how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : Text searchable pdf application SDK tool html wpf asp.net online soc1-part1318

Sampling Design 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
Figure  2.1  LDSF  hierarchical sampling design.  (a)  Represents the  100 km
grid 
divided into 16 clusters, (b) illustrates the 1 km
2
clusters with 10- 0.001 km
2
plots, (c) 
illustrates how the plots are laid out with four subplots. The background is a fine 
resolution, QuickBird satellite image. 
The center-point of each cluster in the LDSF is randomly placed within each 2.5 x 2.5 
km tile in each Sentinel site, and the sampling plots are randomized around each cluster center-
point, resulting in a spatially stratified, randomized sampling design. Both the number of plots 
per cluster and the cluster size may be adjusted depending on the specific purpose of the 
survey being conducted. For example, 1 km
2
clusters are useful for large-area reconnaissance 
surveys; whereas, 0.1 km
2
(10 ha) clusters may be more appropriate for more detailed project-
level surveys. Thus there is a high degree of flexibility as long as randomization is maintained 
and  samples  are  collected  using  a  nested  design  (i.e.  Plot  within  Cluster  within  Site). 
Randomizing the plots in the cluster is extremely important to minimize any local biases that 
may  arise  from  convenience  sampling.  The  randomization  procedures  are  done  using 
customized programs or scripts (www.africasoils.net), but may also be done in any common 
spreadsheet program and can be downloaded to a Global Positioning System (GPS) so that 
field crews can navigate to the sampling points. A consistent projection system should be used 
and recorded to enable plots to be revisited. 
On  each  plot,  detailed  observations  and  measurements  describing  land  and 
Text searchable pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf image; make pdf text searchable
Text searchable pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
convert pdf to word searchable text; how to select all text in pdf file
Sampling Design 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
vegetation cover and soil condition are recorded, following the guidelines provided in the LDSF 
guide to field sampling and measurement procedures (Africa Soil Information Service, 2010).  
2.1
Sample size determination and sample allocation 
2.1.1 Sample size determination 
The  number  of plots  required  to estimate SOC  stocks depends on  the  desired  precision. 
Optimal size does not necessarily guarantee the desired precision of carbon estimate unless it 
is complemented with a proper unbiased sampling design. The number of plots required to 
measure carbon stocks is often within a precision level of ±10% of the mean SOC stocks at 
95% confidence level (Boscolo et al., 2000). The number of samples needed for a given area 
can be calculated using Equation 1 (Pearson et al., 2005).  
ௌ 
(Eq. 1) 
Where:    n = number of plots 
E = allowable error. Calculated by multiplying the mean carbon stocks by the desired 
precision (that is, mean carbon stock 
0.1, for 10% precision) 
t = the sample statistic from the t-distribution for the 95% confidence interval; t is  
usually set at 2 as sample size is unknown  
N = number of sampling units in the population 
S = standard deviation of stratum 
Example 
Taking the mean and standard deviation of SOC stocks of the five sentinel sites in western 
Kenya (see Section 8), the number of plots needed to report SOC stocks with a precision level 
of ±10% of the mean at 95% confidence level is calculated as follows. 
Area of sentinel site   
= 10,000 ha 
Plot size 
= 0.1 ha 
Mean SOC stock     
= 21.53 t C ha
-1
Standard deviation    
= 13.62 
Precision   
= 10% 
= 10,000/0.1 = 100,000 
= 21.53 
0.1= 2.15 
= 2 
͸  
     ͷ 
 
͸   
= 160 plots 
2.1.2 Sample allocation 
If we have a fixed number of plots they can be allocated to each stratum based on the principle 
of optimum allocation (Eq. 2). In this case, observations are allocated to the strata so as to give 
the smallest standard error possible with a total of n- observations (Freese, 1984). 
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
pdf make text searchable; can't select text in pdf file
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
select text pdf file; how to select text in pdf reader
Sampling Design 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
(Eq. 2) 
Where:    N
h
= size of stratum h  
S
h
= standard deviation in stratum h  
L = number of stratum  
Example  
The number of plots required for stratum 1 (Table 2.1) is calculated as follows: 
௦௧௥ ௧௨௠  
͸ 
n
stratum 1
= 60 
Similarly, the number of plots required for the other strata are calculated and 
summarized in the following table 
Table 2.1 Example data for sample allocation 
Site 
Area (km
2
Standard deviation for SOC stock 
Number of plots  
Stratum 1  
50 
12.64 
60 
Stratum 2 
30 
18.91 
53 
Stratum 3 
20 
24.97 
47 
Total 
100 
160 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
how to select text on pdf; search pdf for text in multiple files
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing formats in VB.NET. Support
search text in pdf using java; find and replace text in pdf file
Field Measurements 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
FIELD MEASUREMENTS 
The following field measurement guide is extracted from the Land Degradation Surveillance 
Framework (LDSF) field guide, which we recommend using for the field measurements. The 
LDSF field guide is available at www.africasoils.net. The LDSF includes measurement of tree 
and shrub densities, vegetation structure, visible erosion, and infiltration capacity among other 
environmental variables, in addition to collecting soil samples. While this protocol just describes 
soil sampling, it is recommended to collect multiple environmental variables at the same point in 
time. 
3.1
Preparation for a field work 
It is important to consider the following points before commencing fieldwork: 
Proper preparation before going to the field is critical to ensure a successful field 
sampling campaign, and for the safety and well-being of the field team. Prior to any 
field campaign, it is important to have a good understanding  of the area to be 
surveyed,  including  its  topography,  climate  and  vegetation  characteristics, 
accessibility, and its security situation. 
Collate  existing  information  about  the  area  to  be  surveyed  including:  maps 
(topographical, geological, soils and/or vegetation), satellite images and/or historical 
aerial photographs, long-term weather station data, government statistics, census 
data etc. 
Load coordinates of sampling locations into the GPS units before going to the field. If 
possible, load local maps into the unit to aid in navigation in the field. 
Do a thorough equipment check before leaving for the field. 
When conducting field campaigns in new countries, it is generally recommended you 
conduct a reconnaissance survey during which local contacts are established and 
agreements made. 
Obtain permission from the land owner(s) to sample a given area, and make sure 
that he/she understands what you are doing. Inform local government officers and 
community leaders about your activities. 
The following equipment and supplies are recommended for field crews: 
GPS and extra batteries 
Clinometer  
Notebook computer  
Digital camera 
Sheet holder 
Paint or ribbon for marking plot center 
A soil auger 
Buckets 
The metal sampling plate 
Sample tags, bags, and a permanent marker 
Measuring tape  
Builder’s sa
nd 
2-mm sieve 
Graduated cylinder 
Mixing trowel  
First aid kit 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
how to select text in pdf; search pdf documents for text
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. C# source codes are provided to use in .NET class
pdf find and replace text; how to search a pdf document for text
Field Measurements 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
3.2
Laying out the plot 
The LDSF field measurement protocol is implemented at the level of the 1000 m
2
plot.  
Using a measuring tape or a pre-marked chain, measure out the distance (12.2 m) 
from the plot centre-point  (Figure 3.1a) to the centre  of  the  up-slope sub-plot. 
Distance should be corrected when plots fall on steep terrain (see Section 3.3.2). 
Mark this sub-plot (2) centre point.  
Sub-plots 3 and 4 should be offset 120 and 240 degrees from the up-slope point, 
respectively. The angles can be measured using a compass or the sampling plate 
can be marked and used to locate Sub-plots 3 and 4 (Figure 3.1b). 
(a)   
(b) 
Figure 3.1 (a) Sampling plot layout, with the four subplots (dotted circles). Sub-plots 
have a radius of 5.64 m (area = 100 m
2
), and the distance along the radial arms 
between subplot centres is 12.2 m. The whole plot has a radius of 17.84 m (area= 
1000 m
2
). (b) Cumulative mass soil sampling plate showing the angles at which to 
locate the sub-plots. The angles can be measured using a compass or the sampling 
plate can be marked and used to locate Sub-plots 3 and 4. 
3.3
Plot level measurements 
3.3.1 
Georeferencing  
At the plot level, basic site characteristics are described and recorded. Initially, georeference the 
centre of the plot by letting the GPS average the position for at least 5 minutes. Store this as a 
waypoint in  the GPS, and  record  the easting (longitude), northing (latitude), elevation and 
position error on the field-recording sheet. 
3.3.2 
Slope  
Stand in the centre of the plot and take an up-slope sighting along the steepest part to a point 
on the up-slope plot boundary. Use a clinometer to measure the slope in degrees. Repeat the 
process in the downslope direction. Ensure that you sight to a location that is at the same height 
as the observer’s eye
-level. 
In steep terrain (slope > 10%), use the following formula to calculate the distance 
from the centre-point to the other sub-plots: 
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET convert PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF.
search pdf files for text programmatically; find and replace text in pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
converting pdf to searchable text format; search a pdf file for text
Field Measurements 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
ܮݏ  
௢௦ ௌ 
(Eq. 3) 
Where:    Ls = slope distance 
L = horizontal distance  
S = slope angle in degrees  
3.3.3 
Soil sampling 
Two types of soil samples are collected at each plot: composite soil samples and cumulative 
mass soil samples. Composite soil samples are considered a representative sample of the plot 
and used for analysis of carbon. Cumulative mass soil samples are collected to estimate bulk 
density of the soil. 
3.3.3.1 
Composite soil sampling 
Top- and subsoil samples are collected from the center of each subplot at 0-20 cm and 20-50 
cm depth increments, respectively. Topsoil subplot samples are pooled (composited) into one 
sample for each plot; the same is done with subsoil samples.  
Field sampling procedure is as follows: 
Collect topsoil (0-20 cm) and subsoil (20-50 cm) samples from the center of each 
subplot using an auger. Place each sample into a separate bucket. Depending on 
the objective of carbon measurement, soil samples can be collected to the desired 
depth (e.g., 0-20 cm, 20-50 cm, 50-80 cm, and 80-110 cm). 
Pool (composite) topsoil samples from each subplot into one bucket. Mix soil in the 
bucket thoroughly. The same is done for the subsoil 
Take a representative ~700 g subsample of the topsoil and place it in a plastic bag. 
Label the bag. The same is done for the subsoil.  
Auger depth restrictions are recorded at each sub-plot (in cm), if present. 
Sample labelling: Site Name, Cluster, Plot, Depth  
Note that there should be one bag of the topsoil and one bag of the subsoil for each plot.  
3.3.3.2 
Cumulative mass soil sampling 
To estimate the soil carbon stock, bulk density should be measured for each depth and plot 
(IPCC, 2003). Bulk density is the mass of oven-dry material per unit volume of soil in its field 
state. Its value mostly ranges from 1.0 to 1.8 g cm
-3
for mineral soils (Dewis and Freitas, 1970). 
Bulk density is usually estimated by taking undisturbed soil samples using a core sampler. 
However, in landscape level studies this method is often impractical due to the tediousness of 
this  method,  limiting  repeatability  across  landscapes.  Undisturbed  samples  are  further 
complicated  if  stones  are  present,  when  sampling  2:1  clay  soils  that  have  shrink-swell 
characteristics, and due to lack of cohesion in sandy soils. It is also impractical to attempt to use 
different methods in different soil types. In this protocol bulk density is estimated by recovering 
soil from augered samples and determining the soil mass per unit volume augered. Since bulk 
density is generally less variable than carbon concentration, it can be determined at the centre 
subplot only. The cumulative mass soil samples require different processing than the regular 
(composite) samples. The total air-dry weight of the sample is determined as well as the weight 
of  the  coarse  fraction  (>  2  mm)  and  the  oven-dry  moisture  content  is  determined  on  a 
subsample. Laboratory processing steps are given in Section 4.1.2 and calculation procedures 
in Section 5.2. 
Depending on soil texture, a clay, combination or sand auger can be used, but 
XImage.OCR for .NET, Recognize Text from Images and Documents
Output OCR result to memory, text searchable PDF, Word, Text file, etc. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try OCR for .NET with online support.
text searchable pdf file; search multiple pdf files for text
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
searchable PDF document. Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF file from text (
how to make a pdf file text searchable; convert pdf to searchable text
Field Measurements 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
10 
ensure to use the same auger for the entire depth (do not switch augers as this may change the 
volume of soil collected). A sampling plate (Fig. 3.1b) is used as an auger guide, to prevent 
collapse of the hole near the surface, and to aid full recovery of the soil sample.  
Field sampling procedure is as follows: 
Press the sampling plate firmly onto the soil, so the sheet is flush with the soil 
surface. Stand on either side of the plate to further secure it. 
Place the auger in the center of the hole and begin to auger straight down, using the 
same auger for all depths (Figure 3.2a). If your augering becomes crooked, stop and 
start a new hole, otherwise you will get an inaccurate measurement of the depth.  
Auger down to 20 cm depth and transfer all of the soil from the auger and any soil 
that fell onto the sampling plate into the bucket. 
Transfer all of the soil to a labeled plastic bag.  
The next sample is from 20-50 cm and then 50-80 cm. Depending on the objective of 
carbon measurement, soil samples can be collected to the desired depth (e.g., 0-20 
cm, 20-50 cm, 50-80 cm, and 80-110 cm). 
Auger depth restrictions are recorded, if present. 
Sample labelling: Site Name, Cluster, Plot, CM, Depth (e.g. 0 
20 cm) (CM is meant to 
indicate a cumulative mass soil sample). 
If the soil is very dry, it may be difficult to auger and collect all of the soil from the 
depth increment, in which case pre-wetting the soil before augering each increment may be 
helpful. If you wet the soil be sure to double bag the sample and do not place the sample label 
tag in the bag with the wet soil, as the tag will stick to the soil and make it difficult for processing 
in  the  lab.  Sampling  points  should  be  1  m  distance  from  tree  stems  and  should  avoid 
disturbances like animal holes, trails.  
During soil sampling the mass of soil was determined for each depth and the volume 
of the auger hole can be calculated using auger diameter and soil depth (see Section 5.2). The 
volume of the auger hole can be calibrated using the sand back-filling method (Figure 3.2b). 
With this method, the volume of the auger hole is checked by back filling with sand. First you 
sieve a quantity of dry sand through a 2 mm sieve, and then fill it into a graduated cylinder 
(Figure 3.2b). Then you pour the sand into the auger hole until flush with the top of the soil 
surface and record the volume of sand required to do so. Sample processing methods used are 
described in the laboratory methods section. 
(a) 
(b) 
Figure 3.2 (a) Field soil sample collection and (b) determining auger-hole volume 
using sand filling method.  
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
11 
LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS 
4.1
Soil sample processing  
All soil processing procedures are described in the AfSIS standard operating procedure for soil 
processing (www.africasoils.net) and are only summarized here.  
4.1.1 Composite soil samples 
Drying and sieving 
Air-dry  composite  soil  samples  (collected  from  the  four  sub-plots  per  plot)  by 
spreading a sample out as a thin layer into a shallow tray. Drying can be done in 
large room, a custom-made solar dryer, or a forced-air oven at 40° C.  
Break up clods as far as possible to aid drying. It is important to ensure that no 
material from a sample is lost or discarded as weights of soil fractions are to be 
recorded  on  processing.  Contamination  from  dust,  plaster  or  other  potential 
contaminants should be avoided. Drying time depends on the samples and ambient 
conditions, but the samples should be thoroughly dry (i.e. constant weight)  
Weighing and sieving 
Weigh the whole dried soil sample to 0.1 g using a calibrated top-pan balance and 
record the weight.  
Using a wooden rolling pin, gently crush the sample to pass through a 2 mm mesh 
size sieve. While crushing, remove any plant materials (e.g. roots) and any possible 
pieces of gravel (making sure they are gravel and not soil aggregates) and place in a 
separate pile (the coarse fraction).  
Pass the crushed sample through the 2 mm sieve. DO NOT use the sieve as a 
grinder; i.e. do not rub or mash the soil on the sieve, but shake the sieve gently to 
allow the soil to pass through. 
Once the entire sample has been sieved, weigh and record the coarse fragments (> 
2 mm). 
Note: The whole sample should be processed and no material should be discarded. 
You will remain with two fractions:  
o
The coarse fraction (>2 mm), which cannot pass through the sieve. 
o
The soil fines (<2 mm), which have passed through the sieve. 
The weight of the fine fraction is calculated by subtracting the weight of the coarse 
fragments from the total air-dried soil sample.  
Subsampling of fine fractions 
If the weight of the soil fines is much greater than 350 g, subsample the soil fines 
using coning and quartering (see below) or a sample divider (riffle box) to give about 
(not less than) 350 g of soil.  
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
12 
Coning and quartering procedure  
Use a large cleaned surface or heavy-duty plastic sheeting. 
Thoroughly mix the soil sample and spread the sample into a conical pile. 
Further mix the soil by circumventing the cone symmetrically, repeatedly 
taking a spatula-full of soil from the base and transferring the soil to the 
apex of the cone. Ensure the spatula is large enough to reach to center of 
the cone. Circumvent the cone twice.  
Flatten the cone to a height of about 1 cm. Use a flat spatula or ruler, 
divide the pile into quarters along two lines intersecting 90° to each other. 
Select one pair of opposite quarters as the sample to be retained. If the 
sample is still too large then repeat the procedure from the beginning. 
Continue  the  coning  and  quartering  technique  on  all  samples  to  obtain  a 
representative 20 g subsample for laboratory analysis. 
Place the remaining 350 g sample of soil fines into a strong Size 5 khaki paper bag 
and send it to soil laboratory. Excess soil fines should be stored in a labeled bag in 
case further analyses are done later. 
4.1.2 Cumulative mass soil samples  
The cumulative mass samples are processed in exactly same way as the composite soil 
samples, except that in addition, the gravimetric moisture content on a subsample is determined 
in order to calculate the actual oven dried mass of each sample, and is described below. 
Air-dry the cumulative mass soil  
Weigh the entire air-dried soil sample to 0.1 g and record the weight. 
Determine gravimetric moisture content (Eq. 4) on a subsample  
o
Weigh a labeled sample tin for taking oven-dry moisture content and record 
weight. 
o
Take an approximately 50 g representative subsample of the original sample 
and place it into the weighed sample tin and record weight of tin + air-dried 
soil 
o
Place tin + air-dried soil into oven at 105 
o
C until a constant weight is obtained 
(~48 hrs.).  
o
Once soil is dry, weigh the tin + oven-dried soil (record the weight).  
o
Calculate the gravimetric moisture content (Eq. 4). 
Gently crush the remainder of the air-dried sample to pass through a 2 mm diameter 
sieve. 
Weigh the remaining coarse fragments (> 2 mm). 
Calculate the percentage of the coarse fraction (Eq. 5).  
These data will be used to calculate the oven-dried weight of the original cumulative mass soil  
௠ ௦௦  ௢  ௪ ௧ ௥
௠ ௦௦ ௢  ௢௩ ௡  ௥    ௦௢ ௟
(Eq.4)  
ݎݏ݁ ݂ݎ ݃ ݁ ݐ      
௠ ௦௦  ௢   ௢ ௥௦   ௥  ௧ ௢௡
்௢௧ ௟   ௥  ௥    ௦௢ ௟ ௠ ௦௦ ௠ ௦௦ ௢  ௦௨ ௦ ௠௣௟ 
(Eq.5)
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
13 
Examples 
1. 
A cumulative mass soil sample taken from 0-20 cm weighed 1091.3 g (Table 5.1: 
Stratum 1, plot 1). A subsample weighing 142 g (including tin) was taken to determine soil 
moisture content. The weight of the tin was 90 g. After drying the soil at 105 
o
C to a constant 
weight, the soil and tin weighted 136 g. The gravimetric moisture content and the oven-dry 
mass of the cumulative soil mass are calculated as follows: 
Mass of air-dried soil sample = 142 
90 = 52 g 
Mass of oven dried soil sample = 136 
90 = 46 g 
= 0.13 
2. 
13% of the original soil sample in the above example is moisture and the remaining 
87% is oven-dry soil mass. The oven-dried soil mass of the original sample is calculated as 
follow: 
ͻ     
(1 - 0.13) = 948.9 g  
3. 
With a coarse fragment of 52 g (Table 5.1:Stratum 1, Plot 1), the % coarse fragments 
for the sample can be calculated as follow: 
ݎݏ݁ ݂ݎ ݃ ݁ ݐ 
= 5%  
4.2
Soil carbon analysis 
Total  carbon and  organic  carbon  concentration  (g  kg
-1
)  are  determined  on  soil  reference 
samples only, by thermal oxidation (Skjemstad and Baldock, 2008) using a carbon analyzer 
according to Standard ISO 10694: Soil quality - Determination of organic and total carbon after 
dry  combustion  (elementary  analysis).  These  reference  soil  carbon  measurements  are 
calibrated to soil infrared spectral measurements and the calibrations then used to predict 
carbon  values  for  all  samples.  Soil  reference carbon  is  determined on  total  and acidified 
samples, i.e. fumigated with hydrochloric acid to remove inorganic carbon (carbonate) (Harris et 
al., 2001). Inorganic carbon is estimated as the difference between unacidified and acidified 
carbon.  
The World Agroforestry Centre’s standard operating procedure for carbon analysis in 
soils and plants uses the Thermal Scientific FlashEA 1112. It is based on the flash dynamic 
combustion  method,  which  produces  complete  combustion  of  the  sample  within  a  high 
temperature reactor, followed by an accurate and precise determination of the elemental gases 
produced using a thermal conductivity detector. A complete standard operating procedures for 
carbon analysis in soils and plants using the Thermal Scientific FlashEA 1112 can be found at 
www.africasoils.net
Reference samples are usually defined as the topsoil and subsoil samples from Plot 1 
of each cluster (i.e. the composite samples), but where depths below 50 cm are sampled then 
additional reference samples may be included from the additional depths so that these are 
included in calibrations. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested