FUNDAMENTALS
7
where the constants K
1
, K
2
, K
3
are ideally equal, but
differ slightly in practice, and represent the rotor-sta-
tor transfer functions;
α
1
, α
2
, and α
3
, are ideally zero (or small and equal),
but are appreciable in practice, and represent the
rotor-stator time-phase shift at the carrier frequency;
and ω= 2πf, where f is the carrier (or reference) fre-
quency used to excite the system.
With these variables accounted for the basic synchro
signal relationship is a shown in Figure 1.11a.
Similarly, a 4-wire set of resolver signals (see Figure
1.10d) measured at terminals S1 and S3 (V
x
), S2
and S4 (V
y
), and corresponding to the 
spacial
phase
angle θ, would be represented mathematically by:
where K
x
and K
y
are ideally equal transfer-function
constants like K
1
, K
2
, and K
3
;
α
x
and α
y
are ideally zero time-phase shifts, like α
1
,
α
2
, and α
3
;
and ω = 2πf where f is the same as in the synchro
equations.
V  = K
sin θ sin (ωt + α  ) 
x
x
x
V  = K
cos θ sin (ωt + α  ) 
y
y
y
30
90
150
210
270
330
360
θ          (DEGREES)
CCW
0
S4-S2 = V         COS(θ)
MAX
S3-S1 = V         SIN(θ)
MAX
- V
MAX
+ V
MAX
In Phase 
with RH-RL
Out of Phase 
with RH-RL
Figure 1.11b.ResolverSignal Relationships.
“repeaters”), or perform other low-energy mechani-
cal work. Table 1-1 relates torque components to the
analogous control components described above.
The  most  important  fact  about  all  synchro  and
resolver  signals  is  that  they  present  information
about the angular position of a shaft in the form of
relative amplitudes of a carrier wave.
All
signals, rotor
and stator, input and output, are at the same fre-
quency, and (except for imperfections in the compo-
nents)  in  perfect  time-phase synchronization.
Although it is common to speak of the “phase angle”
of the shaft, and of the winding as a “3-phase”(syn-
chro) or “2-phase” (resolver), all carrier signals are
sine waves, in phase with all others in the system...
except  for  the  imperfections  and  undesired  side-
effects  to  be  discussed  later. To  differentiate
between time-phase angle and shaft-position angles
(or their electrical equivalents), we refer to the latter
as “spatial-phase”angles.
A 3-wire set of synchro signals (see Figure 1.10a),
measured between pairs of terminals, S1, S2 and
S3, corresponding to the spacial phase angle, would
be represented mathematically as:
V     = K
sinθ sin (ωt + α  ) 
V
= K
sin (θ + 120˚) sin (ωt + α  ) 
V
= K   sin (θ - 120˚) sin (ωt + α   ) 
1
2
3
1
2
3
2-3
3-1
1-2
30
90
150
210
270
330
360
θ          (DEGREES)
CCW
0
S3-S1 = V          SIN(θ)
MAX
S2-S3 = V          SIN(θ + 120°)
MAX
S1-S2 = V          SIN(θ + 240˚)
MAX
- V
MAX
+ V
MAX
Out of Phase 
with RH-RL
In Phase 
with RH-RL
Figure 1.11a.Synchro SignalRelationships.
Standard Synchro Control Transmitter (CX)Outputs as a Function of
CCWRotation From Electrical Zero (EZ).
Standard Resolver Control Transmitter (RX)Outputs as a Function of
CCWRotation From Electrical Zero (EZ).
Pdf find and replace text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf editor with search and replace text; convert pdf to searchable text online
Pdf find and replace text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
searching pdf files for text; how to make a pdf document text searchable
FUNDAMENTALS
8
That is, regardless of dθ/dt, the rotational velocity of
the shaft, or even of d
2
θ/dt
2
, the angular acceleration,
the value of θis always given by:
However, there is an undesired effect in synchros and
resolvers  called  “speed  voltage,” which  can  cause
appreciable deviations from the ideal relationship stat-
ed above.Speed voltageis discussed in Section VII.
Speed voltage is only one of several undesirable
effects that cause synchro and resolver behavior to
depart from the ideal relationships discussed above.
Among the others are: harmonic distortion; quadra-
turecomponents (of output voltage);loading (of or by
the synchro or resolver);time-phaseshift in the syn-
chro or resolver (the parameter α, mentioned above);
and nonlinearities in the synchro or resolver - i.e.,
departures, due to mechanical imperfections in the
magnetic or windings that cause departure from the
ideal transfer functions described above. All of these
are discussed in some detail in Section VII.
As a final item in our discussion of useful mathematical
relationships, let us examine the nature of digital sig-
nals. A digital signal consists of a set of voltage levels
(or current or resistance levels), at a set of terminals,
each of which has been reassigned a certain “weight”
(i.e., a certain relative
importance
), in accordance with
a certain “code”. The most common code is the so
called “natural binary” code, in which the weight of
each successive voltage-level terminal, from the small-
est to the largest, is given by the simple relationship:
where n is the number of terminals, which varies
from 1 to N (the maximum number of terminals). In
a digital signal, the voltage level at each terminal
may have either one of only two values, nominally:
The ONE state (for example, +4 Volts)
The ZERO state (for example, 0 Volts)
weight = 2
n-1
θ = tan 
V
x
V
y
-1
With these variables accounted for the basic resolver
signal relationship is a shown in Figure 1.11b.
Thus, for any static spatial angle θ, the outputs of a syn-
chro or a resolver are 
constant-amplitude
sine waves at
the  carrier  frequency. In  resolver  format,  ignoring
imperfections, the ratio of the amplitudes would be:
This ratio is independent of the frequency and
amplitude of the reference excitation (carrier fre-
quency and amplitude).
Similarly, for the  same static spatial angle θ, the
ratios of the amplitudes of the synchro-format sig-
nals, ignoring imperfections, would be:
These ratios are independent of the frequency
and amplitude of the reference excitations, as in
the resolver-format case, above.
As we shall see, all data-conversion techniques in
current use operate on 
resolver-format
(sin/cos) sig-
nals, for convenience. This is done by converting
from synchro to resolver-format before digitizing or
operating on the signals.
So far, we have spoken only of 
static
shaft angles. In
practical systems, of course, θ changes, sometimes
rapidly, sometimes slowly and sometimes intermit-
tently. At all times, however, the 
instantaneous
value
of θcorresponds to the
instantaneous
ratios of V
x
/V
y
.
             sin (θ)    
V          sin (θ + 120˚) 
2-3
3-1
=
         sin (θ + 120˚)    
V          sin (θ - 120˚) 
1-2
2-3
=
V          sin (θ - 120˚)    
              sin (θ) 
3-1
1-2
=
Note that this 
set of ratios is a 
single position, θ,
and is the same 
information as is 
contained in Vx/Vy
above.   
V        sin θ  
x
V       cos θ  
y
=           = tan θ
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
and ASP.NET webpage. Find and replace text in PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
how to select text in a pdf; pdf find text
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
how to select all text in pdf; how to select all text in pdf file
FUNDAMENTALS
9
The examples  given  are completely  arbitrary,  the
ONE and ZEROstates may be any two easily distin-
guished values. All that matters is that they be dif-
ferent enough so that noise, drift, and other circuit or
signal imperfections are not able to create any doubt
as to which state exists at a particular terminal.
Each terminal in a set is said to present a “bit” of
information, while the entire set, in the pre-assigned
sequence, is called a “word.” The 10-bit digital word:
1101000101
would represent voltage values of +4, +4, 0, +4, 0, 0,
0, +4, 0, +4 Volts and the conventional way of writing
the word would indicate that the extreme-right-hand
bit (a one, in this example), would be the 
least-signif-
icant bit
(or LSB) - i.e., its weight would be:
with respect to the extreme-left-hand bit (also a ONE in this
example), which is, by convention, the 
most-significant-bit
(or MSB), the weight of which (relative to the LSB) is:
In other words, a ONE level in the MSB position (i.e.,
a +4 V ONE state on the MSB 
terminal
) has 512
times as much weight as a ONE in the LSB position.
The actual value of the digital word 1101000101 is
found by adding the ONE bits, in proper weight, and
to count the ZERO bits as zero:
(MSB)  1 = 2   = 512
9
1 = 2   = 256
8
0 = 0   = 000
0 = 0   = 000
1 = 2   = 064
6
0 = 0   = 000
0 = 0   = 000
0 = 0   = 000
1 = 2   = 004
2
(LSB)  1 = 2   = 001
0
837
MSB = 2     = 2   = 512
n-1
9
LSB = 2   = 1
0
Note that the 
maximum value
that can be represent-
ed by a 10-bit word is (when all bits are in the ONE
state) is (2
10
-1) =1,023, or one less than 2
10
. The
resolution to which the digital word can be varied
then is ±LSB, which is:
But the digital word need 
not
be interpreted in terms
of an LSB=1. In the case of angle data, for example,
we might set the maximum value of an N-bit word
equal to 360°, so that
but this would, for most values of N, give us rather
inconvenient values for each bit. A more appropriate
scheme is to set the MSB=180°. Then the bits would
have values in descending order, of:
In this scheme, then, a 10-bit digital word in natural
binary code would have a resolution of:
Note also that the 
first two bits
of any natural-binary-
coded digital word scaled in the manner described
above determine the 
quadrant
in which the angle lies
(see pages 47 and 48 for a detailed explanation).
± 1LSB =             ≅ 0.35˚ 
360˚
1024
(MSB)   2       = 180˚
N - 1
2       =  90˚
N - 2
2       =  45˚
N - 3
(LSB)   2       =  
(
0
180˚
N - 1
2
...
n = N
n = 1
Σ
= (2       + 1) = 360˚
N - 1
Resolution = 
1
2
n
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
how to select text on pdf; search text in multiple pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. you can download the RasterEdge .NET Image SDK and find the PDF processing component DLL
search text in pdf image; select text in pdf
FUNDAMENTALS
10
Typical Synchro/Resolver System Architecture
Synchro and resolver components can be intercon-
nected and combined (mechanically and electrically)
with other devices and circuits in hundreds - perhaps
thousands - of useful configurations. A number of
these combinations are shown in Section IX of this
handbook, but, before considering them it would be
best to review a “pre-digital” use of synchros in the
all-analog configurations in which these components
were originally used.
Single-Speed System
Figure 1.12a shows what might be called the “clas-
sic” combination of  synchro  components  into  an
electro-mechanical follow-up mechanism. The input
angle (θ
1
) is established by the position command -
a setting of the shaft position of the control transmit-
ter, CX, by hand or by some director mechanism -
and the position of the mechanical load (e.g., a valve,
a turntable, a tool-bit feed screw) is made to conform
to  this  command,  rapidly  and  accurately. The
sequence of events is as follows:
(1) The CX puts out a 3-wire representation of θ
1
,
the position command.
(2) The CT transforms θ
2
into a 2-wire signal pro-
portional to the sine of (θ
- θ
2
).
(3) The output of the CT is amplified and used to
drive the servo motor.
(4) The servo motor positions the load, through the
gear train, which simultaneously drives the shaft of
the CT.
(5) When the load has reached the correct (com-
manded) position, θ
= θ
2
, the output of the CT is
then zero, and the motor stops.
The above will be recognized as a vastly oversimpli-
fied description, but it should serve to identify the
function
of each element in the follow-up servo.
With the advent of digital electronics, it became pos-
sible to replace  one  or  more  of  the  synchro (or
resolver) components in such a system by an accu-
rate, small, reliable, and economical electronic cir-
cuit. In the system of Figure 1.12a, for example, the
control transmitter could be replaced by a digital-to-
synchro converter,as shown in Figure 1.12b, which
would accept 
digital
commands, from aprogramming
device - such as a computer, or a punched paper
tape, or a “Read-Only Memory”(ROM)- and produce
the input to the CT. Such a combination is called a
“hybrid” synchro  system,  because  it  combines
electromechanical and electronic devices for angular
data conversion.
In all the systems shown so far, only one or two
angles are involved in the data manipulation and
control. In many applications, as we shall see, 
many
angles may be measured, monitored, or controlled;
therefore, the systems shown are relatively simple
(although very important) examples.
CONTROL
TRANSFORMER
CT
CONTROL
TRANSMITTER
CX
SERVO
MOTOR
M
θ
1
θ
2
MECH LOAD
GEAR TRAIN
V
R
Figure 1.12a.Typical Electromechanical Follow-up
Servo.
SOLID-STATE
CONTROL
TRANSMITTER
CONTROL
TRANSFORMER
CT
AMPL
SERVO
MOTOR
M
θ
1
DIGITAL
θ
IN
MECH LOAD
θ
2
D/S
Figure 1.12b.Follow-up Servo with D/S converter
replacing CX of Figure 1.12a.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
Unzip the download package and you can find a project XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo or XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Editor Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
how to select text in pdf image; convert pdf to word searchable text
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
to How to Build Online VB.NET PDF Viewer in Unzip the download package and you can find a project named XDoc Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
how to search pdf files for text; how to select text in pdf
FUNDAMENTALS
11
In all of the synchro systems shown and discussed
so far, the relationship between θ(the shaft angle to
be  monitored,  measured,  or  controlled)  and  the
angular setting of the synchro or resolver transducer
has been a constant ...usually shown as unity (direct
coupling), but possibly geared up or down. In all
such “single-speed”systems, the product of dynam-
ic fidelity and resolution is the figure of merit - i.e.,
how fast one may track, measure, convert, and react
to, variations in θ, to an accuracy consistent with how
many bits of resolution.
See Figures 1.13 through 1.16 for examples of other
types of synchro systems.
Multispeed System
There is a type of synchro/resolver system (shown in
Figure 1.17) in which much higher accuracies and
resolution may be achieved. This is called a multi-
speed system.
A multispeed synchro system consists of two or more
synchros or resolvers geared together, usually with a
gear ratio of some whole number.The most common
are two-speed systems with ratios of 1:8, 1:16, 1:32,
1:36 but other ratios can also be found. To under-
stand how these systems achieve high accuracy let
us examine a typical two-speed system.
In the single-speed case (see Figure 1.12a) the sys-
tem  will, essentially, have an accuracy dependent
upon the accuracy of the CT (we will assume a per-
fect transducer) and the positional resolution of the
servo loop. Assume we can position the CT with a
certain accuracy, say within ±0.1°. If we now gear this
CT to  another  with  a  gear ratio  of  1:n (called a
“coarse”CT) where the CT we are positioning rotates
n turns for each single turn of the other, then 0.1° of
rotation of the fast CT (called the “fine”CT) will turn
the slow CT (called the “coarse”CT) 0.1÷n, so that an
inaccuracy in the fine CT position is effectively divid-
ed by the gear ratio (often called the speed ratio).
CX (ANGLE SENSOR)
S1
S2
S3
RH
RL
1
2
DIGITAL
DIGITAL
DISPLAY
183.9˚
θ
IN
SOLID-STATE
SYNCHRO/DIGITAL
CONVERTER
M
(
θ
OUT
)
CONTROL
DIFFERENTIAL
TRANSMITTER
CDX
β
CT
α
θ
2
M
MECH LOAD
D/S
DIGITAL
θ
SERVO MOTOR
β = θ − α
θ
2
= β AT NULL
Figure 1.13.Angle Position Readout.
Figure 1.15.HybridFollow-up Servo System with
D/S Converter and CDX used to produce output
equal to difference between two angular inputs, one
digitaland one analog
MSB
LSB
D/S
DIGITAL
INPUT 
θ
1
ECDX
SOLID-STATE
ELECTRONIC
CDX
CT
θ
3
M
MECH LOAD
DIGITAL
INPUT 
θ
2
θ
3
= θ
1
− θ
2
AT NULL
Figure 1.14.HybridFollow-upServo System with
ECDXto add two angular inputs in digital format.
MECHANICAL
LOAD
M
CX
REFERENCE
EXCITATION
INPUT
SOLID-STATE
CONTROL
TRANSFORMER
(SSCT)
DIGITAL
COMPUTER
θ
θ
Figure 1.16.HybridFollow-up Servo System Used
to Interface Computer with Motor-Driven Load.
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; In the following code table, you will find a piece of
how to search a pdf document for text; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
to PDF. Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. In the following code table, you will find a VB NET code sample for how to set PDF file permissions
pdf text select tool; pdf search and replace text
FUNDAMENTALS
12
we use it to drive a servo to position we can theoret-
ically increase our positioning resolution by a factor
of n.
Let us examine why. If we have a servo loop which
can position θ to a point where the null is less than
some value, say 2mV, this will represent some posi-
tional resolution, say 0.2° (this figure is determined
by the loop gain of the system). Assume now that
our servo system input is the 1xCT error voltage and
we have driven to a 2 mV null. This means θand φ
are still 0.2° apart. If we now switch the servo input
from the 1xCT output to the nxCT output, the servo
will see a 2n mV voltage and position θ so that the
nxCT output is a 2 mV null and:
To implement such a system it is apparent that we
must have a means of determining when to switch
from the coarse (1x) output to the fine (nx) output.
φ = θ within 0.2˚ ÷ n
Perhaps the easiest way to explain their operation is
to examine a basic system as shown in Figure 1.18.
Assume θ= φ;that is, assume the control transform-
ers (CT) are at the same angle as the transmitters
(CX). For convenience let θ = φ = 0 so all synchros
are at 0°. Under these conditions the output of both
CT’s will beat null, there will be no error signal from
either the one speed (1x) or n speed (nx) CT.
Now assume we change the input shaft position by
some small amount, say 2°, so θ is not equal to φ.
The output of the 1xCT is now some value, E
1xCT
and since the nxCT is geared to it by 1:n the nxCT
output will be n times E
1xCT
. Since φ still equals 0°
the output of the 1xCT can be expressed as:
where  A=F.S.,  and  the  nxCT  output  can  be
expressed as:
Note: 1x signifies that the coarse CX is connected
directly to the shaft being monitored. It has a 1:1
relationship with it.
It can be seen then that as an additional bonus the
error gradient at nullout of the n speed CT is n times
the one speed CT gradient (see Figure 1.19) and if
E      = A sin (θ   - φ  ) = A sin (2n˚ - 0˚)
1xct
E      = A sin 2n˚
1xct
n
n
     = A sin (θ - φ) = A sin (2˚ - 0˚)
1xct
     = A sin 2˚
1xct
"COARSE"
SYNCHRO
"FINE"
SYNCHRO
ANY ARBITRARY
RATIO*
SHAFT
COUPLING
TRANSDUCERS
TO INPUT
DATA
SPEED RATIO=GEAR RATIO=S
(FOR IDENTICAL NUMBER OF POLE PAIRS
ON THE TWO SYNCHROS)
S
θ
θ
*USUALLY 1:1
Figure 1.17.Two-Speed Synchro Transducer
Configuration.
TRANSDUCER
1XCX
nXCX
1XCT
nXCT
θ
I
N
I
N
ref:
1X OUTPUT
nX OUTPUT
θ
for changing θ
error
error
00
180
0
3600
let n = 5
θ
θ
Figure 1.18.Two-Speed Servo Loop.
Figure 1.19.Relative RMS Magnitudes of Coarse
and FineOutputs.
FUNDAMENTALS
This can be accomplished with a sensor to monitor
the coarseoutput level and control which error signal
is used. The crossover level is set within 90° or less
of the finespeed null(approximately 3° in a 1:32 sys-
tem) to prevent hang ups at false nulls on the fine
output. Since the fine CT turns n times for one turn
of the coarse CT there will be n points where its out-
put will be at null, therefore, the fine error signal is
only used when it is within 90° of the true null. Or
more correctly when the coarse null is within (90°/n).
Stick-off Voltage
If Figure 1.20 is examined it can be seen that for both
even and odd ratios a fine and coarse stable null
exists together only at 0° (or 360°). A stable null is
defined as the point where the error signals pass
through zero in the positive direction. If a servo is set
up to drive towards 0° misalignment it will drive away
from 180° because the phaseof the error signal for a
displacement will be opposite than that at 0°. An
unstable null will exist at 180° but the slightest dis-
turbance will cause it to drive to the correct null.
If the coarse/fine ratio is even, the unstable coarse
nullat 180° will be accompanied by a stable finenull.
If the coarse/fineratio is odd, the coarse and fine sig-
nals each have unstable nulls at 180°, and there is
no  danger  of  the  system  accidentally  remaining
aligned at 180°, but if an even ratio system happened
to be at 180° from the true stable null (as can happen
at power turn on or some forms of switched systems)
then the servo would sense the coarse null (even
though an unstable one) and switch to the fine error
signal. Since the fine error signal is at a stable null
the system would “lock in” at 180° from where it
should.
To enable even-ratio systems to function without the
possibility of nulling at 180°, a stick-off voltage is
added to the coarse control signal.
Figure 1.21 shows a simplified circuit for this pur-
pose. When a fixed AC voltage of the correct phase
is added to the coarse signal, and the stator of the
coarse control transformer (or transmitter) is suitably
repositioned, the coarse system can be made to null
at 180° of fine rotation, which is unstable fine null.
The null at 0° is unaffected.
In detail, the coarse control transformer signal/mis-
alignment curve is shifted obliquely so that it still
passes throughout the same nullat 0° but a different
null at 180°. The stick-off voltage shifts the coarse
null  horizontally  by  90°  of  fine rotation,  and  the
coarse synchro offset shifts the error signal by a fur-
ther 90° of fine rotation. At 0° the two 90° changes
cancel; at 180° they add up to prevent a fine stable
null at 180°.
“Stick-off” voltage can be added to any even-ratio,
two-speed  system,  regardless  of  the  method  of
adding the coarseand fine signals. The voltage must
have the same phase as the normal coarse signal to
avoid introducing quadrature components at null. A
two-speed S/D converter is described in detail on
pages 33 through 36. Three-speed, four-speed, and
even more highly articulated synchros are practical,
although they are rarely used. In all multispeed ser-
vos,  the  accuracy  of  the  gearing  must  be  high
enough to support the added resolution provided by
the fine synchro.
Where mechanical gearing size and/or errors cannot
be tolerated, electrical two-speed synchros can be
used. Electrical two-speed  synchros are devices
with two rotor/stator winding sets. The two-speed
13
EVEN RATIO  n = 8  
ODD RATIO  n = 5  
360˚/0˚
360˚/0˚
360˚/0˚
360˚/0˚
180˚
180˚
1x (coarse)
nX (fine) n=EVEN
1x (coarse)
nX (fine) n=ODD
Figure 1.20.CT Voltage/Misalignment Curves for
Even and Odd Ratios.
FUNDAMENTALS
14
COARSE CT
AC
STICKOFF
VOLTAGE
I
n
LEVEL
SENSOR
CROSS OVER
SWITCH
SWITCHED ERROR
VOLTAGE, Es
FINE CT
E
S
WITHOUT STICKOFF
E
S
WITH STICKOFF & OFFSET COARSE CT
FALSE STABLE NULL
STABLE NULL
UNSTABLE
NULL
STABLE
NULL
OFFSET DUE TO
COARSE CT
OFFSET
180
180
360/0
360/0
360/0
360/0
OFFSET DUE TO
STICKOFF VOLTAGE
Figure 1.21.Unstable False NullShifted by Adding ‘Stick-Off’Voltage to CoarseSignal and Displacing
Coarse Control Transformer Output.
FUNDAMENTALS
15
ratio (N:1) is achieved by having Nx as many in the
“fine” rotor/stator set than there are in the “coarse”
rotor/stator set. Since the individual rotor/stator sets
on an 
electrical
two-speed synchro are brought out
separately to appropriate sets of terminal, they may
be treated (i.e., connected) in the same manner as
separate 
mechanical
two-speed transducers.
The  advantages  of electrical two-speed synchros
(resolvers are also available in this configuration)
are:no inaccuracies due to gear train wear or back-
lash, increased reliability due to fewer moving parts,
lower driving torque required, and smaller size. With
all  these  things  considered,  the  cost  differential
between a mechanical two-speed arrangement (two
synchros and a gear train) and a single electrical
two-speed unit is marginal. Electrical two-speed syn-
chros are generally available in binary ratios, i.e., 8,
16, and 32 to 1. Electrically there is no difference
between electrical and mechanical units.
Digital Data Conversion Techniques for
Synchro/Resolver Systems
This handbook does not attempt to study every cir-
cuit technique ever used for synchro/resolver data
manipulation.It does not even attempt to present an
encyclopedic survey of every kind of circuit in current
use; instead, it reflects a selective concentration on
what authors deem to be the most important and
effective modern techniques. To justify our selec-
tions, we offer the following brief review of older con-
version techniques.
V
X
V
A
INPUT
V
Y
INPUT
R
C
Vref
Vref
A
GATE ON
GATE OFF
ZERO
CROSSING
DETECTORS
CLOCK
PULSE IN
DIGITAL VALUE OF θ
COUNTER
RESOLVER
(OR SYNCHRO
PLUS SCOTT "T")
V
X
V
Y
Vref
θ
V
A
V
A
V
A
V
B
V
B
V
X
INPUT
V
Y
INPUT
A
B
Figure 1.22.Single-RC Phase-Shift Synchro-Digital Converter.
Figure 1.23.Two-RCPhase-Shift S/D Converter (uses same zero-crossing detectors, gate, counter, and
clock-pulses as that of Figure 1.22).
FUNDAMENTALS
16
1.Single-RC phase-shift approaches (Figure 1.22).
2.Double-RC phase-shift approaches (Figure 1.23).
3.Real-time-function-generator
approaches
(Figure 1.24).
4.Ratio-bounded  harmonic  oscillator approaches
(Figure 1.25).
5.Demodulation of  sine and cosine with µP  and
A/Ds (Figure 1.26).
Let us briefly consider each of them in turn, recog-
nizing that the examples of each type given here are
subject to wide variation.
The  single-RC phase-shift synchro-to-digital
converter shown in Figure 1.22 operates by com-
paring the zero-crossing times of the reference wave
and  the phase-shifted  sine-to-cosine (resolver-for-
mat) wave, V
A
at point A in the diagram. It can be
shown that, if ωRC=1 (where ω = 2πtimes the refer-
ence carrier frequency) the phase shift between the
voltage from point A to ground and the reference
FUNCTION
GENERATOR
PROGRAMMING
CIRCUITRY
ANALOG
COMPUTING
CIRCUITRY
FUNCTION
GENERATOR
FUNCTION
GENERATOR
Vx
Vy
A/D
CONVERTER
DIGITAL SIGNALS (θ - φ)
ANALOG VOLTAGE
PROPORTIONAL TO (θ - φ)
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
= θ
WHEN
(θ - φ) IS
AT NULL
Vy f (φ)
Vx f (φ)
θ
in
φ
SIN
DC SIN
COS
DC COS
DEMODULATOR
DEMODULATOR
A/D
A/D
DIGITAL
ANGLE
OUTPUT
DIG SIN
DIG COS
SCOTT
T
S1
S2
S3
REF
REF
µP
Vx
BOUND
INTEGRATOR NO.1
INTEGRATOR NO.2
A
Vy
BOUND
UNITY GAIN
INVERTER
B
Figure 1.24.Real-Time Trigonometric — Function-Generator S/D Converter.
Figure 1.25.Harmonic OscillatorS/D Converter.
Figure 1.26.Demodulation, A/D, and µP approach to S/D.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested