how to open a pdf file in asp.net using c# : .Net extract text from pdf software application dll winforms windows web page web forms HISTORY%20Website%20bookmarks4-part892

41 
One of the most notorious child sexual assault cases involved the prosecution of Father Donald 
McGuire, a Jesuit priest who was Mother Theresa’s confessor.  McGuire had brought Chicago 
boys to a home in Lake Geneva where he assaulted them in the 1960s.  Despite the passage of 
time, District Attorney Koss obtained a jury conviction, and Judge James L. Carlson sentenced 
McGuire to prison in 2007.  Shortly thereafter, many other victims came forward, which resulted 
in many lawsuits against the Jesuits.  Father Donald McGuire remains the highest-ranking Jesuit 
priest prosecuted for child abuse.  The case was covered not only by local media, but, in 
addition, has been written about in the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times, the Boston 
Globe, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle and National 
Public Radio.  The next year, Koss received awards for Prosecutor of the Year from the 
Wisconsin District Attorneys Association and the Wisconsin Victim/Witness Association. 
During those 22 years, Walworth County changed significantly.  The population grew from 
75,000 to over 100,000, and cases increased in numbers and seriousness.  The office strove to 
become more efficient and professional.  In 1988, Crystal Zarnstorff became the Office 
Administrator and continues to run the business part of the office to this date.  In 1991, a second 
victim/witness professional was added.  In 2000, a paralegal position was approved, and Dawn 
Thiele was hired.  When the county grew to over 100,000, Assistant District Attorney Joshua P. 
Grube became a Deputy District Attorney in 2007. 
In 2000, Assistant District Attorney Maureen D. Boyle helped to establish a victim impact panel, 
which requires those convicted of drunk driving to listen to victims describe the pain of drunk 
dri
ving crashes.  The District Attorney’s Office continues to run that program.
Crimes that were rarely seen in Walworth County in earlier times, such as homicides, armed 
robberies, drugs, and serious drunk driving crashes, increased as the population grew.  Despite 
that, the office maintained a philosophy of protecting victims and the public by aggressive but 
fair prosecution of offenders.  Even though caseloads were heavy, it was insured there was 
always time to meet with victims and help them through their cases. 
Training was also important.  The office provides training to each law enforcement agency in the 
county, to social workers, medical personnel, educators, students, and the general public on 
criminal issues that affect them.  
On July 31, 2012, Phillip A. Koss left the office of District Attorney to succeed former District 
Attorney Robert J. Kennedy as Circuit Court Judge.  Daniel Necci was appointed District 
Attorney that summer.  
.Net extract text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
.net extract pdf text; copy text from scanned pdf
.Net extract text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from scanned pdf to word; c# extract pdf text
42 
HISTORY OF ATTORNEYS FROM 1990-2012 
District Attorney 
Phillip A. Koss 
1999-2012 
Deputy District Attorney (new position approved in 2007) 
Joshua P. Grube 
2007 
present 
(formerly Assistant District Attorney) 
Assistant District Attorneys 
Daniel R. Goglin 
1983-1999 
Phillip A. Koss 
1985-1990 (sworn in as DA 12/3/1990) 
Jayne Davis Dewire   
1989-1992 
James H. Klick 
1990-1991 
David A. Danz 
1990-1991 
Steven J. Watson 
1991-1994 
Sandra A. Sweetman   
1991-1992 
Diane M. (Resch)Donohoo  1992 
present 
James P. Martin 
1992-1994 
Susan L. Karaskiewicz 
1994-1997 
Maureen D. Boyle   
1994-1996, 1998-2003 
Kristine E. Drettwan   
1996-2003 
Julie A. Salvin  
1997-1999 
Julie A. Nelson 
1999-2000 
Christine L. Hansen   
2001 
Steven J. Madson 
2001-2010 
Joshua P. Grube 
2003-2007  
(appointed Deputy District Attorney in 2007) 
Dennis R. Krueger   
2003-2007 
Tricia J. Riley  
2007-2008 
Zeke S. Wiedenfeld   
2008 
present 
Haley J. Rea   
2010 
present 
Victim/Witness Workers 
Mary B. Koss  
1986-1994 
Marilyn J. Kaddatz   
1991-1997 
Evelyn M. Schulz 
1994-2012 
Beverly A. Buchholz  
1997-2010 
Loretta S. Meinel 
2010 
present 
Amy L. Los   
2012 
present 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
pdf text replace tool; .net extract text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
copy text from pdf to word with formatting; find and replace text in pdf
43 
Finance 
Department
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
copying text from pdf to excel; erase text from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in VB.NET project.
get text from pdf c#; c# extract text from pdf
44 
Numbers, Numbers, Numbers 
(Yes, we are talking about the Finance Department) 
One, two, three, four . . . Counting is one of the first things we teach our children and 
grandchildren.   It’s a necessity.  From paying for our first candy bar to depositing our 
first pay check, numbers play a significant role in our personal lives.  They also play a 
significant role in tracking public functions. 
Review of county records from 1923 indicates that, even then, counties were required 
to ensure that all revenues and expenditures were properly recorded.  During that 
year, approximately $477,000 was expended for operation and maintenance and 
$840,000 for capital outlay.  Interestingly, 99% of the capital outlay was for highways 
and bridges.  They were a “big ticket” item then and they remain so today.  Within 
the audited financial statements were summaries of revenues, expenditures, lists of 
outstanding checks and tax certificates owned by the county at year end.   
While the specific details were interesting, the amount of information now required to 
be included in the county’s financial statements has grown exponentially due to the 
creation of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) in 1984.  GASB 
is an independent organization that is recognized as the official source of generally 
accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for state and local governments.  The growth 
of both financial reporting requirements and county operations has contributed to the 
evolution of the county’s finance department.
County “Auditors”
Prior to 1930, financial recordkeeping was primarily the respon-
sibility of county officials, with state auditors reviewing the 
work.  The 2003 information was reviewed by the Wisconsin 
Tax Commission.  In 1930, the county contracted with Jonathon 
Cook & Company to audit the various county offices.  It was the 
first audit of its kind for Walworth County and it revealed the 
necessity of setting up better controls of transactions. 
In 1933, the county elected to contract for additional professional services. A.R. Barr 
was contracted to review the financial records on a monthly basis and make all 
necessary entries.  They provided special reports for the Finance Committee and 
County Board.  As time allowed during the year, they completed part of the work of 
the annual audit.   A.R. Barr served as the county auditor from 1930 
1953. 
On October 1, 1954 the county employed J. Werner Deignan as the County Auditor.  
Mr. Deignan served for 31 years and retired on June 30, 1986.  As highlighted in Mr. 
Deignan’s resignation letter, he had witnessed the evolution from 
hand posting of 
records to National Cash Register Accounting on bookkeeping machines to data 
processin
g on the first baby IBM to the new “sophisticated” System 38.  He 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
find and replace text in pdf file; copy paste text pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
export highlighted text from pdf; copy text from locked pdf
45 
participated in the transition to GAAP reporting.  Throughout his long and dedicated 
career with Walworth County, Mr. Deignan and his audit firm worked to ensure that 
the county maintained a strong financial position.  He witnessed firsthand many of the 
worldwide technical innovations highlighted herein.  
The last report submitted by a “county auditor” was submitted under Deignan’s 
signature and was the last of an era.  No longer are employees allowed to be 
designated as the county’s “auditor.”  Audits are now required to be completed by an 
independent third party. 
From 1986 through 1996, the position of Director of Accounting & Budgets oversaw 
financial activities under the supervision of the County Clerk. 
Department Evolution 
Initial Creation 
In January 1996, the county hired its first full-time administrative coordinator and 
soon thereafter created a separate and distinct finance department.  This was a 
significant change in county operations.  No longer were financial responsibilities 
under the direction of an elected county official.  They were now the responsibility of 
an accounting professional.  The newly created position of Finance Director reported 
directly to the Administrative Coordinator and the County Board.  Gene Strizek was 
hired in July of 1996 as the first Finance Director and served for one year. Key 
responsibilities of the department were accounting, budgeting and financial reporting.  
Effective October 1997, Nicole Andersen (Nicki) was subsequently appointed 
Finance Director.  Ms. Andersen was promoted to the newly created position of 
Deputy County Administrator 
Finance in July, 2004 and currently serves in that 
position.   
Purchasing 
Since its inception as a separate department, the responsibilities of the finance 
department continue to evolve.  In addition to budget and financial reporting 
functions, the department was delegated the responsibility of overseeing the 
purchasing function.  In 1998, the county added a Central Services (Purchasing) 
Manager position and the county moved from a decentralized purchasing format to a 
centralized format in order to obtain increased efficiencies and bulk purchase savings.  
Over time, standardized procedures and contracts were developed to minimize 
potential liabilities.  In 2005, a stand-alone purchasing system was implemented on a 
countywide basis and an integrated software system was installed in 2007.  As part of 
a reorganization that transferred employee benefit responsibilities to finance in 2007, 
the purchasing function was ultimately transferred to Central Services where many of 
the core functions continue to evolve.  
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Using this VB.NET PDF text conversion API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save it as new txt file.
copy text from pdf to word; how to copy and paste pdf text
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document. Add necessary references: C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From PDF File in C#.NET.
copy paste pdf text; copy pdf text to word document
46 
Accounts Payable 
In an ongoing effort to consolidate and improve financial functions, the accounts 
payable function was transferred from the County Clerk to the Finance Department in 
2000.  Enhancements continued to be made and, beginning in 2004, accounts payable 
operations were centralized.  The implementation of a purchasing card system has 
reduced the number of checks which are required to be printed and reduces the 
paperwork necessary to purchase many of the county’s small ticket items.  A bonus 
feature is the rebate received from belonging to a purchasing card consortium.  
Currently, finance staff are working with the county’s bank to facilitate additional 
uti
lization of electronic fund transfer for significantly more of the county’s vendors. 
Payroll 
In June 2004, the department assumed responsibility for issuing the county payroll.  
Reorganization of the Human Resource department resulted in payroll staff being 
assigned to the Finance Department.  Staff members have been provided the 
opportunity for increased training and one member, Trina Adams, currently holds a 
Certified Payroll Professional rating.  The county is privileged to have 
knowledgeable, dedicated individuals who continue to add value to the payroll 
function.  Staff ensure compliance with negotiated payroll related items and with 
government regulations. 
Budget and Financial Reporting 
Within the department, budget and financial reporting responsibilities continue to be 
enhanced to meet the increasing need for financial information and to meet regulatory 
requirements.  Quality is considered key. 
In 2001, 
Finance staff 
completed 
the county’s 
first 
Comprehensi
ve Annual 
Financial 
Report 
(CAFR).  
One year 
later, the 
county  
submitted  
its fiscal  
year 2002 to 
Receiving Walworth  ounty’s sixth consecutive financial reporting award from 
the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) are Andy Lamping, 
Finance Manager; Jessica Lanser, Comptroller; Nancy Russell, County Board 
Chair; Sarah Kitsembel, Wisconsin Government Finance Officers Association 
(WGFOA) President; Nicki Andersen, Deputy County Administrator-Finance; and 
David Bretl, County Administrator. 
47 
the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for consideration for the 
Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting.  Finance staff are 
proud to have received this award annually since 2002.  GFOA’s Certificate of 
Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting is a national awards program which 
evaluates information presented in a municipality’s annual financial report.  The 
program recognizes exemplary financial reporting by state, provincial and local 
governments, as well as public universities and colleges, throughout the United States 
and Canada.  This award has been made possible through the combined efforts of 
dedicated finance staff (particularly Jessica Lanser, Comptroller), county management, 
elected officials and those individuals within county departments who work to ensure 
quality information is maintained on a day-to-day basis.  
The 2005 adopted 
budget was 
submitted to the 
GFOA for 
consideration for the 
Distinguished   
budget presentation 
award.  Finance  
staff are pleased to 
have received this 
recognition for the 
2005 document and 
each year thereafter.  
The GFOA’s Dis
tinguished Budget 
Presentation Award 
recognizes exem-
plary budget 
documentation by 
state, provincial and 
local governments, 
as well as public universities and colleges, throughout the United States and Canada.  As 
with the previously mentioned award, this is only possible through the countywide efforts 
of dedicated staff.  Special thanks go to Stacie Johnson, Budget Analyst, for her dedicated 
efforts to revise and revamp our previous budget format into an informative, user friendly 
document.   
The county works diligently with all staff to continue to improve its budget and 
financial reporting documents.  In 2004, staff developed its ever popular Budget in 
Brief booklet.  It is widely used as a reference book and is utilized in numerous 
community presentations. 
The department website has been active since 2003 and materials are continuously 
updated.  The site contains active links to numerous financial documents and provides 
Receiving Walworth  ounty’s fifth Distinguished  udget Presentation Award 
for Fiscal Year 2009 are  Stacie Johnson, Budget Analyst; Jessica Lanser, 
Comptroller, Nicki Andersen, Deputy County Administrator-Finance; Nancy 
Russell, County Board Chair; David Bretl, County Administrator. 
48 
instantaneous information to the community.  Payroll and employee benefit materials 
are available for the convenience of county employees. 
Employee Benefits 
As with all businesses, and life in general, change is just around the corner.  In June 
2007, the Finance Department was asked to assume responsibility for overseeing the 
employee benefits function.  While employee benefits staff were working diligently 
to maintain the program, it was determined that significant increases in benefit costs 
required increased financial review and oversight.  The county self funds its health 
and dental plans, and nationwide increases in health care costs were stretching county 
resources.  The Finance Department “inherited” a seasoned benefit s
pecialist (Sarah 
Anderson), one clerical support and two vacant positions.  The department 
successfully recruited Dale Wilson as Payroll/Benefit Manager and Josh Pollock as 
Benefit Assistant.  In conjunction with the Finance team, the benefit team has made 
significant strides in improving overall financial management of the benefit 
programs. While the county cannot control the impact of national events, benefits 
staff continually work to improve the overall status of the funds.    
To offset the additional workload related to employee benefits, the centralized 
purchasing function was transferred to Central Services. 
In conjunction with the management of the health fund, the county currently offers an 
annual “health risk assessment.”  This risk assessment is
utilized to promote 
improved wellness activities for county employees and their families.  Based upon a 
Finance initiative, an employee wellness council was formed in 2009.  The council’s 
goals and objectives were approved by the Human Resource Committee in 2009.  A 
bi-monthly wellness & employee benefits newsletter was initiated in November 2009 
to promote improved fitness and to increase employee understanding of current 
employee benefits.  Discounted memberships at area health clubs were negotiated and 
a significant number of employees took advantage of the opportunity.  The council 
continues to discuss fundraising opportunities that would support wellness initiatives 
on an ongoing basis.  
Risk Management 
Risk management has historically been under the preview of the corporation counsel.  
In 1988, Walworth County, like many others, was unable to obtain general liability 
insurance.  As a solution, the county joined with other Wisconsin counties to form the 
Wisconsin Counties Mutual Insurance Corporation (WCMIC).  The county was a 
member until 2007.   
In 2007, the Wisconsin Municipal Mutual Insurance Company (WMMIC) recruited 
the county for owner/membership and insurance coverage was transferred effective 
January 1, 2008.  As an owner / member, the county has 1 voting representative.  The 
Deputy County Administrator- 
Finance has, from the time of the county’s initial 
49 
membership, been designated as the voting member.  The company has a strong 
dividend history and is continually evaluating membership opportunities for other 
Wisconsin municipalities. 
Investments 
Historically, investment activities were the responsibility of the County Treasurer.  In 
December 2008, the responsibility for investment oversight was transferred to the 
Deputy County Administrator- 
Finance.  In addition to the county’s operational 
funds, responsibility for long-
term investment of the county’s Other Post Employ
-
ment Benefits (OPEB) funds was also established.  The county began funding its 
OPEB liability in 2005 and established a formal trust in 2007.  The county has 
established a 30-year funding schedule.  Every 2 years, the county will enlist the aid 
of an actuary to reevaluate the estimated OPEB liability.   
Technology 
In 1984, Walworth County installed a countywide accounting system that was utilized 
as the core financial system for over 2 decades. 
By the late 1980’s / early 1990’s, desktop computers were starting to make an 
appearance in county departments.  Electronic recordkeeping greatly enhanced staff’s 
ability to monitor county finances and produce reports, but it was a double-edged 
sword.  The increased capability to 
track/access information created even 
greater expectations by information 
users to produce more and more 
reports.  While people initially thought 
that the age of computers would mean 
less paper, in reality, it was the 
impetus for producing even more.  
Accessibility of information was 
enhanced with the first laptop 
computer in 1999.  These 
technological changes would only be 
an inkling of future changes. 
In 2002, the county took another 
technological step.  Direct deposit was 
initiated for specified groups within 
the county.  Additional groups were 
added as negotiations allowed.  The 
electronic transfer of funds resulted in 
reduced bank costs and eliminated 
employee trips to their financial 
institutions.  
Evolution of Computing 
2400 BC  The Roman abacus was used in 
Babylonia as early as 2400 BC.  The 
word originates  
from the Latin  
word abokos used 
to describe a  
“calculating table.” 
2000 BC  The counter abacus was devised by 
Egyptian mathematicians in Egypt in 
2000 BC.  Many other forms of 
“reckoning boards” followed. 
1613 
The first use of the word “computer” 
was recorded in 1613, referring to a 
person who carried out calculations 
or computations.  It continued to be 
used in that sense until the middle of 
the 20
th
century when it began to 
take on its more familiar meaning - a 
machine that carries out 
computations. 
50 
Significant technological changes began occurring in 2005.  To facilitate a 
countywide purchasing process, a standalone purchasing system was implemented.  
This provided for centralized review of requisitions and countywide bid preparation. 
In 2006, Walworth County implemented countywide electronic timekeeping.  Initially 
a “culture shock,” many employees were concerned about giving up their paper 
timesheets.  As with many things, change was difficult for some.  With time, concerns 
have significantly diminished.  Most staff find the information easy to access and 
monitor.  Timekeeping cards were integrated with the building access system in 2007 
to improve efficiencies and monitor building access. 
2007 brought significant changes to financial reporting.  The financial system which 
had been in place for over 2 decades was replaced with an integrated financial 
package 
MUNIS.  Phase I of the project resulted in General Ledger, Budget, 
Accounts Payable, Capital Assets and Purchasing modules going live on January 1, 
2007.   It was a momentous day when the county left the “green screens” behind and 
moved to an interactive financial reporting system.  Anyone who has ever 
implemented a new software system can relate to the pride (or was it relief?) that was 
felt when the transition was successfully completed.   
Without a breath, Phase II planning began for implementation of the Human 
Resources/Payroll module.  This module had more details to monitor.  With 7 
bargaining units and the non-represented staff, the number of payroll codes was  
amazing.   Thanks to dedicated payroll staff, the MUNIS payroll and HR module 
went live on January 1, 2009, and everyone received their paycheck.  The county has 
continued to make improvement
s within the system since its initial “go live” date.
2009 truly saw the advent of less paper.  The finance department began the electronic 
distribution of pay advices to selected groups.  Staff receives their information sooner 
and less paper is produced.  Negotiations continue with other groups to provide this 
benefit to their members. 
The Evolution of Computing (continued) 
1622  William Oughtred invented the slide rule.  The devices were used by generations of 
engineers and other mathematically inclined professional workers, until the invention of 
the pocket calculator.  The engineers in the Apollo program that sent a man to the moon 
made many of their calculations on slide rules, which were accurate to three or four 
significant figures. 
1623  Wilhelm Schickard built the first mechanical calculator  
and thus became the father of the computing era. 
1801  Joseph-Marie Jacquard developed a loom in which  
the pattern being woven was controlled by punched  
cards.  This was a landmark point in programmability. 
1884  The first successful key-driven adding machine (the Comptometer) was invented.  Just 
pressing the keys caused the result to be calculated.  No separate lever was required.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested