how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : How to search text in pdf document application SDK tool html wpf web page online slaa0130-part1271

1995
Mixed-Signal Products
Application Report
SLAA013
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search text in multiple pdf; select text in pdf
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search text in pdf using java; how to select text in pdf and copy
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Texas Instruments and its subsidiaries (TI) reserve the right to make changes to their products or to discontinue
any product or service without notice, and advise customers to obtain the latest version of relevant information
to verify, before placing orders, that information being relied on is current and complete. All products are sold
subject to the terms and conditions of sale supplied at the time of order acknowledgement, including those
pertaining to warranty, patent infringement, and limitation of liability.
TI warrants performance of its semiconductor products to the specifications applicable at the time of sale in
accordance with TI’s standard warranty. Testing and other quality control techniques are utilized to the extent
TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Specific testing of all parameters of each device is not necessarily
performed, except those mandated by government requirements.
CERTAIN APPLICATIONS USING SEMICONDUCTOR PRODUCTS MAY INVOLVE POTENTIAL RISKS OF
DEATH, PERSONAL INJURY, OR SEVERE PROPERTY OR ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE (“CRITICAL
APPLICATIONS”). TI SEMICONDUCTOR  PRODUCTS ARE  NOT DESIGNED,  AUTHORIZED,  OR
WARRANTED TO BE SUITABLE FOR USE IN LIFE-SUPPORT DEVICES OR SYSTEMS OR OTHER
CRITICAL APPLICATIONS. INCLUSION OF TI PRODUCTS IN SUCH APPLICATIONS IS UNDERSTOOD TO
BE FULLY AT THE CUSTOMER’S RISK.
In order to minimize risks associated with the customer’s applications, adequate design and operating
safeguards must be provided by the customer to minimize inherent or procedural hazards.
TI assumes no liability for applications assistance or customer product design. TI does not warrant or represent
that any license, either express or implied, is granted under any patent right, copyright, mask work right, or other
intellectual property right of TI covering or relating to any combination, machine, or process in which such
semiconductor products or services might be or are used. TI’s publication of information regarding any third
party’s products or services does not constitute TI’s approval, warranty or endorsement thereof.
Copyright    1999, Texas Instruments Incorporated
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf searchable text converter; pdf text search tool
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
text searchable pdf; pdf text searchable
iii
Contents
Section
Title
Page
1 Introduction
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
2 The Ideal Transfer Function
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
2.1 Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
2.2 Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC)
3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3 Sources of Static Error
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3.1 Offset Error
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3.2 Gain Error
5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3.3 Differential Nonlinearity (DNL) Error
6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3.4 Integral Nonlinearity (INL) Error
7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3.5 Absolute Accuracy (Total) Error
8
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
4 Aperture Error
9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
5 Quantization Effects
10
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
6 Ideal Sampling
12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
7 Real Sampling
13
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8 Alaising Effects and Considerations
14
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.1 Choice of Filter
14
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2 Types of Filter
14
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2.1 Butterworth Filter
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2.2 Chebyshev Filter
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2.3 Inverse Chebyshev Filter
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2.4 Cauer Filter
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.2.5 Bessel-Thomson Filter
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8.3 TLC04 Anti-Aliasing Butterworth Filter
16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
search pdf documents for text; find and replace text in pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
pdf select text; pdf find highlighted text
iv
List of Illustrations
Figure
Title
Page
1. The Ideal Transfer Function (ADC)
2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
2. The Ideal Transfer Function (DAC)
3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
3. Offset Error
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
4. Gain Error
5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
5. Differential Nonlinearity (DNL)
6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
6. Integral Nonlinearity (INL) Error
7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
7. Absolute Accuracy (Total) Error
8
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
8. Aperture Error
9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
9. Quantization Effects
10
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
10. Ideal Sampling
12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
11. Real Sampling
13
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
12. Aliasing Effects and Considerations
14
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
13. TLC04 Anti-aliasing Butterworth Filter
16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
find and replace text in pdf; pdf find and replace text
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
searching pdf files for text; how to search pdf files for text
1
1 INTRODUCTION
This application report discusses the way the specifications for a data converter are defined on a manufacturers data sheet
and considers some of the aspects of designing with data conversion products. It covers the sources of error that change
the characteristics of the device from an ideal function to reality.
2 THE IDEAL TRANSFER FUNCTION
The theoretical ideal transfer function for an ADC is a straight line, however, the practical ideal transfer function is a
uniform staircase characteristic shown in Figure 1. The DAC theoretical ideal transfer function would also be a straight
line with an infinite number of steps but practically it is a series of points that fall on the ideal straight line as shown in
Figure 2.
2.1 Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
An ideal ADC uniquely represents all analog inputs within a certain range by a limited number of digital output codes.
The diagram in Figure 1 shows that each digital code represents a fraction of the total analog input range. Since the analog
scale is continuous, while the digital codes are discrete, there is a quantization process that introduces an error. As the
number of discrete codes increases, the corresponding step width gets smaller and the transfer function approaches an
ideal straight line. The steps are designed to have transitions such that the midpoint of each step corresponds to the point
on this ideal line.
The width of one step is defined as 1 LSB (one least significant bit) and this is often used as the reference unit for other
quantities in the specification. It is also a measure of the resolution of the converter since it defines the number of
divisions or units of the full analog range. Hence, 1/2 LSB represents an analog quantity equal to one half of the analog
resolution.
The resolution of an ADC is usually expressed as the number of bits in its digital output code. For example, an ADC
with an n-bit resolution has 2
n
possible digital codes which define 2
n
step levels. However, since the first (zero) step
and the last step are only one half of a full width, the full-scale range (FSR) is divided into 2n – 1 step widths.
Hence
1 LSB
FSR 2
n
–1 forann-bitconverter
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
search multiple pdf files for text; make pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
search pdf files for text programmatically; how to select text in pdf
2
0 ... 101
Analog Input
Value
Ideal Straight Line
Center
Step Width (1 LSB)
0 ... 100
0 ... 011
0 ... 010
0 ... 001
0 ... 000
0
1
2
3
4
5
Digital Output
Code
RANGE OF
ANALOG
INPUT
VALUES
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
CODE
Step
4.5  5.5
0 ... 101
3.5  4.5
0 ... 100
2.5  3.5
0 ... 011
1.5  2.5
0 ... 010
0.5  1.5
0 ... 001
 0.5
0 ... 000
Analog Input
Value
0
1
2
3
4
5
+1/2
LSB
–1/2
LSB
Inherent Quantization Error (± 1/2 LSB)
CONVERSION CODE
Quantization
Error
Midstep Value
of 0 ... 011
Elements of Transfer Diagram for an Ideal Linear ADC
Figure 1. The Ideal Transfer Function (ADC)
3
2.2 Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC)
A DAC represents a limited number of discrete digital input codes by a corresponding number of discrete analog output
values. Therefore, the transfer function of a DAC is a series of discrete points as shown in Figure 2. For a DAC, 1 LSB
corresponds to the height of a step between successive analog outputs, with the value defined in the same way as for
the ADC. A DAC can be thought of as a digitally controlled potentiometer whose output is a fraction of the full scale
analog voltage determined by the digital input code.
5
Digital Input Code
Ideal Straight Line
Step Height (1 LSB)
4
3
2
1
0
0 ... 000 0 ... 001
0 ... 011
0 ... 101
Step
Digital Input Code
Analog Output Value
0 ... 000
0 ... 001
0 ... 010
0 ... 011
0 ... 100
0 ... 101
0
1
2
3
4
5
Step Value
CONVERSION CODE
0 ... 010
0 ... 100
Analog Output
Value
Elements of Transfer Diagram for an Ideal Linear DAC
Figure 2. The Ideal Transfer Function (DAC)
4
3 SOURCES OF STATIC ERROR
Static errors, that is those errors that affect the accuracy of the converter when it is converting static (dc) signals, can
be completely described by just four terms. These are offset error, gain error, integral nonlinearity and differential
nonlinearity. Each can be expressed in LSB units or sometimes as a percentage of the FSR. For example, an error of 1/2
LSB for an 8-bit converter corresponds to 0.2% FSR.
3.1 Offset Error
The offset error as shown in Figure 3 is defined as the difference between the nominal and actual offset points. For an
ADC, the offset point is the midstep value when the digital output is zero, and for a DAC it is the step value when the
digital input is zero. This error affects all codes by the same amount and can usually be compensated for by a trimming
process. If trimming is not possible, this error is referred to as the zero-scale error.
0
1
2
3
001
000
011
010
Analog Output Value
Digital Output Code
000
001
010
011
2
1
3
Digital Input Code
Analog Output Value (LSB)
Actual
Offset Point
Actual
Diagram
Ideal
Diagram
(a) ADC
(b) DAC
0
Ideal Diagram
+1/2 LSB
Nominal
Offset Point
Offset Error
(+1 1/4 LSB)
Offset Error
(+1 1/4 LSB)
Nominal
Offset Point
Actual
Diagram
Actual
Offset Point
Offset error of a Linear 3-Bit Natural Binary Code Converter
(Specified at Step 000)
Figure 3. Offset Error
5
3.2 Gain Error
The gain error shown in Figure 4 is defined as the difference between the nominal and actual gain points on the transfer
function after the offset error has been corrected to zero. For an ADC, the gain point is the midstep value when the digital
output is full scale, and for a DAC it is the step value when the digital input is full scale. This error represents a difference
in the slope of the actual and ideal transfer functions and as such corresponds to the same percentage error in each step.
This error can also usually be adjusted to zero by trimming.
0
5
6
7
101
000
111
110
Analog Input Value (LSB)
Digital Output Code
000
100
101
110
111
5
4
7
6
Digital Input Code
Analog Output Value (LSB)
Actual Gain Point
Nominal Gain
Point
Gain Error
(– 3/4 LSB)
Actual Diagram
(1/2 LSB)
Ideal Diagram
(a) ADC
(b) DAC
0
Actual Gain
Point
Nominal Gain Point
Ideal Diagram
Gain Error
(– 1 1/4 LSB)
Gain Error of a Linear 3-Bit Natural Binary Code Converter
(Specified at Step 111), After Correction of the Offset Error
Figure 4. Gain Error
6
3.3 Differential Nonlinearity (DNL) Error
The differential nonlinearity error shown in Figure 5 (sometimes seen as simply differential linearity) is the difference
between an actual step width (for an ADC) or step height (for a DAC) and the ideal value of 1 LSB. Therefore if the
step width or height is exactly 1 LSB, then the differential nonlinearity error is zero. If the DNL exceeds 1 LSB, there
is a possibility that the converter can become nonmonotonic. This means that the magnitude of the output gets smaller
for an increase in the magnitude of the input. In an ADC there is also a possibility that there can be missing codes i.e.,
one or more of the possible 2n binary codes are never output.
0
1
2
3
4
5
(b) DAC
0 ... 101
0 ... 100
0 ... 011
0 ... 010
0 ... 001
0 ... 000
0 ... 110
(a) ADC
Analog Input Value (LSB)
Digital Output Code
0 ... 000
0 ... 001
0 ... 010
0 ... 011
0 ... 100
0 ... 101
Digital Input Code
5
4
3
2
1
0
6
Analog Output Value (LSB)
Differential
Linearity Error (1/2 LSB)
1 LSB
Differential Linearity
Error (– – 1/2 LSB)
1 LSB
Differential
Linearity Error (+1/4 LSB)
Differential Linearity
Error (– – 1/4 LSB)
1 LSB
1 LSB
Differential Linearity Error of a Linear ADC or DAC
Figure 5. Differential Nonlinearity (DNL)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested