how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : How to search text in pdf document application SDK tool html wpf asp.net online soc0-part1317

A Protocol for Measurement and Monitoring Soil Carbon 
Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
The Earth Institute, Columbia University (EI) 
June
2011
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf find highlighted text; how to select text in a pdf
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
select text in pdf reader; text searchable pdf file
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
This document was developed through a grant to the World Wildlife Fund from the Global 
Environment Facility and implemented by the United Nations Environment Program 
Document Version 1.1 
01 June 2011 
Authors:      Ermias A. Betemariam e.betemariam@cgiar.org 
Tor-G. Vagen 
t.vagen@cgiar.org  
Keith D. Shepherd    
k.shepherd@cgiar.org  
Leigh Winowiecki   
leigh.winowiecki@gmail.com  
World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)  
United Nations Avenue, Gigiri
P.O. Box 30677
Nairobi, 00100, Kenya 
Tel: +254-722-4000 
Fax: +254 20 7224001 
Email: worldagroforestry@cgiar.org 
www.worldagroforestry.org 
This publication may be cited as: 
Aynekulu, E. Vagen, T-G., Shepherd, K., Winowiecki, L. 2011. A protocol for measurement and 
monitoring soil carbon stocks in agricultural landscapes. Version 1.1. World Agroforestry Centre, 
Nairobi. 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf make text searchable; convert pdf to word searchable text
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
pdf searchable text converter; how to select all text in pdf
FOREWORD 
This protocol has been developed over a number of years through various projects and is 
currently  being  refined  in  the  context  of  the  Africa  Soils  Information  Service  (AfSIS: 
www.africasoils.net), funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Alliance for a 
Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), and the Carbon Benefits Project: Modeling, Measurement 
and  Monitoring,  funded  by  the  Global  Environment  Facility  (GEF)  of  the  United  Nations 
Environment Program (UNEP). 
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
search text in pdf image; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
search pdf for text; text searchable pdf
Abbreviations and Acronyms  
AfSIS 
Africa Soil Information Service  
CBP 
Carbon Benefits Project 
CDM  
Clean Development Mechanism 
cm 
Centimeter  
FAO   
Food and Agriculture Organization 
FT-NIR    Fourier Transform Near-Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 
FT-MIR 
Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 
Gram 
GEF   
Global Environment Fund 
GIS 
Geographic Information Systems  
GPS   
Global Positioning System 
ha    
Hectare 
ICRAF 
World Agroforestry Centre  
IR 
Infrared spectroscopy 
ISRIC 
International Soil Reference Information Service 
LDSF  
Land Degradation Surveillance Framework 
MIR   
Mid Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy 
MLR 
Multiple Linear Regression 
MPA  
Multipurpose Analyzer 
NAMA 
Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action 
NIR   
Near Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 
PCR 
Principal Components Regression 
RER   
The Ratio Error Range 
PLS   
Partial Least Squares Regression 
RPD  
Ratio of Prediction to Standard Deviation 
REDD 
Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation  
RMSEP  
Root Mean Square Error of Prediction 
SOC 
Soil Organic Carbon 
SOM  
Soil Organic Matter 
SOP   
Standard Operating Procedure 
SSN     
Sample Serial Number 
Tonne 
TXRF  
Total X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy 
UNEP  
United Nations Environment Program  
UNFCCC   United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
VNIR  
Visible Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy 
XRD   
X-ray Powder Diffraction Spectroscopy 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
how to search pdf files for text; find text in pdf files
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
pdf searchable text; how to select text in a pdf
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 
1.1  Background ......................................................................................................................... 1 
1.2  Land Degradation Surveillance Framework (LDSF) ........................................................... 2 
 SAMPLING DESIGN ............................................................................................................... 3 
2.1  Sample size determination and sample allocation .............................................................. 5 
2.1.1 Sample size determination .............................................................................................. 5 
2.1.2 Sample allocation ............................................................................................................ 5 
 FIELD MEASUREMENTS ...................................................................................................... 7 
3.1  Preparation for a field work ................................................................................................. 7 
3.2  Laying out the plot ............................................................................................................... 8 
3.3  Plot level measurements ..................................................................................................... 8 
3.3.1  Georeferencing ................................................................................................................ 8 
3.3.2  Slope ............................................................................................................................... 8 
3.3.3  Soil sampling ................................................................................................................... 9 
3.3.3.1 
Composite soil sampling .............................................................................................. 9 
3.3.3.2 
Cumulative mass soil sampling ................................................................................... 9 
 LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS ...................................................................................... 11 
4.1  Soil sample processing ..................................................................................................... 11 
4.1.1 Composite soil samples ................................................................................................ 11 
4.1.2 Cumulative mass soil samples ...................................................................................... 12 
4.2  Soil carbon analysis .......................................................................................................... 13 
4.3  Soil infrared spectroscopy ................................................................................................. 14 
 DATA ANALYSIS .................................................................................................................. 15 
5.1  Spectral libraries ............................................................................................................... 15 
5.1.1 Data pre-treatment ........................................................................................................ 16 
5.1.2  Spectral calibrations ...................................................................................................... 17 
5.1.3  Validation ....................................................................................................................... 17 
5.1.4 Spectral data handling ................................................................................................... 18 
5.2  Calculation of soil organic carbon stocks .......................................................................... 18 
 SOIL ORGANIC CARBON MONITORING ........................................................................... 23 
 COSTS OF MEASURING SOIL ORGANIC CARBON STOCKS ......................................... 24 
7.1  Costs of measuring SOC .................................................................................................. 24 
7.2  Cost 
error analysis .......................................................................................................... 26 
 APPLICATION TEST IN WESTERN KENYA ....................................................................... 27 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
pdf text search; find text in pdf image
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
searching pdf files for text; pdf text search tool
8.1  Materials and methods ...................................................................................................... 27 
8.1.1  Study area and soil data ................................................................................................ 27 
8.1.2  Determining SOC stocks ............................................................................................... 27 
8.1.3  Predicting SOC using soil spectroscopy ....................................................................... 28 
8.1.4 Modeling SOC stocks using QuickBird reflectance ....................................................... 29 
8.2  Results .............................................................................................................................. 29 
8.2.1  Determination of bulk density using cumulative soil mass ............................................ 29 
8.2.2 Predicting SOC using soil spectroscopy ....................................................................... 30 
8.2.3 Determining SOC stocks ............................................................................................... 31 
8.2.4  Determining landscape level SOC stocks ..................................................................... 36 
 REFERENCES ..................................................................................................................... 38 
10  APPENDIX 1 FIELD DATA COLLECTION FORM ............................................................. 40 
11  APPENDIX 2  SPATIAL MODELING OF SOC USING REMOTELY SENSED DATA....... 41 
Acknowledgments 
The Global Environmental Facility (GEF) of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) 
provided financial support. The authors would like to acknowledge Richard Coe and Markus 
Walsh for their useful comments on the previous version of the protocol. 
Introduction 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
INTRODUCTION
1.1
Background
Burning of fossil fuels and land-use change, particularly deforestation, have resulted in a steady 
accumulation of CO
2
and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which is the cause of 
global warming (IPCC, 2003). The two major strategies to mitigate the potential negative effects 
of climate change are reducing the emission of greenhouse gases and the capture and storage 
of CO
2
from the atmosphere. Through the framework of the Clean Development Mechanism 
(CDM)  under  the  Kyoto  protocol,  increasing  terrestrial  sinks  through  afforestation  and 
reforestation are the two accredited activities. Besides afforestation and reforestation, reducing 
Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) and enhancing carbon stocks 
though  sustainable  land  management  (REDD+)  are  given due credit  in  mitigating  climate 
change (Campbell, 2009).  
Measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) of such climate mitigation actions thought 
Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) is one major outcome of the Bali convention 
(United Nations, 2007). MRV gives opportunities to developing countries to claim financial, 
technical and capacity building support from developed countries to implement their NAMAs. 
Understanding these benefits, a growing number of developing countries (e.g. Algeria, China, 
South  Africa,  Indonesia,  Costa  Rica)  have  drafted,  adopted  and,  in  some  cases,  started 
implementing national climate action plans (Fransen et al., 2008). However, lack of a robust 
method of measuring NAMAs and the technical gaps pose serious challenges for developing 
countries (Ellis and Larsen, 2008). 
The  United  Nations  Framework  Convention  on  Climate  Change  (UNFCCC)  has 
recommended a three-tier approach to allow for increasing level of effort and accuracy, as 
appropriate or economically  viable, when estimating carbon  benefits. Soil  has  much  more 
variability than vegetation and therefore needs more sampling effort, which sometimes may 
exceed the benefits expected from the increase in stock (IPCC, 2003). Therefore developing 
locally  calibrated  models  that  can  use  easily  collected  data  can  minimize  the  cost  of 
demonstrating a change in soil organic carbon stock (IPCC, 2003).  
The Global Environment Facility (GEF) has called for the development of a system for 
measuring and monitoring carbon benefits of sustainable land management projects and natural 
resource management interventions. A number of carbon measurement schemes are emerging 
for specific applications (Lal et al., 2001). However, there is so far no comprehensive and 
standardized protocol for measurement and monitoring of carbon in diverse tropical agricultural 
landscapes that is applicable everywhere. A robust and cost effective method of measuring 
above- and below-ground carbon stocks would facilitate the MRV of NAMAs. Developments in 
soil infrared spectroscopy, which is proposed in this protocol for rapid soil carbon measurement, 
has the potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of measuring and monitoring soil organic 
carbon (SOC) stocks (Shepherd and Walsh, 2007). 
The protocols presented here are a result of a number of years’ work by the World 
Agroforestry Centre and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. They were developed within 
a broader framework of monitoring land health 
the capacity of land to sustain delivery of 
essential ecosystem services 
which is especially critical for food security, livelihoods, poverty 
alleviation, and safeguarding the environment in tropical developing countries. The methods 
were developed in response to the need for improved methods for measuring and monitoring 
the land and soil resource base at different scales, to help target and assess interventions that 
are designed to enhance productivity and maintain ecosystem functions. There has been a lack 
of application of scientific and systematic approaches to land monitoring (Young, 2000) to the 
degree  that  we  do  not  have  reliable  data  for  planning  purposes  or  reliable  learning  on 
outcomes. 
The overall framework is Land Health Surveillance 
an approach to measurement 
and monitoring of the health of land resource base that draws heavily on scientific principles 
used in public health surveillance. These principles include use of statistical sampling frames, 
consistent  application  of  standardized  measurement  protocols,  case  definitions  based  on 
Introduction 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
population data, screening tests to rapidly diagnose cases, and synthesis through rigorous 
statistical  analysis  (e.g.,  Shepherd and Walsh,  2007). The  Land Degradation Surveillance 
Framework (LDSF) is a field implementation of land health surveillance and now forms the basis 
for  monitoring  soil  and  vegetation  condition  in  the  Africa  Soil  Information  Service 
(www.africasoils.net). 
Soil health and vegetation productivity are closely related to above- and below-ground 
carbon  stocks.  In  most  systems,  without  excessive  biomass  removals,  higher  vegetation 
productivity generally leads to greater soil carbon stocks and protects soil against erosion; while 
greater carbon stocks, especially in agricultural systems, generally promote good soil biological, 
physical and chemical properties and soil productivity. Indeed, soil organic carbon is one of the 
most widely used indicators of soil health. On the other hand, carbon alone does not provide 
sufficient information to guide wise use of land resources and standalone carbon measurement 
systems  will  have  limited  value,  especially  given  the  resources  required  to  take  the 
measurements. Therefore, it makes sense to embed carbon measurement within broader land 
health  surveillance  schemes.  The  objective  of  this  protocol  is  to  give  guidelines  for 
measurement  and  monitoring  of  soil  organic  carbon  stocks  within  a  broader  land  health 
surveillance framework.  The protocol includes: 
Sampling design 
Field measurements 
Laboratory measurements 
Data analyses 
Field test of the protocol 
1.2
Land Degradation Surveillance Framework (LDSF) 
The  Land  Degradation  Surveillance  Framework  (LDSF)  is  designed  for  sampling  entire 
landscapes in order to provide baselines of land resources (e.g. soil and vegetation) and socio-
economic profiles  (e.g.  household indicators),  as  well  as a framework for  monitoring  and 
evaluating project interventions and their impacts on land and people. The framework is flexible 
and may be adapted to projects of varying size (spatial coverage) and with different objectives 
such  as  measuring  land  cover  change,  assessing  soil  carbon  stocks  and  sequestration 
potentials, and biodiversity assessments. The LDSF is standardized and therefore can be used 
to compare project baselines and monitoring results over a wide range of ecosystems. This is 
currently not achievable in most studies and projects due to inconsistencies in measurement 
procedures. Also, the framework  is  relatively simple in  that the exact same measurement 
procedures are followed both in baseline measurements and in monitoring and evaluation. 
The LDSF uses the concept of sentinel sites, a landscape-scale sampling unit within 
which nested sampling designs are employed to quantify land soil characteristics at different 
spatial scales. The baselines are designed to be of help in project implementation by quantifying 
and locating priority areas; for example areas for reforestation or enrichment planting, or areas 
with specific biophysical constraints (e.g. soil fertility decline, soil physical degradation, etc.). 
The baselines can include socioeconomic data to help assess whether project interventions are 
socially and economically acceptable or viable. There are numerous other potential applications 
depending on individual project objectives. For example, the LDSF could provide a sound basis 
for monitoring land degradation in national land health surveillance schemes. 
Sampling Design 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
SAMPLING DESIGN 
The first step is to define and bound the target area. The sentinel sites can be replicated at 
different scales,  within  projects,  watersheds,  administrative  boundaries,  countries,  or  even 
continents. For example the Africa Soil Information Service (Africa Soil Information Service, 
2010) is sampling 60 sentinel sites in Sub-Saharan Africa, at randomized locations within major 
climate zones. For project assessment, it is often advisable to additionally sample areas outside 
the project so that leakage can be assessed and to provide control areas for project impact 
assessment. 
Stratifying the area in terms of factors that influence carbon stocks will normally 
reduce errors associated with project-scale estimates of carbon stocks. At a continental level, 
climate tends to explain more variation in soil organic carbon than any other single factor (Wang 
et al., 2010) but locally historic land use often has a dominant influence, and this may not be 
well reflected by current land use (e.g. Vagen et al., 2006). Stratifying on too many variables 
can rapidly become un-manageable in terms of the number of strata produced and in practice it 
is often adequate to stratify on at most several major ecological zones. The sentinel sites are 
typically large enough to capture variation in conditions at the landscape scale (e.g. valley 
bottoms, slopes, ridgetops). 
Randomizing sites within the target area and strata is important to provide unbiased 
estimates of carbon stocks and other land health indicators. Providing unbiased data on the 
statistical distribution of variables is not only useful for reporting prevalence of land health 
problems (e.g. low carbon stocks) but also provides a means of setting local reference values 
(e.g. what is low, moderate or high), which can in turn be conditioned on various factors (e.g. 
soil texture). A small probability sample generally provides much more useful information than a 
large biased sample.  
The number of sentinel sites to be characterized per strata depends on the level of 
variability  within  strata  in  the  target  area,  the  required  levels  of  precision  and  resource 
availability. Once an initial set  of sites have  been  characterized  the data can be used to 
establish the gains in precision achievable by additional sampling and to target where additional 
sampling could most increase precision on carbon stock estimates. 
It is wise to first conduct reconnaissance of the sentinel site to plan field operations. 
Viewing the site on satellite images or using Google Earth can provide information on terrain 
and vegetation type, road access, population centre, etc. Site visits to establish permissions 
from  local  authorities  or  land  owners  and  to  explain  the  purpose  of  the  survey  to  local 
communities are essential. If a sentinel site is inaccessible due to reasons such as insecurity or 
lack of access permissions, then alternative randomized locations are used. 
The LDSF Sentinel sites are 10 x 10 km in size. The basic sampling unit within sites 
is called a Cluster. A Cluster is a 1-km radius circle within which 10 circular plots of 0.1 ha (1000 
m
2
) are randomized (Figure 2.1).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested