how to open a pdf file in asp.net using c# : Extract formatted text from pdf application SDK tool html .net winforms online guide2-part821

Institutional repositories typically do not permit content to be removed 
once submitted. However, a variety of legitimate circumstances might 
require an institution to limit access to particular content to a specific 
set of users. These circumstances might include copyright restrictions, 
policies established by a particular research community (limiting access 
to departmental working papers to members of that department, for  
example), embargoes that an institution’s Sponsored Programs Office 
might require to keep the institution in compliance with the terms 
of sponsor contracts, and even monetary access fees for certain data. 
Implementing these policy-based restrictions requires robust access and 
rights management mechanisms to allow or restrict access to content 
-and, conceivably, to parts of digital objects - by a variety of criteria, 
including user type, institutional affiliation, user community, and others, 
(Johnson, 2002).
Considerations:
_ 
Will the embargo status and length of embargo be determined by 
repository staff or data producers (or their representatives)?
_ 
Will the repository choose to hold materials where the metadata 
is publicly accessible but the data are embargoed or restricted in 
some way?
_ Can the repository software be configured to automatically release 
the data on the end  date of the embargo or will manual  
procedures be needed?
3.f 
RIGHTS AND OWNERSHIP
The repository service may wish to enter a license agreement with the 
depositor upon transfer of the data item through a written or  
click-through Depositor Agreement.
_ 
How extensive are the rights given to the digital repository over 
the deposited material?
_ 
Are there limitations to what the digital repository is allowed to do 
with the material?
21
In the UK, the Data Protection Act defines personal, confidential and sensitive data and sets out 
parameters under which data processors (researchers) can use them. Furthermore, Research Ethics 
Committees may approve or disapprove data sharing plans based on the  researchers’ methods and 
what sort of consent has been sought.
A thorough overview of ‘consent, confidentiality and ethics in data sharing’ for researchers has 
been written by the UK Data Archive as part of their suite of web pages dedicated to managing and 
sharing data (UK Data Archive, 2008d).
Submission of Data (Ingest)
Extract formatted text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
erase text from pdf file; extract text from pdf java open source
Extract formatted text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
export highlighted text from pdf to word; delete text from pdf with acrobat
Considerations: 
_ Are file format changes limited by authenticity requirements?
_ 
Is the repository free to change the original submitted material as 
it sees fit during the preservation processing? (Beedham et al, 2005 
p. 105)
_ 
Can the repository translate, copy or re-arrange datasets to  
ensure their future preservation and accessibility, and keep copies 
of datasets for security and back-up, or can depositors notify the 
repository that specific restrictions apply?
_ 
Can the repository migrate datasets to another repository (e.g. 
subject-based, institutional) on condition that all metadata are 
migrated with the dataset, and that no charge will be levied by the 
destination repository?
_ 
Can the repository incorporate metadata or documentation into 
public access catalogues for the datasets it holds?
_ 
Will the repository be under any obligation to reproduce, transmit, 
broadcast or display a dataset in the same format or software as 
that in which it was originally created?
_ 
While every care will be taken to preserve the dataset, will the 
repository be liable for loss or damage to the dataset or any other 
data while it is stored in the repository or a repository to which 
the dataset is subsequently migrated?
_ 
Do depositors retain the right to deposit the item elsewhere in its 
present or future version(s)?
Depositors’ agreements regarding 
copyright may cover the following:
t 
The content of deposited dataset does not breach any law.
t 
It is original and does not infringe the copyright of any other  
person (e.g. it is not derived from a licensed or commercial  
product).
t 
If it contains material that is copyright of a third-party, the  
depositor has secured permission from the rights-holder or their 
representative to include such material in the dataset (including a 
commercial or academic partner in a research project).
t 
Any third-party materials for which the depositor has not secured 
the necessary permissions have been deleted from the dataset 
before deposit.
t 
If the dataset has been sponsored or subsidised by any  
institution or organisation other than the depositor’s employer, 
s/he has fulfilled all obligations to that institution or organisation 
regarding publication.
The institution’s legal office may wish to sign off on the final Depositor 
Agreement.
22
Submission of Data (Ingest)
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
class program. Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in C#.NET class. Supports adding text
cut text from pdf document; extract text from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET. Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page. Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. Add
a pdf text extractor; copy pdf text to word document
Does data have copyright?
Facts are not copyrightable in any jurisdiction, but there are varying 
levels of protection for data in different countries. In the European 
Union, the Database Directive has led to greater protection for  
compiled databases than in the USA which is governed solely by  
copyright law. The Digital Curation Centre has produced a briefing paper 
that clarifies IPR in Databases within UK law (McGeever, 2007).
23
Sample copyright statements for inclusion in a Depositor Agreement:
Any copyright violations are entirely the responsibility of the authors/depositors. If the repository 
receives proof of copyright violation, the relevant item will be removed immediately. 
The repository shall not be under any obligation to take legal action on a depositor’s behalf or on 
behalf of any other rights holder in the event of breach of intellectual property rights or any other 
right in the material deposited. 
Depositors retain all moral rights to the work including the right to be acknowledged.
An example of a depositor agreement (for the Edinburgh DataShare repository) is here:
http://datalib.ed.ac.uk/DataShare/Depositor-Agreement.pdf.
Submission of Data (Ingest)
XImage.OCR for .NET, Comprehensive Feature Details
It empowers .NET users to extract formatted text from Tiff, scanned PDF, and Jpeg images. Then, output recognized information to PDF, Word, and text files.
find and replace text in pdf; pdf text replace tool
4. ACCESS AND REUSE OF DATA
4.a  ACCESS TO DATA OBJECTS
Digital research data should be easy to find, and access should be 
provided in an environment which maximises ease of use; provides 
credit for and protects the rights of those who have gathered or created 
data; and protects the rights of those who have legitimate interests in 
how data are made accessible and used (RIN, p.10).
OPEN ACCESS
The open access publishing movement was started by the Budapest 
Open Access Initiative and its signatories in February 2002. ‘Open Access 
means access to material via the Internet in such a way that the 
material is free for all users to read and use.’ 
(Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access) 
24
Open Data:
‘Open Data is a philosophy and practice requiring that certain data are freely available to 
everyone, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control. It has a 
similar ethos to a number of other “Open” movements and communities such as open source and 
open access’ (Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_data).
Recent technological advances in web services and infrastructures have democratised the processes 
allowing data to be used, stored, visualised, analysed in collaborative ways.
Examples of collaborative utilites which use ‘community-driven’ Web 2.0 technologies to visualise 
or ‘mash’ numeric data include Many Eyes, Swivel and Infochimps.  There are also a whole range of 
spatial visualisations or mashups using mapping tools, earth viewers or open geo-browsers such as 
Google Earth, OpenStreetMap, Open Layers, which capitalise on and utilise the preponderance of 
location-based information. These utilities allow researchers to upload and analyse their own data 
in ‘open’ and kinetic environments (Macdonald, 2008 a, b). 
By opening up their code to repository developers (e.g. through APIs) or by the development of new 
plug-ins or tools, numeric and spatial data visualization could be enhanced within the repository 
environment. This would have the potential of engaging potential depositors, to enhance output, 
and to provide analysis and visualisations as part of ‘value-added’ functionality. 
See also: non-profit organisations such as the Open Data Foundation 
(http://www.opendatafoundation.org/), and the Open Knowledge Foundation 
(http://www.okfn.org/) 
Access and Reuse of Data
Considerations:
_ 
Will access to the content in the repository be open to the public? 
Note restrictions on reuse may apply even though access is  
allowed. (see section 4.b, Use and Reuse of data Objects.) 
CONTROLLED ACCESS 
If access to some or all items is controlled, the repository might be  
required to limit access based upon:
_ 
User type/status (general public, research organization,  
membership, administrative staff)
_ Location – access restricted to specific IP location or physical 
location
_ 
The number of concurrent users of an object at a given time.
RESTRICTED ACCESS
The repository may be required to restrict access to data for a number 
of reasons e.g. datasets might contain confidential information that 
could lead to the identification of respondents or datasets may be used 
to develop a patent or commercial product.  How is this implemented? 
(Dulong de Rosnay, 2008). 
How will restricted access conditions be implemented?
_ 
The repository stores data on a secure non-networked server and 
has clear policies regarding the physical safekeeping and use of 
the restricted datasets when in the researcher’s possession.
_ 
The repository offers a Data Enclave for restricted data with  
confidentiality issues for which there is heightened sensitivity to 
disclosure, as indicated either by the depositor or the repository. 
The only form of access to such data is through on-site analysis in 
the repository’s secure data enclave with very controlled 
conditions (ICPSR, 2007a). 
REGISTRATION
Considerations:
_ 
Will registration be compulsory before downloading or accessing 
data?
_ 
Will registration be compulsory for depositors only?
_ 
Will a local registration system be implemented or will it  
interoperate with other systems (e.g. UK Access Federation or 
campus single sign-on)?
25
Access and Reuse of Data
_ 
Will access be managed at the institutional/departmental level, 
user registration level, or at the dataset level?
_ 
Are all datasets individually tagged with differing rights,  
permissions, and/or conditions?
_ Are users required to confirm their acceptance of the terms and 
conditions of access?
ACCESS METHODS
Considerations for data delivery:
_ The repository provides a link to download entire data files.
_ 
Data can be accessed through a batch feature.
_ 
Data can be accessed through a query-based system.
_ 
Extracts of data may be chosen for download, and descriptive  
statistics may be created by the user.
_ Analytical routines to use with specific software applications will 
be provided online (e.g. set up files or system files).
_ 
Visualization and mapping applications will be provided online.
_ 
Other web services may access the data in the system.
26
The following digital repository systems are used by social science data archives and may be  
implemented locally, though they are not open source and may involve payment. They offer a range 
of data management and online data analysis features.
The Dataverse Network Project at Harvard University: ‘The extensive digital library services of each 
dataverse include data archiving, preservation formatting, cataloguing, data citation, searching, 
conversion, subsetting, online statistical analysis, and dissemination. Each dataverse presents a 
hierarchical organization of datasets, which might include only studies produced by the dataverse 
creator (such as for an author or research project), those associated with published work (such as 
replication datasets for journal articles), or datasets collected for a particular community (such as 
for a journal’s replication archive, or a college class or subfield.)’ (http://thedata.org) 
NESSTAR at Norwegian Social Science Data Services: ‘Nesstar is a software system for data 
publishing and online analysis. The software consists of tools which enables data providers to 
disseminate their data on the Web. Nesstar handles survey data and multidimensional tables as well 
as text resources. Users can search, browse and analyse the data online.’ 
(http://www.nesstar.com)
Survey Documentation and Analysis (SDA) from the University of California at Berkeley: 
‘SDA is a set of programs for the documentation and web-based analysis of survey data. There are 
also procedures for creating customized subsets of datasets.’
(http://sda.berkeley.edu) 
Access and Reuse of Data
4.b  USE AND REUSE OF DATA OBJECTS 
The repository may have a policy informing users of possible limitations. 
Prior to downloading data, will the user be required to agree to the 
terms of an online Terms of Use statement?
Considerations: 
_ 
The data are in the public domain and reuse is not limited.
_
The data are covered by contractual restrictions for attribution, 
limitation to non-commercial usages, prohibition to modify data, 
or other constraints on their redistribution or modification.
_
All reuse of data is prohibited.
_
Restrictions are applied for data users on the right to reformat and 
redistribute.
_
Restrictions can be lifted on a case-by-case basis (e.g. by request).
_
Stipulations are made for the data to be used in an ethical manner 
or responsible manner.
Repository services may wish to enable depositors to attach a Creative 
Commons (CC) license to their work. The following CC licenses are  
commonly used in internet applications and apply to copyrighted works.
_ 
Attribution: The repository allows data users to copy, distribute, 
display, and reuse your copyrighted work, and derivative works 
based upon it - but only if they give credit in the required manner.
_ 
Non-commercial: The repository allows others to copy, distribute, 
display, and perform your work, and derivative works based upon 
it - but for non-commercial purposes only.
_ 
No Derivative Works: The repository allows others to copy,  
distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, 
not derivative works based upon it.
27
Creative Commons ‘provides free tools that let authors, scientists, artists, and educators easily 
mark their creative work with the freedoms they want it to carry so others can share, remix, use 
commercially, or any combination thereof.’ (http://creativecommons.org)
Science Commons is a US-based project that explores legal and cultural ramifications of data 
sharing. They have concluded that using Creative Commons licenses on data is not appropriate, but 
others, such as the Open Knowledge Foundation in the UK, have contested this. A Digital Curation 
Centre briefing paper covers Science Commons’ conclusions on this topic (McGeever, 2009).
Open Data Commons provides forms of data licenses for data that are consistent with the open 
data movement, for example, the Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) and Open Database 
License (DDbl). (http://www.opendatacommons.org)
Access and Reuse of Data
28
_ 
Share Alike: The repository allows others to distribute derivative 
works only under a licence identical to the licence that governs the 
original work.
Citation 
_ 
Will users of the data be required or requested to cite the 
dataset/s?
_
What is required? For example will authors, title and full 
bibliographic details be given in addition to any of the following:
t 
a hyperlink or URL for the original metadata page
t 
the original copyright statement
t 
the original rights permission statement
_
Is mention of the repository mandatory in institutional policy?
Copies 
What restrictions, if any, will be placed on making copies of the data 
and accompanying materials?
_ 
Copies can be reproduced, displayed or given to 3rd parties in any 
form or medium
_
Copies can only be made for personal research or study,  
educational or not-for-profit purposes
_
Copies can be made for commercial purposes without prior 
permission or charge
_
Full items must not be sold commercially without formal  
permission of the copyright holders.
See: CLADDIER briefing on data publication – 
At present written publications cite data sources within text and acknowledgements, making the 
data difficult to discover automatically. The CLADDIER project in the UK investigated and identified 
a number of user requirements for citing data including: need for an unambiguous reference to a 
well defined permanent entity; the reference/citation needs to be understandable for humans; an 
unambiguous data reference should include the activity or tool which produced the data (where 
practicable); the source of the data (i.e. the repository) may be as important as the producer and 
needs to be unambiguous. 
They also found that data producers have certain requirements for citation, namely it should be 
traceable to the data provider/producer, usable for usage metrics, recognised as intellectually 
equivalent to academic papers, and able to be used to search for papers citing data. 
(http://claddier.badc.ac.uk/trac/raw-attachment/wiki/wp10-mtg/CLADDIER-datapub-brief-
ing-20070514.pdf)
Access and Reuse of Data
29
Harvesting of metadata and textual content:
_ 
Will it be permissible for data or metadata items to be harvested 
by robots for full-text indexing or citation analysis?
_
Will the repository system allow searching of its information  
objects by search engines such as Google and Yahoo, according to 
current protocols and security policies?
4.c  TRACKING USERS AND USE STATISTICS
_ Will all access mechanisms be sufficiently granular to allow the 
identification of individual users in order to maintain logs of 
actions performed by users?
_
Will all actions relating to access to the material be recorded?
_
What repository use statistics will be made available and to whom?  
For example:
t 
Repository staff
t 
Depositors
t 
Data producers
t 
Repository users
t 
Research funders / publishers
t 
Institutional / organisational purse holders / senior 
management?
Access and Reuse of Data
30
5. PRESERVATION OF DATA
Repositories may have different purposes, from data sharing to 
long-term archiving, but some policies and planning around preservation 
issues must be taken from the outset, to ensure continuing access as 
long as is needed.
5.a  RETENTION PERIOD 
Define a dataset retention period, for example:
t Items will be retained indefinitely.
t 
Items will be retained for at least xxx years from the date of  
deposition.
t 
Items will be retained for the lifetime of the repository.
t 
Retention periods may be set for individual items, as required.
5.b  FUNCTIONAL PRESERVATION 
It may not be possible to guarantee the readability of some file formats 
due to software obsolescence, but the repository may choose to  
promise to maintain the usability and understandability
of the specific 
file formats over time.
_ 
If the repository promises usability and understandability over 
time, what specific file formats will be included in this guarantee?
5.c  FILE PRESERVATION
The earlier section on data file formats (1.e) covers which file formats 
will be accepted for deposit. This section deals with how the repository 
will manage datasets over time.
Database Curation:
‘Database archiving focuses on archiving data that are maintained under the control of a database 
management system and structured under a database schema, e.g. a relational database. When 
archiving scientific and reference data, database archiving is frequently regarded as maintaining a 
collection of database snapshots over time…. This form of database archiving involves making  
off-line copies of the data and managing these copies efficiently.‘ For further information, see the 
DCC briefing paper (Müller, 2009). 
Preservation of Data
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested