21 
the same location by the same authors (Kneebone and Pepper, 1984), evaluated whether luxury 
water use of applied irrigation occurred, and what maximum ET rates might be when excessive 
water was available to bermudagrass. This trial was installed from Nov 26, 1979 to Oct 25, 1980 
using percolation lysimeters.  Three different sand-soil mixes were prepared in the following 
proportions: 19:1, 18:2, and 16:4, all of them providing good infiltration and drainage. Three 
irrigation levels (4.5, 9.6 and 14.3 in week
-1
) applied in increments of 2.3, 4.8 and 7.2 in twice 
each week were used with each sand-soil mix. Results showed that increasing the availability of 
water whether by irrigation level or by water holding capacity of the sand-soil mix in most cases 
increased ET from bermudagrass. Average ET rates were 0.17, 0.28 and 0.30 in d
-1
(1.22, 1.92 
and 2.09 in week
-1
) for 4.50, 10 and 14.33 in wk
-1
application rates, respectively. Average ET 
rates were 0.20, 0.25 and 0.30 in d
-1 
(1.41, 1.73 and 2.09 in wk
-1
) for 19:1, 18:2 and 16:4 sand-
soil mixes. The data showed that ET rates from bermudagrass turf can exceed pan evaporation by 
a considerable amount. 
Stewart et al. (1969) studied ET rate as a function of plant density and water table depth 
in South Florida using Tifway bermudagrass growing in non-weighing evapotranspirometers. 
Depth to water table was 24 in the first year, 36 in the second, and 12 in the third year during the 
3-year study. Water replacement ranged from well-watered conditions at a 12 in water table to 
partial stress at a 36 in water table depth. The plant cover treatments were established by killing 
part of the sod to give the preselected 0-, 1/3-, 2/3-, and full-sod cover treatments. An annual 
water balance showed a linear decrease between degree of plant cover and annual ET rate. ET 
rates increased with sod cover at water-table depths of 24 in (from 42 in y
-1 
(0.11 in d
-1
)-full sod- 
to 16 in y
-1
(0.04 in d
-1
)
-no sod-), and 36 in (from 35 in y
-1
(0.09 in d
-1
)
-full sod- to 19 in y
-1
(0.05 
in d
-1
)
-no sod-). ET rates decreased with cover for the water table depth of 12 in (from 42 in y
-
1
(0.11 in d
-1
)
-full sod- to 46 in y
-1
(0.13 in d
-1
)
-no sod. Evaporation from bare soil (no sod, 46 in 
y
-1 
(0.13 in d
-1
)), with a 48 in water table was about 11% more than from full sod cover (42 in y
-1 
(0.11
in d
-1
)) in 1967. The ground surface of this treatment was moist continuously, indicating 
that the capillary fringe reached the soil surface. Similar results were shown in Stewart and Mills 
(1967). 
Similar results to those found at the park site by Devitt et al. (1992) were observed for 
both „c
ommon
and 
„t
ifway
bermudagrass in Georgia (Carrow, 1995) under field conditions. 
The irrigation regime imposed moderate stress on the turfgrasses (water applied at 56% plant 
Pdf find text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search multiple pdf files for text; search text in multiple pdf
Pdf find text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
cannot select text in pdf; search pdf files for text programmatically
22 
available soil water depletion). Average ET rate was 0.12 in d
-1
(44 in y
-1
). Compared to other 
reports, the results were lower. Reasons for this disparity could be that all the data reported by 
others were obtained in arid or semi-arid climates with lower humidity using non-limited soil 
moisture conditions compared to the humid Georgia conditions. Under arid conditions and 
turfgrass stress, water consumption by bermudagrasses was much lower than the previous report 
(Garrot and Mancino, 1994). This study carried out in Arizona, from 1989 to 1991, showed that 
bermudagrasses varieties 
texturf-10
tifgreen
and 
midiron
had mean ET rates of 0.10, 0.09 
and 0.09 in d
-1
(36, 34 and 33 in y
-1
) respectively, under infrequent irrigation regime under 
fairway conditions. ET rate was derived from gravimetric samples and irrigation was applied 
only when turf showed symptoms of wilt. The conclusions remarked that bermudagrass growing 
in an arid environment can be maintained under fairway condition with 33 to 36 in of water 
annually. 
Under low management (intended to be equivalent to minimal home lawn management) 
in a desert area of Arizona, and using 10.8 ft
2
lysimeter boxes, tall fescue and St. Augustinegrass 
used  significantly  more water  than  bermudagrass  and  zoysiagrass  (72,  65  and  52  in  y
-1
), 
respectively (Kneebone and Pepper, 1982). Bermudagrass and zoysiagrass were dormant during 
the winter and spring, while tall fescue was still growing. St. Augustinegrass does not become 
dormant as quickly as bermudagrass and zoysiagrass during the winter. The low management 
resulted in a relatively low quality turf, but even when under a high management the quality was 
improved, but was not as lush as many commercial lawns. Their data indicated that normal water 
use in Tucson might range from 51 to 67 in y
-1
depending upon management. About 11 in of this 
amount was available from rainfall in this area.  
A relatively new method to estimate crop evapotranspiration in Central Florida was used 
by Jia et al. (2007) from July 2003 through December 2006. Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) rates 
were estimated for bahiagrass using the eddy correlation method, and the study was conducted 
under well-watered conditions. This method overcomes the need to determine each component in 
the water balance by using the energy balance approach (Tanner and Greene, 1989). The results 
of this study showed that the highest average monthly ET rate (0.17 in d
-1
) occurred in May. The 
lowest average monthly ET rate (0.03 in d
-1
) occurred in January. Another study showed that 
bahiagrass used 11% more water than St. Augustinegrass under well watered conditions when 
UF/IFAS recommendations were followed (Dukes et al., 2008; Zazueta et al., 2000). However, 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
how to make a pdf document text searchable; can't select text in pdf file
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
find text in pdf image; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
23 
water use rates for both grasses were similar when water was scarce (Dukes et al., 2008). Under 
water stress conditions, St. Augustinegrass may be more stressed beyond the point of recovery 
while Bahiagrass may recover when water becomes available (Zazueta et al., 2000). 
Research over the last 30 years provides a much clear understanding of turfgrass water 
use  rates  throughout  U.S.  Warm-season  species  like  hybrid  bermudagrass,  zoysiagrass, 
buffalograss, and centipedegrass consumed the lowest water use rates, ranging from 0.12 to 0.35 
in day
-1
. Cool-season species like the fine-leafed fescues ranked medium, whereas Kentucky 
bluegrass and creeping bentgrass showed very high water use rates, with 0.14 to 0.50 in day
-1
(Kenna, 2008). However, several studies indicated that considerable inter- and  intraspecies 
variation exists in ET rates (Green et al., 1990a). 
Table  3: Summary table showing turfgrass species mean daily evapotranspiration rate (ETo), 
methodology used to determine ET, water availability, and respective references. 
Turfgrass species 
ET rate 
(in d
-1
Study period 
length 
Methodology & 
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Bahiagrass 
Jan (0.03) 
Feb (0.03) 
Mar (0.08) 
Apr (0.14) 
May (0.17) 
Jun (0.13) 
Jul (0.12) 
Aug (0.11) 
Sep (0.09) 
Oct (0.07) 
Nov (0.06) 
Dec (0.03) 
July 2003 
through 
December 2006. 
Eddy correlation 
method. 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Jia et al., 2007 
Central Florida, 
FL. 
Tifway bermudagrass 
Common bermudagrass 
Meyer zoysiagrass 
Common 
centipedegrass 
Raleigh St 
Augustinegrass 
Rebel II tall fescue 
Kentucky-31 tall fescue 
(K
c
values are annual 
values) 
0.19/0.17* 
0.19/0.17* 
0.18/0.17* 
0.17/0.16* 
0.20/0.17* 
0.20/0.17* 
0.17/0.18* 
First season: 
from 26 June to 
10 Oct 1989 (data 
on the left). 
*Second season: 
from 5/4/90 to 
11/2/90 (data on 
the right). 
TDR
s
Water stress 
conditions. 
Carrow, 1995. 
Griffin, GA. 
C# Excel - Search and Find Text in Excel
Easy to search and find text content and get its location details. Allow to search defined Excel file page or the whole document. C# PDF: Example of Finding Text
select text in pdf file; how to make pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
pdf select text; search pdf for text
24 
Turfgrass species 
ET rate 
(in d
-1
Study period 
length 
Methodology & 
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Bermudagrass 
overseeded with 
perennial ryegrass 
0.15 to 0.18
a
0.10 to 0.12
b
2-yr study. 
a
Lysimeter irrigated 
using ET feedback 
system. 
b
Lysimeter irrigated 
according to local 
management. 
Both, well-watered 
and water stress 
conditions. 
Devitt et al., 
1992, NV. 
Bahiagrass 
Buffalograss 
Centipedegrass 
Bermudagrass (avg. 3 
cultivars) 
Seashore paspalum 
St. Augustinegrass 
Tall fescue 
0.25 
0.17 to 0.21 
0.18 to 0.22 
0.16 to 0.23  
0.18 to 0.24 
0.19 to 0.25 
0.20 to 0.28 
From Aug. 1982 
to Sept. 1984.  
Water balance 
method (using black 
plastic minilysimeter 
pots). 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Kim and Beard, 
1988. 
College 
Station, TX. 
St. Augustinegrass 
(mean of ten 
genotypes) 
0.19/0.30 
Individual 
measurements in 
the field in Sept. 
1985, July and 
Aug. 1986, and 
Sept. 1987(value 
on the left). 
Summer 1988 
under controlled-
environment 
conditions (value 
on the right). 
Water balance 
method (using black 
plastic minilysimeter 
pots). 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Atkins et al., 
1991. 
College 
Station, TX. 
Zoysia (mean of 11 
genotypes) 
0.37/0.36 
Fall 1985, 
Summer 1986 
and Summer 
1987. In the field 
from May to Oct 
(value on the left) 
and from Nov. to 
April under 
glasshouse 
conditions (value 
on the right). 
Water balance 
method (using black 
plastic 
minilysimeters). 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Green et al, 
1991. 
College 
Station, TX. 
Kentucky bluegrass 
Red fescue 
Perennial grass 
Hard fescue 
0.14 
0.14 
0.15 
0.12 
From July to 
September, 1984-
1985. 
Water balance 
method (using 
weighing 
minilysimeters). 
Aronson et al., 
1987a. 
Kingston, RI. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer also enable users to quickly find text content by
convert pdf to word searchable text; how to select text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
select text in pdf reader; search pdf documents for text
25 
Turfgrass species 
ET rate 
(in d
-1
Study period 
length 
Methodology & 
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Cool-season perennial 
grasses: 
Hard fescue 
Creeping bentgrass 
Sheep fescue 
Chewing fescue 
Creeping ann.bluegrs.  
Kentucky bluegrass 
Perennial ryegrass 
Tall fescue 
Rough bluegrass 
Kentucky bluegrass 
0.29 
0.40 
0.37 
0.30 
0.39 
0.49 
0.36 
0.45 
0.33 
0.47 
ET rate measured 
every 24-hour. 
Water balance 
method (using black 
plastic minilysimeters 
under controlled 
environment). 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Green et al., 
1990a. 
College 
Station, TX. 
Bermudagrass 
0.25 
From 11/26/79 to 
10/25/80. 
Water balance (using 
1m
2
lysimeters). 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Kneebone and 
Pepper, 1984. 
Bermudagrass 
Zoysiagrass 
0.30 
0.28 
From 1977 to 
1979. 
Water balance (using 
1m
2
lysimeters). 
Both, well- and water 
stress conditions. 
Kneebone and 
Pepper, 1982. 
Merion Kentucky 
bluegrass  
Bermudagrass 
Bermudagrass 
Merion Kentucky  
bluegrass  
Rebel tall fescue 
Tifway bermudagrass 
Common buffalograss 
0.19 (a) 
0.21 (b) 
0.14 
0.19 
0.22 
0.23 
0.18 
0.18 
First experiment: 
From 7/13/79 to 
10/4/79. 
Second exp.:  
From 6/20/80 to 
8/28/80. 
Third  exp.: 
From 6/8/81 to 
8/16/81. 
Weighing lysimeter: 
[(a) 2 cm mowing 
height. 
(b) 5 cm mowing 
height]. 
Values are the 
average of two 
lysimeters. 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Feldhake et al., 
1983. 
Ft. Collins, CO. 
Tifway bermudagrass 
(original data in in y
-1
0.11 
0.09 
0.11 
0.09 
0.09 
0.12 
0.07 
0.07 
0.12 
Full sod 
treatment: 
1965 
1966 
1967 
2/3 sod treatmnt: 
1965  
1966 
1967 
1/3 sod treatmnt: 
1965 
1966 
1967 
Non-weighing evapo-
transpirometers. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Stewart et al., 
1969. 
Ft. Lauderdale, 
FL. 
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
function will help users to freely convert Excel document to PDF, Tiff and Text search and select functionalities and manipulate help to find text contents on
how to make a pdf document text searchable; select text in pdf file
XDoc.Word for .NET, Support Processing Word document and Page in .
Able to view and edit Word rapidly. Convert. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to ODT. Text & Image Process. Search and find text in Word. Insert image to Word page
pdf search and replace text; how to make pdf text searchable
26 
Turfgrass species 
ET rate 
(in d
-1
Study period 
length 
Methodology & 
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Tifway bermudagrass 
0.12 
0.11 
0.11 
5-yr average 
(1963-67). 
Depth to water 
table: 
12 in 
Depth to water 
table: 24 in 
Depth to water 
table: 36 in 
Non-weighing evapo-
transpirometers. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Stewart et al., 
1967.  
Ft. Lauderdale, 
FL. 
Table 4:  List of most common methodologies used by the authors to determine ETc. Turfgrass type and 
maximum and minimum ETc values are shown too. 
ETc range (in d
-1
Methodology 
Author 
Turfgrass type 
min 
max 
Minilysimeters / water balance 
Aronson et al., 1987. 
Cool-season 
0.09 
0.16 
Kim and Beard, 1988. 
Cool-season 
0.20 
0.28 
Green et al., 1990. 
Cool-season 
0.29 
0.49 
Bowman  and  Macaulay, 
1991. 
Cool-season 
0.18 
0.51 
Aronson et al., 1987. 
Warm-season 
0.16 
0.26 
Green et al., 1990b. 
Warm-season 
0.09 
0.46 
Atkins et al., 1991. 
Warm-season 
0.15 
0.23 
Green et al., 1991. 
Warm-season 
0.09 
0.41 
Large lysimeters / water balance 
Stewart and Mills, 1967. 
Warm-season 
0.07 
0.20 
Stewart et al., 1969. 
Warm-season 
0.09 
0.11 
Kneebone and Pepper, 1982. 
Warm-season 
0.25 
0.35 
Kneebone and Pepper, 1984. 
Warm-season 
0.15 
0.35 
Devitt et al., 1992. 
Warm-season 
0.10 
0.18 
Eddy correlation 
Jia et al., 2008. 
Warm-season 
0.02 
0.20 
3.3. Turf crop coefficients 
A crop coefficient (K
c
) is the ratio of the crop evapotranspiration (ETc) to the potential 
evapotranspiration (ETo) that varies in time based on growth and horticultural practices. Once 
such coefficients have been generated, only estimates of ETo are required to estimate actual ET 
needed for scheduling irrigation for a similar climate (Devitt and Morris, 2008). Thus, using 
different ETo equations will generate different K
c
values, which is one reason the ASCE-EWRI 
27 
Standardized Reference ET methodology was developed (Allen et al., 2005). Allen et al. (2005) 
stated “ther
e can be considerable uncertainty in K
c
-based ET predictions due to uncertainty in 
quality and representativeness of weather data for the ETo estimate and uncertainty regarding 
similarity in physiology and morphology between specific crops and varieties in an area and the 
crop for which the K
c
was originally derived
. In the following paragraphs, several studies on 
crop  coefficient  determination  for  cool-  and  warm-season  turfgrasses  are  presented  and 
discussed. Table 5 shows a summary of crop coefficient values for these studies, and Table 6 
shows a list of the most used methodologies to determine reference ETo. 
K
c
‟s
can vary substantially over short time periods, so monthly averaged coefficients are 
normally used for irrigation scheduling (Carrow, 1995). These coefficients can be averaged to 
yield quarterly, semi-annual, or annual crop coefficients (Richie et al., 1997), although averaging 
K
c
‟s reduces monthly precision and turfgrass may be under
-irrigated during stressful summer 
months. Factors influencing crop coefficient for turfgrasses are seasonal canopy characteristics, 
rate of growth, and soil moisture stress that would cause coefficients to decrease, root growth 
and turf management practices (Gibeault et al., 1989; Carrow, 1995). In specific cases were turf 
species and environment were previously studied, annual average K
c
can be suggested, like the 
recommendations of Gibeault et al. (1989) using a K
c
value of 0.8 for cool-season turfgrasses 
and 0.6 for warm-season turfgrasses. 
In this literature review, K
values for both warm-season and cool-season turfgrasses are 
described  and  discussed.  K
c
data  for  warm-season  grasses  includes  common  and  hybrid 
bermudagrasses,  St.  Augustinegrass,  bahiagrass,  centipedegrass,  zoysiagrass,  and  seashore 
paspalum. K
c
values for cool-season turfgrasses includes Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, 
tall fescue, mixed grasses, shortgrass and sagebrush. 
One of the most comprehensive studies provided an estimate of Penman K
c
‟s
for various 
grasses  grown  in  southeastern  U.S.  was  presented  by  Carrow  (1995),  including 
Tifway
‟ 
bermudagrass, 
common
bermudagrass, 
Meyer
zoysiagrass, 
common
centipedegrass, 
Raleigh
St. Augustinegrass, and 
both, „
Rebel II
and 
Kentucky-31
‟ tall fescue
. The study was 
conducted in Georgia  at  plot level,  during 1989 and  1990, where  these  seven turfgrasses 
(including warm-season and cool-season turfgrasses) are commonly used in the mid- to upper 
28 
Southeast  region.  Reference crop evapotranspiration was  determined  by  the  FAO modified 
Penman equation, which is described by Doorenbos and Pruitt (1984) as: 
ETope = c[W X Rn + (I-W) X f(u) X (ea-ed)] 
where,  ETope is reference evapotranspiration (mm), c is adjustment factor to compensate for the 
effect of day and night weather conditions, W is temperature related weighing factor for the 
effect  of  radiation  on  ETo  (mm),  I  is  irrigation  (mm),  Rn  is  net  radiation  in  equivalent 
evaporation (mm), f(u) is a wind function, ea is saturation vapor pressure of air at the mean daily 
air temperature (kPa) and ed is actual vapor pressure of air at the mean daily air temperature 
(kPa). Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) was derived from daily soil water extraction data from 
TDR probes obtained during dry-down periods following irrigation or rainfall events when no 
drainage occurred. The irrigation regime imposed moderate to moderately severe stress on the 
turfgrass but this would be representative of most home lawn irrigation regimes; however, this 
approach violates the “well
-
watered” conditions for crop coefficient development
(Allen et al., 
1998). ETc was determined by the soil-water balance method.  Therefore, K
c
was calculated 
dividing  ETc  by  the  FAO  modified  Penman  ETo.  For  all  grasses,  coefficients  varied 
substantially over short time periods, but data was presented as monthly averages. 
Tifway
bermudagrass exhibited least variation (0.53-0.97 for K
c
) and 
Meyer
zoysiagrass the most 
(0.51-1.14 for K
c
). In general, warm-season species ranged from 0.67 to 0.85, while cool-season 
grasses were 0.79 and 0.82. A similar study using cool-season and warm-season grasses under 
warmer conditions (California) was presented by Meyer and Gibeault (1987). They developed a 
set of crop coefficients for Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, tall fescue (cool-season 
grasses) and hybrid bermudagrass, zoysiagrass and seashore paspalum (warm-season grasses), 
that could be used by California turfgrass managers to determine on-site water use by both type 
of turfgrasses. Monthly crop coefficient data were developed in this experiment to evaluate 
responses  of  these  species  to  60%  and  80%  of  replacement  evapotranspiration  for  water 
conservation; under these stressed conditions, considerable error could exist in the K
c
values. K
c
values ranged from 0.60 to 1.04 for cool-season turfgrasses, and from 0.54 to 0.79 for warm-
season grasses. ETc was calculated by multiplying pan evaporation (E
pan
) times annual crop 
coefficients,  Kp,  that  were  determined  from  previous  research  using  applied  water  and 
evaporation pan data: 
29 
ETc = E
pan
x K
p
Turfgrass crop coefficients were estimated by dividing ETc and ETo. The latter was calculated 
using the modified Penman equation (Doorenbos and Pruitt, 1977). 
Another study comparing cool-season and warm-season turfgrasses was performed by 
Smeal et al. (2001) in New Mexico, from 1998 to 2000. One of the objectives was to formulate 
turfgrass crop coefficients. The warm-season species used were bermudagrass, buffalograss and 
blue gramma, while the cool-season species were bluegrass, perennial ryegrass and tall fescue 
seeded on individual plots. Sprinkler irrigation was applied to each plot, using catch-cans to 
collect and measure applied water after each irrigation. Soil moisture measurements were taken 
using a neutron probe in depth increments of 6 and 12 inches every 10 days during the active 
growing season. All plots were mowed weekly to a uniform height of 2.5 to 3.0 inches (3.5 to 4.0 
inches  for  blue  gramma  and  gramma/buffalograss  mix).  Appropriate  fertilization  and  pest 
management techniques were used. For the purpose of this study, the water requirement was 
defined as the ET measured at the location farthest away from the line-source where turf quality 
was judged  as still acceptable  (i.e.  not  necessarily  well-watered). Turf  ET per period was 
calculated using a soil water balance equation. Although not directly mentioned in the paper, 
potential  evapotranspiration  was  computed  using  the  Samani  and  Pessarakly  equation 
(http://weather.nmsu.edu/
): 
ETo = 0.0135 (KT)(Ra)(TD)
1/2
(TC+17.8) 
where TD is Tmax-Tmin (
o
C), TC is average daily temperature (
o
C) and Ra is extraterrestrial 
radiation (mm day
-1
). K
c
was calculated as the ratio between actual ET to ETo. Instead of 
monthly K
c
values, the authors presented K
c
‟s as a function of cumulative heat
units or growing 
degree-days (GDD). This was done to compensate for the effects of temperature on the initiation 
and duration of the active growing (green) period, and on plant growth and development during 
the season. K
c
values ranged from both 0.3 to 0.72 and from 0.15 to 0.60 for cool-season and 
warm-season turfgrasses, respectively. In addition, two equations for K
c
calculation based on 
GDD were presented: 
K
c
= (5.75 x 10
-4
GDD) 
(1.425 x 10
-7
GDD
2
) + (1.04 x 10
-11
GDD
3
for cool-season turfgrasses, and 
30 
K
c
= (0.00127 x GDD) 
(8.399 x 10
-7
GDD
2
) + (1.614 x 10
-10
GDD
3
for warm-season turfgrasses. 
Based on these equations, and knowing, from the authors, that base temperatures for 
cool-season and warm-season turfgrasses are 40F and 60F, respectively, monthly K
c
values were 
estimated using average monthly temperature from the area (http://www.weather.com
). GDD 
were estimated. For cool-season turfgrasses, March was the month with the lowest K
c
value 
(0.05) and July was the month with the highest value (0.72). Dormant conditions occurred from 
October to February. For warm-season turfgrasses, June showed the lowest K
c
value (0.28) and 
August the highest (0.60). It seems that dormancy occurred from October to April.  
Another study using bahiagrass 
Flugge
‟ 
was presented by Jia et al. (2007). Daily K
c
values were determined for July 2003 through December 2006 in central Florida, where the eddy 
correlation  method was  used to estimate crop evapotranspiration  rates,  under well-watered 
conditions. ETo was calculated using the standardized reference evapotranspiration equation. 
Monthly K
c
values were low in the winter time because of the dormant grass status, and high in 
the summer time, although the K
c
values also decreased in the summer time from peak values in 
May. The multiannual average K
c
value was minimum in January (0.35) and maximum in May 
(0.90). Jia et al. (2007) also calculated turfgrass K
c
values for southern Florida using Stewart and 
Mills (1967) Ft. Lauderdale, FL water use data for two warm-season grasses. Reference ET 
values were calculated using climate data for Miami, FL (USDC, 2007) where the daily average 
solar radiation values were estimated using Hargreaves‟ equation (Allen et al., 1998). The results 
showed that calculated K
c
values for southern FL were higher than those in north Florida, 
especially in winter months. The reason of this difference is likely due to growing conditions 
persisting all year in the southern part of the state, with higher temperatures along the year 
compared  to  north  Florida. The  K
c
value  was maximum  in  May  (0.99) and  minimum  in 
December  (0.70).  Another  study  in  the  southern area  of  Florida, the  water  budgets  of  a 
monoculture  St.  Augustinegrass  „Floratam‟  and  an  alternative  ornamental  l
andscape  were 
compared (Park and Cisar, 2006). ETa was determined by a water balance equation and ETo was 
estimated using the McCloud method. Low Kc values were obtained, probably because the 
McCloud method was developed empirically for and not accurate outside the climatic conditions 
of Gainesville.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested