April/May/June
Vol 27 No 2
Spotlight on import excel and export excel: 
Easing the exchange of data
My favorite feature added in Stata 12 is the ability to import and export Microsoft Excel
®
files.  Nearly 
every day, I work on a project that requires me to transfer data from a spreadsheet into Stata.  
Previously, there were two alternatives: I could copy-and-paste the data into the Data Editor or I could 
export the data as a text file and then use insheet.  The copy-and-paste method works fine for 
small datasets, but for larger datasets I typically went with the latter method.  However, when exporting 
the data as a text file, I would still have to verify that the top line contained valid variable names, or else 
I would have to specify my own variable names within Stata.  Moreover, the process was clumsy.  Why 
do I need to export the data in an intermediate format, and why do I invariably need to fire up my text 
editor to inspect that text file?  The Excel import and export features added in Stata 12 are a godsend 
to me.
Spreadsheets are nearly ubiquitous in business and government, and they allow Stata users to 
exchange data with those who are less fortunate.  Many commercial data providers supply an Excel 
plug-in that allows you to retrieve their data directly into spreadsheets.  Countless more providers 
distribute their data as Excel file downloads.  Accountants and financial analysts are accustomed to 
New from Stata Press
Interpreting and Visualizing Regression Models 
Using Stata
p. 3
Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, 
Third Edition
p. 3
A Gentle Introduction to Stata, Revised Third Edition
p. 4
New from the Stata Bookstore
A Short Introduction to Stata for Biostatistics 
(Updated to Stata 12)
p. 5
Regression Methods in Biostatistics: Linear, 
Logistic, Survival, and Repeated Measures Models, 
Second Edition
p. 5
2012 Stata Conference
Join us in San Diego, California.
p. 6
Stata Users Group meetings
Berlin, Germany: June 1 
Lisbon, Portugal: September 7 
Barcelona, Spain: September 12
London, UK: September 13–14 
Bologna, Italy: September 20–21
p. 8
Public training schedule
p. 10
NetCourse schedule
p. 11
What our users love about Stata
p. 11
Upcoming events
p. 11
The Stata News
Executive Editor ............Karen Strope
Production Supervisor ....Annette Fett
Pdf find highlighted text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find and replace text in pdf file; search pdf documents for text
Pdf find highlighted text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
select text pdf file; pdf search and replace text
working with Excel files but typically do not have Stata on their machines, 
so being able to import and export Excel files is a convenience to me.
There are several reasons why I prefer to use a spreadsheet as part of my 
data collection process.  It allows me to do an initial scan of the data using 
the same program that created the file to make sure it contains the data I 
expected.  In addition, spreadsheet-format data files often contain rows and 
columns that include descriptions, comments, and other textual information; 
seeing the data in a spreadsheet helps me decide what area to import into 
Stata.  Finally, some websites give the option of downloading data as a 
spreadsheet or a text file.  If there are many data fields, looking at the text file 
can sometimes be confusing, especially if it contains missing data, so I will 
opt to download the spreadsheet version.
Recently, I was looking at the distribution of sales of Stata across the United 
States. As part of my analysis, I needed to look at economic growth in 
each of the 366 metropolitan statistical areas in the country.  I therefore 
proceeded to the Bureau of Economic Analysis website, quickly found 
gross metropolitan product data, and proceeded to download the dataset 
as a spreadsheet file.
I then opened the file and noticed that the actual data were in rows 7 
through 373 (including a row for all metropolitan areas).  Row 6 contained 
column headings that included entries like “2010”.  Knowing that valid 
Stata variable names could not start with numbers, I renamed those entries 
to, for example, “Y2010”. I then opened Stata, filled in the 
import excel dialog box as shown in the figure below, and had the 
data I needed to proceed.
The previous example was straightforward, and I probably could have just 
as easily worked with a raw text file or else just copied the data from the 
spreadsheet and pasted it into the Data Editor.  The next example would 
have been impossible without import excel to save the day.
An associate emailed me with a problem.  He had downloaded financial 
information on 6,400 companies from the Bloomberg Professional 
service.  The nearly 200 megabytes of raw data were stored in a set of 10 
Excel spreadsheets, one for each industry he was studying.  Within each 
spreadsheet file, each company’s data was stored on an individual sheet; 
one spreadsheet had about 300 sheets while another had over 1,000.  
Moreover, each sheet had rows of headers and footers of varying sizes.  
One alternative would have been to write a Visual Basic script to go through 
each sheet and export the relevant range of data as a text file.  However, 
I hadn’t written a VB script in several years, and I would still have had to 
write another program in Stata to import each text file, create a valid date 
variable, and check for obvious errors.
The only saving grace was that my associate did have a list of the 
companies’ ticker symbols separated by industry.
Because of Stata 12’s import excel function, I was able to write a 
do-file to read in each company’s data, append that data to a master 
Stata dataset, and provide error checking, all in just 50 lines of code!  A 
do-file to read in the text files and perform the same integrity checks would 
likely have been longer.  Going that route, I probably would have spent at 
least half a day brushing up on my VB skills to write a program to export 
the data as text as well. import excel proved invaluable here.
I have referred to Excel spreadsheet files, but in fact I do not even use 
Microsoft Excel.  Many of StataCorp’s internal applications are UNIX-based, 
so I use a Linux computer at work.  I also use Linux at home so that I do 
not have to remember the idiosyncrasies of two operating systems.  Instead 
of Excel, I use LibreOffice Calc, an open-source alternative, and I almost 
never run into problems working with Excel files in Calc.  Even if you do 
not use Microsoft Excel, the ability to work with Excel files in Stata can still 
prove useful.
Most of the time, I need to import spreadsheet data into Stata to perform 
analyses.  However, Stata also has an export excel command that 
allows you to create Excel spreadsheets based on Stata datasets.
Of course, if I were working on a detailed transaction-level dataset with 
millions of observations on hundreds of variables, I would not want to 
use a spreadsheet program at all.  Use the right tool for the job.  But 
despite the increasing interest in “big data”, many common tasks involve 
moderately sized datasets.  In those cases, import excel and 
export excel are valuable additions to your toolbox.
— Brian Poi 
Senior Economist
2
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office search in the viewed document and find what you for, all results will be highlighted with specific
convert pdf to word searchable text; find and replace text in pdf
New from Stata Press
Interpreting and Visualizing Regression 
Models Using Stata
Author:  Michael N. Mitchell
Publisher:  Stata Press
Copyright:  2012
ISBN-13:  978-1-59718-107-5 
Pages:  588; paperback
Price:  $58.00
Michael Mitchell’s Interpreting and Visualizing Regression Models Using Stata 
is a clear treatment of how to carefully present results from model-fitting in a 
wide variety of settings. It is a boon to anyone who has to present the tangible 
meaning of a complex model in a clear fashion, regardless of the audience. 
As an example, many experienced researchers start to squirm when asked to 
give a simple explanation of the practical meaning of interactions in nonlinear 
models such as logistic regression. The techniques presented in Mitchell’s book 
make answering those questions easy. The overarching theme of the book is 
that graphs make interpreting even the most complicated models containing 
interaction terms, categorical variables, and other intricacies straightforward.
Using a dataset based on the General Social Survey, Mitchell starts with basic 
linear regression with a single independent variable, and then illustrates how 
to tabulate and graph predicted values. While illustrating, Mitchell focuses 
on Stata’s margins and marginsplot commands, which play 
a central role in the book and which greatly simplify the calculation and 
presentation of results from regression models. In particular, through use of 
the marginsplot command, Mitchell shows how you can graphically 
visualize every model presented in the book. Gaining insight into results is 
much easier when you can view them in a graph rather than in a mundane 
table of results.
Mitchell then proceeds to more-complicated models where the effects 
of the independent variables are nonlinear. After discussing how to detect 
nonlinear effects, he presents examples using both standard polynomial terms 
(squares and cubes of variables) as well as fractional polynomial models, 
where independent variables can be raised to powers like 
1 or 
1
/
2
. In all 
cases, Mitchell again uses the marginsplot command to illustrate the 
effect that changing an independent variable has on the dependent variable. 
Piecewise-linear models are presented as well; these are linear models in 
which the slope or intercept is allowed to change depending on the range 
of an independent variable. Mitchell also uses the contrast command 
when discussing categorical variables; as the name suggests, this command 
allows you to easily contrast predictions made for various levels of the 
categorical variable.
Interaction terms can be tricky to interpret, but Mitchell shows how graphs 
produced by marginsplot greatly clarify results. Individual chapters 
are devoted to two- and three-way interactions containing all continuous or 
all categorical variables and include many practical examples. Raw regression 
output including interactions of continuous and categorical variables can be 
nigh impossible to interpret, but again Mitchell makes this a snap through 
judicious use of the margins and marginsplot commands in 
subsequent chapters.
The first two-thirds of the book is devoted to cross-sectional data, while the 
final third considers longitudinal data and complex survey data. A significant 
difference between this book and most others on regression models is that 
Mitchell spends quite some time on fitting and visualizing discontinuous 
models—models where the outcome can change value suddenly at 
thresholds. Such models are natural in settings such as education and policy 
evaluation, where graduation or policy changes can make sudden changes in 
income or revenue.
This book is a worthwhile addition to the library of anyone involved in 
statistical consulting, teaching, or collaborative applied statistical environments. 
Graphs greatly aid the interpretation of regression models, and Mitchell’s book 
shows you how.
You can find the table of contents and online ordering information at 
stata-press.com/books/interpreting-visualizing-regression-models.
Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using 
Stata, Third Edition
Authors:  Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and Anders 
Skrondal
Publisher:  Stata Press
Copyright:  2012
ISBN-13:  978-1-59718-108-2 
Pages:  974; paperback
Price:  $109.00 (both volumes)
Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Third Edition, by Sophia 
Rabe-Hesketh and Anders Skrondal, looks specifically at Stata’s treatment 
of generalized linear mixed models, also known as multilevel or hierarchical 
models. These models are “mixed” because they allow fixed and random 
effects, and they are “generalized” because they are appropriate for 
continuous Gaussian responses as well as binary, count, and other types of 
limited dependent variables.
The material in the third edition consists of two volumes, a result of the 
substantial expansion of material from the second edition, and has much to 
offer readers of the earlier editions. 
Volume I is devoted to continuous Gaussian linear mixed models and has 
nine chapters organized into four parts. The first part reviews the methods of 
linear regression. The second part provides in-depth coverage of two-level 
models, the simplest extensions of a linear regression model.
Rabe-Hesketh and Skrondal begin with the comparatively simple random-
intercept linear model without covariates, developing the mixed model from 
principles and thereby familiarizing the reader with terminology, summarizing 
3
and relating the widely used estimating strategies, and providing historical 
perspective. Once the authors have established the mixed-model foundation, 
they smoothly generalize to random-intercept models with covariates and 
then to a discussion of the various estimators (between, within, and random 
effects). The authors then discuss models with random coefficients.
The third part of volume I describes models for longitudinal and panel data, 
including dynamic models, marginal models (a new chapter), and growth-
curve models (a new chapter). The fourth and final part covers models with 
nested and crossed random effects, including a new chapter describing in 
more detail higher-level nested models for continuous outcomes.
The mixed-model foundation and the in-depth coverage of the mixed-
model principles provided in volume I for continuous outcomes make 
it straightforward to transition to generalized linear mixed models for 
noncontinuous outcomes, which are described in volume II.
Volume II is devoted to generalized linear mixed models for binary, 
categorical, count, and survival outcomes. The second volume has seven 
chapters also organized into four parts. The first three parts in volume II cover 
models for categorical responses, including binary, ordinal, and nominal (a 
new chapter); models for count data; and models for survival data, including 
discrete-time and continuous-time (a new chapter) survival responses. The 
fourth and final part in volume II describes models with nested and crossed-
random effects with an emphasis on binary outcomes.
The book has extensive applications of generalized mixed models performed 
in Stata. Rabe-Hesketh and Skrondal developed gllamm, a Stata program 
that can fit many latent-variable models, of which the generalized linear mixed 
model is a special case. As of version 10, Stata contains the xtmixed, 
xtmelogit, and xtmepoisson commands for fitting multilevel 
models, in addition to other xt commands for fitting standard random-
intercept models. The types of models fit by these commands sometimes 
overlap; when this happens, the authors highlight the differences in syntax, 
data organization, and output for the two (or more) commands that can be 
used to fit the same model. The authors also point out the relative strengths 
and weaknesses of each command when used to fit the same model, 
based on considerations such as computational speed, accuracy, available 
predictions, and available postestimation statistics.
In summary, this book is the most complete, up-to-date depiction of Stata’s 
capacity for fitting generalized linear mixed models. The authors provide an 
ideal introduction for Stata users wishing to learn about this powerful data 
analysis tool.
Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Third Edition may be 
purchased as a two-volume set for $109. Alternatively, either volume may 
be purchased individually for $62. 
• Volume I: Continuous Responses
• Volume II: Categorical Responses, Counts, and Survival
You can find the table of contents and online ordering information at 
stata-press.com/books/multilevel-longitudinal-modeling-stata.
A Gentle Introduction to Stata, Revised 
Third Edition
Author:  Alan C. Acock
Publisher:  Stata Press
Copyright:  2012
ISBN-13:  978-1-59718-109-9 
Pages:  401; paperback
Price:  $48.00
Alan C. Acock’s A Gentle Introduction to Stata, Revised Third Edition is aimed 
at new Stata users who want to become proficient in Stata. After reading this 
introductory text, new users not only will be able to use Stata well but also will 
learn new aspects of Stata easily.
Acock assumes that the user is not familiar with any statistical software. This 
assumption of a blank slate is central to the structure and contents of the 
book. Acock starts with the basics; for example, the portion of the book that 
deals with data management begins with a careful and detailed example of 
turning survey data on paper into a Stata-ready dataset on the computer. 
When explaining how to go about basic exploratory statistical procedures, 
Acock includes notes that will help the reader develop good work habits. This 
mixture of explaining good Stata habits and good statistical habits continues 
throughout the book.
Acock is quite careful to teach the reader all aspects of using Stata. He 
covers data management, good work habits (including the use of basic do-
files), basic exploratory statistics (including graphical displays), and analyses 
using the standard array of basic statistical tools (correlation, linear and 
logistic regression, and parametric and nonparametric tests of location and 
dispersion). Acock teaches Stata commands by using the menus and dialog 
boxes while still stressing the value of do-files. In this way, he ensures that all 
types of users can build good work habits. Each chapter has exercises that 
the motivated reader can use to reinforce the material.
The tone of the book is friendly and conversational without ever being glib or 
condescending. Important asides and notes about terminology are set off in 
boxes, which makes the text easy to read without any convoluted twists or 
forward-referencing. Rather than splitting topics by their Stata implementation, 
Acock arranges the topics as they would appear in a basic statistics textbook; 
graphics and postestimation are woven into the material in a natural fashion. 
Real datasets, such as the General Social Surveys from 2002 and 2006, are 
used throughout the book.
The focus of the book is especially helpful for those in psychology and the 
social sciences, because the presentation of basic statistical modeling is 
supplemented with discussions of effect sizes and standardized coefficients. 
Various selection criteria, such as semipartial correlations, are discussed for 
model selection.
The revised third edition of the book has been updated to reflect the new 
features available in Stata 12 and Stata 11. The ANOVA chapter has been 
revised to incorporate the pwmeans command, to do mean comparisons, 
4
and the marginsplot command, which simplifies the construction of 
graphs showing interaction effects. Menus and screenshots have also been 
updated. As in the third edition, an entire chapter is devoted to the analysis 
of missing data and the use of multiple-imputation methods. Factor-variable 
notation is introduced as an alternative to the manual creation of interaction 
terms. The new Variables Manager and revamped Data Editor are featured in 
the discussion of data management.
You can find the table of contents and online ordering information at 
stata-press.com/books/gentle-introduction-to-stata.
New from the Stata Bookstore
A Short Introduction to Stata for 
Biostatistics (Updated to Stata 12)
Authors:  Michael Hills and  
Bianca L. De Stavola
Publisher:  Timberlake Consultants
Copyright:  2012
ISBN-13:  978-0-9571708-0-3 
Pages:  181; paperback
Price:  $52.00
A Short Introduction to Stata for Biostatistics bridges the information 
gap between Stata’s Getting Started manual and Reference manuals by 
providing a more detailed introduction to the most often used analytic 
methods in biomedical research. Although the book is written specifically for 
biostatisticians, epidemiologists, and health professionals new to Stata, it is 
also useful for more-experienced users wanting more in-depth knowledge 
of both Stata commands and biostatistical issues. The book is hands on, 
intended to be used while working with Stata, and includes a CD-ROM 
containing the datasets and several author-written programs.
The first four chapters provide an overview of data entry and management 
commands, including those used to create, label, and drop variables and 
those used to sort observations. The next two chapters cover graphics. Then 
comes the bulk of the book, which details methods used in data description 
and analysis. Beginning with commands used to create frequency tables 
and summary statistics, the authors proceed to describe commands used 
for univariate and multivariate analyses, including linear regression, Poisson 
regression, logistic regression, survival data analysis (proportional hazards 
models and competing-risks models), and meta analysis. Included among the 
final chapters is a useful tutorial on report generation.
You can find the table of contents and online ordering information at 
stata.com/bookstore/short-intro-stata-biostatistics.
Regression Methods in Biostatistics: Linear, 
Logistic, Survival, and Repeated Measures 
Models, Second Edition
Authors:  Eric Vittinghoff, David V. Glidden, 
Stephen C. Shiboski, and                  
Charles E. McCulloch
Publisher:  Springer
Copyright:  2012
ISBN-13:  978-1-4614-1352-3
Pages:  509; hardcover
Price:  $74.75
Regression Methods in Biostatistics: Linear, Logistic, Survival, and Repeated 
Measures Models, Second Edition is intended as a teaching text for a one-
semester or two-quarter secondary statistics course in biostatistics. The book’s 
focus is multipredictor regression models in modern medical research. The 
authors recommend as a prerequisite an introductory course in statistics or 
biostatistics, but the first three chapters provide sufficient review material to 
make this requirement not critical.
Vittinghoff, Glidden, Shiboski, and McCulloch take a unified approach to 
regression models. They begin with linear regression and then discuss 
issues such as model statement and assumptions, types of regressors 
(for example, categorical versus continuous), interactions, causation and 
confounding, inference and testing, diagnostics, and alternative models for 
when assumptions are violated. Then they discuss these same issues in the 
contexts of other multipredictor regression models, namely, logistic regression, 
the Cox model, and generalized linear models (GLMs). The authors then cover 
generalized estimating equations (GEE) and the analysis of survey data. Almost 
all analyses are performed using Stata.
The second edition provides two new chapters and substantially expands some 
of the existing chapters. Specifically, a new chapter on strengthening causal 
inference describes the fundamentals of causal inference and concentrates on 
two estimation methods—inverse probability weighting and what the authors 
call potential outcomes estimation. This chapter also covers propensity scores, 
time-dependent treatments, instrumental variables, and principal stratification. 
The other new chapter is on missing data. The authors describe the missing-
data problem and its impact on statistical inference. They then discuss three 
approaches for handling missing data: maximum likelihood estimation, multiple 
imputation, and inverse weighting. Among the substantially revised chapters 
are chapters on logistic regression, now including categorical outcomes; on 
survival analysis, now including competing risks; on generalized linear models, 
now including negative binomial and zero-truncated and zero-inflated count 
models; and more. All the Stata examples used in the book have been updated 
for Stata 12.
You can find the table of contents and online ordering information at 
stata.com/bookstore/regression-methods-biostatistics.
5
Conference
About the 
Conference
Join us in sunny San Diego for the 2012 
Stata Conference. The Stata Conference is 
enjoyable and rewarding for Stata users at all 
levels and from all disciplines. This year’s program 
will include presentations by users and invited speakers, 
and it will also include the ever-popular “Wishes and grumbles” 
session. Representatives from StataCorp include Bill Gould, President 
and Head of Development; Chuck Huber, Senior Statistician; and Kristin 
MacDonald, Senior Statistician. 
Accommodations
Rooms at the Manchester Grand Hyatt are available at the discounted 
rate of $229 per night. For reservations, call 1-888-421-1442 and 
identify yourself as a guest with the group Stata, or reserve online (see 
stata.com/sandiego12 for details). Please make your reservation by 
Monday, June 25, 2012, to receive the discounted rate.
Scientific committee
• A. Colin Cameron, University of California–Davis
• Xiao Chen, University of California–Los Angeles
• Phil Ender (chair), University of California–Los Angeles
• Estie Hudes, University of California–San Francisco
• Michael Mitchell, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Logistics organizer
Sarah Marrs, StataCorp LP
smarrs@stata.com
Dates
July 26–27
Venue
Manchester Grand Hyatt
One Market Place
San Diego, CA 92101
Cost
$195 regular; $75 student
Register
stata.com/sandiego12
6
Program
Thursday, July 26
Custom Stata commands for semi-automatic 
confidentiality screening of Statistics Canada data 
Jesse McCrosky, University of Saskatchewan 
scdensity: A program for self-consistent density estimation
Joerg Luedicke, University of Florida and Yale University 
TMPM: The trauma mortality prediction model is robust to ICD-9, 
ICD-10, and AIS Coding lexicons
Alan Cook, Baylor University Medical Center  
Adoption: A new Stata routine for consistently estimating 
population technological adoption parameters
Aliou Diagne, African Rice Center 
Graphics (and numerics) for univariate distributions
Nicholas J. Cox, Durham University 
Binary choice models with endogenous regressors
Christopher Baum, Boston College and DIW Berlin 
Yingying Dong, University of California–Irvine
Arthur Lewbel, Boston College 
An application of multiple imputation and sampling-based 
estimation
Haluk Gedikoglu, Lincoln University of Missouri
The application of Stata’s multiple-imputation techniques to 
analyze a design of experiments with multiple responses 
Clara Novoa, Texas State University 
EFA within a CFA context
Phil Ender, Unversity of California–Los Angeles 
Structural equation modeling using the SEM builder  
and the sem command
Kristin MacDonald, StataCorp LP 
Imagining a Stata/Python combination
James Fiedler, Universities Space Research Association   
Friday, July 27
Issues for analyzing competing-risks data with missing or 
misclassification in causes 
Ronny Westerman, Philipps-University of Marburg  
Generating survival data for fitting marginal structural Cox 
models using Stata
Mohammed Ehsanul Karim, University of British Columbia
Computing optimal strata bounds using dynamic programming
Eric Miller, Summit Consulting
Correct standard errors for multistage regression-based 
estimators:  A guide for practitioners with illustrations
Joseph Terza, University of North Carolina–Greensboro 
Shrinkage estimators for structural parameters
Tirthankar Chakravarty, University of California–San Diego  
Stata implementation of the nonparametric spatial 
heteroskedasticity- and autocorrelation-consistent covariance 
matrix estimator
P. Wilner Jeanty, Rice University 
Big data, little spaces, high speed: Using Stata to analyze the 
determinants of broadband access in the United States
David Beede, U.S. Department of Commerce  
Brittany Bond, U.S. Department of Commerce 
A comparative analysis of lottery-, charter-, and traditional-based 
elementary schools within the Anchorage school district
Matthew McCauley, University of Alaska–Anchorage     
Matching individuals in the Current Population Survey:  
A distance-based approach
Stuart Craig, Yale University  
Dialog programming for automating the African Transformation 
Index (ATI): Challenges in using Stata
Kwaku Damoah, African Center for Economic Transformation  
Allocative efficiency analysis using DEA in Stata
Choonjoo Lee, Korea National Defense University  
Psychometric analysis using Stata
Chuck Huber, StataCorp LP
Report to users
Bill Gould, StataCorp LP  
Wishes and grumbles: User feedback and Q&A
Register today!
stata.com/sandiego12
7
2012 Stata Users Group meetings
Germany: June 1
The 10th German Stata Users Group meeting will be held at the WZB 
Social Science Research Center in Berlin on Friday, June 1, 2012. Patrick 
Royston, University College–London; Willi Sauerbrei, University of Freiburg; 
and Maurizio Pisati, University of Milano–Bicocca will present this year’s 
keynote speeches. Bill Rising, Director of Educational Services, and Bill Gould, 
President and Head of Development, from StataCorp will also attend. 
Program
Handling interactions in Stata, especially with continuous predictors
Patrick Royston, University College London
Willi Sauerbrei, University of Freiburg
Exploratory spatial data analysis using Stata
Maurizio Pisati, University of Milano–Bicocca
leebounds: Lee’s treatment effect bounds for samples with 
nonrandom sample selection
Harald Tauchmann, Rheinisch-Westfäisches Institut für 
Wirtschaftsforschung
Comparing observed and theoretical distributions
Maarten Buis, University of Tübingen
A simple alternative to the linear probability model for binary 
choice models with endogenous regressors
Christopher F. Baum, Boston College and DIW Berlin
Yingying Dong, University of California–Irvine
Arthur Lewbel, Boston College
Tao Yang, Boston College
Robust regression in Stata
Ben Jann, University of Bern
Working in the margins to plot a clear course
Bill Rising, StataCorp LP
Can multilevel multiprocess models be estimated using Stata? A 
case for the cmp command
Tamás Bartus, Corvinus University of Budapest
Rescaling results of mixed nonlinear probability models to 
compare regression coefficients or variance components across 
hierarchically nested models
Dirk Enzmann, University of Hamburg
Ulrich Kohler, Social Science Research Center Berlin
Multilevel tools
Katja Möhring, University of Cologne
Alexander Schmidt, University of Cologne
Modular programming in Stata
Daniel Schneider, University of Frankfurt/Main
Report to users
Bill Gould, StataCorp
Wishes and grumbles
Venue:  WZB Social Science Research Center
Reichpietschufer 50
D-10785 Berlin
Cost:  Meeting only: €45 regular; €25 student 
Workshop only: €65; Both meeting and workshop: €85
Details: 
stata.com/meeting/germany12
Portugal: September 7
Save the date! This year’s meeting will be held at the Nova School of 
Business and Economics in Lisbon, Portugal. For upcoming details, go to 
stata.com/meeting/portugal12.
Registration
Participants are asked to travel at their own expense. The conference 
fee covers costs for coffee, tea, and lunch. There will also be an optional 
informal meal at a restaurant in Berlin on Friday evening at additional cost.
You can register by emailing Anke Mrosek (anke.mrosek@dpc.de) or by 
writing, phoning, or faxing to
Anke Mrosek 
Dittrich & Partner Consulting GmbH 
Prinzenstr. 2 
42697 Solingen 
Tel: +49 (0) 212 260 66-24 
Fax: +49 (0) 212 260 66-66
GERMANY
8
Spain: September 12
Isabel Cañette and Gustavo Sanchez, Senior Statisticians from StataCorp, will 
attend. The meeting will include the popular “Wishes and grumbles” session. 
Call for presentations
The conference will be conducted mostly in English. Papers will be accepted 
in both Spanish and English, with English being the preferred language. 
Presentations are welcome on any Stata-related topic, including user-
written Stata programs, case studies of research or teaching using Stata, 
discussions of data-management problems, and surveys or critiques of 
Stata facilities in specific fields. The submission deadline is June 22. For 
submission guidelines, see stata.com/meeting/spain12
Registration
To register, please send an email to Timberlake Consulting S.L. at 
info@timberlakeconsulting.com; they will email you the registration 
form that you will need to fill out and return before September 7.
Venue:  Universitat de Barcelona (UB)
Facultat d’Economia i Empresa
Avda. Diagonal, 690. Barcelona 08034
Cost:  €60 regular; €30 student
Details: 
stata.com/meeting/spain12
Italy: September 20–21
The first day of the meeting will comprise five sessions; the second day of the 
meeting will comprise two training courses (one in Italian and one in English).  
Bill Rising, StataCorp’s Director of Educational Services, will attend.
Call for presentations
As in previous years, the emphasis will be on the development of new 
commands or procedures currently unavailable in Stata. Also encouraged 
are proposals based on the use of Stata in previously unpublished empirical 
research and other general-interest applications of Stata, such as data 
management or teaching with Stata.
The submission deadline is June 30. 
For submission guidelines, see stata.com/meeting/italy12
Registration
Submit your completed registration form, found at 
stata.com/meeting/italy12, to TStat S.r.l. by September 10.
TStat S.r.l. 
statausers@tstat.it 
Tel: +39 0864 210101 
Fax: +39 0864 206014
Venue:  Grand Hotel Majestic “Giá Baglioni”
Via Indipendenza, 8, 40121 Bologna 
Cost:  Meeting only: €95 regular; €71 student
Meeting and training: €400 regular; €300 student
Details: 
stata.com/meeting/italy12
UK: September 13–14
Bill Gould, President and Head of Development, and Bill Rising, Director of 
Educational Services, from StataCorp will attend. 
Registration
To register for this meeting, contact Timberlake Consultants:
info@timberlake.co.uk
timberlake.co.uk
+44 (0) 20 8697 3377
Venue:  Cass Business School 
Bunhill Row 
London EC1Y 8TZ
Cost:  Both days:  £96 regular; £66 student 
Single day: £66 regular; £48 student 
Dinner (optional): £36
Details: 
stata.com/meeting/uk12
SPAIN
ITALY
9
Course
Dates
Location
Cost
Multilevel/Mixed Models Using Stata
August 30–31, 2012
October 4–5, 2012
Washington, DC
Washington, DC
$1,295
Survey Data Analysis Using Stata
May 30–31, 2012
Washington, DC
$1,295
Using Stata Effectively: Data Management, 
Analysis, and Graphics Fundamentals
June 19–20, 2012
August 28–29, 2012
October 2–3, 2012
November 1–2, 2012
Chicago, IL
Washington, DC
Washington, DC
San Francisco, CA
$950
Public training schedule
Multilevel/Mixed Models 
Using Stata
This two-day course taught by Bill Rising, 
StataCorp’s Director of Educational Services, is 
an introduction to using Stata to fit multilevel/
mixed models. Mixed models contain both fixed 
effects analogous to the coefficients in standard 
regression models and random effects not 
directly estimated, but instead summarized 
through the unique elements of their variance–
covariance matrix. Mixed models may contain 
more than one level of nested random effects, 
and hence these models are also referred to 
as multilevel or hierarchical models, particularly 
in the social sciences. Stata’s approach to 
linear mixed models is to assign random 
effects to independent panels where a 
hierarchy of nested panels can be defined for 
handling nested random effects. Exercises will 
supplement the lectures and Stata examples.
The course will cover the following topics:
• Random-intercept linear model
• Random coefficients and the various 
covariance structures that can be imposed 
with multiple random-effects terms
• Methods for fitting more complex models, 
including crossed-effects models, growth 
curve models, and models with complex 
and grouped constraints on covariance 
structures
• Predictions, model diagnostics, and other 
postestimation tasks
• Binary and count responses
Survey Data Analysis 
Using Stata
This course taught by Stas Kolenikov, Senior 
Survey Statistician at Abt SRBI and Adjunct 
Assistant Professor at University of Missouri–
Columbia, covers how to use Stata for survey 
data analysis assuming a fixed population. We 
will begin by reviewing the sampling methods 
used to collect survey data, and how they act 
in the estimation of totals, ratios, and regression 
coefficients. We will then cover the three 
variance estimators implemented in Stata’s 
survey estimation commands. Strata with a 
single sampling unit, certainty sampling units, 
subpopulation estimation, and poststratification 
will also be covered in some detail.
The course will cover the following topics:
• Sampling
• Sampling design characteristics
› Cluster sampling
› Stratified sampling
› Sampling without replacement
• Regression with survey data
• Variance estimation
› Linearization
› Balanced repeated replication (BRR)
› Jackknife
• Special types of sampling units
› Strata with a single sampling unit
› Certainty units
• Restricted sample and subpopulation 
estimation
• Poststratification
Using Stata Effectively
Become intimately familiar with all three 
components of Stata: data management, 
analysis, and graphics. This two-day course, 
taught by Bill Rising (StataCorp’s Director of 
Educational Services), is aimed at both new 
Stata users and those who want to use Stata 
more effectively. You will learn to use Stata 
efficiently and to make your work reproducible 
and self-explanatory. As a result, collaborative 
changes and follow-up analyses will become 
much simpler.
The course will cover the following topics:
• Stata basics, including overviews of the 
following elements and how to use them 
together: Stata’s GUI, command line, and 
scripting
• Data management
• Workflow
• Analysis, including basic statistical 
commands and common postestimation 
commands for predictions, hypothesis 
tests, marginal effects, and more
• Graphics, including the Graph Editor
For course details or to enroll, visit 
stata.com/public-training or contact us at 
training@stata.com. Want to know when 
a new course is announced? Sign up for an 
email alert at stata.com/alerts.
Enroll today at stata.com/public-training.
10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested