how to open pdf file in web browser c# : Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text application SDK tool html wpf asp.net online R%20dummies40-part1003

cex
pch
font
: Control the character expansion ratio (
cex
), plot character (
pch
),
and font type
lty
lwd
: Control the line type and line width
For example, to modify your plot to have red points and a blue regression line,
use the following:
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     type=c(“p”, “r”),
+     par.settings=simpleTheme(col=”red”, col.line=”blue”)
+ )
You can see the result in Figure 17-6.
Figure 17-6: Using a theme to change the color of the points and lines.
Plotting Different Types
With 
lattice
graphics, you can create many different types of plots, such as
scatterplots and bar charts. Here are just a few of the different types of plots you
can create:
Scatterplot: 
xyplot()
Bar chart: 
barchart()
Box-and-whisker plot: 
bwplot()
One-dimensional strip plot: 
stripplot()
Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf find and replace text; search pdf for text in multiple files
Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search a pdf document for text; how to search text in pdf document
Three-dimensional scatterplots: 
cloud()
Three-dimensional surface plots: 
wireframe()
For a complete list of the different types of 
lattice
plots, see the Help at 
?
lattice
.
Because making bar charts and making box-and-whisker plots are such
common activities, we discuss these functions in the following sections.
Making a bar chart
To make a bar chart, use the 
lattice
function 
barchart()
. Say you want to
create a bar chart of fuel economy for each different type of car. To do this, you
first have to add the names of the cars to the data itself. Because the names are
contained in the row names, this means assigning a new column in your data frame
with the name 
cars
, containing 
rownames(mtcars)
:
> mtcars$cars <- rownames(mtcars)
Now you can create your bar chart using similar syntax to the scatterplot you
made earlier:
> barchart(cars ~ mpg | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     main=”barchart”,
+     scales=list(cex=0.5),
+     layout=c(3, 1)
+ )
Once again (because you have eagle eyes), you’ve noticed the additional
argument 
layout
in this code. Lattice plots adapt to the size of the active graphics
window on your screen. They do this by changing the configuration of the panels of
your plot. For example, if your graphics window is too narrow to contain the panels
side by side, then 
lattice
will start to stack your panels.
You control the layout of your panels with the argument 
layout
, consisting
of two numbers indicating the number of columns and number of rows in your
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file
search pdf for text; search pdf documents for text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Convert PDF document page to separate text file in Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR
how to select text in a pdf; pdf searchable text
plot. In our example, we want to ensure that the three panels are side by side,
so we specify 
layout=c(3, 1)
.
Your plot should look like Figure 17-7.
Figure 17-7: Making a 
lattice
bar chart.
Making a box-and-whisker plot
A box-and-whisker plot is useful when you want to visually summarize the
uncertainty of a variable. The plot consists of a dark circle at the mean; a box
around the upper and lower hinges (the hinges are at approximately the 25th and
75th percentiles); and a dotted line, or whisker, at 1.5 times the box length (see
Chapter 14).
The 
lattice
function to create a box and whisker plot is 
bwplot()
, and you
can see the result in Figure 17-8.
Figure 17-8: Making a 
lattice
box-and-whisker plot.
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
More and more companies are trying to convert printed business be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp. original layout and formatting of scanned images, fax
search text in multiple pdf; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
convert pdf to searchable text; how to search text in pdf document
Notice that the function formula doesn’t have a left-hand side to the equation.
Because you’re creating a one-dimensional plot of horsepower conditional on
cylinders, the formula simplifies to 
~ hp | cyl
. In other words, the formula starts
with the tilde symbol:
> bwplot(~ hp | factor(cyl), data=mtcars, main=”bwplot”)
Plotting Data in Groups
Often, you want to create plots where you compare different groups in your
data. In this section, you first take a look at data in tall format as opposed to data
in wide format. When you have data in tall format, you can easily use 
lattice
graphics to visualize subgroups in your data. Then you create some charts with
contained subgroups. Finally, you add a key, or legend, to your plot to indicate the
different subgroups.
Using data in tall format
So far, you’ve graphed only one variable against another in your 
lattice
plots.
In most of the examples, you plotted 
mpg
against 
hp
for each unique value of 
cyl
.
But what happens when you want to analyze more than one variable
simultaneously?
Consider the built-in dataset 
longley
, containing data about employment,
unemployment, and other population indicators:
> str(longley)
‘data.frame’: 16 obs. of  7 variables:
$ GNP.deflator: num  83 88.5 88.2 89.5 96.2 ...
$ GNP         : num  234 259 258 285 329 ...
$ Unemployed  : num  236 232 368 335 210 ...
$ Armed.Forces: num  159 146 162 165 310 ...
$ Population  : num  108 109 110 111 112 ...
$ Year        : int  1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 ...
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
pdf text search; convert pdf to searchable text online
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
converting pdf to searchable text format; pdf searchable text
$ Employed    : num  60.3 61.1 60.2 61.2 63.2 ...
One way to easily analyze the different variables of a data frame is to first
reshape the data frame from wide format to tall format.
A wide data frame contains a column for each variable (see Chapter 13). A
tall data frame contains all the same information, but the data is organized in
such a way that one column is reserved for identifying the name of the
variable and a second column contains the actual data.
An easy way to reshape a data frame from wide format to tall format is to use
the 
melt()
function in the 
reshape2
package. Remember: 
reshape2
is not part of
base R — it’s an add-on package that is available on CRAN. You can install it with
the 
install.packages(“reshape2”)
function.
> library(“reshape2”)
> mlongley <- melt(longley, id.vars=”Year”)
> str(mlongley)
‘data.frame’: 96 obs. of  3 variables:
$ Year    : int  1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 ...
$ variable: Factor w/ 6 levels “GNP.deflator”,..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ value   : num  83 88.5 88.2 89.5 96.2 ...
Now you can plot the tall data frame 
mlongley
and use the new columns 
value
and 
variable
in the formula 
value~Year | variable
.
> xyplot(value ~ Year | variable, data=mlongley,
+     layout=c(6, 1),
+     par.strip.text=list(cex=0.7),
+     scales=list(cex=0.7)
+ )
The additional arguments 
par.strip.text
and 
scales
control the font size
(character expansion ratio) of the strip at the top of the chart, as well as the scale,
as you can see in Figure 17-9.
When you create plots with multiple groups, make sure that the resulting
plot is meaningful. For example, Figure 17-9 correctly plots the 
longley
data,
but it can be very misleading because the units of measurement are very
different. For example, the unit of GNP (short for Gross National Product) is
probably billions of dollars. In contrast the unit of population is probably
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB.NET Framework. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
search text in pdf image; find text in pdf image
XImage.OCR for .NET, Recognize Text from Images and Documents
extraction from images captured by digital camera, scanned PDF document and image-only PDF. Output OCR result to memory, text searchable PDF, Word, Text file
pdf select text; search text in pdf using java
millions of people. (The documentation of the 
longley
dataset is not clear on
this topic.) Be very careful when you present plots like this — you don’t want
to be accused of creating chart junk (misleading graphics).
Figure 17-9: Using data in tall format to put different variables in each panel.
Creating a chart with groups
Many graphics types — but bar charts in particular — tend to display multiple
groups of data at the same time. Usually, you can distinguish different groups by
their color or sometimes their shading.
If you ever want to add different colors to your plot to distinguish between
different data, you need to define groups in your 
lattice
plot.
Say you want to create a bar chart that differentiates whether a car has an
automatic or manual gearbox. The 
mtcars
dataset has a column with this data,
called 
am
— this is a numeric vector with the value 
0
for automatic and 
1
for
manual. You can use the 
ifelse()
function to convert from numeric values to a
character values 
“Automatic”
and 
“Manual”
:
> mtcars$cars <- rownames(mtcars)
> mtcars$am <- with(mtcars, ifelse(am==0, “Automatic”, “Manual”))
Now you plot your data using the same formula as before, but you need to add
an argument defining the group, 
group=am
.
> barchart(cars ~ mpg | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     group=am,
+     scales=list(cex=0.5),
+     layout=c(3, 1),
+ )
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a doc = new TIFFDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert loaded TIFF
how to search a pdf document for text; search a pdf file for text
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
how to search pdf files for text; find text in pdf files
When you run this code, you’ll get your desired bar chart. However, the first
thing you’ll notice is that the colors look a bit washed out and you don’t have a key
to distinguish between automatic and manual cars.
Adding a key
It is easy to add a key to a graphic that already contains a 
group
argument.
Usually, it’s as simple as adding another argument, 
auto.key=TRUE
, which
automatically creates a key that matches the groups:
> barchart(cars ~ mpg | factor(cyl), data=mtcars,
+     main=”barchart with groups”,
+     group=am,
+     auto.key=TRUE,
+     par.settings = simpleTheme(col=c(“grey80”, “grey20”)),
+     scales=list(cex=0.5),
+     layout=c(3, 1)
+ )
One more thing to notice about this specific example is the arguments for
par.settings
to control the color of the bars. In this case, the colors are shades of
gray. You can see the effect in Figure 17-10.
Figure 17-10: A 
lattice
bar chart with groups and a key.
Printing and Saving a Lattice Plot
You need to know three other essential things about 
lattice
plots: how to
assign a 
lattice
plot to an object, how to print a 
lattice
plot in a script, and how
to save a 
lattice
plot to file. That’s what we cover in this section.
Assigning a lattice plot to an object
Lattice plots are objects; therefore you can assign them to variables, just like
any other object. This is very convenient when you want to reuse a plot object in
your downstream code — for example, to print it later.
The assignment to a variable works just like any variable assignment in R:
> my.plot <- xyplot(mpg ~ hp | cyl, data=mtcars)
> class(my.plot)
[1] “trellis”
Printing a lattice plot in a script
When you run code interactively — by typing commands into the R console —
simply typing the name of a variable prints that variable. However, you need to
explicitly print an object when running a script. You do this with the 
print()
function.
Because a 
lattice
plot is an object, you need to explicitly use the 
print()
function in your scripts. This is a frequently asked question in the R
documentation, and it can easily lead to confusion if you forget.
To be clear, the following line of code will do nothing if you put it in a script
and source the script. (To be technically correct: the code will still run, but the
resulting object will never get printed — it simply gets discarded.)
> xyplot(mpg ~ hp | cyl, data=mtcars)
To get the desired effect of printing the plot, you must use 
print()
:
> my.plot <- xyplot(mpg ~ hp | cyl, data=mtcars)
> print(my.plot)
Saving a lattice plot to file
To save a 
lattice
plot to an image file, you use a slightly modified version of
the sequence of functions that you came across in base graphics (see Chapter 16).
Here’s a short reminder of the sequence:
1. Open a graphics device using, for example, 
png()
.
Tip: The 
lattice
package provides the 
trellis.device()
function that
effectively does the same thing, but it’s optimized for 
lattice
plots, because it
uses appropriate graphical parameters.
2. Print the plot.
Remember: You must use the 
print()
function explicitly!
3. Close the graphics device.
Put this into action using 
trellis.device()
to open a file called 
xyplot.png
,
print your plot, and then close the device. (You can use the 
setwd(“~/”)
to set your
working directory to your home folder; see Chapter 16.)
> setwd(“~/”)
> trellis.device(device=”png”, filename=”xyplot.png”)
> print(my.plot)
> dev.off()
You should now be able to find the file 
xyplot.png
in your home folder.
Chapter 18
Looking At ggplot2 Graphics
In This Chapter
Installing and loading the ggplot2 package
Understanding how to use build a plot using layers
Creating charts with suitable geoms and stats
Adding facets to your plot
One of the strengths of R is that it’s more than just a programming language
— it also has thousands of packages written and contributed by independent
developers. One of these packages, 
ggplot2
, is tremendously popular and offers a
new way of creating insightful graphics using R.
Much of the 
ggplot2
philosophy is based on the so-called “grammar of
graphics,” a theoretically sound way of describing all the components that go
into a graphical plot. You don’t need to know anything about the grammar of
graphics to use 
ggplot2
effectively, but now you know where its name comes
from.
In this chapter, you first install and load the 
ggplot2
package and then take a
first look at layers, the building blocks of the 
ggplot2
graphics. Next, you define the
data, geoms, and stats that make up a layer, and use these to create some plots.
Finally you take full control over your graphics by adding facets and scales as well
as controlling other plot options, such as adding labels and titles.
Installing and Loading ggplot2
Because 
ggplot2
isn’t part of the standard distribution of R, you have to
download the package from CRAN and install it.
In Chapter 3, you see that the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN) is a
network of servers around the world that contain the source code, documentation,
and add-on packages for R. Its homepage is at 
http://cran.r-project.org
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested