how to open pdf file on button click in c# : Convert pdf to searchable text online SDK software service wpf windows html dnn Romero_Dukes_Turfgrass%20ET_Crop_%20Coefficient_%20Lit4-part1080

41 
production. The actual evapotranspiration for these results were 25% lower than the control 
conditions for Viburnum odoratissimum (Ker.-gawl) (33 vs 43 gal); 28.9% higher than the 
control conditions for Ligustrum japonicum Thunb. (36 vs 28 gal) and 10.4% higher than the 
control conditions for Rhaphiolepsis indica Lindl. (23 vs 20 gal). 
4. Estimating water needs for landscape plantings 
The irrigation requirements are well established for agricultural crops; however, in urban 
landscapes, irrigation requirements have been determined for many turfgrasses but not for most 
landscape  species.  Landscape  irrigation  increases  dramatically  during  summer  months  and 
contributes substantially to peak demand placed on municipal water supplies, and outdoor water 
use may account for 40 to 60% of residential water consumption (White et al., 2004). Estimates 
of landscape water needs are important to preserve water resources, to keep the landscape quality 
and to save money. Water is a limited natural resource that needs to be supplied according to the 
plant needs and so money can be saved since water costs continue to increase. The potential for 
plant injury caused by water deficits or excess can be minimized by identifying plant water needs 
(Costello et al., 2000). 
The prediction of water use in landscapes with multiple plant species is still incipient and 
has  just started (Havlak,  2003). There  is  a system  of estimating irrigation water  needs of 
landscapes, based on reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and a landscape coefficient (K
L
) which 
is a function of a species factor (k
s
), microclimate factor (k
m
) and  a density factor (k
d
) which has 
been developed and is currently being updated in California (Costello et al., 2000). However, this 
method includes information that is based on research and on field experience (observation) and 
readers are advised for some subjectivity in the method, and estimations of water needs are not 
exact values. Another methodology has been proposed by Eching and Snyder (2005) where the 
landscape coefficient (K
L
) estimation considers a species (K
s
), microclimate (K
mc
), vegetation 
(K
v
), stress (K
s
) and an evaporation (K
e
) factors. This method includes a computerized program 
called LIMP.XLS which is able to calculate ETo
rates, determine landscape coefficient (K
L
values, estimate landscape evapotranspiration (ET
L
) and determine irrigation schedules at daily 
basis. Finally, White et al. (2004) proposed to find a relationship between ETc and ETo for a 
multiple plant species landscape to calculate a landscape coefficient for use in the development 
of residential water budgets. 
Convert pdf to searchable text online - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
cannot select text in pdf file; can't select text in pdf file
Convert pdf to searchable text online - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search text in pdf using java; search pdf files for text programmatically
42 
4.1 The Landscape Coefficient Method 
The Landscape Coefficient Method (LCM) describes a method of estimating irrigation 
needs of landscape plantings in California on a monthly basis. It is intended as a guide for 
landscape professionals. The assignment of species coefficients was done by asking members of 
a committee to place the species  under different water  use categories  and no  actual field 
measurements support the values given in the study (Garcia-Navarro et al., 2004). Readers are 
advised that LCM calculations give estimates of water needs, not exact values, and adjustments 
to irrigation amounts may be needed in the field (Costello et al., 2000). Water needs of landscape 
plantings can be estimated using the landscape evapotranspiration formula: 
ET
L
= (K
L
) (ETo)  
(4) 
where  landscape evapotranspiration  (ET
L
) is equal to the landscape  coefficient  (K
L
) times 
reference evapotranspiration (ETo). The ET
L
formula differs from the ETc formula since the 
crop coefficient (K
c
) has been substituted for the landscape coefficient (K
L
). This change is 
necessary because of important differences which exist between crop or turfgrass systems and 
landscape plantings. 
4.1.1. The landscape coefficient formula 
Costello et al. (2000) pointed out the reasons why there must be a landscape coefficient: 
1) because landscape plantings are typically composed of more than one species, 2) because 
vegetation density varies in landscapes and 3) because many landscapes include a range of 
microclimates. These factors make landscape plantings quite different from agricultural crops 
and turfgrasses and they need to be taken into account when making water loss estimates for 
landscapes.  The  landscape  coefficient  estimates  water  loss  from  landscape  plantings  and 
functions as the crop coefficient but not determined in the same way. Species, density and 
microclimate factors are used to calculate K
L
K
L
= (k
S
) (k
d
)
(k
mc
(5)
By assigning numeric values to each factor, a value of K
L
can be determined. The 
selection of each numeric value will depend on the knowledge and gained experience of the 
landscape professional, which make the method largely subjective. 
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to Download and try RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF for .NET
pdf text searchable; search text in multiple pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
pdf make text searchable; find and replace text in pdf
43 
4.1.2. The landscape coefficient factors 
The species coefficient (k
s
): This factor ranges from 0.1 to 0.9 and are divided into 4 categories, 
very low, low, moderate and high. These species factor ranges apply regardless of vegetation 
type (tree, shrub, herbaceous) and are based on water use studies, and from agricultural crops. 
Relative water need requirements for plants have been completed for over 1800 sp (see the water 
use classifications of landscape species -WUCOLS III- list).  
The density coefficient (k
d
):  This factor is used in the landscape coefficient formula to account 
for differences in vegetation density among landscape plantings. This factor is separated into 
three categories: low (0.5
0.9), average (1.0) and high (1.1
1.3). Immature and sparsely planted 
landscapes, with less leaf area, are assigned a low category k
d
value. Planting with mixtures of 
trees, shrubs and groundcovers are assigned a density factor value in the high category. Plantings 
which are full but are predominantly of one vegetation type are assigned to the average category.  
The microclimate coefficient (k
mc
): This factor ranges from 0.5 to 1.4 and is divided into three 
categories: low (0.5
0.9), average (1.0) and high (1.1
1.4
). An „average‟ microclimate condition 
is equivalent to reference ET conditions: open-field setting without extraordinary winds or heat 
inputs  atypical  for  the location.  In  a  „high‟  microclimate  condition,  site  features  increase 
evaporative con
ditions (e.g. planting near streets medians, parking lots). „Low‟ microclimate 
condition is common when plantings are shaded for a substantial part of the day or are protected 
from strong winds.  
4.1.3. Irrigation efficiency and calculating the total amount of water to apply 
The ET
L
formula calculates the amount of irrigation water need to meet the needs of 
plants; however, this is not the total amount of water needed to apply. The landscape will require 
water in excess of that estimated by ET
L
since every irrigation system is inefficient to some 
degree. The total amount or water needed for a landscape planting is calculated using the 
following formula, in spite of the method use to determine irrigation efficiency: 
TWA = ET
L
/IE                                                       (6) 
Where TWA = Total Water Applied, ET
L
= Landscape Evapotranspiration and IE = Irrigation 
Efficiency. Just note that the IE factor needs to be addressed carefully when planning and 
managing landscapes. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
& searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP.NET MVC in IIS, ASP.NET Ajax, Azure cloud service, DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Convert PDF document page
text searchable pdf file; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
more companies are trying to convert printed business on artificial intelligence to extract text from documents will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
pdf searchable text; pdf text select tool
44 
5. Discussion and Conclusions 
As a group, warm-season turfgrasses have lower ETc rates than cool-season turfgrasses. 
Within warm-season grasses, species ETc rates ranged from 0.07 to 0.30 in d
-1
(bermudagrass), 
0.03 to 0.25 in d
-1
in d
-1
(bahiagrass), 0.16 to 0.22 in d
-1
(centipedegrass), 0.17 to 0.21 in d
-1
(buffalograss), 0.17 to 0.30 in d
-1
(St. Augustinegrass), 0.18 to 0.24 in d
-1
(seashore paspalum) 
and 0.17 to 0.37 in d
-1
(Zoysiagrass). Kentucky bluegrass exhibited very high water use rates (as 
high as 0.49 in d
-1
), followed by tall fescue (0.14 to 0.45 in d
-1
), bentgrass (max. of 0.40 in d
-1
), 
and hard fescue (0.12 to 0.37 in d
-1
). However, it is difficult to establish and recommend a 
minimum and maximum rate for a specific species since the results are mixed due to climatic and 
methodology differences in water use determination. However, it does appear that in general 
cool-season turfgrasses use more water than warm-season but that in some cases warm-season 
grass water use may approach cool-season water use rates under non-limiting water conditions. 
Results from Jia et al. (2009), Brown et al., (2001), Devitt et al. (1992), Atkins et al. (1991), 
Green et al. (1991) and Kneebone and Pepper (1982) showed high ETc values for warm-season 
turfgrasses; these experiments were set under well watered conditions or under high management 
treatment  (high  fertilization rates and  non-limiting soil  moisture),  which makes the results 
reliable since the plants had no water stress at all. 
Differences in reference evapotranspiration estimation impact many of the reviewed K
c
values; however, the Penman methods will likely agree the closest. A number of studies used 
slightly stressed turfgrass, due to either dormancy or water stress, conditions for K
c
development 
and these values should be avoided. For example, Jia et al. (2009) showed monthly K
c
values 
varying from very low in December (0.35) to high in summer (0.90). This difference was 
because K
c
was estimated over dormant as well as growing turfgrass. Compared to other results 
where turf K
c
values were estimated during growing periods, these K
c
values looked too low for 
a turfgrass K
c
. However, the annual range of values given by Jia et al. (2009) are appropriate for 
estimation of annual water needs. 
Minimum and maximum K
c
values ranged between 0.05 to 1.23. As for ETc, K
c
values 
were higher for cool-season grasses. However, under well watered conditions, warm-season 
grasses showed high Kc values that did approach those shown by cool-season grasses. In general, 
all turfgrasses had substantial changes in crop coefficient values over the time period when 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
how to select text in pdf and copy; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage One is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf find highlighted text
45 
measurements  were conducted. In  addition,  because green up and  dormancy  vary between 
regions, K
c
values may not be directly transferable unless adjusted. 
K
c
values developed by Jia et al. (2007), Brown et al. (2001), and Devitt et al. (1992) 
appear to follow accepted methodology for K
c
determination of warm-season turfgrass. 
It is important to understand the seasonal water use over a period of repeated years rather 
than relying only on short study periods. Seasonal water use differences can be attributed to 
different green up periods in the spring and dormancy periods in the fall and winter across grass 
varieties. The different growth periods across different climatic regions impacted the K
c
values.  
In contrast to turfgrasses, ornamental water requirements data are very scarce and most of 
the available data is not direct water use determination studies. The landscape coefficient method 
is presented here as a methodology to estimate a landscape coefficient (K
L
). K
L
multiplied by a 
reference evapotranspiration (ETo) could give an estimate of the water requirement for a specific 
group of plants in a determined location. However, this methodology is very subjective. 
6. Acknowledgements 
The authors want  to  thank  the  South West  Florida Water Management District for 
funding the development of this review. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in to export Word from multiple PDF files in
search pdf for text; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
This online guide content is Out Dated! Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications.
how to select text in pdf image; how to select all text in pdf file
46 
7. References 
Allen, R. G., Pereira, L. S., Raes, D. and Smith, M. 1998. Crop Evapotranspiration. Guidelines 
for computing crop water requirements. FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 56. Food and 
Agric. Org. of the United Nations, Rome, Italy. 300 p. 
Allen, R. G., Smith, M., Pereira, L. S., and Perrier, A. 1994. An update for the calculation of 
reference evapotranspiration. ICID Bull: 43(2):35-92. 
Allen, R. G., Walter, I. A., Elliot, R. L., Howell, T.A., Itenfisu, D., Jensen, M. E. and Snyder, R. 
2005.  The  ASCE  standardized  reference  evapotranspiration  equation.  ASCE  and 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 
Aronson, L. J., Gold, A. J., Hull, R. J. and Cisar, J. L. 1987b. Cool-season turfgrass responses to 
drought stress. Crop Science 27:1261-1266. 
Aronson, L.J., Gold, A.J., Hull, R.J. and Cisar, J.L. 1987a. Evapotranspiration of cool-season 
turfgrasses in the humid Northeast. Agronomy Journal 79:901-905. 
Atkins, C. E., Green, R. L., Sifers, S. I., and Beard, J. B. 1991. Evapotranspiration rates and 
growth characteristics of ten St. Augustinegrass genotypes. HortScience 26(12):1488-
1491. 
Augustin, B. J. 2000. Water requirements of Florida turfgrasses. University of Florida, IFAS, 
Coop. Exten. Pub. EP-024. UF/IFAS. 
Beard, J. 1994. The water-use rate of turfgrasses. TurfCraft Australia 39:79-81. 
Beard, J. and Kim, K. 1989. Low water-use turfgrasses. USGA Green Section Record. 27(1):12-
13. 
Beard, J. B. and Green, R. L. 1994. The role of turfgrasses in environmental protection and their 
benefits to humans. Journal of Environmental Quality Vol. 23 No. 3:452-460. 
Beard, J. B., Green, R. L. and Sifers, S. I. 1992. Evapotranspiration and leaf extension rates of 24 
well-watered, turf-type Cynodon genotipes. HortScience 27(9):986-988.  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
convert pdf to searchable text; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to
select text in pdf reader; pdf select text
47 
Beeson, Jr., R. C. 2006. Relationship of plant growth and actual evapotranspiration to irrigation 
frequency based on management allowed deficits for container nursery stock. Journal of 
the American Society for Horticultural Science 131(1):140-148. 
Bennett, O. L. and Doss, B. D. 1960. Effect of soil moisture level on root distribution of cool-
season forage species. Agronomy Journal 52:204-207. 
Blaney, H. F. and Criddle, W. D. 1950. Determining water requirements in irrigated areas from 
climatological  and  irrigation  data.  United  States  Department  of  Agriculture,  Soil 
Conservation Service. 
Bowman D. C. and Macaulay, L. 1991. Comparative evapotranspiration rates of tall fescue 
cultivars. HortScience 26(2):122-123.  
Brown,  P.  2003.  Turfgrass  consumptive  use  values  for  the  Tucson  area.  Turf  irrigation 
management series: IV.  AZ1313. The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. 
Brown, P. W., Mancino, C. F., Young, M. H., Thompson, T. L., Wierenga, P. J. and Kopec, D. 
2001. Penman-Monteith crop coefficients for use with desert turf systems. Crop Science 
41:1197-1206. 
Burman, R. D., Nixon, P. R., Wright, J. L. and Pruitt, W. O. 1980. Water requirements. Chap. 6. 
In M.E. Jensen (ed.). Design and operation of irrigation systems. ASAE Monograph 3. 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers, St. Joseph, MI. 
Busey, P. 2002. Turfgrass in a nutshell. University of Florida 
Fort Lauderdale. Available on-
line: [http://grove.ufl.edu/~turf/turfcult/nutshell.html]. Verified: March 27, 2006. 
Carrow,  R.  N.  1995.  Drought  resistance  aspects  of  turfgrasses  in  the  Southeast: 
Evapotranspiration and crop coefficients. Crop Science 35:1685-1690. 
Costello, L. R. and Jones, K. S. 1999. WUCOLS III. In: A guide to estimating irrigation water 
needs  of  landscape  plantings  in  California.  University  of  California  Cooperative 
Extension. California Department of Water Resources. 
Costello, L. R., Matheny, N. P. and Clark, J. R. 2000. The landscape coefficient method. In: A 
guide to estimating irrigation water needs of landscape plantings in California. University 
of California Cooperative Extension. California Department of Water Resources. 
48 
Devitt, D. A. and Morris, R. L. 2008. Urban landscape water conservation and the species effect. 
In: J.B. Beard and M.P. Kenna. Water quality and quantity issues for turfgrasses in urban 
landscapes. The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, IO, USA.  
Devitt, D. A., Morris, R.L. and Bowman, D.C. 1992. Evapotranspiration, crop coefficients, and 
leaching fractions of irrigated desert turfgrass systems. Agronomy Journal 84:717-723.  
Doorenbos, J. and Pruitt, W.O. 1984. Guidelines for predicting crop water requirements. FAO 
Irr. And Drain. Paper 24. United Nations, Rome, Italy. 
Doorenbos, J. and W. Pruitt, W.O. 1977. Crop water requirements. FAO 24. 
Duble,  R.  L.  2006.  Water  management  on  turfgrasses.  Available  on  line: 
[http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/water.html]. Verified: Nov 21
st
, 2006. 
Duble, 
R. 
L. 
2008a. 
Buffalo 
Grass. 
Available 
on 
line: 
[http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/buffalo.html]. Verified: Oct 16
th
, 2008). 
Duble, 
R. 
L. 
2008b. 
Kentucky 
Bluegrass. 
Available 
on 
line: 
[http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/bluegrass.html]. Verified: Oct 16
th
, 2008). 
Duble, 
R. 
L. 
2008c. 
Tall 
Fescue. 
Available 
on 
line: 
[http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/tallfesc.html]. Verified: Oct 16
th
, 2008). 
Dugas, W.A. and Bland, W.L. 1989. The accuracy of evaporation measurements from small 
lysimeters. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 46:119-129. 
Dukes, M.D., Trenholm, L.E., Gilman, E., Martinez, C.J. Cisar, J.L., and Yeager, T.H. 2008. 
Frequently asked questions about landscape irrigation for Florida-friendly landscaping 
ordinances. University of Florida, IFAS, Coop. Exten. Pub. ENH1114. UF/IFAS. 
Eching,  S. and Snyder, R. L. 2005. Estimating urban  landscape evapotranspiration.  ASCE 
Conference  Proceeding.  World  Water  and  Environmental  Resources  Congress, 
Anchorage, Alaska, USA. 
Ekern, P. C. 1966. Evapotranspiration by Bermudagrass Sod, Cynodon dactylon L. Pers., in 
Hawaii. Agronomy Journal 58:387-390.  
49 
EPA WaterSense. 2007. Weather- or sensor-based irrigation control technology notification of 
intent. 
Meeting 
Summary. 
Tampa, 
FL. 
Available 
at: 
[http://www.epa.gov/WaterSense/docs/irr_control_meeting_summary508.pdf] 
Erickson, J. E., Cisar, J. L., Volin, J. C. and Snyder, G. H. 2001. Comparing nitrogen runoff and 
leaching between an alternative residential landscapes. Crop Science 41:1889-1895. 
Ervin, E.  H.  and Kosky,  A.  J.  1998. Drought avoidance  aspects  and crop coefficients of 
Kentucky bluegrass and Tall fescue turfs in the semiarid west. Crop Science 38:788-795. 
FDEP,  2002.  Florida  Water  Conservation  Initiative.  Florida  Department  of  Environmental 
Protecion. 
Available 
online 
at: 
[http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/waterpolicy/docs/WCI_2002_Final_Report.pdf]  
Feldhake, C. M., Danielson, R. E. and Buttler, J. D. 1983. Turfgrass evapotranspiration. I. 
Factors influencing rate in urban environments. Agronomy Journal Vol. 75 824-830. 
Fender, D. 2006. Urban perennial grasses in times of a water crisis: benefits and concerns. 
Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). Water quality & quantity 
issues for turfgrasses in urban landscapes, Las Vegas, NV.  
Garc
ί
a-Navarro, M. C., Evans, R. Y., and Savé, R. 2004. Estimation of relative water use among 
ornamental landscape species. Scientia Horticulturae 99: 163-174. 
Garrot, D. J. and C. F. Mancino. 1994. Consumptive water use of three intensively managed 
bermudagrasses growing under arid conditions. Crop Science 34:215-221. 
Gibeault, V. A., Cockerham, S., Henry, J. M. and Meyer, J. 1989. California Turfgrass: it‟s use, 
water requirement and irrigation. California Turfgrass Culture Vol. 39, numbers 3 and 4. 
Cooperative Extension, University of California. 
Green, R. L., Beard, J. B. and Casnoff, D. M. 1990a. Leaf blade stomatal characterizations and 
evapotranspiration rates of 12 cool-season perennial grasses. HortScience 25(7):760-761.  
Green, R. L., Kim, K. S. and Beard, J. B. 1990b. Effects of flurprimidol, mefluidide, and soil 
moisture on St. Augustinegrass evapotranspiration rate. HortScience 25(4):439-441.  
Green, R. L., Sifers, S. I., Atkins, C. E. and Beard, J. B. 1991. Evapotranspiration rates of eleven 
Zoysia genotypes. HortScience 26(3):264-266.  
50 
Grimmond,  C.  S. B.,  Isard, S.A.,.and  Belding,  M.J.  1992. Development and  evaluation of 
continuously weighing mini-lysimeters. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 62:205-
218. 
Havlak,  R.  2003.  Predicting  water  use  in  urban  residential  landscapes.  Available  online: 
[http://towtrc.tamu.edu/funding/usgs/2003-04/havlak.pdf].  Verified:  November  20
th
2008. 
Howell,  T.  A.  and  Evett,  S.  R.  2006.  The  Penman-Monteith  Method.  Available  on-
line:[http://www.cprl.ars.usda.gov/wmru/pdfs/PM%20COLO%20Bar%202004%20corre
cted%209apr04.pdf.  Verified: April, 21 2006. 
Huang, B. 2006. Turfgrass  water  use and  conservation  strategies. Council for Agricultural 
Science and Technology (CAST). Water Quality & Quantity Issues for Turfgrasses in 
Urban Landscapes. 
Huang, B. and  Fry, J. D. 2000. Turfgrass  Evapotranspiration. Journal of Crop Production: 
Agricultural Management in Global Context 2(2):317-333. 
Huang, B., Duncan, R. R. and Carrow, R. N. 1997. Drought-resistance mechanisms of seven 
warm-season turfgrasses under surface soil drying: I. Shoot response. Crop Science 
37:1858-1863. 
Irmak, S. 2005. Crop evapotranspiration and crop coefficients of Viburnum odoratissimum (Ker.-
Gawl). Applied Engineering in Agriculture 21(3):371-381 
Irmak, S., Haman, D. Z., Irmak, A., Campbell, K. L., Jones, J. W. and Crisman, T.L. 2004. 
Measurement and analyses of growth and stress parameters of Viburnum odoratissimum 
(Ker-gawl) grown in MPBS. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science. 
39(6):1445-1455. 
Jensen,  M.  E.,  1973  (ed.).  Consumptive  use  of  water  and  irrigation  water  requirements. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, New York. 
Jensen, M. E., Burman, R. D. and Allen, R. G. 1990. Evapotranspiration and Irrigation Water 
Requirements. ASCE Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practice No. 70. American 
Society of Civil Engineers, New York. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested