how to open pdf file in web browser c# : Searching pdf files for text software SDK project winforms wpf html UWP R%20dummies8-part1011

Take a look at the vector 
baskets.of.Granny
:
> str(baskets.of.Granny)
num [1:6] 12 4 5 6 9 3
R tells you a few things here:
First, it tells you that this is a 
num
(numeric) type of vector.
Next to the vector type, R gives you the dimensions of the vector. This example
has only one dimension, and that dimension has indices ranging from 1 to 6.
Finally, R gives you the first few values of the vector. In this example, the vector
has only six values, so you see all of them.
If you want to know only how long a vector is, you can simply use the
length()
function, as follows:
> length(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] 6
Vectors in R can have other types as well. If you look at the vector 
authors
, for
example (refer to Chapter 3), you see a small difference:
> authors <- c(“Andrie”, “Joris”)
> str(authors)
chr [1:2] “Andrie” “Joris”
Again, you get the dimensions, the range of the indices, and the values. But
this time, R tells you the type of vector is 
chr
, or character.
In this book, we discuss the following types of vectors:
Numeric vectors, containing all kind of numbers.
Integer vectors, containing integer values. (An integer vector is a special kind
of numeric vector.)
Logical vectors, containing logical values (
TRUE
and/or 
FALSE
)
Searching pdf files for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf searchable text; find text in pdf files
Searching pdf files for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf find and replace text; select text in pdf file
Character vectors, containing text
Datetime vectors, containing dates and times in different formats
Factors, a special type of vector to work with categories.
We discuss the first three types in this chapter and character vectors in
Chapter 5.
R makes clear distinctions among these types of vectors, partly for reasons
of logic. Multiplying two words, for example, doesn’t make sense.
Testing vector types
Apart from the 
str()
function, R contains a set of functions that allow you to
test for the type of a vector. All these functions have the same syntax: 
is
, a dot,
and then the name of the type.
You can test whether a vector is of type 
foo
by using the 
is.foo()
function.
This test works for every type of vector; just replace 
foo
with the type you
want to check.
To test whether 
baskets.of.Granny
is a numeric vector, for example, use the
following code:
> is.numeric(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] TRUE
You may think that 
baskets.of.Granny
is a vector of integers, so check it, as
follows:
> is.integer(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] FALSE
R disagrees with the math teacher here. Integer has a different meaning for R
than it has for us. The result of 
is.integer()
isn’t about the value but about the
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
combine, and consolidate multiple PDF files into one regular expressions; Find required text with page co Highly configurable for searching PDF text; Available in
search multiple pdf files for text; select text pdf file
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
Load a Word File. File: Merge Word Files. File: Split Word file with various search options, like searching whole Word C# PDF: Example of Finding Text in Word.
pdf make text searchable; pdf editor with search and replace text
way the value is stored in memory.
R has two main modes for storing numbers. The standard mode is 
double
.
In this mode, every number uses 64 bits of memory. The number also is stored
in three parts. One bit indicates the sign of the number, 52 bits represent the
decimal part of the number, and the remaining bits represent the exponent.
This way, you can store numbers as big as 1.8 × 10
308
in only 64 bits. The
integer
mode takes only 32 bits of memory, and the numbers are represented
as binary integers in the memory. So, the largest integer is about 2.1 billion,
or, more exactly, 2
31
– 1. That’s 31 bits to represent the number itself, 1 bit to
represent the sign of the number, and –1 because you start at 0.
You should use integers if you want to do exact integer calculations on
small integers or if you want to save memory. Otherwise, the mode 
double
works just fine.
You force R to store a number as an integer by adding 
L
after it, as in the
following example:
> x <- c(4L,6L)
> is.integer(x)
[1] TRUE
Whatever mode is used to store the value, 
is.numeric()
returns 
TRUE
in
both cases.
Creating vectors
To create a vector from a simple sequence of integers, for example, you use
the colon operator (
:
). The code 
3:7
gives you a vector with the numbers 3 to 7,
and 
4:-3
creates a vector with the numbers 4 to –3, both in steps of 1. To make
bigger or smaller steps in a sequence, use the 
seq()
function. This function’s 
by
argument allows you to specify the amount by which the numbers should increase
or decrease. For a vector with the numbers 4.5 to 2.5 in steps of 0.5, for example,
you can use the following code:
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
a single text character and text string to PDF files using online application, such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF
how to make a pdf document text searchable; how to select text on pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other the conversion from a PDF file to a
select text in pdf reader; pdf text search
> seq(from = 4.5, to = 2.5, by = -0.5)
[1] 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5
Alternatively, you can specify the length of the sequence by using the
argument 
length.out
. R calculates the step size itself. You can make a vector of
nine values going from –2.7 to 1.3 like this:
> seq(from = -2.7, to = 1.3, length.out = 9)
[1] -2.7 -2.2 -1.7 -1.2 -0.7 -0.2  0.3  0.8  1.3
You don’t have to write out the argument names if you give the values for
the arguments in the correct order. The code 
seq(4.5, 2.5, - 0.5)
does
exactly the same things as 
seq(from = 4.5, to = 2.5, by = -0.5)
. If you use
the argument 
length.out
, you always have to be spell it out though.
To get back to our All-Star Grannies example (refer to “Using arithmetic
operators,” earlier in this chapter), you have two vectors containing the number of
baskets that Granny and her friend Geraldine scored in the six games of this
basketball season:
> baskets.of.Granny <- c(12,4,4,6,9,3)
> baskets.of.Geraldine <- c(5,3,2,2,12,9)
Now, what is this 
c()
function doing? To find out, read on.
Combining vectors
The 
c()
function stands for concatenate. It doesn’t create vectors — it just
combines them.
In the preceding examples, you give six values as arguments to the 
c()
function and get one combined vector in return. As you know, each value is a
vector with one element for R. You also can use the 
c()
function to combine
vectors with more than one value, as in the following example:
> all.baskets <-c(baskets.of.Granny, baskets.of.Geraldine)
> all.baskets
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
add a single text character and text string to PDF files in VB such as inserting text to PDF, deleting text from PDF, searching text in PDF, extracting text
how to select all text in pdf file; make pdf text searchable
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc., are class provides APIs for converting PDF files to other the conversion from a PDF file to a
search a pdf file for text; how to select text in a pdf
[1] 12  4  4  6  9  3  5  3  2  2 12  9
The result of this code is a vector with all 12 values.
In this code, the 
c()
function maintains the order of the numbers. This
example illustrates a second important feature of vectors: Vectors have an
order. This order turns out to be very useful when you need to manipulate the
individual values in the vector, as you do in “Getting Values in and out of
Vectors,” later in this chapter.
Repeating vectors
You can combine a vector with itself if you want to repeat it, but if you want to
repeat the values in a vector many times, using the 
c()
function becomes a bit
impractical. R makes life easier by offering you a function for repeating a vector:
rep()
.
You can use the 
rep()
function in several ways. If you want to repeat the
complete vector, for example, you specify the argument 
times
. To repeat the
vector 
c(0, 0, 7)
three times, use this code:
> rep(c(0, 0, 7), times = 3)
[1] 0 0 7 0 0 7 0 0 7
You also can repeat every value by specifying the argument 
each
, like this:
> rep(c(2, 4, 2), each = 3)
[1] 2 2 2 4 4 4 2 2 2
R has a little trick up its sleeve. You can tell R for each value how often it has
to be repeated. To take advantage of that magic, tell R how often to repeat each
value in a vector by using the 
times
argument:
> rep(c(0, 7), times = c(4,2))
[1] 0 0 0 0 7 7
And you can, like in 
seq
, use the argument 
length.out
to tell R how long you
want it to be. R will repeat the vector until it reaches that length, even if the last
repetition is incomplete, like so:
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
end users who are searching for both single and batch image and document file conversion solutions for C#.NET application. Our C# TIFF to PDF Conversion SDK
text select tool pdf; search text in multiple pdf
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office methods are offered, like searching content via supported document and image files using signatures.
find and replace text in pdf file; convert pdf to word searchable text
> rep(1:3,length.out=7)
[1] 1 2 3 1 2 3 1
Getting Values in and out of Vectors
Vectors would be pretty impractical if you couldn’t look up and manipulate
individual values. You can perform these tasks easily by using R’s advanced,
powerful indexing system.
Understanding indexing in R
Every time R shows you a vector, it displays a number such as 
[1]
in front of
the output. In this example, 
[1]
tells you where the first position in your vector is.
This number is called the index of that value. If you make a longer vector — say,
with the numbers from 1 to 30 — you see more indices. Consider this example:
> numbers <- 30:1
> numbers
[1] 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14
[18] 13 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
Here, you see that R counts 13 as the 18th value in the vector. At the
beginning of every line, R tells you the index of the first value in that line.
If you try this example on your computer, you may see a different index at
the beginning of the line, depending on the width of your console.
Extracting values from a vector
Those brackets (
[]
) illustrate another strong point of R. They represent a
function that you can use to extract a value from that vector. You can get the fifth
value of the preceding number vector like this:
> numbers[5]
[1] 26
Okay, this example isn’t too impressive, but the bracket function takes vectors
as arguments. If you want to select more than one number, you can simply provide
a vector of indices as an argument inside the brackets, like so:
> numbers[c(5,11,3)]
[1] 26 20 28
R returns a vector with the numbers in the order you asked for. So, you can
use the indices to order the values the way you want.
You also can store the indices you want to retrieve in another vector and
give that vector as an argument, as in the following example:
> indices <- c(5,11,3)
> numbers[indices]
[1] 26 20 28
You can use indices to drop values from a vector as well. If you want all the
numbers except for the third value, you can do that with the following code:
> numbers[-3]
[1] 30 29 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13
[18] 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
Here, too, you can use a complete vector of indices. If you want to expel the
first 20 numbers, use this code:
> numbers[-(1:20)]
[1] 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
Be careful to add parentheses around the sequence. If you don’t, R will
interpret that as meaning the sequence from –1 to 20, which isn’t what you
want here. If you try that code, you get the following error message:
> numbers[-1:20]
Error in numbers[-1:20] : only 0’s may be mixed with negative subscripts
This message makes you wonder what the index 
0
is. Well, it’s literally
nothing. If it’s the only value in the index vector, you get an empty, or zero-length,
vector back, whatever sign you give it; otherwise, it won’t have any effect.
You can’t mix positive and negative index values, so either select a number
of values or drop them.
You can do a lot more with indices — they help you write concise and fast
code, as we show you in the following sections and chapters.
Changing values in a vector
Let’s get back to the All-Star Grannies. In the previous sections, you created
two vectors containing the number of baskets that Granny and Geraldine made in
six basketball games.
But suppose that Granny tells you that you made a mistake: In the third game,
she made five baskets, not four. You can easily correct this mistake by using
indices, as follows:
> baskets.of.Granny[3] <- 5
> baskets.of.Granny
[1] 12  4  5  6  9  3
The assignment to a specific index is actually a function as well. It’s
different, however, from the brackets function (refer to “Extracting values from
a vector,” earlier in this chapter), because you also give the replacement
values as an argument. Boring technical stuff, you say? Not if you realize that
because the index assignment is a vectorized function, you can use recycling!
Imagine that you made two mistakes in the number of baskets that Granny’s
friend Geraldine scored: She actually scored four times in the second and fourth
games. To correct the baskets for Geraldine, you can use the following code:
> baskets.of.Geraldine[c(2,4)] <- 4
> baskets.of.Geraldine
[1]  5  4  2  4 12  9
How cool is that? You have to be careful, though. R doesn’t tell you when it’s
recycling values, so a typo may give you unexpected results. Later in this chapter,
you find out more about how recycling actually works.
R doesn’t have an Undo button, so when you change a vector, there’s no
going back. You can prevent disasters by first making a copy of your object
and then changing the values in the copy, as shown in the following example.
First, make a copy by assigning the vector 
baskets.of.Granny
to the object
Granny.copy
:
> Granny.copy <- baskets.of.Granny
You can check what’s in both objects by typing the name on the command line
and pressing Enter. Now you can change the vector 
baskets.of.Granny
:
> baskets.of.Granny[4] <- 11
> baskets.of.Granny
[1] 12  4  5 11  9  3
If you make a mistake, simply assign the vector 
Granny.copy
back to the
object 
baskets.of.Granny
, like this:
> baskets.of.Granny <- Granny.copy
> baskets.of.Granny
[1] 12  4  5  6  9  3
Working with Logical Vectors
Up to now, we haven’t really discussed the values 
TRUE
and 
FALSE
. For some
reason, the developers of R decided to call these values logical values. In other
programming languages, 
TRUE
and 
FALSE
are known as Boolean values. As
Shakespeare would ask, what’s in a name? Whatever name they go by, these
values come in handy when you start controlling the flow of your scripts, as we
discuss in Chapter 9.
You can do a lot more with these values, however, because you can construct
vectors that contain only logical values — the logical vectors that we mention in
“Looking at the structure of a vector,” earlier in this chapter. You can use these
vectors as an argument for the index functions, which makes for a powerful tool.
Comparing values
To build logical vectors, you’d better know how to compare values, and R
contains a set of operators that you can use for this purpose (see Table 4-4).
Table 4-4 Comparing Values in R
Operator
Result
x == y
Returns 
TRUE
if x exactly equals y
x != y
Returns 
TRUE
if x differs from y
x > y
Returns 
TRUE
if x is larger than y
x >= y
Returns 
TRUE
if x is larger than or exactly equal to y
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested