how to open password protected pdf file in c# : Extract text from pdf file Library control component .net azure wpf mvc EXCEL%20readings26-part99

Determining Letter Grades for Test Scores
A common use of a lookup table is to assign letter grades for test scores. Figure
8-10 shows a worksheet with student test scores. The range E2:F6 (named
GradeList) displays a lookup table used to assign a letter grade to a test score.
Figure 8-10: Looking up letter grades for test scores
The companion CD-ROM contains a workbook that demonstrates both for-
mulas in this section.
Column C contains formulas that use the VLOOKUP function and the lookup
table to assign a grade based on the score in column B. The formula in C2, for
example, is:
=VLOOKUP(B2,GradeList,2)
When the lookup table is small (as in the example shown in Figure 8-10), you
can use a literal array in place of the lookup table. The formula that follows, for
example, returns a letter grade without using a lookup table. Rather, the informa-
tion in the lookup table is hard-coded into a literal array. See Chapter 14 for more
information about literal arrays.
=VLOOKUP(B2,{0,”F”;40,”D”;70,”C”;80,”B”;90,”A”},2)
Another approach, which uses a more legible formula, is to use the LOOKUP
function with two array arguments:
=LOOKUP(B2,{0,40,70,80,90},{“F”,“D”,“C”,“B”,“A”})
224
Part II: Using Functions in Your Formulas
Extract text from pdf file - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
erase text from pdf; copy text from pdf without formatting
Extract text from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from encrypted pdf; copy text from pdf online
Calculating a Grade Point Average
A student’s grade point average (GPA) is a numerical measure of the average grade
received for classes taken. This discussion assumes a letter grade system, in which
each letter grade is assigned a numeric value (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, and F=0). The
GPA comprises an average of the numeric grade values, weighted by the credit
hours of the course. A one-hour course, for example, receives less weight than a
three-hour course. The GPA ranges from 0 (all Fs) to 4.00 (all As).
Figure 8-11 shows a worksheet with information for a student. This student took
five courses, for a total of 13 credit hours. Range B2:B6 is named CreditHours. The
grades for each course appear in column C (Range C2:C6 is named Grades). Column
D uses a lookup formula to calculate the grade value for each course. The lookup
formula in cell D2, for example, follows. This formula uses the lookup table in
G2:H6 (named GradeTable).
=VLOOKUP(C2,GradeTable,2,FALSE)
Figure 8-11: Using multiple formulas to calculate a GPA
Formulas in column E calculate the weighted values. The formula in E2 is:
=D2*B2
Cell B8 computes the GPA using the following formula:
=SUM(E2:E6)/SUM(B2:B6)
The preceding formulas work fine, but you can streamline the GPA calculation
quite a bit. In fact, you can use a single array formula to make this calculation and
avoid using the lookup table and the formulas in columns D and E. This array for-
mula does the job:
{=SUM((MATCH(Grades,{“F”,”D”,”C”,”B”,”A”},0)-1)*CreditHours)
/SUM(CreditHours)}
Chapter 8: Lookups
225
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
export highlighted text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf with formatting
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
get text from pdf into excel; c# extract text from pdf
You can access a workbook that demonstrates both the multiformula and
the array formula techniques on the companion CD-ROM.
Performing a Two-Way Lookup
Figure 8-12 shows a worksheet with a table that displays product sales by month.
To retrieve sales for a particular month and product, the user enters a month in cell
B1 and a product name in cell B2.
Figure 8-12: This table demonstrates a two-way lookup.
The companion CD-ROM contains the workbook shown in Figure 8-12.
To simplify things, the worksheet uses the following named ranges:
Name
Refers To
Month
B1
Product
B2
Table
D1:H14
MonthList
D1:D14
ProductList
D1:H1
226
Part II: Using Functions in Your Formulas
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
cut text from pdf document; extract text from pdf open source
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
extract text from pdf; copy paste text pdf
The following formula (in cell B4) uses the MATCH function to return the posi-
tion of the Month within the MonthList range. For example, if the month is
January, the formula returns 2 because January is the second item in the MonthList
range (the first item is a blank cell, D1).
=MATCH(Month,MonthList,0)
The formula in cell B5 works similarly, but uses the ProductListrange.
=MATCH(Product,ProductList,0)
The final formula, in cell B6, returns the corresponding sales amount. It uses the
INDEX function with the results from cells B4 and B5.
=INDEX(Table,B4,B5)
You can, of course, combine these formulas into a single formula, as shown
here:
=INDEX(Table,MATCH(Month,MonthList,0),MATCH(Product,ProductList,0))
If you use Excel 97 or later,you can use the Lookup Wizard add-in to create
this type of formula (see Figure 8-13).The Lookup Wizard add-in is distrib-
uted with Excel.
Figure 8-13: The Lookup Wizard add-in 
can create a formula that performs 
a two-way lookup.
Chapter 8: Lookups
227
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Professional VB.NET PDF file merging SDK support Visual Studio .NET. Merge PDF without size limitation. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
get text from pdf image; copy text from scanned pdf to word
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
get text from pdf online; copy and paste pdf text
Another way to accomplish a two-way lookup is to provide a name for each
row and column of the table.A quick way to do this is to select the table and
use InsertNameCreate.After creating the names,you can use a simple
formula such as:
= Sprockets July
This formula,which uses the range intersection operator (a space),returns
July sales for Sprockets.See Chapter 3 for details.
Performing a Two-Column Lookup
Some situations may require a lookup based on the values in two columns. Figure
8-14 shows an example.
Figure 8-14: This workbook performs a lookup using information 
in two columns (D and E).
The workbook shown in Figure 8-14 also appears on the companion
CD-ROM.
The lookup table contains automobile makes and models, and a corresponding
code for each. The worksheet uses named ranges, as shown here:
F2:F12
Code
B1
Make
B2
Model
228
Part II: Using Functions in Your Formulas
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Professional VB.NET PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio and .NET framework 2.0. Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online.
copy text from pdf to word; c# get text from pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction.
get text from pdf c#; export text from pdf
D2:D12
Range1
E2:E12
Range2
The following array formula displays the corresponding code for an automobile
make and model:
{=INDEX(Code,MATCH(Make&Model,Range1&Range2,0))}
This formula works by concatenating the contents of Make and Model, and then
searching for this text in an array consisting of the concatenated corresponding
text in Range1 and Range2.
Determining the Address of 
a Value within a Range
Most of the time, you want your lookup formula to return a value. You may, how-
ever, need to determine the cell address of a particular value within a range. For
example, Figure 8-15 shows a worksheet with a range of numbers that occupy a
single column (named Data). Cell B1, which contains the value to look up, is named
Target.
Figure 8-15: The formula in cell B2 returns the 
address in the Datarange for the value in cell B1.
The formula in cell B2, which follows, returns the address of the cell in the Data
range that contains the Targetvalue:
=ADDRESS(ROW(Data)+MATCH(Target,Data,0)-1,COLUMN(Data))
Chapter 8: Lookups
229
If the Datarange occupies a single row, use this formula to return the address of
the Targetvalue:
=ADDRESS(ROW(Data),COLUMN(Data)+MATCH(Target,Data,0)-1)
The companion CD-ROM contains the workbook shown in Figure 8-15.
If the Data range contains more than one instance of the Target value, the
address of the first occurrence is returned. If the Targetvalue is not found in the
Data range, the formula returns #N/A.
Looking Up a Value Using the Closest Match
The VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP functions are useful in the following situations:
 You need to identify an exact match for a target value. Use FALSE as the
function’s fourth argument.
 You need to locate an approximate match. If the function’s fourth argu-
ment is TRUE or omitted and an exact match is not found, the next
largest value less than the lookup value is returned.
But what if you need to look up a value based on the closestmatch? Neither
VLOOKUP nor HLOOKUP can do the job.
Figure 8-16 shows a worksheet with student names in column A and values in
column B. Range B2:B20 is named Data. Cell E2, named Target, contains a value to
search for in the Datarange. Cell E3, named ColOffset, contains a value that repre-
sents the column offset from the Datarange.
You can access the workbook shown in Figure 8-16 on the companion
CD-ROM.
The array formula that follows identifies the closest match to the Targetvalue in
the Data range, and returns the names of the corresponding student in column A
(i.e., the column with an offset of –1). The formula returns Leslie (with a matching
value of 8,000, which is the one closest to the Targetvalue of 8,025).
230
Part II: Using Functions in Your Formulas
Figure 8-16: This workbook demonstrates how to perform 
a lookup using the closest match.
{=INDIRECT(ADDRESS(ROW(Data)+MATCH(MIN(ABS(Target-Data)),
ABS(Target-Data),0)-1,COLUMN(Data)+ColOffset))}
If two values in the Data range are equidistant from the Targetvalue, the for-
mula uses the first one in the list.
The value in ColOffsetcan be negative (for a column to the left of Data), positive
(for a column to the right of Data), or 0 (for the actual closest match value in the
Data range).
To understand how this formula works, you need to understand the INDIRECT
function. This function’s first argument is a text string in the form of a cell refer-
ence (or a reference to a cell that contains a text string). In this example, the text
string is created by the ADDRESS function, which accepts a row and column refer-
ence and returns a cell address.
Looking Up a Value Using Linear Interpolation
Interpolationrefers to the process of estimating a missing value by using existing
values. To illustrate, refer to Figure 8-17. Column D contains a list of values (named
x) and column E contains corresponding values (named y).
The worksheet also contains a chart that depicts the relationship between the x
range and the yrange graphically. As you can see, there is an approximate linear
relationship between the corresponding values in the xand yranges: as xincreases,
so does y. Notice that the values in the x range are not strictly consecutive. For
example, the x range doesn’t contain the following values: 3, 6, 7, 14, 17, 18,
and19.
Chapter 8: Lookups
231
Figure 8-17: This workbook demonstrates a table lookup using linear interpolation.
You can create a lookup formula that looks up a value in the xrange and returns
the corresponding value from the yrange. But what if you want to estimate the y
value for a missing xvalue? A normal lookup formula does not return a very good
result because it simply returns an existing yvalue (not an estimated yvalue). For
example, the following formula looks up the value 3, and returns 18.00 (the value
that corresponds to 2 in the xrange):
=LOOKUP(3,x,y)
In such a case, you probably want to interpolate. In other words, because the
lookup value (3) is halfway between existing xvalues (2 and 4), you want the for-
mula to return a yvalue of 21.000—a value halfway between the corresponding y
values 18.00 and 24.00.
FORMULAS TO PERFORM A LINEAR INTERPOLATION
Figure 8-18 shows a worksheet with formulas in column B. The value to be looked
up is entered into cell B1. The final formula, in cell B16, returns the result. If the
value in B3 is found in the xrange, the corresponding yvalue is returned. If the
value in B3 is not found, the formula in B16 returns an estimated yvalue, obtained
using linear interpolation.
The companion CD-ROM contains the workbook shown in Figure 8-18.
232
Part II: Using Functions in Your Formulas
Figure 8-18: Column B contains formulas that perform 
a lookup using linear interpolation.
It’s critical that the values in the xrange appear in ascending order. If B1 con-
tains a value less than the lowest value in xor greater than the largest value in x,
the formula returns an error value. Table 8-2 lists and describes these formulas.
T
ABLE
8-2 FORMULAS FOR A LOOKUP USING LINEAR INTERPOLATION
Cell
Formula
Description
B3
=LOOKUP(B1,x,y)
Performs a standard lookup, and returns looked-
up value in the xrange.
B4
=B1=B3
Returns TRUE if the looked-up value equals the
value to be looked up.
B6
=MATCH(B3,x,0)
Returns the row number of the xrange that
contains the matching value.
B7
=IF(B4,B6,B6+1)
Returns the same row as the formula in B6 if an
exact match is found. Otherwise, it adds 1 to the
result in B6.
B9
=INDEX(x,B6)
Returns the xvalue that corresponds to the row
in B6.
B10
=INDEX(x,B7)
Returns the xvalue that corresponds to the row
in B7.
B12
=LOOKUP(B9,x,y)
Returns the yvalue that corresponds to the x
value in B9.
Continued
Chapter 8: Lookups
233
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested