
PLTL 2223  
Philosophy of Nature  
3
THEO 1102  
The Bible: Word of God and Book of the 
Church  
3
THEO 1502  
The Church’s Saving Mysteries:  
Introduction to Roman Catholic 
Liturgy and Sacraments  
3
LATN 1102 
Elementary Latin II  
3
Elective  
3
Second Year
Fall Semester (18 credits)
PLTL 1113  
History of Philosophy III  
3
PLTL 2218  
Philosophy of Being  
3
PLTL 3214  
Philosophy of Person  
3
THEO 1203  
New Life in Christ: Introduction to  
Roman Catholic Moral Theology  
3
BIBL 3106 
New Testament Greek I 
3
Elective (or Elementary Spanish I)  
3
Spring Semester (18-21 credits)
PLTL 2243  
Theory of Knowledge  
3
PLTL 2241  
Philosophical Ethics  
3
PLTL 3416  
Philosophy of God  
3
THEO 2302  
American Context  
3
THEO 1404  
Life of the Soul: Introduction to Catholic  
Prayer and Spiritual Traditions 
3
BIBL 3107 
New Testament Greek II   
3
Elective (or Elementary Spanish II) 
3
Additional Requirements
Languages: Each student must complete Elementary Latin 
I and II, as well as either New Testament Greek I and II or 
Elementary Greek I and II. Students without prior Spanish 
study should take Elementary Spanish I & II in Pre-Theology 
as prerequisites for Intermediate Pastoral Spanish in the 
M.Div. program.
Certificates
An ICSST certificate attests to the completion of a 
substantial and coherent program of learning, involving 18 
to 24 credits in a given area of study, without completion 
of all the requirements for a degree program. A certificate 
program allows some students to finish a discrete program 
of learning and obtain a credential for it. Other students may 
use a certificate program as a way of “testing the waters” 
prior to and/or en route to completion of a degree program. 
A certificate can be earned concurrently with a degree. 
ICSST offers a certificate in Catholic Evangelization and a 
certificate in Seminary’s Theological Education for Parish 
Services (STEPS).
Certificate Program in Catholic 
Evangelization
For persons who desire to be equipped to bring the Good 
News of Jesus Christ to their homes, parishes and local 
communities.
Admission Requirements: Students must meet the same 
requirements as those for the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry 
program, except that the GRE/MAT and psychological 
testing are not required.
Course Requirements: 18 credits, as follows:
BIBL 6210 Biblical Call Narratives; HSTD/PTHO/
STHO 6334 Catholic Evangelization; PTHO/STHO 6333 
Evangelizing Church; BIBL/PTHO 6571 The Parables of 
Jesus; STHO 6999 MA Seminar; and PTHO/STHO 6244 
Prayer, Discipleship and Community.
Additional Requirements: Students are required to 
participate in four Saturday sessions per year designed to 
help them to discern and deepen their spiritual gifts, while 
forming small group communities of faith and prayer. 
The sessions allow students to deepen their faith with one 
another, as they learn and hone skills of spiritual leadership 
and Catholic evangelization.
306   Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
Certificate Program in Seminary’s 
Theological Education for Parish Services 
(STEPS)
For persons seeking a deeper understanding of their faith, 
particularly those who are preparing to work in a parish 
setting or those who already work in a parish and seek 
additional academic and professional credentials.
Admission Requirements: Students must meet the same 
requirements as those for the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry 
program, except that the GRE/MAT and psychological 
testing are not required.
Course Requirements: 24 credits, divided as follows: 
Foundational Level: 12 credits, including: BIBL 6529 
Spirituality of the Old Testament; BIBL 6501 Synoptic 
Gospels; HSTD 6809 History of Christianity; STHO 
6246 Theology of Vatican II. Advanced Level: 12 credits, 
including: BIBL 6506 Introduction to Pauline and Johannine 
Literature; STHO 6503 Sacraments of Initiation; STHO 
6202 Revelation and Faith; CETH 6130 Major Themes in 
Christian Ethics.
Additional Requirements: Students are required to 
participate in spiritual formation and praxis opportunities 
that allow them to deepen their spiritual gifts while gaining 
practical skills that will better prepare them for pastoral 
service. These include theological reflection, retreats, days 
of reflection, spiritual conferences and training in public 
speaking and leadership skills.
The STEPS program was designed in collaboration with 
Education for Parish Services (EPS), a nationally-recognized 
lay education organization based in Washington, DC.
Course Descriptions
BIBL 3106/6006 New Testament Greek I
Introduction to New Testament Greek vocabulary and 
grammar, focusing on noun declensions and elementary verb 
tenses. Reading, translation and analysis of short passages 
from the New Testament. 3 credits
BIBL 3107/6007 New Testament Greek II
Further study of New Testament Greek vocabulary and 
grammar, focusing on more advanced verb tenses and moods. 
Reading, translation and analysis of passages from the New 
Testament. Prerequisite: BIBL 3106/6006. 3 credits
BIBL 6113 Biblical Hebrew I
An introduction to the most basic elements of Hebrew 
grammar with accent on the noun and the qal stem of the 
verb, Hebrew thought patterns and sentence structure, plus 
instruction in use of a Hebrew lexicon. A study of grammar 
accompanied by selected readings from Genesis. 3 credits
BIBL 6114 Biblical Hebrew II
A continuation of BIBL 6113. Prerequisite: BIBL 6113. 
3 credits
BIBL 6117 Bible/Christian Morality
This course takes up the issue of difficult moral questions 
and the way in which the Bible provides resources for 
resolving these questions in a Christian manner. The course 
is divided into two parts: Part 1 deals with difficult moral 
questions provided by biblical narratives themselves and 
reviews ways in which Christians have addressed them. 
These questions include the “dark passages of scripture,” 
such as laws commanding genocide in the book of Joshua, 
and Old Testament legislation on polygamy, slavery, adultery 
and homosexuality. Part 2 deals with the biblical principles 
of New Testament Christian ethics and how they apply to 
difficult contemporary moral problems in beginning, middle 
and end-of-life issues, sexual morality, capital punishment, 
pacifism and war. (Cross-referenced to CETH 6117) 3 credits
BIBL 6122 Biblical Archaeology
The purpose of this course is to provide students with 
an introduction to biblical archaeology. The course (1) 
introduces students to the history of archaeology in the Holy 
Land, (2) reviews the nature, goals and methods used by 
archaeologists in excavating and studying the material and 
religious cultures of the Bible and (3) explores ways in which 
archaeological data can be placed in dialogue with the study 
of Scripture. (Cross-referenced to HSTD 6122) 3 credits
BIBL 6201 Pentateuch
Introduction to critical theories useful to Pentateuchal 
research; historical and geographical context of the 
Pentateuch; literary genres; development of Pentateuchal 
books and their underlying theologies; exegesis of selected 
passages. 3 credits
BIBL 6203 Prophetic Literature
A study of the authority, role and key concepts of the 
Hebrew prophets in the context of their own times and the 
possible paradigms for the present; an in-depth study of 
significant passages in the classical prophets; exegesis of 
selected texts. 3 credits
BIBL 6205 Wisdom Literature and Psalms
An examination of the notion of wisdom in the ancient 
Near East; genre of wisdom literature; close examination of 
selected sapiential books; study of various types of Psalms, 
their significance in Israel and their importance to the Church 
today; exegesis of selected passages. 3 credits
BIBL 6210 Biblical Call Narratives
Exploration of how divine calls bestow dramatic meaning 
and personhood upon the lives of various figures in the Bible 
and those who hear and receive their message. Such figures 
include Adam and Eve, Cain, Abraham, Jonah, St. Paul and 
the Church-Bride of the Apocalypse. Clarification of the 
nature of human objections to the divine call and the way in 
which they are divinely resolved. Exploration of how biblical 
narrative can enrich a theology and philosophy of vocation 
and personhood and strengthen the capacity to live and work 
in faith, hope and charity. 3 credits
Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology   307
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
BIBL 6231 Suffering and the Book of Job
Many Old Testament texts explore the meaning of human 
suffering, but the most sustained reflection on this subject 
is the Book of Job. The book focuses on how Job, a man 
renowned for his righteousness, is forced to prove by his 
suffering that this righteousness is authentic. In doing so, it 
prompts its readers to explore their own assumptions about 
suffering and righteousness and leads them to perceive 
how the meaning of human suffering is linked to religious 
freedom and love. The book will be of interest to all who 
wish to understand the poetic and spiritual power of the 
Old Testament and its pastoral applications to life’s deepest 
problems. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6267) 3 credits
BIBL 6236 The Book of Genesis and Family Spirituality 
This course explores how and why the family dynamics 
portrayed in the Book of Genesis constitute the foundations 
of biblical wisdom and spirituality. By examining the stories 
about Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Abraham, Sarah and 
Hagar, Isaac, Rebekah and Ishmael, Jacob, Esau, Rachel and 
Leah, and Joseph and his brothers and sister, the course seeks 
to clarify the wisdom and depth of the principles that ground 
biblical family spirituality in Judaeo-Christian tradition and 
in Catholic theology. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6236)  
3 credits
BIBL 6237 Biblical Family Narratives 
This course examines the central role of family life in the 
covenant relationship with God. Significant texts from 
the Old Testament and the New Testament are analyzed. 
Particular emphasis is given to the Infancy Narratives. 
(Cross-referenced to PTHO 6237) 3 credits 
BIBL 6239 Wedding Feast at Cana 
This course studies the Wedding Feast at Cana (John 2:1-
11) by looking at the pericope in light of the four senses 
of Scripture: the literal, the allegorical, the moral and the 
anagogical. It looks at the passage as it fits into the plan of 
John’s Gospel and the broader scope of John’s theology. In 
doing so, major themes from the wedding feast are examined 
with regard to how these themes apply to marriage today. 
These themes include: New Creation; bride and bridegroom; 
sacrifice; the domestic church; marriage; and the Eucharist. 
The course draws heavily on St. John Paul II’s Apostolic 
Exhortation Familiaris Consortio. (Cross-referenced to 
PTHO 6239) 3 credits
BIBL 6240 The Family in the Early Church 
In his writings, St. John Paul II stresses that parenthood is a 
spiritual rather than a biological function. This course sets 
out to trace the sources of this conception in the history of 
the early Church, looking for the sources and development of 
this conception in the Old Testament, in Christ’s redefinition 
of the family on spiritual grounds, and in the lives and 
writings of the early Christians who took up His call to 
spiritual rebirth. Keeping to the thread of this central idea, 
the course seeks to identify the essential characteristics of 
the Christian conception of the family in the early Church in 
relation to the various dominant but non-Christian models of 
the family in the Jewish, Greek and Roman cultural world, 
which the early Christians inhabited. (Cross-referenced to 
HSTD 6240) 3 credits 
BIBL 6241 The Gospel and the Family 
What images and lessons of faith, hope and, above all, love, 
did Jesus impart to families? Close readings of Scripture 
passages dealing with the family—taken from the Four 
Gospels—and lively class discussions are the focus of 
this course. Practical implications and spiritual disciplines 
for families today will be drawn from Scripture, class 
discussions and lectures and class exercises and projects. 
(Cross-referenced to PTHO 6241) 3 credits
BIBL 6248 Deuterocanonical Books
Spiritual and social developments within Judaism between 
the third century B.C. and the second century A.D. are 
studied through representative works. Interest in the course 
centers on the heritage of the Hebrew Bible in a variety of 
religious expressions. The roots of both Rabbinic Judaism 
and Christianity can be appreciated only within this context. 
3 credits
BIBL 6398 The Dark Passages of the Bible
This course explores violence-ridden and morally challenging 
passages of the Bible, including those that apparently 
sanction capital punishment, child-sacrifice, extermination 
of non-combatants in warfare, polygamy, slavery, lying and 
making the Cross a gateway to eternal life. The course seeks 
to familiarize students with these passages and illuminate 
Jewish and Christian ways of explaining their meaning and 
function in the canon. (Web-based; Cross-referenced to 
CETH 6398). 3 credits
BIBL 6408 Introduction to the New Testament
This course introduces students to the scholarly study of the 
New Testament, with a view also to its use in the liturgy and 
pastoral ministry. The background, structure, characteristics, 
themes, and theology of the various books of the New 
Testament are discussed, with special attention given to 
the four Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the letters 
of St. Paul. Numerous passages from the New Testament 
are considered through more detailed exegesis, using both 
diachronic (historical-critical) and synchronic (narrative) 
methods, but also considering their theological meaning in 
light of the whole Bible (canonical exegesis), the Church’s 
Tradition (e.g., Fathers of the Church and the liturgy) 
and the analogy of faith (the Church’s faith taught by the 
Magisterium). Catholic principles for biblical interpretation 
guide the approach of the course. 3 credits
BIBL 6410 Catholic Epistles – Hebrews
This course presents the Epistle to the Hebrews together with 
the seven Epistles, known as the seven Catholic or General 
Epistles: James, 1-2 Peter, 1-2-3 John and Jude. These works 
present a witness to Jesus of those who had seen him in his 
earthly career, namely two members of his family (James and 
Jude) and two of the most important of the Twelve (Peter and 
John). While discussing various scholarly debates about the 
Epistles, the course emphasizes basic themes and structure.  
3 credits
308   Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
BIBL 6413 Infancy Narratives
This course examines the infancy narratives in the canonical 
Gospels. The cultural, historical and theological aspects 
surrounding the Nativity and its proclamation will be 
considered. An exegetical study of the passages will be 
undertaken, emphasizing the historical-critical approach to 
biblical theology. 3 credits
BIBL 6501 Synoptic Gospels
An historical and critical approach to the study of the 
gospels, its limits and benefits and its acceptability to the 
Church. The “synoptic problem” and the consequences of its 
resolution for study of the gospels. Diverse forms within the 
gospels and the characteristics of each gospel. 3 credits
BIBL 6503 Johannine Literature
Consideration of the general characteristics, literary 
relationships, possible sources, overall structure and recurrent 
themes in John’s Gospel; numerous passages exegeted. 
Overview of the Johannine epistles and their historical 
context. 3 credits
BIBL 6504 St. Paul in Acts
This course examines the figure of Paul the Apostle in the 
Acts of the Apostles. Particular attention is paid to Paul’s 
missionary journeys as articulated by Acts, the theologically-
rich preaching of the apostle and his judicial trials. In 
this way, students will enter into conversation with early 
Christian kerygma, missionary strategy, cultural dialogue and 
apologia for the faith. (Cross-referenced to HSTD 6504)  
3 credits
BIBL 6505 Pauline Literature
Treatment of Paul’s life and background; introduction to each 
of Paul’s letters with attention to the historical situation and 
major interpretive concerns associated with each; theological 
development as evidenced from letter to letter; exegesis of 
selected passages. 3 credits
BIBL 6506 Introduction to Pauline and Johannine 
Literature
This course aims to introduce the student to an appreciation 
of various historical, literary and theological aspects of the 
Fourth Gospel and of Paul’s Letters, especially those to the 
Galatians and Romans. Special attention is paid to the way in 
which these writings reflect, interpret and develop the early 
Christian kerygma (proclamation) and thereby contribute 
to the Christian interpretation of Jesus, person and mission 
(Christology and Soteriology) and the means by which faith 
in him as the Christ and Son of God communicates abundant 
life (the Sacraments and Ecclesiology). 3 credits
BIBL 6508 Acts and Primitive Christianity
This course treats the Acts of the Apostles, its motifs and 
its ideas. It focuses especially on the Acts’ presentation 
concerning the emergence and development of the Christian 
movement in the decades following Jesus’ death and 
resurrection, and it compares this presentation with evidence 
found elsewhere in the New Testament. (Cross-referenced to 
HSTD 6508) 3 credits
BIBL 6522 The Passion and Resurrection of Jesus
A historical, literary and theological study of the Passion 
and Resurrection Narratives in the four Gospels, as well 
as related texts from the letters of St. Paul and Hebrews. 
Different theories for understanding Christ’s saving work 
(soteriology) also are examined in historical perspective, so 
as to address the question of how Christ’s Paschal Mystery 
effects the world’s redemption. The pastoral application of 
the material to the Lent and Easter seasons also is considered. 
(Cross-referenced to STHO 6532) 3 credits
BIBL 6527 Spirituality of John
A study of the Gospel of John from the viewpoint of his 
spiritual doctrine; the role of faith for John; Jesus’ “Signs” 
and their Christological significance; antinomies in the 
Gospel of John: light/darkness, life/death; prayer in John. 
(Cross-referenced to PTHO 6527) 3 credits
BIBL 6529 Spirituality of the Old Testament
The Old Testament insight into the progressive revelation 
of Divine Presence and Fidelity. A study of the creation 
stories; the Exodus event; the sagas; Divine forgiveness 
and faithfulness; the call to holiness and its particular and 
universal aspects. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6396) 3 credits
BIBL 6530 Peter in the New Testament and Christian 
Antiquity
Few of the disciples of Jesus have created such a vivid and 
lasting impression on their contemporaries or upon history 
and theology as has Simon Peter. Through an attentive 
dialogue with the documents of the New Testament, the first 
two Christian centuries and the witness of the archaeological 
record, participants in this course attempt to come to know 
more profoundly the fisherman from Galilee. In doing so, 
they make use of the best tools of biblical study, historical 
investigation and theological inquiry to understand Peter 
and the basis of his ongoing role in the Christian faith for 
both individual disciples and the community of faith. (Cross-
referenced to HSTD 6530) 3 credits
BIBL 6535 The Scriptural Sources and Meaning of the 
Lord’s Prayer
The purpose of this course is to explore the depth, wisdom 
and power of the Lord’s Prayer by exploring its scriptural 
contexts and sources. Versions of the Prayer in all the 
Gospels and in the writings of Paul are studied to highlight 
the Trinitarian dimension of the Prayer and the way in 
which it maps out the Christian spiritual journey and 
enables Christ’s disciples to escape from various cycles of 
violence that impede their quest for God’s Kingdom. (Cross-
referenced to PTHO 6535). 3 credits
BIBL 6570 Mary in Sacred Scripture 
A study of Scriptural texts and themes related to the Blessed 
Virgin Mary: Old Testament texts/institutions that prefigure 
Mary; New Testament texts that refer to Mary. Exegesis of 
select Lucan and Johannine texts using both modern and 
traditional methods of interpretation. Scriptural foundations 
of Marian dogmas/doctrines, liturgical feasts and devotional 
practices. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6570 and STHO 6570) 
3 credits
Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology   309
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
BIBL 6571 The Parables of Jesus
From the Prodigal Son to the Good Samaritan to the Good 
Shepherd, there are few things as familiar to us as these 
disarmingly simple yet penetrating narratives that Jesus 
used to articulate and proclaim the Kingdom of God during 
his ministry. They were fashioned by him both to awaken 
insight and to provoke response in his listeners. This course 
provides a close study of selected parables of Jesus from the 
Synoptic Gospels. Particular attention is paid to the cultural, 
biblical and literary contexts of the parables examined, so 
that students might approach “hearing” the parables as did 
their first audiences, both grasping their profound insights 
and responding to their call to conversion. Through doing so, 
students will come to appreciate the parables as indispensable 
sources of theology by and about Jesus, and as fonts for 
authentic Christian spirituality in our own day. (Cross-
referenced to PTHO 6571) 3 credits
BIBL 6577 Mariology
Planned lectures include: “Encountering the Mother of God 
in the New Testament,” “Encountering the Mother of God 
in the Church Fathers,” “Encountering the Mother of God in 
Medieval Spirituality,” “Encountering the Mother of God in 
the Renaissance & Baroque,” “Encountering the Mother of 
the God in 19th century Spirituality” and “Encountering the 
Mother of God Today.” (Cross-referenced to HSTD 6577, 
PTHO 6577 and STHO 6577) 3 credits
BIBL 6595 Book of Revelation
A study of the Book of Revelation, examining issues related 
to its authorship and interpretation. Analysis of the book 
within the context of the apocalyptic genre, followed by a 
study of its particular message and theology of hope. Special 
attention to imagery and symbolism in Revelation. 3 credits
BIBL 6723 Passover:  From Moses to Jesus
“Why is this night different from all other nights?” For 
centuries, this Passover question has invited remembrance 
of the mighty deeds by which the Lord rescued his 
people. This course will offer an extended reflection on the 
biblical Passover in three basic parts. First, we will explore 
the roots of Passover in the Old Testament, distilling both 
its history and theology as Israel’s great feast of national 
liberation. Second, we will survey the Passover as recounted 
in intertestamental literature, to grasp how it was thought 
of and lived out in Jewish society in the time leading up to 
Jesus. Third, we will delve into the Passover in the New 
Testament to grasp how, from the ministry of Jesus, to the 
Last Supper, to the early Christian Eucharist, the Passover 
grew into a major theological font used to explain and 
understand what God was accomplishing in Christ. (Cross-
referenced to HSTD 6723). 3 credits
BIBL 6724 Jewish Roots of Christian Spirituality
See PTHO 6724. 3 credits
BIBL 6803 Biblical Prayer & Spirituality
The theme of prayer is intrinsic to biblical narrative. The 
course contains four units, which explore, respectively:  
1) The role of prayer in the Old Testament and the perennial 
relevance of Old Testament prayers, especially the Psalms, 
to Christian prayer; 2) Jewish and Rabbinic prayer forms 
and their relevance to the understanding of Christian New 
Testament prayers, especially the Lord’s Prayer, the Hail 
Mary and the liturgy of the Eucharist; 3) The Lord’s Prayer 
and the Hail Mary themselves; and 4) The role that Scripture 
plays in the prayers of great Christian thinkers, writers, 
missionaries and saints. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6803)  
3 credits
CETH 6105 Fundamental Moral Theology
This course examines the central characteristics of Roman 
Catholic moral theology in the post-Vatican II era: 
specifically, how the discipline currently appropriates 
Scripture, tradition, the magisterium, human experience and 
reason, the universal desire for happiness, and the realities 
of sin and grace, to express the dynamics of the Christian 
moral life conceived as a dialogic response to the gracious 
initiatives of God and ultimately, as an act of worship 
that finds its source and summit in the Eucharist sacrifice 
(Catechism 2031). 3 credits
CETH 6112 Moral Evil and Moral Absolutes
Perhaps no ethical topic is more hotly debated today than 
moral absolutes: whether there are some actions that are 
always and everywhere morally wrong. From abortion to 
artificial contraception, from torture to the death penalty, 
these issues are of pressing concern for marriages, families, 
associations, government and international relations. This 
course seeks to review the Catholic response to this question 
through encountering the Christian tradition. After a short 
investigation on the nature of moral evil in Thomas Aquinas, 
this reading seminar will begin its historical overview of the 
Christian tradition with Sacred Scripture and culminate with 
St. John Paul II’s Encyclical Veritatis Splendor. All of this 
as we seek to get a clearer grasp on the Church’s teaching on 
moral evil and moral absolutes. (Cross-referenced to STHO 
6112) 3 credits
CETH 6114 The Problem of Evil
This course begins with some reflections about experiences 
of evil in a globalized world, society and culture. The course 
then examines how Holy Scripture approaches the problem 
of evil. Systematic reflections follow, focusing on the 
theological question: “Why does the good and omnipotent 
God create the human being capable of evil?” Finally, the 
course presents Christ on the cross and in the resurrection 
both as the victim of evil and as victor over evil. (Cross-
referenced to STHO 6253). 3 credits 
CETH 6116 Social Justice in the Fathers
This course examines the social teachings of early 
Christianity so as to delineate the distinctive features of 
modern and ancient social doctrines while at the same time 
revealing the fundamental continuum and trajectory that 
characterize the genuine development of Catholic theology 
and moral teaching. (Cross-referenced to HSTD 6419)  
3 credits
CETH 6117 Bible/Christian Morality
See BIBL 6117. 3 credits
310   Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology
Seton Hall UniverSity
Graduate Catalogue 2014-15
CETH 6126 Ethics of Virtue
This course examines moral strengths as lived through 
the four cardinal virtues — both how these virtues can 
be obtained and how they are related to the Christian life 
through the theological virtues (faith, hope and charity), the 
gifts of the Holy Spirit and the Beatitudes. (Cross-referenced 
to STHO 6126) 3 credits
CETH 6130 Major Themes in Christian Ethics
A team-taught survey of Christian ethics, including 
fundamental moral theology and Catholic teaching in sexual 
morality, healthcare and social justice. Not applicable to 
M.Div. or M.A. with Christian ethics concentration. 3 credits
CETH 6132 The Four Loves
See PTHO 6132. 3 credits
CETH 6134 Four Loves and Family Life
This course begins with Benedict XVI’s Deus Caritas Est 
and concludes with C. S. Lewis’ The Four Loves and St. 
John Paul II’s Love and Responsibility. Illuminating these 
works by engaging with the key philosophical and biblical 
texts that they cite, the course proceeds to illuminate the 
nature of love through the writings of Anglican, Protestant 
and Catholic novelists and theologians. The purpose of the 
course is to help people to understand the spiritual nature 
of love in its manifold forms, and so, gracefully to inflame 
and sustain their aptitude for courtship, family affection, 
friendship and charity. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6134)  
3 credits
CETH 6138 Theological Aesthetics: God, Beauty, and Film 
Few realities captivate us culturally, emotionally and 
aesthetically, as the medium of film. In the complex 
multimedia culture we live in, film moves us in a way that 
no other media seem capable of doing. Moreover, films 
have a rich capacity to explore ideas and raise questions in 
something more than merely an intellectual manner. In this 
course, we seek to capture film capturing us as we study 
three aspects of this draw: First, we explore the medium of 
film itself and why it is so powerful. Second, we examine 
the human emotional life to which film is intimately 
connected and on which it operates. Finally, we explore some 
theological themes, issues and questions – ranging from 
anthropology to morals to eschatology – which are raised in 
contemporary film. (Web-based; Cross-referenced to STHO 
6138) 3 credits
CETH 6205 Healthcare Ethics
To develop skills in using Catholic Church teaching 
and Natural Law argumentation, an examination of the 
concepts of health, the human person, personal and social 
responsibility, confidentiality, reproductive technologies, 
abortion, medical research, experimentation, transplants, 
psychotherapy, addiction, suicide, euthanasia and care of the 
disabled, those with AIDS and the dying. 3 credits
CETH 6215 End-of-Life Issues
This course treats contemporary issues regarding the end 
of human life, including sanctity of human life, patient 
autonomy, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, organ 
donation, and medically-assisted nutrition and hydration, 
examined from the perspectives of Faith (Scripture, tradition 
and magisterium), Reason (philosophy) and Law (natural and 
civil law). (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6216) 3 credits
CETH 6217 Beginning-of-Life Issues
This course treats contemporary issues regarding the 
beginning of human life, including cloning, embryonic stem 
cell research, reproductive technologies including in vitro 
fertilization, abortion, ectopic pregnancies, early induction 
and the ethical treatment of rape victims. This course seeks to 
apply the teaching of the Church and sound ethical reasoning 
to the issues raised by recent reproductive and prenatal 
technologies so that students will be able to advise effectively 
the people to whom they minister in making virtuous medical 
decisions. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6217) 3 credits
CETH 6227 John Paul II and Sexual Ethics 
This course investigates some of the major contributions 
of St. John Paul II to the Church’s understanding of sexual 
ethics. It uses his Theology of the Body and pre-papal work 
Love and Responsibility as a foundation, placing sexual 
ethics within an “integral vision of the human person.” It also 
explores relevant passages in his other writings. This course 
addresses some culturally controversial topics in sexual 
ethics—such as contraception, homosexual marriage and in 
vitro fertilization—and discusses the competing “visions of 
the human person” that are at the root of the modern debate. 
(Cross-referenced to PTHO 6227 and STHO 6256) 3 credits 
CETH 6252 Theology of the Body
See PTHO 6224. 3 credits
CETH 6254 Theology and Spirituality of Marriage and 
the Family
Marriage and family life is a great gift of God’s creation. 
Through the Sacrament of Marriage, spousal and familial 
love is taken up into the infinite love of Christ and the 
Church. In the communion of love open to God’s gift of life, 
all married couples and their children are called to holiness. 
Through readings based on the works of St. Paul, St. 
Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Hugh of St. Victor and St. 
John Paul II, this course explores the ways in which God’s 
sanctifying presence is manifest in and through Christian 
spousal love that is open to life and placed at the service of 
the human community. (Cross-referenced to PTHO 6254 and 
STHO 6254) 3 credits
CETH 6259 Secularism and Catholicism
This course investigates the historical causes, nature 
and value of secularism as a cultural and socio-political 
phenomenon affecting Catholic religious experience in 
what was once called Latin Christendom. The course is not 
only interested in secularism as such, but also in various 
contemporary Catholic responses towards it. Throughout, the 
investigation will be viewed through the theological lens of 
Christian faith as revealed in Jesus Christ and authoritatively 
interpreted through the teaching authority of the Church. 
(Web-based; Cross-referenced to STHO 6259). 3 credits
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested