how to open pdf file on button click in c# : How to select all text in pdf file Library software component .net winforms web page mvc Romero_Dukes_Turfgrass%20ET_Crop_%20Coefficient_%20Lit1-part1077

11 
semiarid and arid regions if irrigated. Bluegrass can survive several months without significant 
rainfall or irrigation. High nitrogen fertilization and frequent mowing greatly decrease root 
growth in this turfgrass (Kenna, 2006; Duble, 2008b).  
Disadvantages
: In alkaline soils Kentucky bluegrass often develops iron chlorosis. Root 
growth practically ceases at temperatures above 80
o
F. 
Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne): it is generally considered to be a short-lived 
perennial, but it can persist indefinitely if not subjected to extremes in high or low temperature. 
Ryegrass is a very competitive cool-season grass, best adapted to coastal regions that have 
moderate temperature throughout the year. However, it persists under cold winter conditions 
where it is protected by consistent snow cover. Because it germinates quickly, it is used to 
compliment Kentucky bluegrass in sunny lawn mixes in the cool-season zone; in the South, is 
the primary overseed grass (Kenna, 2006; UCDavies; 2004) 
Disadvantages
: It may suppress germination of other grasses in the mixture (allelopathy); 
it is drought sensitive and if seeded alone, becomes “steamy” after a couple of years. It also can 
become weedy when used to overseeded warm-season grasses. 
Tall fescue (Festuca spp
.): Introduced from Europe in the early 1800‟s, tall fescue can be 
found from the Pacific Northwest to the southern states in low-lying pastures. It grows best in 
moist environments, although tall fescue has  good drought tolerance, surviving  during  dry 
periods in dormant conditions. It tolerates heat better than other cool-season species. Compared 
to bluegrass and perennial ryegrass, tall fescue tolerates shade conditions the most, but it is 
inferior to fine fescue in the shade (Kenna, 2006; Duble, 2008c). 
Disadvantages
: It should not be use where mowing heights are below 1.5 inches during 
summer months. Although its wear tolerance is considered good for cool season grasses, it is not 
nearly as wear tolerant as bermudagrass. Due to this, its use on golf courses and athletic fields in 
the South is limited. 
Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera): It is the grass cultivated exclusively on golf 
courses, especially on putting greens and fairways. Its name derives from the vigorous, creeping 
stolons than develop at the surface of the ground. The leaves on the bentgrass are long and 
How to select all text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to select text in pdf reader
How to select all text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf find highlighted text; converting pdf to searchable text format
12 
slender. Due to its poor stress tolerance and high maintenance requirements, bentgrasses are not 
suitable for home lawns. 
Disadvantages
: When grown to normal height, this grass becomes shaggy. It does not 
tolerate hot, dry weather, or cold winters. 
3.2 Evapotranspiration 
3.2.1. Definition 
Evapotranspiration (ET) represents the loss of water from the soil through the combined 
processes  of  evaporation  (from  soil  and plant  surfaces)  and plant  transpiration.  Reference 
evapotranspiration (ETref) is the rate at which readily available soil water is vaporized from 
specified vegetated surfaces (Jensen et al., 1990). Reference evapotranspiration is defined as the 
ET rate from a uniform surface of dense, actively growing vegetation having specified height 
and surface resistance, not short of soil water, and representing and expanse of at least 328 ft. of 
the same or similar vegetation (Allen et al., 2005). Evapotranspiration is directly measured using 
lysimeters.  Lysimeters  are  tanks  filled  with  soil  in  which  crops  are  grown  under  natural 
conditions to measure the amount of water lost by evaporation and transpiration. This method 
provides a direct measurement of ET and is frequently used to study climatic effects on ET and 
to evaluate estimating procedures. By the nature of its construction, a lysimeter prevents the 
natural  vertical  flow  and  distribution  of  water.  Ideally,  lysimeters  must  meet  several 
requirements for the data to be representative of field conditions (Van Bavel, 1961; Miranda et 
al., 2006). Lysimeters can be grouped into three categories: (1) non-weighing, constant water-
table type; (2) non-weighing, percolating-type; and (3) weighing types. Also, large and mini-
lysimeters can be used for different applications. Large lysimeters are the standard instrument for 
measuring evapotranspiration (surface area > 6.6
ft
2
) (Slatyer and McIlroy, 1961). To make good 
and reliable measurements, lysimeters need to meet some requirements: 
- When lysimeter are used to measure actual evapotranspiration rates, it seems essential 
that they are either quite deep or fitted with a tensioning at the bottom, to allow a normal 
root growth; 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page.
convert pdf to searchable text online; how to search a pdf document for text
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Dim allImages = PDFImageHandler.ExtractImages(doc) ' Extract all images in page 2. Dim page As PDFPage = doc VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
pdf searchable text converter; how to select text in pdf image
13 
- They should contain  an undisturbed, representative profile.  In a disturbed profile, 
moisture transmission, moisture retention, and root distribution is likely to be different 
from that of the original profile and measurements may not be representative; 
- The vegetation inside and outside the lysimeter should be kept as similar as possible; 
- Diminishing the effect of the lysimeter rim over ET measurements by reducing the 
lysimeter wall thickness, the gap between inner and outer walls, and the height of the 
lysimeter rim relative to soil surface; 
- Reducing the oasis effect by providing sufficient distances of windward fetch of similar 
vegetation and soil moisture regimes. 
Recently many researchers have used „minilysimeters‟ in field studies (Grimmond et al., 
1992).  They  have  the  advantage  that  minilysimeters  (1)  permit  the  measurement  of  the 
evaporative  flux from smaller areas; (2)  create less  disturbance to the environment during 
installation; (3) are cheaper to install than the large ones. But there are a big number of potential 
sources  of  error  associated  when  using  lysimeters,  either  related  with  the  mechanics  or 
electronics  of the lysimeter. In general,  the  effect of sources of error  on the accuracy of 
evapotranspiration measurements is inversely related to the surface area of the lysimeter (Dugas 
and Bland, 1989). 
A large number of empirical methods have been developed over the last 50 years to 
estimate evapotranspiration from different climatic variables. Some of these methods are derived 
from the now well-known Penman equation (Penman, 1948) to determine evaporation from 
open water, bare soil and grass (now called evapotranspiration) based on a “combination” of an 
energy balance and an aerodynamic formula, given as: 
λE = [Δ(R
n
G)] + (γ λ E
a
) / (Δ + γ)  
(1) 
where λE is the evaporative latent heat flux in MJ m
-2
d
-1
, Δ is the slope of the saturated vapor 
pressure curve [ δe
o
/ δ T, where e
o
is saturated vapor pressure in kPa and T is the temperature in 
o
C, usually taken as the daily mean air temperature], Rn is net radiation flux in MJ m
-2
d
-1
 G is 
sensible heat flux into the soil in MJ m
-2
d
-1
, γ is the psychrometric constant in kPa 
o
C
-1
, and E
a
is 
the vapor transport of flux in mm d
-1
[1.0 mm d
-1
= 0.039 in d
-1
= 1.0 kg m
-2
d
-1
]. Penman (1948) 
defined E as 
open water evaporation
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
coding example shows you how to redact PDF text content Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document All Rights Reserved
search text in pdf image; how to select all text in pdf
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
C# coding example describes how to redact PDF text content. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document All Rights Reserved
pdf find text; pdf text search tool
14 
Various derivations of the Penman equation included a bulk surface resistance term 
(Monteith, 1965) and the resulting equation is now called the Penman-Monteith equation, 
which may be expressed for daily values as: 
λET
= {[Δ (R
n
G)] + [86,400 ρ
a
C
p
(e
s
o
e
a
)]/r
av
}/ Δ + γ (1 + r
s
/r
av
)            (2) 
where ρ
a
is air density in kg m
-3
C
p
is specific
heat of dry air, e
s
is mean saturated vapor
pressure 
in kPa computed as the mean e
o
at the daily minimum and maximum
air temperature in 
o
C, r
av
is 
the bulk surface aerodynamic resistance for water vapor in s m
-1
, e
a
is the mean daily ambient 
vapor pressure in kPa and
r
s
is the canopy surface resistance in s m
-1
.
As early as 1952, turfgrass crop-water requirement studies began in Florida (McCloud 
and Dunavin, 1954). Estimations of water use at Gainesville were underestimated according to 
the formulas of Blaney and Criddle (1950), Tabor (1931) and Thornthwaite (1948) when the 
mean temperature was above 70 F (McCloud, 1955). For this reason, an empirical formula (3) 
was developed for Gainesville, FL as follows: 
Potential daily water-use = ETp = KW
(T-32)
(3) 
It was observed that formula fit the data best when K = 0.01, W = 1.07, and T = mean 
temperature in F. This formula was used to compute a predicted weekly water-use value, and 
both predicted and measured data were highly correlated (Mc Cloud, 1955).  It is important to 
note that this equation is only relevant for Gainesville climatic conditions as explained by 
McCloud (1955). 
An updated equation was recommended by FAO 56 (Allen et al. 1998) with the FAO-56 
Penman-Monteith Equation. Allen et al. (1998) simplified equation (2) by utilizing some 
assumed constant parameters for a clipped grass reference crop that is 0.4 ft tall. In the context of 
this new standardization, reference evapotranspiration, it was assumed that the definition for the 
reference crop was “a hypothetical reference crop with an assumed crop height of 0.
4 ft, a fixed 
surface resistance of 70 s m
-1
and an albedo value of 0.23” (Smith et al., 1992). The new 
equation is:  
ETo 
= {[0.408Δ (R
n
G)] + [γ 900/(T+273) U
2
(e
s
o
e
a
)]}/ Δ + γ( 1 + 0.34 U
2
)      (4) 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
find text in pdf files; searching pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; select text pdf file
15 
where ETo is the reference evapotranspiration rate in mm d
-1
, T is mean air temperature in 
o
C, 
and U
2
is wind speed in m s
-1
at 6.6 ft above the ground (and RH or dew point and air 
temperature are assumed to be measured at 6.6 ft above the ground level 
or converted to that 
height- to ensure the integrity of computations). Equation 4 can be applied using hourly data if 
the constant value “900” is divided by 24 for the hours in a day and the R
n
and G terms are 
expressed as MJ m
-2
h
-1
In 1999, the ASCE Environmental and Water Resources Institute Evapotranspiration in 
Irrigation and Hydrology Committee was asked by the Irrigation Association to propose one 
standardized equation for estimating the parameters to gain consistency and wider acceptance of 
ET models (Howell and Evett, 2006). The principal outcome was that two equations (one for a 
short crop such as clipped grass, ETos and another for a taller crop such as alfalfa, ETrs) were 
developed for daily (24 hr) and hourly time periods. The ASCE-EWRI standardized reference 
ET equation (Allen et al., 2005) based on the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith equation (4) for a 
hypothetical crop is given as, 
ETsz = {[0.408 
Δ
(R
n
G)] + [
γ
C
n
/(T+273) U
2
(e
s
e
a
)]}/ 
Δ
γ
(1 + C
d
U
2
)          (5) 
where ETsz is the standardized reference evapotranspiration for a short reference crop (grass - 
ETos) or a tall reference crop (alfalfa - ETrs) in units based on the time step of mm d
-1
for a 24-h 
day or mm h
-1
for an hourly time step, C
n
is the numerator constant for the reference crop type 
and time step and C
d
is the denominator constant for the reference crop type and time step (see 
Table 1 for values of C
n
and C
d
). 
Table 1: Values for C
n
and C
d
in Eq. 5 (after Allen et al., 2005). 
Calculation 
time step 
Short reference crop 
ETos 
Tall reference crop, 
ETrs 
Units for 
ETos,ETrs 
Units for R
n
and 
C
n
C
d
C
n
C
d
Daily 
900 
0.34 
1600 
0.38 
mm d
-1
MJ m
-2
d
-1
Hourly, 
daytime 
37 
0.24 
66 
0.25 
mm h
-1
MJ m
-2
h
-1
Hourly, 
nighttime 
37 
0.96 
66 
1.7 
mm h
-1
MJ m
-2
h
-1
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
how to search text in pdf document; pdf text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
pdf search and replace text; how to select text in pdf
16 
Reference  evapotranspiration  (ET)  replaced  the  term  potential  ET.  Reference 
evapotranspiration is defined as the ET rate from a uniform surface of dense, actively growing 
vegetation  having  specified  height  and  surface  resistance,  not  short  of  soil  water,  and 
representing an expanse of at least 328 ft of the same or similar vegetation (Allen et al., 2005). 
The crop evapotranspiration (ETc) under standard conditions is the evapotranspiration from 
disease-free, well fertilized crops, grown in large fields under optimum soil water conditions and 
achieving full production under the given climatic conditions (Allen et al., 1998). 
3.2.2. Evapotranspiration of turfgrasses 
The water requirements of most turfgrasses have been established by scientific study 
(Beard and Green, 1994). Water use of turfgrasses is the total amount of water required for 
growth and transpiration plus the amount of water lost from the soil surface (evaporation), but 
because  the  amount  of  water  used  for  growth  is  so  small,  it  is  usually  referred  to  as 
evapotranspiration (Huang, 2006; Augustin, 2000). Most of the water transpired through the 
plant moves through openings in the leaves called stomates, whose primary benefit is the cooling 
effect resulting from the evaporation process. The amount of water lost through transpiration is a 
function  of  the  rate  of  plant  growth  and  several  environmental  factors:  soil  moisture, 
temperature, solar radiation, humidity and wind. Transpiration rates are higher in arid climates 
than in humid climates because of the greater water vapor deficit between the leaf and the 
atmosphere in dry air. Thus, transpiration losses may be as high as 0.4 in of water per day in 
desert climates during summer months; whereas, in humid climates under similar temperature 
conditions, the daily losses may be only 0.2 in of water (Duble, 2006). The application of water 
to turfgrass in amounts exceeding its requirements can be attributed to human factors, not to 
plant needs (Beard and Green, 1994). 
The most commonly used cool- and warm-season turfgrass species have been categorized 
for ETc rates (Beard and Kim, 1989) as shown in Table 2. 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by you how to copy pages from a PDF file and paste
search text in pdf using java; convert pdf to searchable text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Windows systems Click to select drawing annotation with default properties Click to add a text box to specific
how to search pdf files for text; how to select all text in pdf file
17 
Table 2: Evapotranspiration rates of warm and cool-season turfgrasses commonly used in North America 
(after Beard and Kim, 1989). 
Relative ranking 
ET Rate  
(mm d
-1
            (in d
-1
Cool-season 
Warm-season 
Very low 
< 6 
< 0.24 
Buffalo grass 
Low 
0.24 - 0.28 
Bermudagrass hybrids 
Bluegrama 
Bermudagrass 
Centipedegrass 
Zoysiagrass 
Medium 
7 - 8.5 
0.28 
0.33 
Hard fescue 
Chewings fescue 
Red fescue 
Bahiagrass 
Seashore paspalum 
St. Augustinegrass 
Zoysiagrass 
Relative ranking 
ET Rate  
(mm d
-1
            (in d
-1
Cool-season 
Warm-season 
High 
8.5 - 10 
0.33 - 0.39 
Perennial ryegrass 
Very high 
> 10 
 0.39 
Tall fescue 
Creeping bentgrass 
Annual bluegrass 
Kentucky bluegrass 
Italian ryegrass 
Many investigators have shown how turfgrass water use vary by species, genotypes, 
climatic conditions, plant density, water-table depth, water availability, plant morphological 
characteristics, etc. (Ekern, 1966; Stewart et al., 1967; Stewart et al., 1969; Tovey et al., 1969; 
Kneebone and Pepper, 1981; Aronson et al., 1987; Meyer and Gibeault, 1987; Kim and Beard, 
1988; Green et al., 1990a; Green et al., 1990b; Atkins et al., 1991; Bowman and Macaulay, 1991;  
Green et al., 1991; Kneebone and Pepper, 1994; Brown, 2003). There are two common ways to 
determine the water loss due to evapotranspiration: measurement and estimation. Measurement 
methods include lysimeters, eddy correlation and soil water balance to name a few. Estimation 
methods include, energy balance, mass transfer, combination of energy and heat, mass transfer 
and crop coefficients. Next, summaries of research are presented based on direct measurement of 
evapotranspiration, specifically using both big  and mini-lysimeters. Just  keep in  mind that 
potential errors in resolution can be found when using this methodology. As described in section 
18 
3.2.1, lysimeters need to meet some requirements to work  adequately. This information  is 
summarized in Table 3, and Table 4 shows the main methodologies used for ETc determination. 
Kim and Beard (1988) conducted research on turfgrass evapotranspiration rates using 12 
turfgrass species, including warm-season and cool-season grasses, growing under well-watered 
conditions, from 1982 to 1984. ET rates were determined by the water balance method. Black 
plastic minilysimeters were used. The ET rate differences among species were associated to 
morphological  characteristics  such  as  shoot  density,  number  of  leaves  per  unit  area,  leaf 
orientation, leaf width, and vertical leaf extension rate. St. Augustinegrass exhibited a medium 
low ET rate of 0.23 in d
-1
due to a very low shoot density (low canopy resistance). Bahiagrass 
showed a medium ET rate of 0.25 in d
-1
when growing under non-limiting soil moisture due to 
its high leaf area. In contrast, Adelayd seashore paspalum had a low ET rate of 0.21 in d
-1
value 
associated with a very rapid vertical leaf extension rate but medium leaf width. Zoysiagrasses 
exhibited significant differences in ET rates, due to the vertical leaf orientation. The three 
bermudagrasses (Arizona common, tifgreen, and tifway) were in the low range due to a low leaf 
area. Centipedegrass low ET rates were related to a very slow vertical leaf extension rate. 
Results reported by Atkins et al. (1991) showed variation in ET rates among 10-well 
watered St. Augustinegrass genotypes in the field and in a controlled-environment chamber in 
Texas.  The  experiment  was  carried  out  using  black  plastic  minilysimeter  pots.  ETc  rate 
estimations using a water-balance method were determined in Sept. 1985, July and Aug. 1986, 
and Sept. 1987. Averaged ETc rates were significantly lower in Sept. 1985 (0.21 in d
-1
) than in 
Aug. 1986 and Sept. 1987 (0.51 and 0.56 in d
-1
, respectively). The chamber study involved 
controlled conditions monitoring temperature, photoperiod, wind speed and solar radiation. The 
genotype effect was significant for ETc rates, probably due to the higher evaporative potential of 
the controlled-
environment chamber. „Texas Common‟ and „
PI 410356
ranked lowest for ETc 
rate at 0.26 and 0.29 in d
-1
, respectively, while 
TX 106
and 
TXSA 8218
ranked highest, both 
at 0.32 in d
-1
. St. Augustinegrass species seemed to have no significant intraspecies ETc rate 
variation  when  evaluated  under  well-watered  field  conditions.  A  similar  study  using 
minilysimeters  under both  field and  controlled-environment  conditions  was carried out for 
eleven Zoysia genotypes under well-watered conditions, also in Texas (Green et al., 1991). 
Under field conditions, ETc rates were evaluated from 1985 to 1987, and the results showed 
genotype 
KLS-11
ranking highest for ET rate with 0.16 in d
-1
, while genotype 
Belair
had the 
19 
lowest rate with 0.15 in d
-1
. ETc rates were higher under controlled conditions, with genotype 
KLS-11
showing the lowest rate (0.33 in d
-1
) and genotype Emerald with the highest rate (0.41 
in d
-1
). The highest water consumption by Zoysia genotypes under controlled conditions was due 
to the higher evaporative potential demand of the environmental chamber. 
Feldhake et al. (1983) used weighable bucket lysimeters to measure ET rates of different 
cool- and warm-season turfgrasses under the effects of mowing height, N fertilization, etc., in a 
study from 1979 to 1981 in Colorado. The study was performed under well-watered conditions. 
ET rates were 0.22 in d
-1
for Kentucky bluegrass „Merion‟, 
0.23 in d
-1
for tall fescue, and 0.18 in 
d
-1
for  both  „tifway‟  and  „common‟  bermudagrass.  „
Merion
Kentucky  bluegrass 
evapotranspiration rates varied according to the mowing height from 0.19 in d
-1
(0.79 in mowing 
height + N) to 0.21 in d
-1
(1.97 in mowing height + N). When Kentucky bluegrass was deficient 
in N, ET rate increased to 0.21 in d
-1
. ET rate was influenced by the type of grass and by mowing 
height and fertility. 
ET from four cool-season turfgrasses was compared under well-watered conditions under 
field  conditions  in  Rhode  Island (Aronson  et  al.,  1987a)  as  follows:  Kentucky  bluegrass, 
perennial ryegrass, chewing red fescue and hard fescue. ET rates were measured by determining 
the mass loss of weighing lysimeters containing 0.5 ft deep sod soil cores. The lysimeters and the 
surrounding plots were sprinkler irrigated to saturation and drained to field capacity and then 
irrigated every 4 to 5 days in the absence of precipitation. The lysimeters were weighed at 24-h 
intervals to calculate water loss due to ET. The average ET rate for all turfgrasses for the two-
year study (July through September) was 0.15 in d
-1
for Kentucky bluegrass, 0.14 in d
-1
for red 
fescue, 0.15 in d
-1
for perennial ryegrass and 0.12 in d
-1 
for hard fescue. The same turfgrass 
species were tested in a similar experiment but under controlled conditions to test for responses 
to drought stress (Aronson et al., 1987b). Small 10-in diameter lysimeters were placed in a 
greenhouse and kept for 80 days under well-watered conditions before drought tests were begun. 
Adequate light and fertilizers were provided to each lysimeter. The grasses were exposed to two 
consecutive drought stress periods: the first one was continued until visible signs of stress were 
observed; second, the grasses were allowed to recuperate under well-watered conditions for 3 
weeks until they recovered their initial turf quality scores. The second drought period was 
continued until plant death. ET  was determined as previously described  in  this paragraph. 
Although no numerical results were published for water consumption, the most drought tolerant 
20 
of the four grasses studied were the fescues. Both, the perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass 
were less drought tolerant and sustained substantial injury when the soil water potential declined 
to more than -125 centibars (cb). According to these results, the range between -50 to -80 cb may 
represent a threshold level of drought stress for cool-season grasses growing in this area, since 
characteristics like ET, quality score, leaf growth rate and leaf water potential showed marked 
changes under those soil water potentials. Tall fescue avoids drought better than Kentucky 
bluegrass because it can develop a deeper, more extensive root system, being more able to 
extract more deep soil moisture for continued transpiration, compared to Kentucky bluegrass 
(Ervin and Koski, 1998).  
Another study using minilysimeters under controlled-environment conditions was carried 
out  for 12 cool-season  turfgrasses (hard fescue, creeping bentgrass, sheep fescue, chewing 
fescue,  creeping  annual  bluegrass,  Kentucky  bluegrass  (cultivars 
Bensun
Majestic
and 
Merion
), perennial ryegrass, tall fescue (cultivars 
Rebel
and 
K-31
) and rough bluegrass at 
College Station, TX (Green et al.,1990a). ET rates were based on three sequential measurements 
from each minilysimeter made in 24 hr under non-limiting soil moisture conditions. The highest 
ET rates were exhibited by Kentucky bluegrasses (0.48 in d
-1
) and the lowest by the fine-leafed 
fescues (0.30 in d
-1
), results that agreed with those showed by Aronson et al. (1987b). 
There are numerous studies measuring bermudagrass ET rates due to the prevalence of 
this grass on golf courses. Devitt et al. (1992) determined ET rates from lysimeters located on a 
park and on two golf course sites. The two-year average (1988-1989) ET rate at the golf course 
sites (one of them irrigated according to local management (control) and the other irrigated by 
input from an ETc feedback system) was 59 in y
-1
(0.16 in d
-1
). By contrast, the park site had a 
two year average ET rate of 42 in y
-1
(0.11 in d
-1
), which was 29% lower than the golf course 
sites. Differences were attributed to cultural management input. In Tucson, Arizona, a study 
carried  out using  percolating  lysimeters  and  testing  high  and  low management  treatments 
(simulating a highly fertilized golf course fairways and commercial lawns in the Southwest in the 
former case, and equivalent to minimal home lawn management for the latter case) showed no 
significant differences among three bermudagrasses (Kneebone and Pepper, 1982). 
Tifgreen
Santa Ana
and 
Seeded
bermudagrasses showed an average ET rate of 0.18 in d
-1
(65 in y
-1
)
under the high management treatment. Under the low management treatment, the average ET 
rate was 0.14 in d
-1
(51 in y
-1
) for the same bermudagrass species. Another study carried out in 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested