how to open pdf file on button click in c# : How to select text in pdf image SDK Library service wpf asp.net windows dnn SBA%20Export%20Business%20Planner1-part1151

www.sba.gov
2. Introduction to Exporting    11
Dispelling Export Myths
Myth: Exporting is only for large companies.
Fact: Small firms account for 97% of all exporters.
Myth:  Only tangible projects can be exported.
Fact:  Service exports are a fast-growing and profitable endeavor. In fact, U.S. service exports 
more than doubled between 1990 and 2000, increasing from $148 billion to $299 billion. 
By 2010, U.S. service exports reached $543 billion annually!
Myth: It’s difficult to get financing for exporting.
Fact:  The U.S. government offers many opportunities for business financing and loans.  
Check out Chapter 6. Financing Your Export Venture.
Myth: I don’t need to export; my domestic market is strong.
Fact:  Your overseas-based competition is almost certainly looking at the U.S. market also. 
Meeting your competition in their market will lead to a global competitive advantage for you. 
Myth: You need to be fluent in one or more foreign languages to export.
Fact:  The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Foreign and Commercial Service can provide 
translators for small businesses. In addition, many small businesses have found that 
English is spoken in many countries around the world. 
Myth: Only experienced exporters should accept payment in foreign currencies.
Fact:  Only quoting in U.S. dollars makes U.S. exporters less competitive. There are many 
tools, strategies and government programs to help you, as a new exporter, manage 
foreign risk.
Myth: Licensing requirements for exporting are not worth the effort.
Fact:  Most products do not need an export license. Exporters simply write “NLR” for “no 
license required” on the Shipper’s Export Declaration. (An export license is needed only 
when exporting certain restricted commodities, like high-tech goods or defense-related 
items, or when shipping to a country currently under a U.S. trade embargo or other trade 
restrictions.)
Myth:  Companies interested in exporting have to “go it alone” to learn how.
Fact:   There is vast array of services available, from financing to training to one-on-one  
counseling. Start exploring these resources today at SBA’s Exporting page—and be  
sure to review Chapter 3. Training and Counseling.
Government’s Role: Working Together 
for Your Exporting Success
Entrepreneurs and small business owners like you drive innovation, strengthen the U.S.’s 
competitive edge, and create good jobs for American workers. With government support, you can 
get the export financing you need to buy space and equipment, hire more workers, and gear up for 
moving your company into exporting.
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
Back to  
Previous View
How to select text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to search a pdf document for text
How to select text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make pdf text searchable; convert pdf to searchable text online
www.sba.gov
2. Introduction to Exporting    12
In 2010, President Barack Obama signed an Executive Order to promote U.S. exports. The National 
Export Initiative was launched as a critical component of stimulating economic growth by increasing 
the export of goods, services, and agricultural products. The initiative works to help firms—especially 
small businesses—overcome the hurdles to entering new export markets by assisting with financing, 
and in general by pursuing a government-wide approach to export advocacy abroad, among 
other steps. There is even a government web portal comprised of many government partners and 
dedicated exclusively to promoting export growth: www.export.gov.
The Small Business Administration supports small businesses interested in exporting through 
counseling, training and financing. Options for small business exporters include Export Express and 
the Export Working Capital Program (EWCP). The Export-Import Bank of the United States also has 
loans that can help small businesses who are looking to export their goods and services. You’ll learn 
more about these options in Chapter 6. Financing Your Export Venture.
SBA Export Financing: At-A-Glance
SBA provides export financing through three different types of 
loan programs:
• Export Working Capital Program (EWCP)
• Export Express Program   
• International Trade Loan Program
Learn more in Chapter 6. Financing Your Export Venture.
SBA Video Clips
View small business success stories online!
Getting Started in Exporting
Why export? 
Finding Your First Customer
Knowing the Export Environment
Marketing Strategies/Market Research
Creating an Export Business Plan
Connecting with Foreign Buyers 
Meet Your Customers–Traveling There
Identifying Marketing Channels/Activities
Understanding Partnerships and Distributors
Getting Your Product from Here to There
Providing Good Customer Service
Understanding Legal Considerations
Financing
Case Studies
ATC International
Nanmac
Omega Technologies
CA Wireless
The Produce Connection
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
Back to  
Previous View
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. C# programming sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF. // Get page 3 from the document.
how to select text in pdf reader; converting pdf to searchable text format
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
search text in multiple pdf; search text in pdf using java
www.sba.gov
2. Introduction to Exporting    13
Exporting: What’s In It for Your Business?
International trade enables producers of goods and services to move beyond the U.S. market of 
more than 300 million people and sell to the world market of nearly 7 billion people. If you are new 
to the international arena, you are encouraged to take advantage of the tremendous resources and 
services available to you from SBA and other United States government agencies.  
There has never been a better time to expand into exporting. Today’s business climate is offering: 
• Reduction in trade barriers
• Available productive capacity in the United States to handle manufacturing expansion 
• A ready supply of workers
• Lower costs for transportation and communications
For your business, this can mean:
• Increased sales and profit
• Reduced dependence on the domestic market alone
• Extended sales potential and product life of existing products
• Stabilized seasonal market/sales fluctuations
Case Study: Moving from Domestic to International Business
Who: Southwest Windpower, located in Flagstaff, AZ
Opportunity: When Southwest Windpower began producing battery-charged small wind 
generators in 1987, the company realized that there could be great potential for the worldwide 
distribution of wind generators. Andrew Kruse, executive vice president for business 
development, discovered SBA resources while looking online for information about exporting.  
Results: An SBA export counselor advised Kruse on  
how the Export Working Capital Program could be  
used to expand his business. Today, Southwest Windpower 
distributes products to more than 120 countries. Nearly half  
of its sales of $425 million in 2008 came from international 
markets. In 2009, Southwest Windpower was recognized  
as SBA’s National Exporter of the Year during National Small 
Business Week. 
“Financing to help expand 
exports has been one of the 
greatest challenges for our 
business. The SBA has been 
crucial to our success,” said 
Andy Kruse.
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Text: Insert
search multiple pdf files for text; search a pdf file for text
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Header/Footer: Insert/Delete
how to select all text in pdf file; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
: Information on government 
Financing Your Small Business Exports, Foreign Investments or Projects
www.export.gov/begin
A beginner’s overview at 
:
Will Your Next Customer Come From?
Where
assistance to small businesses wanting to export their products and services.
Information on government programs that offer training, counseling, and financial 
:
Explore Exporting
to view the many resources available for beginning exporters.  
As you embark on the path toward equipping your business for exporting, you’ll likely find it helpful 
Resource List for Beginning Exporters
: A handy primer describing SBA’s enhanced export financing 
International Trade Loan Fact Sheet
exporters.   
: All about fast and easy loans for small 
SBA Export Express—A Fact Sheet for Small Businesses
loans, insurance and grant programs. 
options.
Export Working Capital Program—A Fact Sheet for Small Businesses: SBA’s role in export financing.
www.sba.gov
2. Introduction to Exporting    14
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
NEXT UP 
Chapter 3. 
Training and Counseling
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
select text in pdf; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
how to make a pdf document text searchable; find text in pdf image
www.sba.gov
2. Introduction to Exporting    15
Notes:      
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
Save
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported image formats: PNG Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
how to select text in a pdf; find and replace text in pdf
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
make pdf text searchable; pdf editor with search and replace text
www.sba.gov
3. Training and Counseling   16
3
Training and Counseling  
Information
Local Counseling  
& Training
SBA District Offices
Small Business Development  
Centers (SBDCs)
SCORE
Women’s Business Centers 
(WBCs)
U.S. Export Assistance 
Centers (USEACs)
As you proceed through the export readiness process and begin to identify opportunities and potential 
hurdles, you will likely have more questions than when you started. Luckily, there is a wealth of  
training and counseling services available. These range from information for the beginning exporter 
who is determining export readiness to more advanced training and counseling opportunities as your 
export venture grows.  
As you work through various sections of this Planner and review/update your Export Business Plan 
and Marketing Plan over time, you will likely wish to seek additional training opportunities and  
educational resources.  
Opportunities for counseling include:
• Small Business Development Centers, with over 950 offices across the country
• SCORE — Counselors to America’s Small Business, with more than 400 offices
• Women’s Business Centers, more than 110 locations
• State-Level Exporting Offices (check your state website for contact information)
Exporters who take the export-readiness assessment at export.gov will be referred to the appropriate 
counseling office.
Local Counseling & Training
Business guidance and support are crucial to increasing your odds of long-term exporting success.
SBA encourages you to take advantage of counseling, training and business development  
specialists providing free and low-cost services in your area.
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
search pdf documents for text; pdf find and replace text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
how to select text in pdf image; pdf select text
www.sba.gov
3. Training and Counseling   17
SBA District Offices
SBA’s District Offices are responsible for providing companies with information for enhancing and 
growing their businesses. SBA’s District Offices also oversee the delivery of SBA’s Technical  
Assistance programs throughout the states, such as:
• Financial assistance for new or existing businesses through guaranteed loans made by area bank 
and non-bank lenders.
• Free counseling, advice and information on starting a business through SCORE Learn more.
• Free consulting services through the network of Small Business Development Centers. SBDCs 
also conduct training events throughout the district—some require a nominal registration fee. 
Learn more.
• Women’s Business Ownership Representatives are available to advise women business owners. 
Learn more.
See opportunities for online training with SBA.
Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs)
Starting a business can be a challenge, but there is help for you in your area. Small Business  
Development Centers (SBDCs) are partnerships primarily between the government and colleges/ 
universities, and administered by the Small Business Administration. SBDCs provide educational 
services for small business owners, including export counseling and training.   
Locations
• Located in all 50 states as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Territories.
• Operated state-wide or at a state region-wide level.
• 63 Lead Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs).
• Lead organization coordinates program services offered to small businesses through a network of 
subcenters and satellite locations in each state. 
• Each center has a director, staff members, volunteers and part-time personnel.
• Certain SBDCs have a focus on international trade. Find these through the lead SBDCs.
Offerings
• SBDC services include, but are not limited to, assisting small businesses with financial, marketing, 
production, organization, engineering and technical problems and feasibility studies.
• All services given at SBDCs are free and confidential.
• Additional low-cost training options are available.
Eligibility
• Assistance from an SBDC is available to anyone interested in beginning a small business for the 
first time or improving or expanding an existing small business and who cannot afford the services 
of a private consultant.
Find an SBDC
• Visit the Association of Small Business Development Centers website to find your nearest SBDC.
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
SCORE
SCORE, known as “Counselors to America’s Small Business,” is a nonprofit association comprised  
of 11,500 volunteer business counselors throughout the United States and its territories. SCORE 
members are trained to serve as counselors, advisors and mentors to aspiring entrepreneurs and 
business owners. These services are offered at no fee, as a community service. Here are some of the 
ways you can get in touch with SCORE and start getting the business advice you are looking for:
• SCORE Online: Choose a mentor. Ask your business questions with the click of a mouse.
• Visit Your Local SCORE Office: Make an appointment with a mentor and talk face-to-face or attend 
a business workshop.
• Online Workshops: Check out one of the free, online workshops or register for a webinar.
• Business eNewsletters: Subscribe to the eNewsletter and get business tips and interviews with  
leading experts.
Visit the SCORE Website today!
Women’s Business Centers (WBCs)
Women’s Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers 
designed to help women start and grow small businesses. Although few are currently providing  
export counseling, WBCs operate with the mission to “level the playing field” for women entrepreneurs, 
who still face unique obstacles in the world of business.   
• Through the management and technical assistance provided by the WBCs, entrepreneurs— 
especially women who are economically or socially disadvantaged—are offered comprehensive 
training and counseling on a vast array of topics in many languages to help them start and grow 
their own businesses.
• Visit the SBA Office of Women’s Business Ownership to learn more about their program, how they 
can help your business, and where to find your closest WBC.
U.S. Export Assistance Centers (USEACs) 
www.sba.gov
3. Training and Counseling   18
United States. They provide help for small business owners who are further along in their exporting 
plans/initiatives.
Each USEAC is staffed by professionals from the SBA, the U.S. Department of Commerce,  
Export-Import Bank of the U.S., and other public and private organizations. Together, their mission 
is to provide the help you need to compete in today’s global marketplace. Your local U.S. Export 
Assistance Center is your one-stop shop, designed to provide export assistance for your small- or 
medium-sized business.
.
Find your local U.S. Export Assistance Centers
U.S. Export Assistance Centers (USEACs) are located in major metropolitan areas throughout the 
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
NEXT UP 
Chapter 4. 
Getting Started: Creating an Export Business Plan
www.sba.gov
3. Training and Counseling   19
Notes:      
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
Save
www.sba.gov
4. Getting Started: Creating an Export Business Plan    20
4
Getting Started:   
Creating an Export Business Plan
Information
The Importance 
of Planning
Export Readiness: Profiling  
Your Current Business
Conduct an  
Industry Analysis
Identifying Products 
With Export Potential 
Marketability
Determining Your  
Expansion Needs  
Setting Your  
Export Goals
Worksheets
> Market Expansion: Benefits/Trade-offs  
Business Analysis
Industry Analysis
Products with Export Potential
Matching Products to Global Trends/Needs
Most Penetrable Markets
Markets to Pursue
Short- and Long-Term Goals
Once you have reviewed the Benefits of Exporting and are familiar 
with the many Government Resources that are available to assist 
you, you are ready to begin the planning process.
Immediate next steps involve determining your small business’ 
export readiness and creating an initial Export Business Plan. [Later, 
in Chapter 5, you will develop a Marketing Plan for your product/
service.]  
While it may be tempting to jump right into a Marketing Plan, 
it is critical to first assess the current state of your business.  
Assessment enables you to evaluate potential and identify gaps 
to gain a clear understanding of what is necessary for growing 
your business into the international marketplace. What’s more, this 
comprehensive process will equip you with the information you’ll  
need to make good decisions as you expand into exporting.
As with all of the chapters in this Planner, the information and 
worksheets are integrated throughout, to guide you through the 
suggested planning steps. Proper planning for exporting is what  
can put you on the road to success!
FACTS
1. With Exporting, you can:
• Increase sales and profit
• Reduce dependence on the  
U.S. market 
• Stabilize seasonal fluctuations
2. Nearly 96% of today’s consumers 
live outside the U.S.
3. Two-thirds of the world’s 
purchasing power is in foreign 
countries. 
4. Outside U.S. borders are markets 
that represent 73% of the world’s 
purchasing power, 87% of its 
economic growth, and 95% of its 
consumers. Yet, fewer than 2% of 
U.S. businesses export. 
Back to  
Previous View
Back to Beginning 
of Chapter
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested