how to open pdf file in web browser c# : Select text in pdf SDK Library API .net wpf web page sharepoint R%20dummies43-part1006

Making Choices with If
Spreadsheets give you the ability to perform all kinds of “What if?” analyses.
One way of doing this is to use the 
if()
function in a spreadsheet.
R also has the 
if()
function, but it’s mostly used for flow control in your
scripts. Because you typically want to perform a calculation on an entire vector in
R, it’s usually more appropriate to use the 
ifelse()
function (see Chapters 9 and
13).
Here’s an example of using 
ifelse()
to identify cars with high fuel efficiency in
the dataset 
mtcars
:
> mtcars <- within(mtcars,
+     mpgClass <- ifelse(mpg < mean(mpg), “Low”, “High”))
> mtcars[mtcars$mpgClass == “High”, ]
Calculating Conditional Totals
Something else that you probably did a lot in Excel is calculating conditional
sums and counts with the functions 
sumif()
and 
countif()
.
You can do the same thing in one of two ways in R:
Use 
ifelse()
(see the preceding section).
Simply calculate a summary statistics on a subset of your data.
Say you want to calculate a conditional mean of fuel efficiency in 
mtcars
. You
do this with the 
mean()
function. Now, to get the fuel efficiency for cars either side
of a threshold of 150 horsepower, try the following:
> with(mtcars, mean(mpg))
[1] 20.09062
> with(mtcars, mean(mpg[hp < 150]))
[1] 24.22353
> with(mtcars, mean(mpg[hp >= 150]))
[1] 15.40667
Counting the number of elements in a vector is identical to it asking about its
length. This means that the Excel function 
countif()
has an R equivalent in
length()
:
Select text in pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
can't select text in pdf file; text searchable pdf
Select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
convert pdf to searchable text; search pdf documents for text
> with(mtcars, length(mpg[hp > 150]))
[1] 13
Transposing Columns or Rows
Sometimes you need to transpose your data from rows to columns or vice
versa. In R, the function to transpose a matrix is 
t()
:
> x <- matrix(1:12, ncol=3)
> x
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    5    9
[2,]    2    6   10
[3,]    3    7   11
[4,]    4    8   12
To get the transpose of a matrix, use 
t()
:
> t(x)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    4
[2,]    5    6    7    8
[3,]    9   10   11   12
You also can use 
t()
to transpose data frames, but be careful when you do
this. The result of a transposition is always a matrix (or array). Because arrays
always have only one type of variable, such as numeric or character, the
variable types of your results may not be what you expect.
See how the transposition of cars is a character array:
> t(mtcars[1:4, ])
Mazda RX4 Mazda RX4 Wag Datsun 710 Hornet 4 Drive
mpg      “21.0”    “21.0”        “22.8”     “21.4”
cyl      “6”       “6”           “4”        “6”
disp     “160”     “160”         “108”      “258”
hp       “110”     “110”         “ 93”      “110”
drat     “3.90”    “3.90”        “3.85”     “3.08”
wt       “2.620”   “2.875”       “2.320”    “3.215”
qsec     “16.46”   “17.02”       “18.61”    “19.44”
vs       “0”       “0”           “1”        “1”
am       “1”       “1”           “1”        “0”
gear     “4”       “4”           “4”        “3”
carb     “4”       “4”           “1”        “1”
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
converting pdf to searchable text format; how to select text on pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
pdf text search tool; select text pdf file
mpgClass “High”    “High”        “High”     “High”
Finding Unique or Duplicated Values
To identify all the unique values in your data, use the 
unique()
function. Try
finding the unique values of number of cylinders in 
mtcars
:
> unique(mtcars$cyl)
[1] 6 4 8
Sometimes you want to know which values of your data are duplicates.
Depending on your situation, those duplicates will be valid, but sometimes
duplicate entries may indicate data-entry problems.
The function to identify duplicate entries is 
duplicated()
. In the built in
dataset 
iris
, there is a duplicated row in line 143. Try it yourself:
> dupes <- duplicated(iris)
> head(dupes)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
> which(dupes)
[1] 143
> iris[dupes, ]
Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width   Species
143          5.8         2.7          5.1         1.9 virginica
Because the result of 
duplicated()
is a logical vector, you can use it as an
index to remove rows from your data. To do this, use the negation operator — the
exclamation point (as in 
!dupes
):
> iris[!dupes, ]
> nrow(iris[!dupes, ])
[1] 149
Working with Lookup Tables
In a spreadsheet application like Excel, you can create lookup tables with the
functions 
vlookup
or a combination of 
index
and 
match
.
In R, it may be convenient to use 
merge()
(see Chapter 13) or 
match()
. The
match()
function returns a vector with the positions of elements that match your
lookup value.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. VB.NET PDF - Redact PDF Text. Help
pdf text searchable; select text in pdf reader
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Redact PDF Text in C#.NET.
cannot select text in pdf file; text select tool pdf
For example, to find the location of the element 
“Toyota Corolla”
in the row
names of 
mtcars
, try the following:
> index <- match(“Toyota Corolla”, rownames(mtcars))
> index
[1] 20
> mtcars[index, 1:4]
mpg cyl disp hp
Toyota Corolla 33.9   4 71.1 65
You can see that the index position is 20, and that the 20th row is indeed the
row you’re looking for.
Working with Pivot Tables
In Excel, pivot tables are a useful tool for manipulating and analyzing data.
For simple tables in R, you can use the 
tapply()
function to achieve similar
results. Here’s an example of using 
tapply()
to calculate mean 
hp
for cars with
different numbers of cylinders and gears:
> with(mtcars, tapply(hp, list(cyl, gear), mean))
3     4     5
4  97.0000  76.0 102.0
6 107.5000 116.5 175.0
8 194.1667    NA 299.5
For slightly more complex tables — that is, tables with more than two cross-
classifying factors — use the 
aggregate()
function:
> aggregate(hp~cyl+gear+am, mtcars, mean)
cyl gear am        hp
1    4    3  0  97.00000
2    6    3  0 107.50000
3    8    3  0 194.16667
4    4    4  0  78.50000
5    6    4  0 123.00000
6    4    4  1  75.16667
7    6    4  1 110.00000
8    4    5  1 102.00000
9    6    5  1 175.00000
10   8    5  1 299.50000
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
pdf editor with search and replace text; convert pdf to searchable text online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
how to select text in pdf; how to select text in pdf and copy
If you frequently work with tables in Excel, you should definitely explore the
packages 
plyr
and 
reshape2
that are available on CRAN at 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/plyr/
and 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/reshape2/
, respectively. These packages provide a
number of functions for common data manipulation problems.
Using the Goal Seek and Solver
One very powerful feature of Excel is that it has a very easy-to-use solver that
allows you to find minimum or maximum values for functions given some
constraints.
A very large body of mathematics aims to solve optimization problems of all
kinds. In R, the 
optimize()
function provides one fairly simple mechanism for
optimizing functions.
Imagine you’re the sales director of a company and you need to set the best
price for your product. In other words, find the price of a product that maximizes
revenue.
In economics, a simple model of pricing states that people buy less of a given
product when the price increases. Here’s a very simple function that has this
behavior:
> sales <- function(price) { 100 - 0.5 * price }
Expected revenue is then simply the product of price and expected sales:
> revenue <- function(price) { price * sales(price) }
You can use the 
curve()
function to plot continuous functions. This takes a
function as input and produces a plot. Try to plot the behavior of sales and revenue
using the 
curve()
function, varying price from $50 to $150:
> par(mfrow=c(1, 2))
> curve(sales, from=50, to=150, xname=”price”, ylab=”Sales”, main=”Sales”)
> curve(revenue, from=50, to=150, xname=”price”, ylab=”Revenue”,
main=”Revenue”)
> par(mfrow=c(1, 1))
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
make pdf text searchable; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf image
Your results should look similar to Figure 19-1.
Figure 19-1: A model of expected sales and revenue.
You have a working model of sales and revenue. From the figure, you can see
immediately that there is a point of maximum revenue. Next, use the R function
optimize()
to find the value of that maximum. To use 
optimize()
, you need to tell
it which function to use (in this case, 
revenue()
), as well as the interval (in this
case, prices between 50 and 150). By default, 
optimize()
searches for a minimum
value, so in this case you have to tell it to search for maximum value:
> optimize(revenue, interval=c(50, 150), maximum=TRUE)
$maximum
[1] 100
$objective
[1] 5000
And there you go. Charge a price of $100, and expect to get $5,000 in
revenue.
The Excel Solver uses the Generalized Reduced Gradient Algorithm for
optimizing nonlinear problems (
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/214115
).
The R function 
optimize()
uses a combination of golden section search and
successive parabolic interpolation, which clearly is not the same thing as the
Excel Solver. Fortunately, a large number of packages provide various different
algorithms for solving optimization problems. In fact, there is a special task
view on CRAN for optimization and mathematical programming. Go to
http://cran.r-project.org/web/views/Optimization.html
to find out more
than you ever thought you wanted to know!
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
pdf make text searchable; find text in pdf files
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
search multiple pdf files for text; how to make pdf text searchable
Chapter 20
Ten Tips on Working with Packages
In This Chapter
Finding packages
Installing and updating packages
Loading and unloading packages
One of the very attractive features of R is that it contains a large collection of
third-party packages (collections of functions in a well-defined format). To get the
most out of R, you need to understand where to find additional packages, how to
download and install them, and how to use them.
In this chapter, we consolidate some of the things we cover earlier in the book
and give you ten tips on working with packages.
Many other software languages have concepts that are similar to R
packages. Sometimes these are referred to as “libraries.” However, in R, a
library is the folder on your hard disk (or USB stick, network, DVD, or whatever
you use for permanent storage) where your packages are stored.
Poking Around the Nooks and Crannies of CRAN
The Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN; 
http://cran.r-project.org
) is
a network of web servers around the world where you can find the R source code, R
manuals and documentation, and contributed packages.
CRAN isn’t a single website; it’s a collection of web servers, each with an
identical copy of all the information on CRAN. Thus, each web server is called a
mirror. The idea is that you choose the mirror that is located nearest to where you
are, which reduces international or long-distance Internet traffic. You can find a list
of CRAN mirrors at 
http://cran.r-project.org/mirrors.html
.
RGui and RStudio allow you to set the location of your nearest CRAN mirror
directly in the application. For example, in the Windows RGui, you can find this
option by choosing Packages⇒Set CRAN mirror. In RStudio, you can find this
option by choosing Tools⇒Options⇒R⇒CRAN mirror.
Regardless of which R editor you use, you can permanently save your
preferred CRAN mirror (and other settings) in special file called 
.RProfile
,
located in the user’s home directory or the R startup directory. For example, to
set the Imperial College, UK mirror as your default CRAN mirror, include this
line in your 
.RProfile
:
options(“repos” = c(CRAN = “http://cran.ma.imperial.ac.uk/”))
For more information, see the appendix of this book.
Finding Interesting Packages
As of this writing, there are more than 3,000 packages on CRAN. So, finding a
package that does something that you want to do may seem difficult.
Fortunately, a handful of volunteer experts have collated some of the most
widely used packages into curated lists. These lists are called CRAN task views, and
you can view them at 
http://cran.r-project.org/web/views/
. You’ll notice that
there are task views for topics such as empirical finance, statistical genetics,
machine learning, statistical learning, and many other fascinating topics.
Each package has its own web page on CRAN. Say, for example, you want to
find a package to do high-quality graphics. If you followed the link to the graphics
task view, 
http://cran.r-project.org/web/views/Graphics.html
, you may notice
a link to the 
ggplot2
package, 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/ggplot2/index.html
. On the web page for a package,
you’ll find a brief summary, information about the packages that are used, a link to
the package website (if such a site exists), and other useful information.
Installing Packages
To install a package use the 
install.packages()
function. This simple
command downloads the package from a specified repository (by default, CRAN)
and installs it on your machine:
> install.packages(“fortunes”)
Note that the argument to 
install.packages()
is a character string. In other
words, remember the quotes around the package name!
In RGui, as well as in RStudio, you find a menu command to do the same
thing:
In RGui, choose Packages⇒Install package(s).
In RStudio, choose Tools⇒Install packages.
Loading Packages
To load a package, you use the 
library()
or 
require()
function. These
functions are identical in their effect, but they differ in the return value:
library()
: Invisibly returns a list of packages that are attached, or returns 
FALSE
if the package is not on your machine.
require()
: Returns 
TRUE
if the package was successfully attached and 
FALSE
if
not.
The R documentation suggests that 
library()
is the preferred way of loading
packages in scripts, while 
require()
is preferred inside functions and packages.
So, after you’ve installed the package 
fortunes
you load it like this:
> library(“fortunes”)
Note that you don’t need to quote the name of the package in the argument of
library()
, but it’s good practice to quote it anyway.
Reading the Package Manual and Vignette
After you’ve installed and loaded a new package, a good starting point is to
read the package manual. The package manual is a collection of all function and
other package documentation. You can access the manual in two ways. The first
way is to use the 
help
argument to the 
library()
function:
> library(help=fortunes)
The second way is to find the manual on the package website. If you point
your browser window to the CRAN page for the 
fortunes
package (
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/fortunes/
), you’ll notice a link to the manual toward
the bottom of the page (
http://cran. r-
project.org/web/packages/fortunes/fortunes.pdf
).
Whichever approach you choose, the result is a PDF document containing the
package manual.
Some package authors also write a vignette, a document that illustrates how
to use the package. A vignette typically shows some examples of how to use the
functions and how to get started. The key thing is that a vignette illustrates how to
use the package with R code and output, just like this book.
To read the vignette for the 
fortunes
package, try the following:
> vignette(“fortunes”)
Updating Packages
Most package authors release improvements to their packages from time to
time. To ensure you have the latest version, use 
update.packages()
:
> update.packages()
This function connects to CRAN (by default) and checks whether there are
updates for all the packages that you’ve installed on your machine. If there are, it
asks you whether you want to update each package and then downloads the code
and installs the new version.
If you add 
update.packages(ask = FALSE)
, R updates all out-of-date
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested