how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : Search pdf files for text programmatically Library application component .net html wpf mvc scenarios.lab52-part1193

(2) Non-wildland-urban interface (non-WUI) zone [MZ-2 in the ouput]:
Objective.–Non-WUI treatments were designed primarily to salvage timber following major
wildfires and insect outbreaks.
Spatial constraints and priorities.–Treatments were excluded from private lands, unsuitable
timberland (as designated), riparian zones, and roadless areas. All other lands were
considered eligible for treatments.
Intensity.–Given spatial constraints above, approximately 17,000 ha of land are eligible for
treatments in the non-WUI zone. The goal was to salvage up to a maximum of 2,000 ha in
any decade experiencing extensive wildfires and/or insect outbreaks.
Treatment regime.–The basic silvicultural treatments included a combination of “clearcut”
and “individual tree selection” in RMLands. Both treatments were single entry treatments
without follow-up. Treatment units were distributed in aggregated fashion in units of 4-40 ha
for clearcut and 10-200 ha for individual tree selection.
Questions to ponder:
3.1 Given your current understanding of RMLands, and Landscape Disturbance-Succession Models in general, what
would be an alternative strategy for simulating climate change that is significantly different than the one
implemented in this experiment?
3.2 Similarly, what would be an alternative strategy for simulating fire suppression that is significantly different than
the one implemented in this experiment?
3.3 Similarly, what would be an alternative strategy for simulating vegetation treatments that is significantly different
than the one implemented in this experiment?
Step 4. Run the simulations and quantify landscape structure
The next step is to run the simulations and quantify the structure of the simulated landscape
trajectories. Given the limitation of this lab, it is not feasible or that important for you to learn how
to parameterize and run RMLands. Moreover, it is time-consuming and somewhat tedious to run
these eight simulations and analyze the output using Fragstast. Thus, we have already done this for
you in advance, as follows:
• RMLands simulations.–Each scenario was run for 2,000 years. The cover-condition (covcond)
output grids plus a suite of grids associated with wildfires and pine beetles were saved in a
separate folder for each scenario (...\exercises\scenarios\results\scenario).
• FRAGSTATS analysis.–The cover-condition (covcond) grids output from each scenario were
analyzed with FRAGSTATS. For the purposes of this exercise, we chose a broad suite of
metrics encompassing a variety aspects of landscape pattern, including both structural and
functional metrics at the class and landscape level. For the functional metrics, we applied the
edgedepth and edge contrast weights constructed based on expert opinion. All the files used to
complete the FRAGSTATS analysis are included in ...\exercises\scenarios\fragstats. At the class
level, we enabled the classes corresponding to two cover types: (1) mixed-conifer forest-
ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir and (2) mesic-wet spruce-fir forest and woodland. The
Lab. 5 Pg. 21
Search pdf files for text programmatically - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to searchable text online; how to select text in pdf and copy
Search pdf files for text programmatically - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf editor with search and replace text; how to search pdf files for text
FRAGSTATS output files have been saved and are included in ...\exercises\scenarios\results.
The landscape and class metrics are included in fragout.land and fragout.class, respectively. 
Questions to ponder:
4.1 Given your current understanding of RMLands and the disturbance scenarios implemented in this experiment,
what is your prediction for the relative effect of future climate on landscape structure? Specifically, which aspects of
landscape structure will be effected and how will they be effected?
4.2 Similarly, what is your prediction for the effect of fire suppression on landscape structure? Specifically, which
aspects of landscape structure will be effected and how will they be effected?
4.3 Similarly, what is your prediction for the relative effect of your vegetation treatment scenario on landscape
structure? Specifically, which aspects of landscape structure will be effected and how will they be effected?
Step 5. Examine the results
The final step is to examine the results. There are numerous ways to examine the results, graphically
and statistically, as follows. 
5.1 View simulation grids
The first thing we can do is visually examine the simulation output grids. This can be a challenging
and time-consuming task due to the many different output grids available. Here, we will focus on
examining only a small subset of the spatial data layers produced by the simulation. 
(1) Perhaps the easiest way to view the simulation is as a slide show. Here, we will view a slide show
of the simulation based on the cover-condition, wildfire mortality, and mountain pine beetle
mortality grids in which each slide represents a 10-year time step. To view a slide show of any of
these output grids for any of the scenarios, simply navigate to the desired folder containing images
(e.g,. ...\exercises\scenarios\results\movies\fc-letburn-notreat\covcond\ and right click on the first
image and choose “preview”. With any luck, it will open with Windows Picture and Fax Viewer and
you can advance through the slides at your own pace:
(2) A second more tedious option is to view the output grids themselves in ArcMap. While not
necessary, if you want to view the grids in this way, open up the ArcMap project
(...\exercises\scenarios\scenarios.mxd) and load any of the stored output grids in the corresponding
results folders.
5.2 Summarize results using R
The second thing we can do is examine the results statistically. For this purpose, we will use the R
language and statistical computing environment (note, it is assumed that you have pre-installed the
R software). Note, detailed instruction on the use of R is beyond the scope of this exercise, so the
instructor will guide you through the following steps.
Open the R interface: Start ( Programs ( R ( R 2.4.0 (or higher)
For the series of R functions used in this exercise, you can execute these functions from the script 
provided. To open the provided R script, do the following:  
Lab. 5 Pg. 22
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
TIFF files compression and decompression method and Image files compression and images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded search index.
convert pdf to searchable text; search text in multiple pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
searching pdf files for text; select text pdf file
From the R console:
Select ‘open script’ from the ‘file’ drop-down menu: File ( Open script
Navigate to and open the following file:
...\exercises\scenarios\scripts\rmlstats.calls.R
To execute a line of the script, do either of the following:
• With the cursor on the desired line, enter control R from the keyboard
• With the cursor on the desired line, right click mouse and select ‘run line or selection’
Now let’s look at the results of the simulation. To begin, we need to load the RMLands R stats
library (rmlstats.R):
source('.../exercises/scenarios/scripts/rmlstats.R')
Important: Note the use of forward slashes ‘/’ instead of the customary backslash.
The rmlstats.R library includes a number of scripts that can be used to create pre-formatted tables
and graphs. For this exercise we will focus on a several different tables and graphs useful for
comparing scenarios. Each table and/or graph is produced by calling one of the pre-existing rmlstats
functions, as described below. 
In using the rmlstats functions below, note the following:
• Most of the functions contain the same set of arguments, e.g., session=, start.step=,
stop.step=, and var=, so once you get used to using these arguments to modify the query, it
is basically the same for all functions.
• All of the functions contain a session= or scenario= argument that allows you to specify
single or multiple scenarios. In all cases, the single scenario query produces a different table
and/or plot than the multiple scenario query. In general, it is useful to first produce a single
scenario query in order to familiarize yourself with the nature of the output and then
produce a multiple scenario query to compare scenarios. Ultimately, the multiple scenario
queries will be most useful for this exercise.
• The multiple scenario queries can be done using all of the existing scenarios (dy default) or
any specific set of scenarios. Given that we have 5 scenarios, the plots may be too cluttered
to visualize effectively. It may be more useful to focus on specific comparisons. For
example, to examine the effect of climate on the simulated range of variability (SRV) in
landscape structure, it may be useful to compare scenarios that differ only in climate, such as
5 vs 7 or 6 vs 8.
• Most of the functions have an outfile= argument, which is a logical; i.e., if outfile=TRUE,
then output files will be generated and saved to disk using a default naming convention. The
default is always outfile=FALSE.
1. Area disturbed summary.–Examine the tabular and graphical summary of the total area
Lab. 5 Pg. 23
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links.
select text in pdf file; how to make a pdf document text searchable
VB.NET PDF - Convert CSV to PDF
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF to batch convert multiple RTF files to adobe PDF files. are able to convert RTF to PDF programmatically with VB
find and replace text in pdf; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
disturbed by timestep for each natural disturbance process and scenario, as follows:
darea('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=5,start.step=1)
A separate table and graph is produced for each disturbance process. 
• To advance through the disturbance processes, simply hit the return key (you may have to
click the cursor in the console window before hitting enter).
• To save the graph as a bitmap for use in a presentation, right click on the graph and select
“copy as bitmap” and then paste directly into your presentation.
To change the first timestep to be displayed, change the start.step= argument.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the session number using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare particular scenarios in single plot, by
specifying a vector of session ids, as follows:
darea('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=c(7,8),start.step=1)
Or you can omit the session= argument altogether and all the unique session id’s in the
darea.csv file will be compared. 
darea('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1)
Note, when multiple sessions are specified, this function produces a clustered bar chart, with
each cluster representing a different scenario (session id) and the bars representing the mean
area disturbed per timestep (by default) for low, high and any mortality disturbances.
To view the ‘minimum’, ‘maximum’, or ‘median’ area disturbed per timestep, instead of the
default ‘mean’, specify the var= argument, as follows:
darea('.../exercises/scenarios/results/', start.step=1,var=’median’)
2. Treated area summary.–Examine the tabular and graphical summary of the total area treated per
timestep for each management type and management zone, as follows:
tarea('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=1,start.step=1)
Note a couple of things. First, the treated area represents the acreage actually treated during a
timestep, not the total area under management at any point in time. Second, the tarea.csv table
that this function calls only contains records for the vegetation treatment scenarios (session 1),
so any calls to the function with other sessions will produce an error. Lastly, the codes reported
in the output correspond to the codes used to parameterize the model, as follows:
MZ1 = Wildland-urban interface (WUI) zone
• MZ1-15 = includes individual tree selection treatment of the cool-moist forest cover
types (e.g., western hemlock-western red cedar, dry-mesic spruce-fir forest and
Lab. 5 Pg. 24
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
to Create New PowerPoint File and Load PowerPoint from Other Files. searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics programmatically.
how to select all text in pdf file; how to make pdf text searchable
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
Users How to Create New Word File and Load Word from Other Files. is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics programmatically.
how to select text in a pdf; search text in pdf using java
woodland, and mesic-wet spruce-fir forest and woodland) within the WUI.
• MZ1-11 = includes restoration treatment of the warm-dry forest cover types (e.g., mixed
conifer forest-ponderosa pine-Douglas fir) combined within the WUI.
MZ2 = Non WUI zone
• MZ2-11 = includes clearcut salvage treatments and individual tree selection salvage
treatments in all forest cover types combined outside the WUI.
To change the first timestep to be displayed, change the start.step= argument.
3. Rotation period summary.–Examine the tabular summary of the observed rotation period by
cover type for each disturbance process and scenario. Only the cover types eligible for a
particular disturbance (as defined in the model) are displayed. Rotation period is defined as the
number years required to disturbed an area equal in size to the area under consideration (e.g.,
extent of a particular cover type) and it is equivalent to the overall point-specific mean return
interval (MRI) for the area under consideration.
rotation('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=5,start.step=1,step.length=10)   
A separate table is produced for each disturbance process with the following summary: 
• Total area (ha) for each eligible cover type and for all eligible cover types combined.
• Rotation period (years) for low mortality, high mortality and any mortality disturbance for
each eligible cover type and for all eligible cover types combined.
To change the first timestep to be displayed, change the start.step argument.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the session number using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single table and save
the output to a csv file, as follows:
rotation('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,step.length,outfile=TRUE)
Note, when multiple sessions are included, this function produces a table in which the columns
represent the different scenarios.
The default table compares the rotation period for ‘any mortality’ disturbances (any.mort). To
compare ‘low’ or ‘high’ mortality rotation periods,  specify the var= argument as follows:
rotation('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,step.length=10,var='low.mort',
outfile=TRUE)
Although though you were not responsible for calibrating the model (this was done in advance
by the instructors), it is useful to examine how well the simulation results agree with certain
expectations or targets for key parameters. Although there is no consensus on the best way to
calibrate LDSMs, for our purpose, it is most useful to compare the observed disturbance
rotation periods with the user-specified target rotation periods, as follows:
Lab. 5 Pg. 25
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
C#.NET using this Word document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Create Word Document from Existing Files Using C#. Create Word From PDF.
pdf find highlighted text; converting pdf to searchable text format
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
pdf text search; make pdf text searchable
rotation('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=5,start.step=20,step.length=10)   
Note, here we arbitrarily changed the start.step to 20 (200 years) to account for the model
equilibration period.
Compare the simulation results with the following wildfire targets specified by expert teams as
part of the Landfire project. Again, it would be prudent to pay attention to only those cover
types with substantial area in the simulation landscape. Note, the values in the table below are
mean wildfire return intervals or rotation periods in years.
Cover type
mri.low.mort mri.high.mort mri.any.mort
Riparian
133
200
80
Mixed Conifer Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir
23
300
21
Mixed Conifer Forest-Larch
50
200
40
Mixed Conifer Forest-Grand Fir
100
220
69
Subalpine Woodland and Parkland
270
400
161
Western Hemlock-Western Red-cedar Forest
133
200
80
Western Hemlock-Western Red-cedar: Cedar Groves
2365
385
334
Dry-Mesic Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland
400
200
133
Mesic-Wet Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland
3420
180
172
Montane-Foothill Deciduous Shrubland
400
100
80
Columbia Plateau Low Sagebrush Steppe
143
250
91
Montane Sagebrush Steppe
400
100
80
Lower Montane-Foothill-Valley Grassland
na
17
17
Subalpine-Upper Montane Grassland
na
150
150
Conifer Swamp
na
400
400
Montane Douglas-fir Forest and Woodland
54
75
31
4. Cover-condition (seral stage) range of variability and departure summary.–Examine the tabular
summary of the simulated range of variability (SRV) in cover-condition and the departure of the
current condition from the SRV, as follows:
covcond('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',session=5,start.step=1,cover.names=
c('Mesic-Wet Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed Conifer Forest-Ponderosa
Pine-Douglas fir'))   
Two summary tables are produced, as follows:
Cover-condition class statistics.–This table provides a summary of the simulated range of
variability in the distribution of area among condition classes (i.e., seral stages) for each cover
type and the departure of the current landscape from the simulated range of variability for each
condition class, and has the following fields:
• covcond.id = unique numeric code for each cover-condition class (corresponds to grid)
• cover.type = cover type name (from the cover.csv table)
Lab. 5 Pg. 26
• condition.class = condition class name (from the condition.csv table)
• SRV0% – SRV100% = simulated range of variability in percent of the cover type comprised
of the corresponding condition class based on percentiles of the simulated distribution,
where SRV0% = the 0  percentile or the minimum simulated value observed, SRV25% =
th
the 25  percentile of the simulated distribution, and so on.
th
• SRV.cv = simulated range of variability coefficient of variation. This is a measure of relative
variability computed by taking the difference between the 95  and 5  percentiles and
th
th
dividing by the median (50  percentile), and multiplying by 100 to convert to a percentage.
th
This measure is analogous to a standard coefficient of variation which is computed by taking
the standard deviation divided by the mean.
• current.%cover = current landscape condition regarding the percent of the cover type
comprised of the corresponding condition class. 
• current.%SRV = current landscape departure from the simulated range of variation, defined
here as simply the percent of the simulated distribution less than the current landscape value.
Cover type SRV departure.–This table provides a summary of the computed cover type departure
index (CTDI). This index represents the overall departure of a cover type from the simulated
range of variability in the distribution of area among condition classes. This table has the
following fields:
• cover.type = cover type name (from the cover.csv table)
• total area = total area (ha) of cover type
• SRV departure = cover type departure index, ranging from 0 (no departure) to 100 (outside
the simulated range of variability)
To change the first timestep to be displayed, change the start.step argument.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the session number using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single table and save
the output to a csv file, as follows:
covcond('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,cover.names=c('Mesic-Wet
Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed Conifer Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas
fir'),outfile=TRUE)
Note, when multiple sessions are included, this function produces a table in which the columns
represent the different scenarios.
The default table compares the seral stage distribution for the ‘median’ simulated range of
variability (srv50%). To compare other SRV quantiles (srv0%, srv5%, srv25%, srv75%, srv95%,
srv100%) or the SRV coefficient of variation (srv.cv),  specify the var= argument, as follows:
covcond('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,cover.names=c('Mesic-Wet
Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed Conifer Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas
fir'),var='srv.cv',outfile=TRUE)
5. Cover-condition (seral-stage) distribution trajectory.–Examine the trajectory of change in the
Lab. 5 Pg. 27
seral-distribution, as follows:
covcond.plot('.../exercises/scaling/results/',session=5,start.step=1,step.length=10,
cover.names=c('Mesic-Wet Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed Conifer
Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir'))
A separate plot is produced for each cover type, depicting its seral stage distribution over time.
Specifically, for each timestep, the proportion of area in each condition (seral stage) class is
depicted as a separate color in a 100% stacked bar chart.
Change the start.step to 0 in order to visualize the equilibration period (and current departure) in
the seral stage distribution.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the session number using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single plot, as follows:
covcond.plot('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,session=5,start.step=1,
step.length=10,cover.names=c('Mesic-Wet Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed
Conifer Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir'))
Note, when multiple sessions are included, this function produces a clustered bar chart, with
each cluster representing a different scenario (session id) and the bars representing the SRV 50%
(by default). Specifically, the default plot compares the seral stage distribution for the ‘median’
simulated range of variability (srv50%). To compare other SRV quantiles (srv0%, srv5%,
srv25%, srv75%, srv95%, srv100%) or the SRV coefficient of variation (srv.cv),  specify the
var= argument, as follows:
covcond.plot('.../exercises/scenarios/results/',start.step=1,step.length=10,
cover.names=c('Mesic-Wet Spruce-Fir Forest and Woodland','Mixed Conifer
Forest-Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir'),var='srv.cv')
6. Landscape metric range of variability and current departure.–Examine the tabular summary of
the SRV in landscape pattern and current departure based on the FRAGSTATS landscape-level
metrics, as follows:
fragland(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
scenarios='hc-letburn-notreat',start.step=1,outfile=TRUE)
Note that LID.path is the path listed in the FRAGSTATS output file in the LID column but only
up to but including the scenario folder. In addition, note the change in the argument name from
‘sessions’ to ‘scenarios’ and that scenarios are referenced by their name not their session ID
number (due to differences in the RMLands and FRAGSTATS output).
Note, the structure of this table is very similar to that of the covcond table (see description
above), the only difference being that instead of unique cover-condition classes (rows), we have
Lab. 5 Pg. 28
landscape metrics. The landscape departure index (LDI) is computed in the same manner as the cover
type departure index (CTDI) and represents the average departure among landscape metrics.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the scenario name using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single table and save
the output to a csv file, as follows:
fragland(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
start.step=1,outfile=TRUE)
Note, when multiple scenarios are specified, this function produces a table in which the columns
represent the different scenarios. Specifically, the table compares the ‘median’ simulated range of
variability (srv50%) in each landscape metric. To compare other SRV quantiles (srv0%, srv5%,
srv25%, srv75%, srv95%, srv100%) or the SRV coefficient of variation (srv.cv),  specify the
var= argument as follows:
fragland(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
start.step=1,var='srv.cv',outfile=TRUE)
7. Landscape metric trajectory.–Examine the trajectory of change in each landscape metric, as
follows:
fragland.plot(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
scenarios='hc-letburn-notreat',start.step=1,step.length=10)
This function produces a figure for each landscape metric depicting its simulated trajectory of
change over time. In addition, the value of the metric for the current landscape and the 5 , 50 ,
th
th
and 95  percentiles of the simulated distribution are plotted as horizontal lines.
th
Change the start.step to 0 in order to visualize the equilibration period (and current departure) in
each landscape metric. 
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the scenarios name using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single plot, as follows:
fragland.plot(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
start.step=1,step.length=10,cex.legend=1)
By omitting the scenarios= argument altogether all the unique scenarios in the fragout.land file
will be compared. Or you can view particular scenarios by specifying a vector of scenario names.
Lab. 5 Pg. 29
8. Landscape metric probability density functions.–Examine the probability density functions for
each landscape metric, as follows:
fragland.pdf.plot(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
scenarios='hc-letburn-notreat',start.step=1)
This function produces a figure for each landscape metric depicting its probability density for
the period designated. In addition, the value of the metric for the current landscape and the 5 ,
th
50 , and 95  percentiles of the simulated distribution are plotted as vertical lines.
th
th
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the scenarios name using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single plot, as follows:
fragland.pdf.plot(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
infile='fragout.land',LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
start.step=1,cex.legend=1)
By omitting the scenarios= argument altogether all the unique scenarios in the fragout.land file
will be compared. Or you can view particular scenarios by specifying a vector of scenario names.
9. Class metric range of variability and current departure.–Examine the tabular summary of the
SRV in landscape pattern an departure based on the FRAGSTATS class-level metrics, as
follows:
fragclass(path='c:/work/landeco-umass/exercises/scenarios/results/',
inland='fragout.land',inclass='fragout.class',
LID.path='D:\\landeco\\exercises\\scenarios\\results\\',
scenarios='hc-letburn-notreat', gridname='covcond',start.step=1,
classes=c('MW_SF:LATE_OP','MCF_PPDF:LATE_OP'),
metrics=c('PLAND','ED','AREA_AM','GYRATE_AM','SHAPE_AM','CORE_AM',
'DCORE_AM','CAI_AM','CWED','TECI','CLUMPY','IJI','AI'),
outfile=TRUE)
This function produces a separate table for each unique class (cover-condition class) in the
FRAGSTATS class output file; otherwise, each table is exactly like the one for the landscape
metrics. The classes= argument allows you to specify which classes you want to compute
statistics for and the metrics= argument allows to specify which metrics to display. Leaving these
argument off altogether of setting them to NULL will produces statistics for all classes and all
metrics.
To change the scenario to be displayed, change the scenarios name using the table in step 3.
Alternatively, it may be more effective to compare all of the scenarios in single table and save
the output to a csv file, as follows:
Lab. 5 Pg. 30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested