how to open pdf file on button click in mvc : Search a pdf file for text control SDK system web page winforms html console soc3-part1320

Costs of Measuring Soil Organic Carbon Stocks 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
24 
COSTS  OF  MEASURING  SOIL  ORGANIC  CARBON 
STOCKS 
7.1
Costs of measuring SOC 
The number of sentinel sites to be characterized per strata depends on the level of variability 
within strata in the target area, the required levels of precision and resource availability. The 
cost of measuring SOC depends on the number of samples, costs of sampling, and laboratory 
prices.  Soil  has  much  greater spatial  variability  than  vegetation and  thus  demands more 
sampling effort. In some cases the cost of demonstrating the change in carbon stocks in soils to 
the required accuracy and precision may exceed the benefits that accrue from the increase in 
stocks (IPCC, 2003; MacDicken, 1997). Thus, developing alternative cheaper and repeatable 
measures is a research priority. Infrared spectroscopy offers promise for a rapid, reliable and 
cost effective measurement of soil organic carbon. In this study we compared the cost of 
measuring SOC analyses using the conventional Thermal Scientific FlashEA 1112 CN analyzer, 
a commercial laboratory in the UK, and near-infrared spectroscopy. All costs are based on 
conducting sampling and analysis in Kenya. 
The total costs of measuring cabon using the Thermal Scientific FlashEA 1112 CN 
analyzer is USD 20.77 per soil sample, of which 87% are personnel costs (Figure 7.1b). If 
acidification is applied to remove carbonates from the sample, the price will increase to USD 
25.76. Soil sampling constitutes the highest proportion of the costs of carbon measurement. 
Figure  7.1  Cost  of  measuring  SOC  stocks:  (a)  costs  and  (b)  cost  structure  of 
measuring one soil sample. The personnel costs are more or less uniform for the four 
major activities, while soil sampling constitutes a large proportion of the other costs.  
The  laboratory  costs  (without  field  sampling  and  sample  preparation  costs)  of 
measuring carbon using the conventional thermal oxidation and NIR soil spectroscopy are USD 
4.99  and  2.19  per  sample,  respectively.  Compared  to  the thermal  oxidation  method,  soil 
spectroscopy can reduce laboratory costs of measuring carbon by 56% (Figure 7.2a). However, 
there is no significant difference in the total cost of measuring SOC between the Thermal 
Scientific FlashEA 1112 CN analyzer and the NIR soil spectroscopy when a small number of 
soil samples are used (Figure 7.2b). This is because a large proportion of the costs of soil 
carbon measurement are incurred for soil sampling and preparation compared with laboratory 
costs (Figure 7.2a). With increasing number of soil samples, however, the total cost of carbon 
(a) 
(b) 
Search a pdf file for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; pdf text search
Search a pdf file for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf editor with search and replace text; make pdf text searchable
Costs of Measuring Soil Organic Carbon Stocks 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
25 
measurement using NIR spectroscopy is cheaper than using the Thermal Scientific FlashEA 
1112 CN analyzer (Figure 7.2b). Compared to costs of other commercial soil labs, the cost of 
measuring SOC using  the NIR spectroscopy is  significantly cheaper  than commercial soil 
laboratories charges (Figure 7.2c, d). However the big advantage of IR technology is the high 
throughout  achievable,  which  is  critical  for  carbon  inventories  at  project  level  or  larger 
geographical extents. The daily throughputs of a thermal analyser is quite low (30 samples 
acidified, or 60 samples unacidifed) whereas NIR throughput is 350 samples per day, and over 
1000 per day with robotic MIR systems (Shepherd & Walsh, 2007). Thus throughput rate is the 
critical determining factor. 
Figure 7.2 Comparisons of costs of measuring SOC carbon: (a) laboratory and (b) 
total costs of measuring SOC using the Thermal Scientific FlashEA 1112 CN analyzer 
and NIR soil spectroscopy. Both the (c) laboratory and (d) total costs of measuring 
SOC using NIR spectroscopy is significantly cheaper than the costs of measuring it in 
commercial soil labs 
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in
cannot select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf image
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded print settings. Embedded search index. Bookmarks. Flatten visible layers. VB.NET Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET Project.
search pdf for text in multiple files; search pdf documents for text
Costs of Measuring Soil Organic Carbon Stocks 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
26 
7.2
Cost 
error analysis 
According to the Marrakesh Accords, uncertainties in measuring greenhouse gases in offsetting 
projects should be quantified. Estimation errors, model errors, and sampling errors associated 
with the number of samples are among the major sources of uncertainties in measuring SOC. 
IPCC  (2003)  has  recommended  using  confidence  intervals  as  quantitative  estimate  of 
uncertainty. 
To estimate the sample size required to measure carbon stocks with the desired 
confidence interval (95%), we used the mean (21.53 t C ha
-1
) and standard deviation (13.62 t C 
ha
-1
) of carbon stocks in the top soil (20 cm) of the five sites in the western Kenya (Fig. 11).  
To decrease the confidence interval from 4.03 to 2.02 t C ha
-1
, the sample size should 
increase from 50 to 200 (Figure 7.3a). The increase in the number of samples from 50 to 150 in 
turn increases the cost of carbon measurement by USD 3115 (Figure 7.3b). 
Figure  7.3  95% confidence intervals (t  C ha-1) of the carbon stock  (a) and  the 
measuring cost of carbon (b) in the topsoil layer (0-20 cm) for western Kenya 
(a) 
(b) 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
option). Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from PDF file. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
pdf make text searchable; text searchable pdf file
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in
pdf searchable text converter; search multiple pdf files for text
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
27 
APPLICATION TEST IN WESTERN KENYA 
8.1
Materials and methods 
8.1.1 
Study area and soil data 
The soil carbon measuring and monitoring protocol was tested using a case study from western 
Kenya. The field sampling design was made based on the Land Degradation Surveillance 
Framework (LDSF) protocol. The field measurement protocol is implemented at the level of the 
1000 m
2
plot. Soil characteristics are measured on four one-hundred-square-
metre ―Sub
-
Plots‖ 
(about 5 m diameter) located at fixed positions within the plots (Figure 3.1a).  
A total of 1163 soil samples were collected from 240 plots (five sites and 10 clusters, 
which  are  located  at the river  Nzoia,  Yala, and Nyando sub-catchments of  Lake Victoria, 
western Kenya (Figure 8.1). Soil samples were taken from six depths (0-20, 20, 40, 40-60, 60-
80, 80-100, and 100-120 cm). We scanned the 1163 soil samples for near infrared and mid 
infrared  soil  spectroscopy,  and  459  samples  were  analysed  for  soil  organic  carbon 
concentration using thermal oxidation at the ICRAF Soil-Plant Spectral Diagnostics laboratory 
as reference samples. The reference data was used for model calibration and validation.  
Figure 8.1 The sentinel sites in western Kenya. The background is a Landsat MSS 
(1973) false colour composite 
8.1.2 
Determining SOC stocks 
Estimates of soil carbon stocks to a fixed depth using single depth bulk density are mostly 
biased. Thus, it is necessary to consider corrections for spatial and temporal variation in bulk 
density in quantifying SOC stocks along a soil profile  (Lee et al., 2009). In this protocol, we 
established the relationship between cumulative soil mass and volume to detrmine bulk density 
for different soil profiles (Figure 3.2).  
Despite the high carbon concentration in the top soil, the carbon density is often less 
than in the sub-soil due to lower soil mass (bulk density) in  the top soil than in deeper soil 
layers.  In  this  protocol,  we  establish  a  relationship  between  cumulative  soil  mass  and 
cumulative soil volume to determine bulk density at different soil depths using a mixed effects 
model (Eq. 10). 
The linear mixed-effects model for a single level of grouping can be written as (Pinheiro 
and Bates, 2000): 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can be Embedded search index.
pdf text searchable; search text in multiple pdf
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
Replace old string by new string in the PDF file. option, The search and replace match rules. Description: Delete specified string text that match the search
find and replace text in pdf file; searching pdf files for text
Data Analysis 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
28 
(Eq. 11) 
ܰ       
ܰ   ܴ
 ܯ
Where: 
y
i
= the ni-dimensional response vector for the i
th
group, 
β = the p
-dimensional vector of fixed effects,  
b
i
= the q-dimensional vector of random effects,  
X
i
& Z
i
= the known fixed-effects and random-effects regressor 
=) matrices of size ni × p and ni × q, respectively,  
ε
i
= the ni-dimensional vector of within-group errors,  
Ψ is the variance
-covariance matrix of the random effects,  
R
i
the variance-covariance matrix of the within-group errors and 
M is the number of groups  
R code  
Library(nlme) 
model<- lmer(CumSoilMass ~ CumSoilVol - 1 + 
(1|Site)+(1|Cluster:Site)+(1|Plot:Cluster:Site),Data)  
Nested sampling design (i.e. Plot within Cluster within Site) 
Site 10 x 10 km study area,  
A Cluster is a 1-km radius circle within a site, 
A plot is a 0.1 ha (1000 m
2
) sampling unit within a cluster 
The data analysis procedures for modelling bulk density using cumulative soil mass 
and volume  was  developed  using a  Mixed-Effects  Modelling approach in  the R statistical 
software. 
R code 
Model  (mass-volume)<- lmer(CumSoilMass ~ CumSoilVol - 1 +  
(1|Site)+(1|Cluster:Site)+(1|Plot:Cluster:Site), data) 
8.1.3 
Predicting SOC using soil spectroscopy  
First, we removed noisy parts of the spectra and applied first derivative data preprocessing to 
improve signal-to-noise-ratio of the spectral data. Soil carbon concentration was skewed due to 
a  low  frequency  of  large  values  and  log  transformation  was  applied  to  obtain  normally 
distributed data. We used partial least square (PLS) regression to relate carbon concentration to 
the spectra. Cross-validation was used to evaluate calibration model performance and the root 
mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) to measure the reliability of the calibration model (see 
Naes et al., 2002).  
 codes  for  the  major  activities  (a  detailed  R  code  script  is  available  at 
www.africasoils.net 
Spectral data transformation 
spectra deriv<-trans(spectra="derivative",order=1,gap=21) 
Model calibration  
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
Replace Text in PDF File. The following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option
pdf find text; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Name. Description. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search. Search text within file by using Ignore case or Whole word search
search text in pdf image; how to select text in pdf and copy
Application Test in Western Kenya 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
29 
model calib<-plsr((carbon reference data)~(spectra),optimum number of pls,validation ="CV")) 
Prediction  
predict<-predict(model calib,all data, optimum number of pls) 
8.1.4 
Modeling SOC stocks using QuickBird reflectance 
Some of the field- and lab-measured indicators (e.g. woody vegetation cover and soil spectral 
characteristics) are statistically linked to reflectance bands from fine resolution satellite imagery 
(e.g. QuickBird, at approximately two metres resolution), so that detailed site-level maps can be 
provided. Calibrations can also be made to moderate resolution imagery (Landsat, ASTER) for 
local to regional mapping. The satellite data is also analysed, using a variety of ―hard‖ and ―soft‖ 
classification modelling methods, to map areas under (i) cultivation or management, (ii) natural 
or semi-natural vegetation, (iii) woody vegetation cover (trees and shrubs), and (iv) bare soil 
background and hard-set (compacted) areas. These classes form the basis for a rule-based 
decision framework for targeting land management intervention strategies, also including such 
information as tree densities and root depth restrictions.  
Multilevel regression models (also called ―mixed effects models‖
) are commonly used 
for  meta-analysis, and  permit  errors to  be structured according  to  the  spatial  hierarchical 
structure  of  the  sampling  scheme.  These  models  not  only  provide  the  ability  to  make 
generalizations about the data at the population level and at different levels of scale, but may 
also improve  estimates of effects and provide richer insights into the data compared with 
conventional models. 
We used a linear mixed-effect model (Eq. 4) to predict soil organic carbon stocks for 
the topsoil (0-20 cm) for the mid Yala site using the reflectance values of the QuickBird imagery. 
8.2
Results 
8.2.1 
Determination of bulk density using cumulative soil mass 
The slope of the cumulative soil mass versus volume plots gives the bulk density (Figure 8.3). 
Application Test in Western Kenya 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
30 
Figure 8.2 Relationship between cumulative soil mass and volume 
8.2.2 
Predicting SOC using soil spectroscopy  
Both NIR and MIR strongly predict carbon concentration with some bias for higher carbon 
values. However, MIR performed better than NIR to estimate SOC concentration (Figure 8.4).  
Cumulative soil volume (cc)
Cumulative soil mass (gm)
2000
4000
6000
8000
1000
3000
5000
Lower Nyando
Lower Nzoia
1000
3000
5000
Lower Yala
Mid Nyando
1000
3000
5000
2000
4000
6000
8000
Mid Yala
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
Application Test in Western Kenya 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
31 
Figure 8.3 Partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis for: (a) NIR and (b) MIR 
cross-validation using a leave one out procedure and (c) density plot showing the 
reference data using the thermal oxidation and the predicted values using NIR and 
MIR spectroscopy 
8.2.3 
Determining SOC stocks 
The SOC stock (t C ha
-1
) was compared using (Figure 8.5d) a single average bulk density for 
the entire soil profile and (Figure 8.5c) using different bulk density values that correspond to 
each depth class.  
Application Test in Western Kenya 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
32 
Figure 8.4 Carbon concentration is highest for the topsoil (a) but the SOC stock (t ha-
1) is less for the topsoil (b) due to low soil mass (bulk density) (c). Quantifying soil 
carbon stock can be biased if calculated based on single average bulk density for the 
different soil depths (d) 
When we estimates of soil carbon stocks for the different depth classes using their 
respective bulk density with using an average bulk density for the entire soil profile, SOC stocks 
are higher in the subsoil (20-40 cm). This result is cosnistent for all the five sites (Figure 8.6). 
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
SOC stock (t ha
-1
SOC stock (t ha
-1
Carbon concentration (g kg
-1
Soil mass (g) 
Application Test in Western Kenya 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
A Protocol for Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Stocks in Agricultural Landscapes 
33 
(a) 
SOC stock (t ha
-1
Depth
(cm)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested