how to open pdf file on button click in c# : How to make a pdf document text searchable control software utility azure windows html visual studio Romero_Dukes_Turfgrass%20ET_Crop_%20Coefficient_%20Lit0-part1076

Turfgrass and Ornamental Plant Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient 
Literature Review 
By 
Consuelo C. Romero 
Post-doctoral Investigator 
and 
Michael D. Dukes 
Associate Professor 
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department 
University of Florida 
Gainesville, FL 
February 23, 2009 
How to make a pdf document text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text on pdf; find and replace text in pdf
How to make a pdf document text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf text search; cannot select text in pdf file
Contents                                                                                                                                    Page 
1. 
Executive summary.
………………………………………………………..………..….
..  3 
2. 
Introduct
ion…………………………………………………………………….………
.    4 
3. 
Literature review
……..…………………………………..………………….…….…
..      6 
3.1. Turfgrass biology and distribution
………………………………………….……
3.1.1. Warm-season turf
grasses…………………………………….…………..
..    7 
3.1.2. Cool-season turfgra
sses………………………………………...…………  
10 
3.2. E
vapotranspiration…….……………………………….…………………………
12 
3.2.1. D
efinition………………………….…………………….…………………
12 
3.2.2 Evapot
ranspiration of turfgrasses……………..
..
……………………
.
……..
16 
3.3. Turf c
rop coefficients……………………………………………………..………
26 
3.4. Water use affected by turfgrass characteristic
s and environmental factor…….….
37 
3.5. Ornamental plants water needs overview
………………………...……………….
39 
3.5.1 Ornamental plants evapotranspiration in Florida
…………….……….…….
40 
4. Estimating water needs for landscape plantings
………………………………...…………….
41 
4.1. The Landscape Coefficient Method
……………………………………………….
42 
4.1.1. The lands
cape coefficient formula……………………….…………………
42 
4.1.2. The landsc
ape coefficient factors………………………….………………..
43 
4.1.3. Irrigation efficiency and calculating the total amount  
o
f water to apply…………………………………………………………….4
5. Discussion and conclusions
……………………..………………………………………….…
44 
6. 
Acknowledgements………………………………………………………………………….   45
7
References……….………………………………………………………...………….……
.
46 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework 2.0 or Now you can convert source PDF document to text file using the
make pdf text searchable; text searchable pdf file
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
After selecting document pages for recognition, we adopt the most can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp image file formats, so you can make all desired
pdf find and replace text; text select tool pdf
1. Executive summary 
Landscapes have become an important crop in the U.S. in many ways. There are an 
estimated 50 million acres of maintained turfgrass on home lawns, golf courses, and other areas. 
Its use brings benefits to the environment but much concern has been created by the excessive 
use of both water and pesticides applied to landscapes. To preserve water it is important to select 
the correct turfgrass and landscape plants for any given climate.  This report presents a detailed 
literature  review  related  to  turfgrass  types,  turf  evapotranspiration  rates  (ETc)  and  crop 
coefficients  (K
c
).  Turfgrass  is  the  focus  of  this  report  since  the  majority  of  maintained 
landscaped area is in turfgrass. However, literature K
c
values for ornamental plants are presented 
where they are available and the landscape coefficient method is introduced. 
The results showed that warm-season turfgrasses are characterized by their lower ETc 
rates compared to cool-season turfgrasses. Warm-season turfgrasses ETc rates ranged from 0.03 
in d
-1
in bahiagrass to 0.37 in d
-1
in Zoysiagrass, while cool-season turfgrasses showed ETc rates 
from 0.12 in d
-1
in hard fescue to 0.49 in d
-1
in Kentucky bluegrass. This high variability among 
species  and  intra-species  were  a  response  of  the  many  factors,  principally  soil  moisture 
conditions. The higher ETc rates were typically associated with well-watered conditions for the 
determination of both ETc and Kc values. Lower ETc rates were associated with water stress 
conditions. Variability was also observed in turfgrass crop coefficients, whose values changed 
substantially over the time period when measurements were conducted. Results were mixed, but 
it does appear that cool-season turfgrasses use more water than warm-season turfgrasses when 
water is non-limited. Maximum and minimum estimated monthly K
c
values were 1.05 and 0.05, 
respectively, for cool-season grasses; for warm-season grasses monthly K
c
values ranged from 
0.99 to 0.28.  
It is important to point out that K
c
‟s
are being incorporated into weather-based irrigation 
controllers; therefore, the selection of K
c
values should be the most suitable for both the species 
and the location of interest. The most common methodology to measure crop evapotranspiration 
was the use of lysimeters (specifically minilysimeters for turfgrasses). Various Penman equations 
were the most common used to calculate reference evapotranspiration. 
In addition to turfgrass, this report also deals with landscape plant water requirements. 
Relevant research-based data on ETc and K
c
for ornamental plants is very limited. The landscape 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Before you get started, please make sure that you have installed the Microsoft we will show you an example code of converting PDF document to text file in a
text searchable pdf; pdf searchable text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file
find and replace text in pdf file; pdf text select tool
coefficient method is presented as a method to estimate irrigation requirements for landscapes 
(which includes turfgrasses and ornamental plants) based on landscape evapotranspiration (ET
L
). 
ET
L
is obtained by multiplying a landscape coefficient (K
L
) by reference evapotranspiration 
(ETo). K
L
replaces K
c
because of important differences existing between a turfgrass system and 
landscape plantings. K
is defined as the product of a species factor, a density factor, and a 
microclimate factor. A numeric value is assigned to each factor, which will depend on the 
knowledge and gained experience of the professional who will use this methodology, which 
makes the method quite subjective. We also make reference to the Water Use Classification of 
Landscape  Species  (WUCOLS) list, which  is  intended only as a  guide to help  landscape 
professionals because it provides irrigation water needs for over 1,900 plant species. In general, 
some subjectivity is found in this methodology.  
The conclusions show that turfgrass water use is influenced by environmental factors 
such  as  weather (temperature,  wind,  solar  radiation, relative  humidity),  soil  type  and  soil 
moisture. It is also affected by species, genotype, and plant morphological characteristics, since 
all these factors affect both plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Concerning ornamental 
plants‟ 
water requirements, there is still a lack of information that leads us to look for a way to 
meet this need, like using the K
L
approach. This approach is very subjective, so results might 
need some adjustments after they are calculated. 
2. Introduction 
Turfgrasses and ornamental plants are considered an integral part of landscape ecological 
systems worldwide which  provide  esthetic value (Roberts  et al., 1992).  Turfgrass provides 
functional  (i.e.  soil  erosion  reduction,  dust  prevention,  heat  dissipation,  wild  habitat), 
recreational (i.e., low cost surfaces, physical and mental health) and aesthetic (i.e. beauty, quality 
of life, increased property values) benefits to society and the environment (Fender, 2006; King 
and Balogh, 2006). However, critics of grass maintain it not only wastes time, money and 
resources, but even worse, that efforts to grow grass results in an excessive use of water and 
pesticides, resulting in an environmental pollution. Critics recommend the total replacement with 
what are termed „native plants‟ (Fender, 2006). Although this could sound drastic
for turfgrasses, 
its  water  requirements  have  been  established  by  scientific  study,  which  means  that  any 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that
select text in pdf; search a pdf file for text
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Recognizing Pages; Scan a document and convert it to a searchable PDF file; Before you OCR images or doucments in Web Document Viewer, make sure that you
pdf make text searchable; how to select text in pdf and copy
application of water in amounts exceeding turf requirements can be attributed to human factors, 
not plant needs (Beard and Green, 1994). 
Turfgrasses have been utilized by humans to enhance their environment for more than ten 
centuries and, for those  individuals or  group that  debate  the  relative merits of any single 
landscape material, the complexity and comprehensiveness of these environmental benefits that 
improve  our  quality-of-life  are  just now being quantitatively  documented through  research 
(Beard and Green, 1994). 
Turf has become an important U.S. crop based on the acreage covered. The most recent 
estimation of the turf area in the U.S. was presented by Milesi et al. (2005). They reported a total 
turfgrass area estimated as 100 million acres (+/- 21.9 million acres for the upper and lower 95% 
confidence
interval bounds), which include all residential, commercial, and institutional lawns, 
parks, golf courses, and athletic fields (Fender, 2006). The study was based on the distribution of 
urban areas from satellite and aerial imagery. If considering the lower 95% confidence interval 
bound, that would represent 78 million acres and this estimate compares to the estimates of 
Morris (2003) who estimated 50 million of acres of turf in the U.S. on home lawns (66.7%), golf 
courses (20%), and sport fields, parks, playgrounds, cemeteries and highway roads (13.4%). The 
annual economic value of this turfgrass is estimated to be $40 billion. Florida has the second 
largest withdrawal of ground water for public supply in the U.S. (Solley et al., 1998) and some 
estimates indicate that 30-70% of publicly supplied drinking water use in Florida accounts for 
landscape water use (FDEP, 2002).  
It is important to keep in mind that turfgrass water use varies among turfgrass species and 
within cultivars. However, cultural practices (like irrigation) can be manipulated to decrease a 
species‟  water  use  and enhance its  drought  resistance
,  playing  an  important role in water 
conservation (Shearman, 2008). Studies described next in sections 3.2.2 and 3.3 show the effects 
of applying different amounts of irrigation water on both turf evapotranspiration rates and Kc 
values. Well-watered conditions should be considered when turf evapotranspiration (ETc) is 
measured for crop coefficient development (Allen et al., 1998). Water stress will affect turf 
evapotranspiration rate, growth rate, and visual quality. Therefore, development of Kc values 
under  water stress  conditions  has  specific  purposes  [e.g.  to be used  by  turf  managers  to 
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll: Word document displaying and are capable of recognizing text from scanned documents, images or existing PDF documents and
pdf editor with search and replace text; search pdf files for text
determine on-site water use by both cool- and warm-season turfgrasses (Meyer and Gibeault, 
1987)].  
Reference  evapotranspiration  (ETo),  turf  evapotranspiration  (ETc)  and  turf  crop 
coefficients (K
c
) can be used to schedule irrigation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA),  through  its  sponsored  partnership  program  named  “WaterSense” 
(http://www.epa.gov/watersense/index.htm
), support the need of using technologies with crop 
coefficients  programmed  into  weather-based  irrigation  controllers  for  efficient  irrigation. 
However, in cases, many controllers have been said to 
have „generous‟ default crop coefficients, 
leading to an over-irrigation process
, as settled in the “Notification of intent meeting summary”
(EPA WaterSense, 2007). 
Currently, Kc values for both turfgrasses and ornamental plants are considered important 
parameters for 
“landscape water budget
s
”  as a way to increase the efficiency of irrigation 
systems.  An  example  given  in  the  Landscape  Water  Budget  standards  for  the  California 
Landscape Contractors Association  - 
CLCA‟s Water Management Certification, which 
uses 
fixed parameters like crop coefficients (for warm-season, cool-season, native plants, ground 
cover/shrubs, and  others)  as key components  to  successfully completing the CLCA  Water 
Management Certification  (http://www.clca.us/water/memOnly/budget.html
). In addition, the 
EPA Water Sense program has proposed a water budgeting procedure for new homes that used 
Kc‟s 
and 
KL‟s 
to 
computed 
required 
landscape 
irrigation 
(http://www.epa.gov/watersense/specs/homes.htm
). 
The objectives of this report are to present a literature review on both evapotranspiration 
and crop coefficients for turfgrasses in the U.S., and ETc values for ornamentals. 
3. Literature review 
3.1. Turfgrass overview 
Turfgrasses are classified into two groups based on their climatic adaptation: warm-
season grasses, adapted to tropical and subtropical areas, and cool-season grasses which are 
adapted  to  temperate  and  sub-arctic  climates  (Huang,  2006).  Warm-season  grasses  use 
significantly less water than cool-season species. Cool season grasses, on the other hand, are 
generally  more  susceptible  to  moisture  stress  than  warm  season  grasses  (Duble,  2006). 
Buffalograss, for example, can survive long periods of severe moisture stress, whereas bluegrass 
would be killed by the same conditions. This difference in water use derives from changes in the 
photosynthetic  process  that occurred  in  grasses  evolving  under  hot,  dry  conditions.  These 
changes, which include modifications to biochemical reactions and internal leaf anatomy, greatly 
enhance  the photysynthetic efficiency  of  warm-season  species  and  help  reduce water use. 
Increased photosynthetic efficiency means that plants can maintain high levels of carbohydrate 
production and continue to grow even when stomates are partially closed. This partial closure of 
the  stomates  slows  the  plant‟s  water  use.  Cool
-season  grasses  cannot  maintain  enough 
carbohydrate production to maintain growth unless their stomates are nearly wide open. When 
water is limited, transpiration rates are generally higher than those of warm-season grasses 
(Gibeault et al., 1989). 
Some turfgrass species that are grown throughout the southeastern USA for home lawns, 
golf courses, athletic fields, right-of-ways, and various other applications are described below 
(Duble, 2008a; Kenna, 2006; Busey, 2002; Trenholm and Unruh, 2002; Ruppert and Black, 
1997): 
3.1.1. Warm-season turfgrasses 
St. Augustinegrass [Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt) Kuntze]: St. Augustinegrass is a 
warm-season grass which some authors believe is native from Africa (Kenna, 2006) or from 
both, the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean (McCarty and Cisar, 1997). It grows vigorously 
during the warm (80 to 95 F) months of spring, summer, and early fall. Of all the warm season 
grasses, it is the least cold tolerant and has the coarsest leaf texture. It prefers well-drained, 
humid and fertile soils that are not exposed to long period of cold weather to produce an 
acceptable quality lawn. Like other warm-season grasses, it goes dormant and turns brown in the 
winter. It is very susceptible to winter injury and cannot be grown as far north as bermudagrass 
and Zoysiagrass. 
Disadvantages:
It  recovers  poorly  from  drought.  There  are  shade  tolerant  cultivars 
existing (e.g. Seville, Delmar, Jade, and possibly Palmetto). It is susceptible to pest problems, 
like chinch bug, which is considered the major insect pest of this species. It wears poorly and 
some varieties are susceptible to cold damage. 
Zoysiagrass  (Zoysia spp.): Zoysiagrass is a warm-season turfgrass that spreads by 
rhizomes and stolons to produce a very dense, wear-resistant turf. These grasses have been 
developed and are adapted to a broader range of environmental conditions. It is believed that 
several species and varieties were introduced from the orient to the United States. There are three 
major  species  of  zoysiagrass  suitable  for  turf  including  japanese  lawngrass  (Z. japonica), 
mascarenegrass (Z. tenuifolia), and manilagrass (Z. matrella). Their slow growth makes them 
difficult to establish; however, this can be a maintenance advantage because mowing is needed 
less frequently compared to some other warm-season grasses. Zoysiagrass is adapted to a wide 
variety of soils, its primary advantage is its moderate tolerance to shade and salts, and provides a 
dense sod which reduces weed invasion. It is also stiff to the touch and offers more resistance 
than bermudagrass. 
Disadvantages:
Zoysiagrass  is  slow  to  establish  because  it  must  be  propagated 
vegetatively. All zoysias form a heavy thatch which requires periodic renovation. There is a high 
fertility  requirement  and  need  for  irrigation  to  maintain  green  color.  These  grasses  are 
susceptible to nematodes, hunting billbugs and several diseases. It tends to be shallower rooting 
and is weakened when grown in soils low in potassium level. 
Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum): Bahiagrass is a warm-season grass that was introduced 
from Brazil in 1914 and used as a pasture grass on the poor sandy soils of the southeastern 
United States. The ability of bahiagrass to persist on infertile, dry soils and resistance to most 
pests has made it increasingly popular with homeowners and public entities like the Department 
of  Transportation  (DOT).  It  can  be  grown  from  seed  which  is  abundant  and  relatively 
inexpensive. It develops an extensive root system which makes them one of the most drought 
tolerant lawngrasses and it has fewer pest problems than any other Florida lawngrass. It is easily 
recognized by the characteristic “Y” shape of its seedhead, as well as its stoloniferous growth 
habit. 
Disadvantages
: Due to the tough leaves and stems, it is difficult to mow. It can be a very 
competitive and unsightly weed in highly maintained turf. It is not well suited for alkaline and 
saline soils. It is intolerant to shade and to mole crickets. 
Bermudagrass  (Cynodon dactylon): Bermuda is a medium- to fine-textured warm- 
season  turfgrass  that  spreads  by  rhizomes  and  stolons.  Also  called  wiregrass,  is  planted 
throughout Florida primarily on golf courses, tennis courts and athletic fields. Extremely heat 
tolerant, but very intolerant of shade, bermudagrass is the dominant sunny lawn grass in the 
south and west of the U.S. It is one of the few warm-season grasses that can be taken north like 
Tennessee, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Oklahoma, as well as the Central Valley of California 
(Kenna, 2006). Bermudagrass is native to Africa where it thrived on fertile soils. It has excellent 
wear, drought and salt tolerance and is good choice for ocean front property, and it is competitive 
against weeds. Improvements in seed establishment as well as cold tolerance will help provide 
bermudagrass cultivars for the transition zone climates of the United States. 
Disadvantages
: Bermudagrass has a number of cultural and pest problems and therefore, 
will need a higher level of maintenance inputs than most other grasses. In central and north 
Florida, bermudagrasses become dormant in cold weather. Overseeding in fall with ryegrass is a 
common practice to maintain year-round green color. Bermudagrasses have very poor shade 
tolerance and should not be grown underneath tree canopies or building overhangs. It can also be 
a very invasive and hard to control weed in some turf settings. 
Centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack ]: Centipedegrass is a warm-
season turf that is adapted for use in low maintenance situation. It was introduced into the United 
States from southeastern Asia. It has a slow growth pattern, so it is not very competitive against 
weeds.  It  is  well adapted to sandy, acidic  soils  and tolerates  low  fertility,  requiring little 
maintenance, compared to other turfgrasses. This grass is moderately shade-tolerant and requires 
infrequent mowing, and will survive mild cold temperatures.  
Disadvantages
: Centipedegrass is highly susceptible to damage from nematodes. It 
exhibits iron chlorosis and produces a heavy thatch if over fertilized. It does not tolerate traffic, 
compaction, high pH, high salinity, excessive thatch, drought, or heavy shade. 
Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum): It is a warm-season grass that is native to 
tropical and sub-tropical regions world-wide. It was introduced into the United States around the 
world through maritime travel and it has since spread along coastal areas of the southeastern US, 
because seashore  paspalum can  survive high levels of salt  in  the  salt-affected waters  and 
environments of these areas. Breeding efforts to improve cold tolerance, color, density, and other 
turfgrass characteristics are well under way. 
10 
This grass produces a high quality turfgrass with relatively low fertility inputs. While it 
has initially been marketed for golf course and athletic field use, it has good potential for use in 
the home lawn market as well. The advantages for use of seashore paspalum in a home lawn 
situation include: excellent tolerance to saline water, excellent wear tolerance, good tolerance to 
reduced water input, relatively low fertility inputs needed to produce a dense, dark green lawn, 
few insect disease problems in most environments, tolerates a wide pH range, tolerates long 
periods of low light intensity and produces a dense root system. 
Disadvantages
: This grass has poor shade tolerance; it performs best when mowed at one 
to two inches; it is sensitive to many common herbicides and may be injured or killed by their 
use. Seashore paspalum tends to become thatchy, particularly when over fertilized and over-
irrigated. 
Buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.): It is a native warm-season perennial 
grass that can be used for low-maintenance lawns and other turf areas. Buffalograss grows best 
in full sun, requiring at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sun daily, and under moderate rainfall (15 to 
30 inches annually). Its tolerance to prolonged droughts and to extreme temperatures together 
with its seed producing characteristics enables buffalograss to survive extreme environmental 
conditions.  It is one or the most uniform and attractive turf. Buffalograss is found throughout the 
Great Plains from Mexico to Montana (Duble, 2008a) 
Disadvantages
: It will not survive in sandy soils and it is only recommended for low 
maintenance, low use turfgrass areas. Over use or excessive traffic are the pressures that lead to 
the deterioration of a stand of buffalograss. 
3.1.2. Cool-season turfgrasses 
Note that cool-season grasses do not survive in Florida due to high temperatures and 
humidity; however, several are listed here since extensive water use research has been conducted 
on these grasses. Cool-season grasses, which are used in lawns, sports fields, golf courses, and 
roadsides include Poa L., Lolium L., Festuca L., and Agrostis L. (Beard, 1994). 
Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis): This grass is a general purpose turfgrass native to 
practically all of Europe, northern Asia and part of north of Africa. It is a long-lived perennial 
that is widely adapted throughout the cool-season growing areas. It also can be used in the cool 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested