how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : How to search a pdf document for text software control dll windows azure winforms web forms soc2-part1319

Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
14 
4.3
Soil infrared spectroscopy 
Diffuse  reflectance  infrared  spectroscopy (IR) is an  established technology  for  rapid,  non-
destructive  characterization  of  the  composition  of  materials  based  on  the  interaction  of 
electromagnetic energy with matter (Figure 4.1). IR is now routinely used for analyses of a wide 
range of materials in laboratory and process control applications in agriculture, food and feed 
technology,  geology  and  biomedicine  (Shepherd  and  Walsh,  2007). Both  the  visible  near 
infrared (VNIR, 0.35-
2.5 μm) and mid infrared (MIR, 2.5
-
25 μm) wavelength regions have been 
investigated for non-destructive analyses of soils and can potentially be usefully applied to 
predict a number of important soil properties, including: soil colour, mineral composition, organic 
matter and water content (hydration, hygroscopic, and free pore water), iron form and amount, 
carbonates, soluble salts, and aggregate and particle size distribution (Shepherd and Walsh, 
2004). Importantly, these properties also largely determine the capacity of soils to perform 
various production, environmental and engineering functions. Infrared spectroscopy enables soil 
sampling density (samples per unit area) to be greatly increased with little increase in analytical 
cost.  
Figure  4.1  Soil  spectral analyses:  (a)  the  use  of  FT-NIR and  (b)  representative 
absorbance soil spectra. 
To guard against prediction failure we recommend a two-phase sampling procedure 
whereby all sampled soils are scanned using IR and a subset of samples (e.g. 10%) is selected 
for  reference  analysis  using  conventional  laboratory  procedures.  For  IR  prediction  of  soil 
organic  carbon  MIR  generally  outperforms  NIR by  more than  10%  increase in  prediction 
accuracy, and can be used with small sample sizes, however a further fine-grinding step is 
required for MIR. 
At  the  present  time  we  recommend  use  of  laboratory-based  Fourier-Transform 
infrared spectrometers that have in-built standards and validation software to ensure stability in 
measurements  over  time and  across  instruments.  Consistency  in  sample  preparation  and 
presentation  is  also  important  for  achieving  reproducible  results.  Full  standard  operating 
procedures for VNIR, FT-NIR and FT-MIR are available at www.africasoils.net
How to search a pdf document for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf text searchable; how to make a pdf document text searchable
How to search a pdf document for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf select text
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
15 
DATA ANALYSIS  
5.1
Spectral libraries 
Shepherd and Walsh (2002) proposed a scheme for the use of spectral libraries as a tool for 
building  risk-based  models  for  soil  evaluation  (Figure  5.1).  This  approach  is  intended  to 
safeguard against  prediction  failures, and  generalize  results  of  soil  assessments  that are 
conducted at a limited number of sites to a wider population of samples. At the heart of this 
process  is  a  classic  two-phase  or  double  sampling  strategy  as  follows:  sampling  the 
Independent (Spectral) Phase: the variability of soils in a given study area is initially sampled 
thoroughly. A large sample of size m is drawn from a population of size M. This is potentially the 
most critical step in building a soil reflectance library, as it determines how well the library will 
represent the target soil population. In the absence of additional information from soil maps, 
digital terrain models and/or remote sensing data, spatially stratified random sampling can often 
be fairly efficient in this regard (see, Webster and Burgess, 1984). For this initial sample only 
the spectral measurements x
ij
(i = 1 . . . no. wavelengths; j = 1 . . . m) are obtained. Sampling 
the Dependent Phase: once the spectral variation of a target population has been thoroughly 
sampled,  the more time consuming and/or  expensive soil properties (e.g. soil carbon)  are 
measured on a subset of soils (n < m, k = 1 . . . n). Depending on the specific application, a 
variety of sub-sampling schemes may be used here, ranging from equal probability to stratified- 
or design-based random sampling approaches. The second stage sample provides estimates of 
the parameters for the dependent phase including the mean and variance of the reference soil 
property under consideration. 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf text select tool; pdf find highlighted text
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to searchable text online
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
16 
Figure 5.1 Logical scheme for use of reflectance spectral libraries in a risk-based 
approach to prediction of soil functional attributes. Source: Shepherd & Walsh (2002). 
For selection of calibration samples when using the LDSF sampling scheme, we 
recommend selecting topsoil and subsoil samples of Plot 1 from each cluster within a site to 
give a  spatially-stratified random sample (see soil  processing SOP at  www.africasoils.net). 
Selecting both  topsoil  and subsoil samples for carbon and  other reference measurements 
provides for fitting a function of concentration with depth and calibrating the parameters of the 
concentration-depth function to IR spectra. 
5.1.1 
Data pre-treatment 
Various signal  processing or spectral data pretreatments,  such as smoothing  and filtering, 
transformation, standardization, and numerical treatments are used to improve signal-to-noise-
ratio, correct for light scattering, convert data into more physically meaningful form, and extract 
meaningful or useful information before calibration. First derivative processing and smoothing 
have found to be generally optimal for calibration of many soil properties. Wavelet transforms 
have shown promise as a way to simultaneously optimize soil spectral information, reduce data 
volume and solve multicollinearity problems (e.g. Ge et al., 2007; Viscarra Rossel and Lark, 
2009). 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
how to search text in pdf document; select text in pdf
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
select text in pdf file; select text in pdf reader
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
17 
Transformation  of  the  y-variable  is  usually  also  necessary  to  obtain  normally 
distributed data in order to satisfy the assumptions of parametric methods and to help minimize 
non-linearity in calibrations. Soil element concentrations are typically highly skewed due to a low 
frequency  of  large  values.  Performance  statistics  are  calculated  on  the  back-transformed 
values. 
5.1.2 
Spectral calibrations 
Sampling of the dependent phase is followed by a calibration step, which describes the 
relationship between the reference property (y) and the multivariate spectral signal (x
k
), for 
example in linear form (Eq. 6):  
ݕ   
ݔ
݂
௞  
(Eq. 6) 
Where:  b
o
& b = regression coefficients 
k = the number of x-variables 
f = the y-residual 
Commonly  used  calibration  methods  include  multiple  linear  regression  (MLR), 
principal components regression (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLS) (Martens 
and Martens, 2001; Naes et al., 2002). PLS and PCR are similar in that both employ orthogonal 
linear combinations of wavelengths to overcome the problem of high-dimensional, correlated 
predictors (multicollinearity) (Martens and Naes, 1989). PLS, the most widely used calibration 
method in infrared spectroscopy, orientates the components to the y variable. 
Guidelines on treatment of calibration outliers are given by Naes et al. (2002). Only 
influential outliers are normally of concern, i.e. those with large leverage (distance in x-space) 
and large y-residuals. 
Both PCR and PLS are now available in most standard statistical packages (e.g. 
Genstat, S-
Plus, SAS, R) as well as in more specialized ― chemometric‖ software packages, 
such as The Unscrambler® (Camo Inc), Matlab (The MathworksTM), PLS-Toolbox (Eigenvector 
Research Inc), and ParLes (Viscarra Rossel, 2008). Additionally, non-linear regression methods 
(e.g.  generalized  additive  models  and  regression  splines,  local  PLS),  and  non-parametric 
classification and regression methods (e.g. classification and regression trees, neural networks, 
support vector machines, genetic algorithms) have also been successfully used in past soil 
reflectance studies.  
5.1.3 
Validation 
Regardless of the specific technique employed, the most important aspect in developing robust 
predictive models is to ensure that model validation matches the intended model use. Model 
validation in this context simply means checking how well the model will perform in predicting 
new data. The simplest measure of the uncertainty on future predictions is the root mean 
square error of prediction (RMSEP). This value expresses the average uncertainty that can be 
expected  when  predicting  the  response-values for  new  samples  (see Naes  et  al., 2002). 
RMSEP is valid, provided that  the new samples represent  an independent  sample of  the 
population under consideration; otherwise, the actual prediction errors might be much higher. In 
this  case,  the  term  ―independent‖ refers to the  notion  that  knowing  something  about  the 
validation samples would not be helpful in predicting the response-values of the calibration 
samples. Soil samples taken in close proximity to one another or at different depths in the same 
soil profile are typically not independent of one another and their inclusion in both calibration 
and validation sets can lead to over-optimistic validation performance.  
Other metrics for evaluating prediction performance commonly used include the ratio 
of prediction to standard deviation (RPD) and the ratio error range (RER). These are calculated 
as (a) the standard deviation of the reference measurements in the validation set, or (b) the 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
text select tool pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
will guide you how to replace text in specified PDF page. 'Open a document Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) 'Set the search options Dim
search pdf files for text; cannot select text in pdf
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
18 
range of the reference measurements in the validation set, divided by the standard error of 
prediction,  respectively.  Guidelines  on  interpretation  are  given  by  Malley  et  al.  (2004). 
Standards for multivariate calibration are given in Standard Practices for Infrared Multivariate 
Quantitative Analysis (ASTM E1655-05) and Standard Practice for Validation of Empirically 
Derived Multivariate Calibrations (ASTM E2617-08a). 
Cross-validation is commonly used to evaluate calibration model performance and 
prevent  over-fitting,  however,  cross-validation  does  not  substitute  for  use  of  independent 
validation sets in evaluating model performance. Statistical re-sampling or ensemble techniques 
such as bootstrap aggregation (or bagging) can also been employed to improve prevent over-
fitting, stabilize models and improve prediction accuracy (e.g. Brown et al., 2006; Viscarra 
Rossel, 1997). 
5.1.4 
Spectral data handling 
Standard operating procedures for management and storage of spectral data are specified in 
the  Standard  Operating  Procedures  for  Spectral  Data  Management  (www.africasoils.net). 
Spectra names contain the unique sample identifier used during sample logging so that they 
can be matched with reference measurement data and field data in the relational database.  
The R statistical language and environment (R Development Core Team, 2008) is 
used to enable easy access to spectral processing and statistical analysis routines R scripts are 
under continuous development but at the time of writing scripts are available in the R package 
―soil.spec‖ on the CRAN server (
http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/soil.spec/index.html) for: 
Importing spec-format files 
Principal Component Analysis (PCA) 
Sample selection using the Kennard-Stone algorithm 
Spectral transformation  
Comparison of regression models  
5.2
Calculation of soil organic carbon stocks  
Soil organic carbon stock can be expressed on an equal mass or equal volume basis. To 
express changes in soil carbon stocks on an equal mass basis requires that the change in the 
soil bulk density. Estimates of soil carbon stocks to a fixed depth using single depth bulk density 
are mostly biased due to the spatial and temporal variability in bulk density (Lee et al., 2009). 
Despite the high carbon concentration in the top soil, (20 cm) the carbon density is often less 
than in the sub-soil due to lower soil mass (bulk density) in the top soil than in deeper soil 
layers. The variability in bulk density with depth can be addressed by establishing relationship 
between cumulative soil mass  and volume (see 8.2). It is likely  that projects designed  to 
enhance soil organic carbon (e.g. afforestation) will also cause the soil bulk density to decrease. 
If it is expected that the soil bulk density will change significantly during the course of the 
project, it is recommended to assess the impact of expressing the changes in soil carbon on an 
equal mass or equal volume basis on the total projected change in soil carbon stocks (IPCC, 
2003).  
To  calculate soil organic carbon stocks on an equal mass basis, three  types of 
variables must be measured: concentration of soil organic carbon, bulk density, and soil depth.  
Soil organic carbon concentration 
Data on soil carbon concentration (g kg
-1
) can be obtained form laboratory measurements. It 
can be also estimated using IR spectroscopy and remote sensing data sources.  
Bulk Density 
Bulk density is calculated from oven-dry weight of soil from a known volume of sampled soil (Eq. 
7). 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
pdf search and replace text; pdf find text
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text highlight function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
how to select text in pdf and copy; search text in multiple pdf
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
19 
(Eq.7)  
Where:  
= bulk density (g cm
-3
M = oven-dry weight of soil (g) 
V = volume of soil (cm
-3
Example 
Assume a dry soil sample taken from a 20 cm depth weights 901.1 g and soil volume of 907 
cm
3
(Table 5.1: stratum 1, plot 1), the bulk density of the sample is calculated as follows: 
ͻ    
ͻ ͹
= 0.99 g cm
-3
Note: Auger diameter of 7.6 cm (radius 3.8 cm) is used to calculate soil volume 
ͺ
 ͻ ͹ 
Soil  carbon  stock for  a  given  soil  layer  is  calculated  by multiplying the  carbon 
concentration in soil fines with bulk density and soil depth (Eq. 8). If the carbon concentration is 
measure on an air-dry soil basis then this may be corrected to an oven-dry weigh basis using 
the air-dry moisture content of the soil. 
ܱܵ   
݂ݎ ݃       
(Eq. 8)
Where:  SOC = soil organic carbon stock (t C ha
-1
C = soil organic carbon concentration of soil fines (fraction < 2 mm) determined   in  
the laboratory (%, g kg
-1
= soil bulk density (g cm
-3
D = depth of the sampled soil layer (cm) 
frag = % mass fraction of coarse fragments/100 
100 is used to convert the unit to convert unit to t C ha
-1
Note:  SOC is determined on  the fine soil  fraction (<  2  mm)  whereas the bulk  density  is 
determined using the total soil mass, and therefore SOC is corrected for the proportion of the 
soil mass that is occupied by coarse fragments (> 2 mm) 
Example  
Soil carbon stock for stratum 1, plot 1 (Table 5.1) is calculated as follows.  
ܱܵ   
ͷ        ቀ  
ቁ      
= 22.67 t C ha
-1 
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
20 
Table 5.1 An example data for SOC stocks calculations  
Site 
Plot 
Carbon 
concentration 
(g kg
-1
Soil 
depth 
(cm) 
Mass of total 
air-dried 
cumulative 
mass soil 
sample (g) 
Mass of air-dried 
cumulative mass 
course fragments 
(g)  
Mass of air-dried 
cumulative mass 
subsample + tin 
weight (g) 
Mass of oven-
dried cumulative 
mass subsample 
(g) 
Mass 
of tin 
(g) 
Gravimetric 
moisture 
content 
Mass of total oven-
dried cumulative 
mass soil sample (g( 
(g) 
Volume 
of soil 
(cm
3
Bulk 
density 
(g cm
-3
Coarse 
fragments 
(%) 
SOC stock 
(t ha-2
Stratum 1 
1.14 
20 
1091.3 
52.0 
142.0 
136.0  90.00 
13.04 
948.9 
907 
1.05 
5.0 
22.67 
1.54 
20 
1189.8 
22.7 
140.0 
131.5  87.00 
19.01 
963.6 
907 
1.06 
2.0 
32.07 
1.18 
20 
1420.7 
41.1 
146.0 
138.1  95.00 
18.42 
1159.0 
907 
1.28 
3.0 
29.26 
0.75 
20 
1361.7 
104.6 
144.0 
136.3  90.00 
16.67 
1134.7 
907 
1.25 
8.0 
17.27 
1.64 
20 
969.3 
46.0 
146.0 
140.7  96.00 
11.86 
854.4 
907 
0.94 
5.0 
29.36 
0.86 
20 
1046.4 
49.8 
139.0 
134.7  89.00 
9.48 
947.2 
907 
1.04 
5.0 
17.07 
0.86 
20 
1095.2 
31.4 
145.0 
139.3  95.00 
12.89 
954.1 
907 
1.05 
3.0 
17.55 
1.02 
20 
1192.6 
91.2 
147.0 
141.8  95.00 
11.11 
1060.1 
907 
1.17 
8.0 
21.94 
0.99 
20 
1349.9 
129.7 
146.0 
137.2  93.00 
19.83 
1082.2 
907 
1.19 
10.0 
21.27 
10 
1.25 
20 
1478.8 
85.7 
144.0 
136.0  93.00 
18.47 
1205.7 
907 
1.33 
6.0 
31.24 
11 
1.1 
20 
1470.7 
70.8 
144.0 
138.6  90.00 
11.20 
1306.0 
907 
1.44 
5.0 
30.10 
12 
1.75 
20 
1076.5 
51.3 
137.0 
131.3  87.00 
12.88 
937.9 
907 
1.03 
5.0 
34.39 
Stratum 2 
2.55 
20 
1657.6 
16.1 
145.0 
139.1  95.00 
13.33 
1436.6 
907 
1.58 
1.0 
79.99 
3.2 
20 
1425.2 
27.5 
140.0 
131.9  90.00 
19.23 
1151.1 
907 
1.27 
2.0 
79.62 
2.11 
20 
1039.2 
29.6 
148.0 
144.5  96.00 
7.18 
964.6 
907 
1.06 
3.0 
43.54 
0.82 
20 
1095.8 
52.1 
142.0 
134.5  89.00 
16.59 
914.0 
907 
1.01 
5.0 
15.70 
2.71 
20 
1239.7 
35.7 
146.0 
140.6  95.00 
11.81 
1093.3 
907 
1.21 
3.0 
63.38 
3.65 
20 
1470.0 
28.3 
149.0 
146.8  95.00 
4.17 
1408.7 
907 
1.55 
2.0 
111.13 
1.2 
20 
1426.8 
13.8 
143.0 
137.3  93.00 
12.78 
1244.5 
907 
1.37 
1.0 
32.61 
2.59 
20 
1259.0 
60.4 
143.0 
137.0  93.00 
13.51 
1088.8 
907 
1.20 
5.0 
59.09 
2.33 
20 
1418.8 
82.1 
140.0 
133.6  90.00 
14.80 
1208.8 
907 
1.33 
6.0 
58.39 
10 
2.4 
20 
653.9 
30.1 
139.0 
128.2  87.00 
26.29 
481.9 
907 
0.53 
5.0 
24.23 
Stratum 3 
0.6 
20 
1312.2 
37.8 
148.0 
142.6  95.00 
11.42 
1162.4 
907 
1.28 
3.0 
14.92 
1.36 
20 
1303.7 
37.6 
141.0 
135.1  90.00 
13.04 
1133.7 
907 
1.25 
3.0 
32.98 
0.57 
20 
713.0 
19.8 
150.0 
143.6  96.00 
13.39 
617.5 
907 
0.68 
3.0 
7.53 
0.81 
20 
742.4 
13.8 
139.0 
131.0  89.00 
19.16 
600.2 
907 
0.66 
2.0 
10.51 
1.34 
20 
1120.4 
10.7 
145.0 
133.9  95.00 
28.57 
800.3 
907 
0.88 
1.0 
23.41 
20 
1342.4 
64.5 
148.0 
140.3  95.00 
17.07 
1113.2 
907 
1.23 
5.0 
46.65 
1.2 
20 
1012.7 
57.6 
145.0 
139.5  93.00 
11.72 
894.0 
907 
0.99 
6.0 
22.24 
1.54 
20 
1077.2 
41.0 
146.0 
140.2  93.00 
12.38 
943.9 
907 
1.04 
4.0 
30.78 
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
21 
Calculating the mean SOC stocks for stratified samples 
In stratified random sampling, the units of the population (e.g., stands) are grouped together 
based on similar criterion (e.g., climatic zone). Each unit (stratum) or stand is then surveyed and 
the stratum estimates are combined to give an estimate for the entire study area (Eq. 9).
(Eq. 9) 
Where:   
= mean SOC stock (t ha
-1
N
h
= size of stratum h  
= mean SOC stock of stratum (t ha
-1
Example 
Table 5.2 An example data for stratified mean SOC stock calculation 
Based on the data in Table 5.2, the mean SOC stock for the site is calculated as follows: 
= 34.43 t ha
-1
The total SOC stock in the top 30 cm of the project area is  
= 100 ha × 34.43 t ha
-1
= 3,443 t 
Calculating confidence interval for the mean  
It is important to report the mean SOC stocks with confidence intervals, which are quantitative 
estimate of uncertainty. First calculate the standard error for the stratified samples (Eq. 10) 
ܵ   
(Eq.10) 
Where:  SE = standard error  
N
h
= size of stratum h  
ܵ
= variance of stratum h  
Site 
Area 
(ha) 
Number of 
plots  
Mean SOC stock 
(t ha
-1
Standard 
deviation (s) 
Variance (s
2
Stratum 1  
50 
12 
25.35 
6.37 
40.58 
Stratum 2 
30 
10 
56.77 
29 
841.00 
Stratum 3 
20 
23.63 
13 
169.00 
Total 
100 
30 
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
22 
ܵ    
= 3.04 
95% confidence interval for the mean SOC stock is calculated as: 
± t
0.05,n-1=29 
× SE 
34.43 ± 2.045 × 3.04 
34.43 ± 6.22 
The lower and upper limits for the mean SOC stocks are 28.21 and 40.65 t ha
-1
, respectively. 
Soil Organic Carbon Monitoring 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
23 
SOIL ORGANIC CARBON MONITORING 
The amount of SOC stock at any given time is controlled by factors of soil formation. The soil 
forming  factors  are  climate,  topography,  parent  material,  biota,  time,  and  human  activity 
(Amundson  and  Jenny,  1997).  Two  general  approaches  to  determine  rates  of  SOC 
accumulation and cycling are: (a) the ―chronosequence‖ approach—
which monitors SOC in 
soils of different ages but similar environment and bedrock, and (b) a ―mass balance‖ approach 
in which C cycling rates are inferred for soils near or at steady state (Amundson, 2001). The 
average C atom in atmospheric CO
2
passes through soil organic matter (SOM) somewhere in 
the  world approximately  every  12  years.  In  recent decades,  the most  notable factor  that 
influences  the global SOC dynamics in space and  time is human induced  land use/cover 
change (IPCC, 2003).  
To understand the impact of projects in the capturing carbon, the SOC stock needs to 
be  tracked though time. Soil  monitoring  assesses  the changes in soil  carbon status  with 
reference to the soil carbon stock at the beginning of the project. The Marrakesh Accords 
specify that all emissions from sources and removal by sinks caused by Article 3.3 and elected 
Article 3.4 activities be reported annually (IPCC, 2003). However, the inter-annual variability in 
SOC stock is often very low. Moreover, the cost of detecting a change in SOC stock using field 
and laboratory measurements is also more expensive than measuring carbon stock in above 
ground woody biomass. Hence, the cost of detecting SOC change might cost more than the 
actual value of carbon sequestered, even though soil-monitoring schemes may serve a number 
of other purposes. Although the change in SOC stock varies with factors that influence the rate 
of production  and  decomposition of  carbon,  a  five-year  monitoring  cycle  is recommended 
(IPCC, 2003), whereas UNFCCC (2006) recommend a monitoring interval of between 10 and 
20 years. A fine temporal resolution in SOC monitoring can be also achieved using modeling of 
SOC using remote sensing and other easily available data sources. Soil monitoring assesses 
the changes in soil carbon status with reference to the soil carbon stock at the beginning of the 
project. 
Tracking changes in soil carbon over time requires that the same equivalent mass of 
soil be measured from one monitoring event to  another. Sampling to a fixed depth (equal 
volume) can underestimate carbon gains via forestation. As the bulk density can change due to 
land  use,  the  same  sampled  volume  contains  less  of  the  original  soil-mass  equivalent. 
Therefore, rates of accrual estimated from sampling to a fixed depth should be considered 
conservative estimates of soil-carbon accretion (Pearson et al. 2007). The changes in SOC 
stock can be converted to tonnes CO
equivalent by multiplying by 3.67, which is the ratio of the 
molecular weights between carbon (12) and carbon dioxide (44).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested