31 
A study carried out in the humid northeast (Rhode Island) using Kentucky bluegrass 
(„Baron‟ and “Enmundi‟
varieties), red fescue, perennial ryegrass and hard fescue under well-
watered conditions during 1984 and 1985 showed that the mean crop coefficients ranged from 
0.97 for hard fescue to 1.05 for 
Baron
Kentucky bluegrass (Aronson et al., 1987a). And, as a 
conclusion, an averaged K
c
value of 1.0 would be appropriate for irrigation scheduling on all the 
grasses studied. K
c
values were obtained dividing ETc data from weighing lysimeters, and ETo 
computed from two predictive methods, the modified Penman equation (Burman et al., 1980) 
and pan evaporation. The exact form of the equation used was: 
ETo = [ Δ/ (Δ+ γ)] + [γ/ (Δ+ γ)]15.36 wf(ea –
ed) 
where ETo is reference crop evapotranspiration in J m
-2
day
-1
; Δ is the slope of the vapor 
pressure 
temperature curve in kPa/
o
C; γ is the psychometer constant in kPa/
o
C; Rn is net 
radiation in J m
-2
day
-1
; G is soil heat flux to the soil in J m
-2
day
-1
, wf is the wind function 
(dimensionless); and (ea-ed) is the mean daily vapor pressure deficit in kPa.  
Monthly crop coefficients for bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass was 
presented by Devitt et al., 1992. Two vacuum-drained lysimeters were installed at two golf 
courses and at a park in Las Vegas, NV. Each site was equipped with an automated weather 
station. One lysimeter was irrigated according to local management and the other lysimeter 
irrigated by input from an ET feedback system. Crop coefficients were calculated by dividing 
monthly ETa by Penman calculated ETo values. The greatest variability in the K
c
values (all 
sites) occurred during the winter months (December to February) and only during this period did 
both the high management turf (golf courses) and the low management turf (park) have similar 
K
c
values. Significant differences were observed the rest of the year as the K
c
values for the golf 
course sites were fit to a bell-shaped curve; the park site had a somewhat flat K
c
response. Since 
the soil type and water quality were similar at each site, as well as mixed grasses, differences 
were attributed to cultural management input. The park turf was simply stressed due to less water 
received by irrigation, compared to the golf sites. As a consequence, ETc was much lower at the 
site park than the golf sites. 
Brown et al. (2001) developed Penman Monteith crop coefficients for warm-season 
„Tifway‟ bermudagrass in summer and overseeded „Froghair‟ intermediate ry
egrass in winter 
under golf course fairway conditions at Tucson, AZ. Froghair is a new intermediate ryegrass 
Pdf text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf; find and replace text in pdf file
Pdf text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select text in a pdf; make pdf text searchable
32 
which is designed for the overseeding market in the Southern regions of the U.S. Intermediates 
are  genetic  crosses  using  annual  ryegrasses  and  perennial  ryegrasses  in  the  parentage 
(www.turfmerchants.com/varieties/TMi_Froghair.html
).  They  related  daily  measurements  of 
ETc obtained from weighing lysimeters to reference evapotranspiration (ETo) computed by 
means of the simplified form of the FAO Penman Monteith Equation (Allen et al., 1994, 1998) 
as shown in equation 4 (section 3.2.1).  Adequate plant nutrition and irrigation were provided to 
the turfgrasses. For warm-season overseeded bermudagrass, a minimum K
c
occurred in June 
(0.78) and a maximum K
c
in September (0.83). A constant K
c
of 0.8 would be effective for 
estimating ETc during the summer months, but not for non-overseeded bermudagrass, which has 
extended periods of slow growth and lower ETc during the spring and fall. Monthly K
c
‟s for 
cool-season 
overseeded „Froghair‟ intermediate ryegrass varied from 0.78 (Jan) to 0.90 (Apr), 
which showed that winter K
c
‟s were dependent upon temperature. Another study reporting K
c
values for Tifgreen and Midiron hybrid bermudagrasses, and Texturf-10 common bermudagrass 
growing at plot level from sod in Tucson, Arizona (Garrot and Mancino, 1994), showed average 
K
c
values ranging from 0.57 to 0.64 with Midiron being lowest and Texturf-10 being highest. 
Irrigation was conducted only when the turf showed symptoms of wilt. Time periods between 
irrigation events were referred to as soil dry down cycles (DDC). ET rate was determined using 
two methods: (i) through the determination of gravimetric soil moisture from soil cores (0 to 36 
in depth, using 12 in intervals) taken at the beginning (48 h after irrigation) and end of each 
DCC. The K
c
‟s were calculated by dividing the actual consumptive use (derived from the 
gravimetric samples) by the cumulative ETo [modified Penman equation (Doorenbos and Pruitt, 
1977)]. Daily K
c
values varied, however, from as high as 1.50 to as low as 0.10, but average K
c
values under their conditions ranged from 0.57 to 0.64. As soil water became limiting during the 
course of a DDC, K
c
values declined, sometimes to < 0.10. These values depended mostly on the 
availability of water. This study implemented deep  and infrequent irrigation regime under 
fairway conditions, when the turf showed symptoms of wilt and keeping the overall turfgrass 
quality above acceptable. 
A similar experiment applying deficit irrigation but using cool-season turfgrasses was 
presented by Ervin and Koski (1998) in Colorado. Kentucky bluegrass (KBG) and tall fescue 
(TF) turfs were subjected to increasing levels of drought through the use of a line-source 
irrigation system with the idea to develop water-conserving crop coefficients (K
c
) to be used 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
text select tool pdf; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
text searchable pdf; pdf text search
33 
with Penman equation estimates of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Their research indicated that 
water conservation can be encouraged while still maintaining acceptable turfgrass quality by 
irrigating every 3 days with K
c
values in the range of 0.60 to 0.80 for KBG and 0.50 to 0.80 for 
TF. 
Crop coefficients for rangeland were also determined (Wight and Hanson, 1990). This 
study used lysimeter-measured ET to determine K
c
‟s under non
-limiting water conditions from 
mixed grass, shortgrass, and sagebrush-grass.  From seasonal plots of daily ET/reference ET, 
lysimeter-measured ET, and daily precipitation, time periods were identified, following periods 
of precipitation, that met the conditions for determining K
c
. The sites were in South Dakota, 
Wyoming and Idaho. The K
c
values were relatively constant among the three study sites and 
over most of the growing season ranging from 0.75 to 0.90. According to the conclusions, these 
are crude estimates because the soil water requirements necessary for the determination of K
c
are 
seldom fully met, and it is difficult to determine when these conditions occur. 
Another factor contributing to the variation in K
c
values is the differing computation 
procedures used by the various researchers to estimate ETo. Recently, the FAO and ASCE have 
identified  this  disparity  in  ETo  computation  procedures  and  have  recommended  using  a 
standardized computation procedure based on the Penman-Monteith Equation to ensure uniform 
estimates of ETo
(Allen
et al., 1998).  
Table 5: Summary chart showing turfgrass species, K
c
,  methodology used to determine K
c
and respective 
references. 
Turfgrass species 
K
c
Study period 
length 
Methodology &  
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Bahiagrass 
Jan (0.35) 
Feb (0.35) 
Mar (0.55) 
Apr (0.80) 
May (0.90) 
Jun (0.75) 
Jul (0.70) 
Aug (0.70) 
Sep (0.75) 
Oct (0.65) 
Nov (0.60) 
Dec (0.45) 
July 2003 
through 
December 2006. 
ETc: Eddy 
correlation method. 
ETref: ASCE-EWRI 
equation (Allen et 
al.,2005) 
K
c
: ETc/ETo. 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Jia et al., 2009. 
Central Florida, 
FL. 
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
find text in pdf files; search pdf documents for text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
search pdf for text in multiple files; search a pdf file for text
34 
Turfgrass species 
K
c
Study period 
length 
Methodology &  
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
St. Augustinegrass + 
Bermudagrass 
Jan (0.71) 
Feb (0.79) 
Mar (0.78) 
Apr (0.86) 
May (0.99) 
Jun (0.86) 
Jul (0.86) 
Aug (0.90) 
Sep (0.87) 
Oct (0.86) 
Nov (0.84) 
Dec (0.71) 
5 years. 
ETc: data from 
Stewart and Mills, 
1967 (5-yr average 
montly data). 
ETref: Hargreaves 
equation (Allen et al., 
1998) using data for 
Miami. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Jia et al., 2009 
(using 5-yr 
average 
monthly ETc 
data from 
Stewart and 
Mills, 1967 for 
South Florida. 
Overseeded  froghair 
ryegrass  (Nov-May) 
Winter (3-yr avg.) 
Tifway  bermudagrass 
(Jun-Sept) 
Summer 
(3-yr avg.) 
Nov (0.82) 
Dec (0.79) 
Jan (0.78) 
Feb(0.79) 
Mar (0.86) 
Apr (0.90) 
May (0.85) 
Jun(0.78) 
Jul (0.78) 
Aug (0.82) 
Sep (0.83) 
Nov. 1994 to 
Sept. 1997. 
ETc: lysimeters 
(water balance) 
ETo: simplified FAO 
Penman-Monteith 
equation (ASCE 
equation., Allen et 
al., 1994, 1998, 
2005). 
K
c
: ETc/ETo. 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Brown et al., 
2001. Tucson, 
AZ. 
Cool-season (bluegrass, 
perennial ryegrass and 
tall fescue) 
Warm-season 
(bermudagrass, 
buffalograss and blue 
grama) 
Mar (0.05) 
Apr (0.20) 
May (0.44) 
Jun (0.64) 
Jul (0.72) 
Aug (0.69) 
Sep (0.64) 
Oct (0.61) 
Jun (0.28) 
Jul (0.54) 
Aug (0.60) 
Sep (0.59) 
1998 to 2000. 
ETc: soil water 
balance equation 
ETo: Samani and 
Pessarakli (1986) 
equation. 
Field experiment 
K
c
: ETc/ETo. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Smeal et al., 
2001. 
Farmington, 
NM. 
Kentucky Bluegrass 
Tall fescue 
0.60 to 0.80 
0.50 to 0.80 
1993 to 1994. 
ETr: (Kimberly-
Penman combination 
eq.(Jensen et al., 90). 
Eta: 80% ETr 
K
c
: ETa/ETr 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Ervin and 
Koski, 1998. 
Fort Collins, 
CO. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
select text in pdf; converting pdf to searchable text format
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
how to search pdf files for text; how to search text in pdf document
35 
Turfgrass species 
K
c
Study period 
length 
Methodology &  
water availability 
Reference/ 
Location 
Tifway bermudagrass 
Common bermudagrass 
Meyer zoysiagrass 
Common 
centipedegrass 
Raleigh St 
Augustinegrass 
Rebel II tall fescue 
Kentucky-31 tall fescue 
K
c
values are annual  
0.67 
0.68 
0.81 
0.85 
0.72 
0.79 
0.82 
First season: 
from 26 June to 
10 Oct 1989 (data 
on the left). 
Second season: 
from 5/4/90 to 
11/2/90 (data on 
the right). 
ETc: soil moisture 
content (TDR
s
during dry-down 
periods when no 
drainage occurred
.
ETref: FAO Penman 
equation 
(Doorenboos and 
Pruitt, 1984). 
K
c
= ETc/ETo 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Carrow, 1995. 
Griffin, GA. 
Bermudagrass/ 
Perennial rye 
Jan (0.44) 
Feb (0.43) 
Mar (0.67) 
Apr (0.76) 
May (0.74) 
Jun (0.89) 
Jul (0.89) 
Aug (0.82) 
Sep (0.82) 
Oct (0.77) 
Nov (0.81) 
Dec (0.51) 
1987 to 1989 
(two golf course 
sites). 
ETc: lysimeters 
(water balance). 
ETo: Modified daily 
Penman combination 
equation (Jensen, 
1973). 
K
c
= ETc/ETo. 
Both, well-watered 
and water stress 
conditions. 
Devitt et al., 
1992. Las 
Vegas, NV. 
Hybrid and common 
Bermudagrass: 
Texturf-10 
Tifgreen 
Midiron 
0.64 
0.60 
0.57 
1989 to 1991. 
These are annual 
K
c
s. 
Water use determined 
by gravimetric 
method. 
ETc=actual water use 
ETo=(mod. Penman, 
Doorenboos and 
Pruitt, 1977). 
K
c
= ETc/ETo. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Garrot and 
Mancino, 1994. 
Tucson, AZ. 
Mixed grass, shortgrass 
and sagebrush-grass 
0.82 
0.79 
0.85 
46 days at Newell 
(1969,1971). 
86 days at Gillete 
(1968-1970). 
121 days at 
Reynolds (1977-
1984). 
ETc: lysimeter (ETc 
was separated into an 
evaporation 
component [EP] and 
a transpiration 
component [Tp]. 
ETref: Jensen-Haise. 
K
c
= ETc/JHET 
(Jensen and Haise, 
1963).Well-watered 
conditions. 
Wight and 
Hanson, 1990. 
Newell, SD. 
Gillette, WY. 
Reynolds, ID. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
searching pdf files for text; search text in pdf image
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
how to select all text in pdf; search pdf files for text
36 
Turfgrass species 
K
c
Study period 
length 
Methodology 
Reference/ 
Location 
Kentucky bluegrass 
Red fescue 
Perennial grass 
Hard fescue 
July (1.03) 
Aug (0.84) 
Sept (1.0) 
July (0.98) 
Aug (0.83) 
Sep (0.99) 
July (1.05) 
Aug (0.88) 
Sept(1.02) 
July (0.98) 
Aug (0.80) 
Sep (0.94) 
From July to 
September, 1984-
1985. 
ETc: 
weighing lysimeters. 
ETo: Modified 
Penman equation 
(Burman et al., 1980). 
K
c
: ETa/ETo. 
Well-watered 
conditions. 
Aronson et al., 
1987a. 
Kingston, RI. 
Cool season grasses 
Jan (0.61) 
Feb (0.64) 
Mar (0.75) 
Apr (1.04) 
May (0.95) 
Jun (0.88) 
Jul (0.94) 
Aug (0.86) 
Sep (0.74) 
Oct (0.75) 
Nov (0.69) 
Dec (0.60) 
Aug. 1981 to 
Dec. 1983. 
ETc: equals the 
actual applied water 
divided by the extra 
water factor 
(EWF90), which was 
1.35 for this case. 
ETo= calculated 
using modified 
Penman equation 
(Doorenboos and 
Pruit, 1977). 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Meyer et al., 
1985. 
Riverside, CA. 
Warm-season grasses 
Jan (0.55) 
Feb (0.54) 
Mar (0.76) 
Apr (0.72) 
May (0.79) 
Jun (0.68) 
Jul (0.71) 
Aug (0.71) 
Sep (0.62) 
Oct (0.54) 
Nov (0.58) 
Dec (0.55) 
Aug. 1981 to 
Dec. 1983. 
ETc: equals the 
actual applied water 
divided by the extra 
water factor 
(EWF90), which was 
1.35 for this case. 
ETo= calculated 
using modified 
Penman equation 
(Doorenboos and 
Pruit, 1977). 
K
c
: ETc/ETo. 
Water stress 
conditions. 
Meyer et al., 
1985. 
Riverside, CA. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality Professional .NET PDF batch conversion control. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
how to select text in pdf reader; pdf text search tool
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
how to select text on pdf; search multiple pdf files for text
37 
Table 6: 
List of common methodologies used by the authors to determine reference ET. K
c
range  
Turfgrass type and maximum and minimum ETc values are shown too.
K
c
range 
Equation used 
Author 
Turfgrass type 
min 
max 
ASCE equation 
Jia et al., 2009 (North FL). 
Warm-season 
0.35 
0.90 
Jia  et  al.,  2009  (using  data 
from Stewart and Mills, 1967, 
South FL). 
Warm-season 
0.70 
0.99 
Brown et al., 2001. 
Warm-season 
0.78 
0.82 
Cool-season 
0.78 
0.90 
Penman /Modified Penman 
Erwin and Koski, 1998. 
Cool-season 
0.50 
0.80 
Carrow, 1995. 
Cool-season 
0.79 
0.82 
Aronson et al., 1987a. 
Cool-season 
0.72 
1.23 
Meyer and Gibeault, 1987. 
Cool-season 
0.60 
1.04 
Carrow, 1995. 
Warm-season 
0.67 
0.85 
Garrot and Mancino, 1994. 
Warm-season 
0.57 
0.64 
Devitt et al., 1992. 
Warm-season 
0.43 
0.89 
Samani and Pessarakli 
Smeal et al., 2001. 
Cool-season 
0.05 
0.72 
3.4. Water use affected by turfgrass characteristics and environmental factors 
Turfgrass ET rates vary among species and cultivars within species. Inter- and intra-
specific variations in ET rates can be explained by differences in stomatal characteristics, canopy 
configuration, growth rate and characteristics of the roots. Turfgrass breeding during the last 25 
years increased emphasis on developing new varieties which require less water, are more tolerant 
to heat, cold, or salinity stresses or improved disease or insect resistance (Kenna, 2006). 
Some of the root characteristics associated with drought resistance include enhanced 
water uptake from deeper in the soil profile, root proliferation into deeper soil layers and 
persistent  root growth in the  drying  surface  soil  (Huang et al.,  1997).  Other  studies also 
recommend the use of infrequent irrigation for better turfgrass quality (Bennett and Doss, 1960; 
Zazueta et al., 2000), because excessive irrigation, which keeps the root system saturated with 
water, can be harmful to the lawn (Trenholm et al., 2001). 
Both,  turfgrass  quality  and  resistance to  drought is  of primary interest to turfgrass 
managers as a result of irrigation practices. In a study using warm-season grasses common 
bermudagrass, centipedegrass, zoysiagrass and seashore paspalum, Huang et al. (1997) tested 
38 
four soil moisture treatments: (i) a control, water content in the entire soil profile kept at field 
capacity; (ii) upper 8 in soil drying while the lower 16 in segment was maintained at field 
capacity, (iii) upper 16 in soil drying, while the lower 8 in segment was kept at field capacity and 
(iv) a rewatering treatment. AP14 and PI 299042 paspalum (the former a Floridian ecotype), and 
TifBlair centipedegrass  produced higher  total  root length  (TRL)  in  the  entire  soil  profile. 
Rewatering caused further shoot growth recovery of the three previous ecotypes, but only partial 
recovery was observed for Zoysiagrass, bermudagrass and Adalayd paspalum. TRL declined 
significantly with the soil drying treatments for zoysiagrass and bermudagrass, but paspalum 
ecotypes were not affected by the treatments. Drought resistance of PI 509018 paspalum was 
equal to tifblair Centipedegrass but higher than AP14. The least resistant were Zoysiagrass, 
followed by bermudagrass  and Adalayd  paspalum.  Youngner et  al.  (1981) showed in two 
consecutive  studies  set  up  in  California,  the  first  one  for  two  warm-season  grasses  (St. 
Augustinegrass and common bermudagrass) and, the second one using two cool-season grasses 
(„Alta‟ tall fescue and „Merion‟ Kentucky bluegrass),
the effect of five irrigation treatments: (i) a 
control based on common practice; (ii) irrigation based on evapotranspiration from a pan, and 
(iii) three automatic irrigations activated by tensiometers at different settings, with the objective 
to develop guidelines for turfgrass irrigation practices. The field study, consisting of 20-by-20-ft 
plots containing two turf varieties, had four replications and subjected to sprinkler irrigation. St. 
Augustinegrass quality was good under all treatments, as well as bermudagrass. Mean maximum 
root depth across all treatments were higher for bermudagrass than for St. Augustinegrass, but no 
differences among the treatments for either species. Kentucky bluegrass used less water than tall 
fescue. The studies showed that tensiometers and evaporation pans were effective irrigation 
guides,  saving  significant  amount  of  water  as  a  result.  Variation  in  turf  quality  occurred 
frequently but was difficult to relate each to a specific irrigation treatment. 
Increased  mowing  height  and  amount  of  top  growth  can  be  expected  to  increase 
evapotranspiration by increasing the roughness of the plant canopy surface, by increasing the 
capacity for absorbing advective heat and by increasing root growth, which results in a greater 
soil water source to exploit (Kneebone et al., 1992). Most data on mowing height effect is 
observed with cool-season grasses. Within warm-season grasses, zoysiagrass, buffalograss and 
centipedegrass showed increased ETc rates at optimum heights of cut (Kim and Beard, 1984). 
Also, any cultural practice that increases leaf surface area, internode length and leaf extension 
39 
(i.e. nitrogen [N] fertilization), is expected to increase water use. Feldhake et al., (1983) reported 
a 13% higher ETc rate for Kentucky bluegrass in Colorado when 8.8 lb/1196 yd
2
of N was 
applied each month during spring and summer compared with only one application for the 
season, applied in spring. Also, soil compaction may affect ETc more than N source or N rates, 
since it may not allow the root system to function adequately due to the poor soil aeration, platy 
massive soil structure and low infiltration rates, which results in reduced water holding capacity 
of the soil (Huang, 2006). 
3.5. Ornamental plants water needs overview 
Reliable research-based data on landscape plants water requirements is very limited, with 
few sources of information offering quantitative estimates (Pittenger and Shaw, 2005), including 
the widely-referenced publication, Water Use Classification of Landscape Plants 
WUCOLS- 
(Costello and Jones, 1999) which is not based on scientific field research. One of the main 
reasons why there is little availability of scientific information is the large number of plant 
species, and the substantial resources needed to identify the water requirements of an individual 
species. WUCOLS is a list intended as a guide to help landscape professional identify irrigation 
water needs of landscape species or for selecting species and to assist in developing irrigation 
schedules for existing landscapes. This guide provides irrigation water needs evaluation for over 
1,900 species used in California landscapes, based on the observations and field experience of 41 
landscape horticulturists in California. Water needs categories assigned for each species were 
determined by consensus of the committee. These categories are: high (70-90% ETo), moderate 
(40 -60% ETo), low (10-30% ETo) and very low (<10% ETo). Assignments were made for each 
of six regions in California: region 1: North-Central coast; region 2: central valleys; region 3: 
south coastal; region 4: south inland valleys and foot hills; region 5: high and intermediate 
desert; region 6:  low desert.  All of these regions  are based on different climate zones in 
California. Each plant of the species list falls into one or more of the following vegetation types: 
trees (T), shrub (S), groundcovers (Gc), vines (V), perennial (P) and biennals (Bi). Cultivars with 
some exceptions are not mentioned. Turfgrasses were not evaluated by the committee, although 
WUCOLS includes  a list of  irrigation  requirements  for turfgrasses from  the  University of 
California ANR public 24191: Turfgrass ET map, central coast of California. However, this list 
has some limitations. It is also subjective (based on field observations rather than scientific data); 
40 
it is a partial list since not all landscape species are included, and last, not all regions of 
California are included in the evaluations. 
3.5.1. Ornamental plants evapotranspiration in Florida 
Erickson et al. (2001), carried out an study in Florida, comparing nitrogen runoff and 
leaching  between  a  turfgrass  landscape  (St.  Augustinegrass)  and  an  alternative  residential 
landscape which included twelve different ornamental ground covers, shrubs, and trees (50% 
native from Florida). The ornamental species used were the same as those used in the two studies 
previously  described.  ETc was determined  for each  landscape treatment based on  rainfall, 
irrigation, and percolate data measured during the experiment. The mean dry season ETc was 
estimated  to be  1.72  and  0.83  in  month
-1 
for  both St. Augustinegrass  and  mixed-species, 
respectively, while the mean wet season ETc was 4.11 in mo
-1
and 3.82 in mo
-1
for the same 
landscapes. With these data, the estimated total annual ETc for the turfgrass landscape would be 
35 in y
-1
and for the ornamental landscape 28 in y
-1
ETc and K
c
values of Viburnum odoratissimum (Ker.-gawl) grown in white and black 
multi-pot box system (MPBS) were measured in Florida during summer and fall (Irmak, 2005). 
From a previous study (Irmak et al., 2004) it was reported that the plants grown in the white 
MPBS had significantly higher growth rates and plant biomass production, since the black 
MPBS had heat induced stress caused by high root-zone temperatures. In summer, the measured 
ETc ranged from 12.12 to 13.15 in for the black and white MPBS plants, respectively; in fall, it 
ranged from 13.62 to 13.81 in for the black and white MPBS plants, respectively. K
c
values of 
plants growing in the black and white MPBS ranged from 0.64 to 1.29, respectively, during the 
summer and K
c
values ranged from 0.55 to 1.68 for the black and white MPBS, respectively, 
during the fall. For both seasons, the highest K
c
values were obtained at the end of the growing 
season.  
A study carried out in Florida using Viburnum odoratissimum (Ker.-gawl), Ligustrum 
japonicum Thunb., and Rhaphiolepsis indica Lindl. growing into 3 gal containers for 6 months 
were  irrigated under different  irrigation  regimes  consisting of an  0.7  in  daily  control  and 
irrigation to saturation based on 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% deficits in plant available water 
(management allowed deficits 
MAD) (Beeson, 2006). The results recommended 20%, 20% 
and 40% MAD for the previously mentioned woody ornamentals, respectively, for commercial 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested