x < y
Returns 
TRUE
if x is smaller than y
x <= y
Returns 
TRUE
if x is smaller than or exactly equal to y
x & y
Returns the result of x and y
x | y
Returns the result of x or y
! x
Returns not x
xor( x, y )
Returns the result of x xor y (x or y but not x and y)
All these operators are, again, vectorized. You can compare a whole vector
with a value. In the continuing All-Star Grannies example, to find out which games
Granny scored more than five baskets in, you can simply use this code:
> baskets.of.Granny > 5
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
You can see that the result is the first, fourth, and fifth games. This example
works well for small vectors like this one, but if you have a very long vector,
counting the number of games would be a hassle. For that purpose, R offers the
delightful 
which()
function. To find out which games Granny scored more than five
baskets in, you can use the following code:
> which(baskets.of.Granny > 5)
[1] 1 4 5
With this one line of code, you actually do two different things: First, you make
a logical vector by checking every value in the vector to see whether it’s greater
than five. Then you pass that vector to the 
which()
function, which returns the
indices in which the value is 
TRUE
.
The 
which()
function takes a logical vector as argument. Hence, you can
save the outcome of a logical vector in an object and pass that to the 
which()
function, as in the next example. You also can use all these operators to
compare vectors value by value. You can easily find out the games in which
Geraldine scored fewer baskets than Granny like this:
> the.best <- baskets.of.Geraldine < baskets.of.Granny
> which(the.best)
[1] 1 3 4
Text searchable pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf files for text; searching pdf files for text
Text searchable pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select text in pdf image; how to select text in pdf and copy
Always put spaces around the less than (
<
) and greater than (
>
) operators.
Otherwise, R may mistake 
x < -3
for the assignment 
x <- 3
. The difference
may seem small, but it has a huge effect on the result. Technically, you also
can use the equal sign (
=
) as an assignment to prevent this problem, but 
=
also is used to assign values to arguments in functions. In general, 
<-
is the
preferred way to assign a value to an object, but quite a few coders disagree.
So, it’s up to you. We use 
<-
in this book.
Using logical vectors as indices
The index function doesn’t take only numerical vectors as arguments; it also
works with logical vectors. You can use these logical vectors very efficiently to
select some values from a vector. If you use a logical vector to index, R returns a
vector with only the values for which the logical vector is 
TRUE
.
In the preceding section, a logical vector, 
the.best
, tells you the games in
which Granny scored more than Geraldine did. If you want to know how many
baskets Granny scored in those games, you can use this code:
> baskets.of.Granny[the.best]
[1] 12  5  6
This construct is often used to keep only values that fulfill a certain
requirement. If you want to keep only the values larger than 
2
in the vector 
x
, you
could do that with the following code:
> x <- c(3, 6, 1, NA, 2)
> x[x > 2]
[1]  3  6 NA
Wait — what is that 
NA
value doing there? Take a step back, and look at the
result of 
x > 2
:
> x > 2
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE    NA FALSE
If you have a missing value in your vector, any comparison returns 
NA
for
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; how to search a pdf document for text
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET class. Able to copy and paste all text content from .txt file to PDF file by keeping
how to select all text in pdf; cannot select text in pdf
that value (refer to “Dealing with missing values,” earlier in this chapter).
It may seem that this 
NA
is translated into 
TRUE
, but that isn’t the case. If you
give 
NA
as a value for the index, R puts 
NA
in that place as well. So, in this case, R
keeps the first and second values of 
x
, drops the third, adds one missing value, and
drops the last value of 
x
as well.
Combining logical statements
Life would be boring if you couldn’t combine logical statements. If you want to
test whether a number lies within a certain interval, for example, you want to
check whether it’s greater than the lowest value and less than the top value.
Maybe you want to know the games in which Granny scored the fewest or the most
baskets. For that purpose, R has a set of logical operators that — you guessed it —
are nicely vectorized (refer to Table 4-4).
To illustrate, using the knowledge you have now, try to find out the games in
which Granny scored the fewest baskets and the games in which she scored the
most baskets:
1. Create two logical vectors, as follows:
> min.baskets <- baskets.of.Granny == min(baskets.of.Granny)
> max.baskets <- baskets.of.Granny == max(baskets.of.Granny)
min.baskets
tells you whether the value is equal to the minimum, and
max.baskets
tells you whether the value is equal to the maximum.
2. Combine both vectors with the 
OR
operator (
|
), as follows:
> min.baskets | max.baskets
[1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
This method actually isn’t the most efficient way to find those values. You see
how to do things like this more efficiently with the 
match()
function in Chapter 13.
But this example clearly shows you how vectorization works for logical operators.
The 
NOT
operator (
!
) is another example of the great power of
vectorization. The 
NA
values in the vector 
x
have caused some trouble already,
so you’d probably like to get rid of them. You know from “Dealing with
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. All text message can be copied and pasted to PDF file by keeping
search pdf files for text programmatically; pdf text search tool
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without to export Word from multiple PDF files in Create editable Word file online without email.
pdf find text; how to select text in pdf
undefined outcomes,” earlier in this chapter, that you have to check whether a
value is missing by using the 
is.na()
function. But you need the values that
are not missing values, so invert the logical vector by preceding it with the 
!
operator. To drop the missing values in the vector 
x
, for example, use the
following code:
> x[!is.na(x)]
[1] 3 6 2 1
When you’re using R, there’s no way to get around vectorization. After you
understand how vectorization works, however, you’ll save considerable
calculation time and lines of code.
Summarizing logical vectors
You also can use logical values in arithmetic operations as well. In that case, R
sees 
TRUE
as 
1
and 
FALSE
as 
0
. This allows for some pretty interesting constructs.
Suppose that you’re not really interested in finding out the games in which
Granny scored more than Geraldine did, but you want to know how often that
happened. You can use the numerical translation of a logical vector for that
purpose in the 
sum()
function, as follows:
> sum(the.best)
[1] 3
So, three times, Granny was better than Geraldine. Granny rocks!
In addition, you have an easy way to figure out whether any value in a logical
vector is 
TRUE
. Very conveniently, the function that performs that task is called
any()
. To ask R whether Granny was better than Geraldine in any game, use this
code:
> any(the.best)
[1] TRUE
We told you that Granny rocks! Well, okay, this result is a bit unfair for
Geraldine, so you should check whether Granny was better than Geraldine in all the
games. The R function you use for this purpose is called — surprise, surprise —
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Support to combine multiple page tiffs into one PDF file. Support SharePoint. Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; search pdf for text
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
how to search text in pdf document; search text in pdf image
all()
. To find out whether Granny was always better than Geraldine, use the
following code:
> all(the.best)
[1] FALSE
Still, Granny rocks a bit.
You can use the argument 
na.rm=TRUE
in the functions 
all()
and 
any()
as
well. By default, both functions return 
NA
if any value in the vector argument is
missing (see “Dealing with missing values,” earlier in this chapter).
Powering Up Your Math with Vector Functions
As we suggest throughout this chapter, vectorization is the Holy Grail for every
R programmer. Most beginners struggle a bit with that concept because
vectorization isn’t one little trick, but a way of coding. Using the indices and
vectorized operators, however, can save you a lot of coding and calculation time —
and then you can call a gang of power functions to work on your data, as we show
you in this section.
Why are power functions so helpful? Maybe you’re like us: We’re lazy and
impatient enough to try to translate our code into “something with vectors” as
often as possible. We don’t like to type too much, and we definitely don’t like to
wait for the results. If you can relate, read on.
Using arithmetic vector operations
A third set of arithmetic functions consists of functions in which the outcome is
dependent on more than one value in the vector. Summing a vector with the 
sum()
function is such an operation. You find an overview of the most important functions
in Table 4-5.
Table 4-5 Vector Operations
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
searchable PDF document. Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF file from text (
how to select text in pdf reader; pdf text search tool
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create and export Word document to HTML (.htm, .html) file. to Word, such as add text annotations to
how to select all text in pdf; select text pdf file
Function
What It Does
sum(x)
Calculates the sum of all values in x
prod(x)
Calculates the product of all values in x
min(x)
Gives the minimum of all values in x
max(x)
Gives the maximum of all values in x
cumsum(x)
Gives the cumulative sum of all values in x
cumprod(x)
Gives the cumulative product of all values in x
cummin(x)
Gives the minimum for all values in x from the start of the vector until the position of that value
cummax(x)
Gives the maximum for all values in x from the start of the vector until the position of that
value
diff(x)
Gives for every value the difference between that value and the next value in the vector
Summarizing a vector
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. inputFilePath) ' Convert loaded TIFF file to PDF document.
search pdf documents for text; pdf search and replace text
XImage.OCR for .NET, Recognize Text from Images and Documents
Output OCR result to memory, text searchable PDF, Word, Text file, etc. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try OCR for .NET with online support.
search text in multiple pdf; pdf editor with search and replace text
You can tell quite a few things about a set of values with one number. If you
want to know the minimum and maximum number of baskets Granny made, for
example, you use the functions 
min()
and 
max()
:
> min(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] 3
> max(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] 12
To calculate the sum and the product of all values in the vector, use the
functions 
sum()
and 
prod()
, respectively.
These functions also can take a list of vectors as an argument. If you want to
calculate the sum of all the baskets made by Granny and Geraldine, you can use
the following code:
> sum(baskets.of.Granny,baskets.of.Geraldine)
[1] 75
The same works for the other vector operations in this section.
As we discuss in “Dealing with missing values,” earlier in this chapter, missing
values always return 
NA
as a result. The same is true for vector operations as well.
R, however, gives you a way to simply discard the missing values by setting the
argument 
na.rm
to 
TRUE
. Take a look at the following example:
> x <- c(3,6,2,NA,1)
> sum(x)
[1] NA
> sum(x,na.rm=TRUE)
[1] 12
This argument works in 
sum()
prod()
min()
, and 
max()
.
If you have a vector that contains only missing values and you set the
argument 
na.rm
to 
TRUE
, the outcome of these functions is set in such a way
that it doesn’t have any effect on further calculations. The sum of missing
values is 
0
, the product is 
1
, the minimum is 
Inf
, and the maximum is 
-Inf
. R
won’t always generate a warning in such a case, though. Only in the case of
min()
and 
max()
does R tell you that there were no non-missing arguments.
Cumulating operations
Suppose that after every game, you want to update the total number of
baskets that Granny made during the season. After the second game, that’s the
total of the first two games; after the third game, it’s the total of the first three
games; and so on. You can make this calculation easily by using the cumulative
sum function, 
cumsum()
, as in the following example:
> cumsum(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] 12 16 21 27 36 39
In a similar way, 
cumprod()
gives you the cumulative product. You also can get
the cumulative minimum and maximum with the related functions 
cummin()
and
cummax()
. To find the maximum number of baskets Geraldine scored up to any
given game, you can use the following code:
> cummax(baskets.of.Geraldine)
[1]  5  5  5  5 12 12
These functions don’t have an extra argument to remove missing values.
Missing values are propagated through the vector, as shown in the following
example:
> cummin(x)
[1]  3  3  2 NA NA
Calculating differences
The last function we’ll discuss in this section calculates differences between
adjacent values in a vector. You can calculate the difference in the number of
baskets between every two games Granny played by using the following code:
> diff(baskets.of.Granny)
[1] -8  1  1  3 -6
You get five numbers back. The first one is the difference between the first
and the second game, the second is the difference between the second and the
third game, and so on.
The vector returned by 
diff()
is always one element shorter than the
original vector you gave as an argument.
The rule about missing values applies here, too. When your vector contains a
missing value, the result from that calculation will be 
NA
. So, if you calculate the
difference with the vector 
x
, you get the following result:
> diff(x)
[1]  3 -4 NA NA
Because the fourth element of 
x
is 
NA
, the difference between the third and
fourth element and between the fourth and fifth element will be 
NA
as well. Just
like the cumulative functions, the 
diff()
function doesn’t have an argument to
eliminate the missing values.
Recycling arguments
In Chapter 3 and earlier in this chapter, we mention recycling arguments. Take
a look again at how you calculate the total amount of money Granny and Geraldine
raised (see “Using arithmetic operators,” earlier in this chapter) or how you
combine the first names and last names of three siblings (see Chapter 3). Each
time, you combine a vector with multiple values and one with a single value in a
function. R applies the function, using that single value for every value in the
vector. But recycling goes far beyond these examples.
Any time you give two vectors with unequal lengths to a recycling function,
R repeats the shortest vector as often as necessary to carry out the task you
asked it to perform. In the earlier examples, the shortest vector is only one
value long.
Suppose you split up the number of baskets Granny made into two-pointers
and three-pointers:
> Granny.pointers <- c(10,2,4,0,4,1,4,2,7,2,1,2)
You arrange the numbers in such a way that for every game, first the number
of two-pointers is given, followed by the number of three-pointers.
Now Granny wants to know how many points she’s actually scored this season.
You can calculate that easily with the help of recycling:
> points <- Granny.pointers * c(2,3)
> points
[1] 20  6  8  0  8  3  8  6 14  6  2  6
> sum(points)
[1] 87
Now, what did you do here?
1. You made a vector with the number of points for each basket:
c(2,3)
2. You told R to multiply that vector by the vector 
Granny.pointers
.
R multiplied the first number in 
Granny.pointers
by 2, the second by 3, the
third by 2 again, and so on.
3. You put the result in the variable 
points
.
4. You summed all the numbers in 
points
to get the total number of
points scored.
In fact, you can just leave out Step 3. The nesting of functions allows you to
do this in one line of code:
> sum(Granny.pointers * c(2,3))
Recycling can be a bit tricky. If the length of the longer vector isn’t exactly a
multiple of the length of the shorter vector, you can get unexpected results.
Now Granny wants to know how much she improved every game. Being lazy,
you have a cunning plan. With 
diff()
, you calculate how many more or fewer
baskets Granny made than she made in the game before. Then you use the
vectorized division to divide these differences by the number of baskets in the
game. To top it off, you multiply by 100 and round the whole vector. All these
calculations take one line of code:
> round(diff(baskets.of.Granny) / baskets.of.Granny * 100 )
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested