how to open pdf file using c# : Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text software Library cloud windows .net web page class synhdbk3-part1423

the envelope amplitudes at the same instant in time.
Reflection will show that the ideal time for this mea-
surement is at the peak of the carrier wave (either
positive or negative peak), when the carrier ampli-
tude is largest, so that the modulated carrier waves
(Vx and Vy ) will yield the largest signals with respect
to noise, drift, quadrature, and other imperfections in
the  measuring  circuits. This  optimum  sampling
instant is readily obtained from the reference signal
(after correcting it for synchro time-phase shift), by
first phase-shifting that signal by 90°, so that its zero-
crossing is at the correct time, then converting it by
clipping  (squaring  off)  into  a  pulse of  the  desired
width, whose trailing edge occurs at the peak of the
phase-corrected reference wave.
Thus, most sampling converters use circuits that: (1)
generate a control pulse at the peak of the reference
wave; and (2) with that pulse, sample and hold - i.e.,
"freeze" - the amplitudes of Vx and Vy. Note that
this procedure yields DC levels proportional to
cosθθ and sinθθ.
The  simplified  circuit  and  waveform  diagrams  of
Figure  2.9  illustrate  the  sampling  procedure
described in the preceding paragraph.
Successive-Approximation Sampling Synchro-
to-Digital Converter
Figure 2.10 shows one of the two types of sampling
S/D converters to be studied in this section. Note
that the circuit contained within the dashed-line area,
labeled "SSCT,” is almost identical to the quadrant
selector and sine/cosine multiplier section of Figure
2.1, which was analyzed earlier in this section. In
fact, the only differences between Figures 2.1 and
2.10 are:
1.The signals presented to the SSCT are sampled
sine and cosine DC levels obtained by sampling
Vx and Vy, rather than continuous modulated car-
riers.
2.The circuit that establishes and stores the digital
angle output word is a sequentially addressed reg-
ister, rather than an up-down counter.
3.The "error processor" performs a simpler function
than the  one  used  in  Figure  2.1,  as  explained
below.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
27
PHASE
SHIFTER
PEAK
DETECTOR
REFERENCE GENERATED HERE
S/H STROBE LINE
RH
RL
REF IN
SYNCHRO IN
S2
S1
CH. 1 INPUT MODULE
CONVERTER
SELECT
CH.1
STROBE GENERATED HERE
PHASE CORRECTED
REFERENCE WAVE
DC=Vx peak
DC=Vy peak
Vx
Vy
S3
D
I
G
I
T
A
L
O
U
T
P
U
T
Figure 2.9. Sample/Hold Technique.
Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to word searchable text; pdf search and replace text
Convert a scanned pdf to searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
text searchable pdf file; pdf text search tool
The error processor comprises only two elements: a
comparator, which senses the polarity of the input
signal, sin (θ - φ); and a gated clock-pulse generator,
which produces an output pulse whenever sin (θ - φ)
is positive - i.e., whenever θ is greater than φ. Thus,
as long as θ exceeds φ, the error processor will feed
clock pulses to the register.
The complete S/D conversion procedure may now be
described as follows. First, assume that the register
has been cleared i.e., preset to all ZEROES, either
by  the  internal  programming  logic  or  by  external
command, before the peak of the reference carrier
initiates its sample command. Then, the resolver-for-
mat outputs of the Scott-T synchro isolation trans-
former  are  sampled  simultaneously,  at  the  carrier
peak, by a circuit of the type shown in Figure 2.9.
The resultant DC levels are presented to the SSCT,
and sin (θ - φ) is computed.
At this point, all of the bits stored in the "n"-bit regis-
ter - i.e., all of the bits of the output word - are at
ZERO; so that the digital word presented to the sine
and cosine multipliers (as the angle φ) is a set of "n"
ZEROES.
Now  begins  a  sequence  of  n  logical  "decisions,"
each of which follows the pattern of the first one. The
first three decisions will be described in detail:
(1) The most-significant bit of the register is set to
ONE,  so that  the word  φ fed  to  the  sine and
cosine multipliers is 1000...0, corresponding to
φ=180°.
(2) The error processor is then "interrogated" - that
is, its output is examined. Now, if θ is larger than
180°, the value of sin (θ - φ) will be positive, and
the error processor will produce a ONE. The ONE
will allow the first stage (most significant bit) of the
output register to remain at the ONE state. If θ is
less than 180°, the error processor will not put out
a ONE, but a ZERO state ...which it should be, for
θ< 180°.
(3) The first decision has now been reached, and
the logic automatically proceeds to the next deci-
sion...that concerning the correct state for the sec-
ond most-significant bit (second stage of the reg-
ister).
(4) The second stage is set to ONE, so that the out-
put word is either 11000...0 (for θ > 180° in deci-
sion #1) or 01000...0 (for θ > 180°  in decision #1.)
(5) Again, the error processor is interrogated. Since
decision  #1  had  two  possible  results,  we  shall
consider both.
(a) If θ is greater than 180°, the value of φ at this
interrogation is 11000...0, or 270°. Thus, if θ lies
between 270° and 360°, the second decision will
be to leave the second register stage in the ONE
state; and if θ lies between 180° and 270°, the
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
28
Vx
Vy
SAMPLING
CIRCUIT
(SEE FIG. 2.9)
θ
IN
SSCT
SEQUENTIAL ADDRESS LOGIC
REGISTER
QUADRANT
SELECTOR
SINE
MULTIPLIER
COSINE
MULTIPLIER
SIN(θ - φ)
180
90
CLOCK PULSES
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
ERROR
PROCESSOR
Figure 2.10. Successive-Approximation S/D Converter.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file
search pdf for text in multiple files; pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Convert PDF document page to separate text file in Text extraction from scanned PDF image with OCR
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf find text
second decision will be to return the second stage
to the ZERO state.
(b) If θ is not greater than 180°, the value of φ at this
interrogation is 01000...0, or 90°. Thus, if θ lies
between 90° and 180°, the second decision will be
to  leave the  second  register  stage  in  the ONE
state;and if θ lies between 0° and 90°, the second
register stage will be returned to the ZERO state.
(6) Now, the decision-making process moves to the
third  register  stage, into  which  a  ONE is  intro-
duced...and the process continues. Note that this
third decision will have a "weight" of 45°, whereas
the second decision added or subtracted a possi-
ble  90°,  and  the  first  decision was  the  "largest
weight"...corresponding to ±180°.
The process described above continues through a
total of "n" decisions, each one causing the digital
output angle word to come closer to the exact value
of  θ -  "successively  approximating"  θ; hence  the
name successive-approximation converter. The last
decision has the weight:
...and leaves the final result with ±1/2 LSB uncer-
tainty. For example, for n = 13, 2² = 8,192, and the
"quantization uncertainty" of the result is 360°/ 8192,
or ±2.6 minutes. The resolution of  the  converter,
then, is ±2.6 minutes, or about ±0.044 degrees.
The  entire  conversion  process  requires  very  little
time - indeed, if every carrier peak is to be sampled
and converted, the conversion must be completed in
less than one carrier  period. Modern high-speed
converters are  so  fast that  hundreds of  complete,
high-resolution conversions can be done in one car-
rier period ... a fact that becomes important when
multiplexed systems are considered, later in this sec-
tion.
Despite this high conversion speed, the successive-
approximation  converter  can  suffer  from  a  "stale-
ness" error, due to the fact that the data determining
Least Significant Bit =
n
360˚
2
θare sampled only once per carrier period. If θ is
changing,  a  periodically  varying  velocity error will
result.This error is reduced almost to zero immedi-
ately after each new sample updates the register,
and thereafter increases to a maximum of:
for constant velocity between samples.
The SamplingHarmonic Oscillator Synchro-to-
Digital Converter
The second type of sampling S/D converter that we
shall examine is illustrated in Figure 2.11. Although
not in common use anymore, it is discussed here for
historical purposes. Note  that  the sampling tech-
nique used  in the converter is somewhat different
from that used in the sampling successive-approxi-
mation converter of Figure 2.10, in that the resolver-
format input signals are first fed to phase-sensitive
demodulators, the outputs of which are DC levels:
Vx = K sin θ
Vy = K cos θ
Velocity Error
(in degrees)
Velocity (in                    )
carrier frequency (in Hertz)
degrees
second
=
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
29
SCOTT
"T"
XFMR
SYNCHRO
INPUTS
SIGNALS
Vref
INPUT
STROBE
INPUT
STROBE
PHASE
SENSITIVE
DEMOD'R
PHASE
SENSITIVE
DEMOD'R
S/H
S/H
S1
S1
S2
S2
Vy
Vy
Vx
R1
R2
R
R
C1
C2
CLOCK
PULSE
GENERATOR
CONTROL
LOGIC
DIGITAL
COUNTER
GATE
DIGITAL OUTPUT
A
Vx
Figure 2.11.Sampling Harmonic Oscillator S/D
Converter.
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
More and more companies are trying to convert printed business be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp. original layout and formatting of scanned images, fax
how to search text in pdf document; searching pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
pdf find highlighted text; search pdf for text
where K is a constant and θ is the shaft angle to be
digitized. It is these DC levels that are sampled at
the appropriate time, to set the initial conditions of
the integrators in a harmonic oscillator converter.
The remainder of the circuit comprises two main sec-
tions:
(1) A two-integrator-plus-inverter chain, enclosed in
a positive-feedback loop. This loop, if "unclamped"
(by  appropriate  programming  of  the  electronic
switches S1 and S2), will oscillate at a frequency
determined solely in the integrator time constants.
(2) A clock-pulse generator/digital-counter circuit that
can be gated on when the oscillator is unclamped,
and gated off at the positive-going zero-crossing of
the voltage at point "A" in Figure 2.11.
Initially, however, the loop is clamped, and prevented
from  oscillating  by  the  closure  of  the  electronic
switches S1 and S2 which apply the sampled DC lev-
els, Vx and Vy, as initial conditions to the two inte-
grators. When  the  integrators  have  stabilized  at
these initial conditions, the switches are opened, the
oscillation begins (see Figure 2.12) and, simultane-
ously, clock pulses are gated into the counter. When
the positive-going zero crossing is reached (point "X"
in Figure 2.12), the clock pulses are inhibited, and
counting stops. At that point, the total stored in the
counter  is  the  digitized  value  of  θ,  the  shaft
angle...provided only that the clock frequency bears
the correct relationship to the integrator time con-
stants. The proof of this relationship between θ and
the stored count, for the initial conditions described,
is given below.
The voltage at point A can be shown to bear the fol-
lowing relationship to the initial conditions:
If the integrator time constants are equal, and the
inverter gain is unity, the natural loop-oscillation fre-
quency, f
L
, is given by:
Note that if the time constants are not equal, the nat-
ural frequency is:
where Ai is the gain of the inverter. Referring now to
the waveform of Figure 2.12, we see that at point
"X", the positive zero crossing that stops the count-
ing process, the following relationships hold:
sin 
(
-        
)
= 0
2πθ
360˚
t
RC
or
2πθ
360˚
t
RC
=
R
C
A
1
1
1
2
2
i
so that V   =  sin 
(
        
)
2πθ
360˚
A
f   = 
1
2πRC
L
from which ω  = 
1
RC
L
t
RC
V   =  sin 
(
ω  t -        
)
2πθ
360˚
L
A
where ω   = 2πf
L
L
f   = the natural oscillation frequency
of the loop,
L
t = the time, in seconds, measured from
the moment of unclamping,
and θ = the input angle to be digitized, in 
degrees.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
30
X
360
θRC
RC
START
STOPS
COUNTING
Va
V
X
(INITIAL
CONDITION)
t = 0
Figure 2.12.Timing Diagram for Figure 2.11.
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
how to search a pdf document for text; pdf editor with search and replace text
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
cannot select text in pdf file; convert pdf to searchable text
Clearly, then, if the clock rate is proportioned so that
some convenient number of pulses - say, 3600 - are
produced in 2πRC seconds, the count at point "X"
will be:
and the total stored in the counter will represent the
angle θ to a resolution of 0.1°, or 1 part in 3600. Any
desired resolution may be obtained (within the stabil-
ity and accuracy limits discussed below) by selecting
the appropriate clock frequency - usually some deci-
mal multiple of 360. Although it is easy and relative-
ly inexpensive to stabilize the frequency of a clock-
pulse generator, it is not easy to stabilize the RC time
constants of the integrators, and it is the ratio of the
clock frequency to the integrator time constants that
determines the attainable accuracy and meaningful
resolution ... ignoring all other sources of error. It is
this  stability problem which has caused this tech-
nique to be abandoned by most manufacturers.
In the most advanced harmonic oscillator designs, a
phase-locked-loop clock generator is used to force
the  clock  frequency  to  track  the  unavoidable  drift
integrator  time-constant  (and  to  compensate  for
other  error  sources,  as  well),  so  that  meaningful
overall accuracy can be achieved. The best worst-
3600
360
(θ)
case "static" error for this class of designs is ±6 min-
utes at considerable cost and complexity.
In Section III, the use of the harmonic oscillator for
synchro/DC and synchro/sine-cosine conversion will
be discussed.
Multiplexing Synchro-to-Digital Converters
Either of the two sampling S/D converters previously
described can be "shared" by a group of synchros or
resolvers, so that more than one source of input data
(i.e., more than one shaft angle) can be digitized by
the same converter circuitry, with a consequent sav-
ings, not only of initial equipment cost, but also of
required power-supply energy, space, and weight. In
addition, reliability is greatly enhanced, by reduction
in  component  count. Some additional  circuitry is
always required, at least to perform the multiplexing
(switching) of the converter from sensor to sensor,
and some systems require the use of a separate set
of sample-hold circuits for each data input, as we
shall see. Consequently, the use of multiplexing is
less attractive  for  only two or  three input  sensors
than it is for many more.
In the simplest approach to sharing an S/D convert-
er (see Figure 2.13), the pair of sample-hold circuits
shown in Figure 2.9 are successively switched from
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
31
θ
1
θ
2
θ
n
SCOTT
T
SCOTT
T
SCOTT
T
MUX
ADDRESS
INPUT
MULTIPLEXER
DUAL S/H
CIRCUIT
AS IN
FIGURE 2.9
S/D
CONVERTER
STROBE
INPUT
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
CHANNEL "N"
CHANNEL 1
CHANNEL 2
Figure 2.13. Multiplexed-Sample/Hold (Sequential Sampling) Approach to Sharing an S/D Converter.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB.NET Framework. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
pdf text search; cannot select text in pdf
XImage.OCR for .NET, Recognize Text from Images and Documents
extraction from images captured by digital camera, scanned PDF document and image-only PDF. Output OCR result to memory, text searchable PDF, Word, Text file
how to select all text in pdf; pdf text select tool
input to input, sampling each, holding the value dur-
ing conversion (which takes considerably less time
than one carrier cycle), and then sampling the next at
the peak of the next succeeding carrier cycle.
This scheme has the advantage  of  simplicity  and
economy, since all that is added in the way of hard-
ware is a multiplexer module and one input isolation
module (synchro or resolver) per input sensor. The
disadvantage  of  successive-peak  sampling  is  the
fact  that  it compounds  the  "staleness error"  men-
tioned on page 28, by making each successive read-
ing one full carrier period later than the preceding
one; therefore, in multiplexing n inputs, the possible
"skew error", as it is called, between readings of the
first and the n
th
channels (as well as between two
successive readings of any channel) is n times the
possible skew error (due to staleness) of a convert-
er-per-channel system.
(There are some second-order advantages and dis-
advantages  of  the  sequential-on-successive-peak 
multiplexed  approach  to  time-sharing  a  converter,
but they will be discussed later sections).
For data-acquisition systems in which the velocity of
one or more of the input channels is high, and for all
systems in which optimum accuracy is essential, a
much better technique for time-sharing the converter
is that shown in Figure 2.14 - the simultaneous-sam-
ple-and-hold approach. In this scheme, each input
sensor is equipped with its own pair of sample-holds,
and all sample-holds are strobed (activated) at the
same instant ... at carrier peak, as before. The mul-
tiplexer then switches the converter (only) from one
pair of "frozen" sine/cosine inputs to the next, paus-
ing at each input channel only long enough to digi-
tize the shaft-angle data and store or report it. If the
converter  and  multiplexer  are  fast  enough,  many
channels can thus be scanned and converted in a
single  carrier  cycle,  thereby  freeing  the  sample-
holds for simultaneous sampling of the very next car-
rier  peak,  thus  minimizing  the  possible  staleness
error to the single carrier-period value attained by
the circuits of Figures 2.10 and 2.11. Regardless of
scanning speed, however, the data sampled, held,
converted, and reported in a single pass is essen-
tially free of channel-to-channel skew, although it will
soon be "out of date" (stale).
Here again, there are many second-order effects to
consider, but they will merely be mentioned briefly
now, and considered in more detail in later sections:
• A possible source of  skew is the  aperture-time
uncertainty  among  the  various  sample-holds.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
32
CHANNEL 1
CHANNEL 2
CHANNEL "N"
θ
1
θ
2
θ
n
SCOTT
T
SCOTT
T
SCOTT
T
S/H
S/H
S/H
S/D
CONVERTER
STROBE
INPUT
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
X
E
R
Figure 2.14.Simultaneous-Sample/Hold (Sequential Sampling) Approach to Sharing an S/D Converter.
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a doc = new TIFFDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert loaded TIFF
find text in pdf files; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
how to select text in a pdf; how to select text in pdf and copy
This is the uncertainty (often called "jitter") in the
interval between the application of the hold com-
mand and the actual "freezing" of the signal.
• The input/output (or transfer) gain of the sample-
holds may vary slightly, creating an error.
• The hold circuits have a finite "droop rate," caused
by switch leakage in the sample-hold circuit.
Note that all the above effects have the potential of
causing  error  even  in  single channel  systems,
because  they  can create  differences  between  the
sine and cosine sample obtained by a single pair of
sample-holds. Fortunately,  modern  high-perfor-
mance sample-holds are available that render all of
the above effects negligible, except in the most pre-
cise systems .. and  even then, they  can  be mini-
mized.
The individual multiplexer channels must be subject-
ed to the same scrutiny. They, too, have settling time
and transfer-gain uncertainties, and can contribute
errors. And the isolation transformers do not all have
exactly the same time phase shifts,  either. All of
these uncertainties, however, yield to the use of the
more advanced, modern hardware, and can almost
always be rendered negligible.
Finally, one must recognize that there is an error
source that cannot be controlled by the design of the
synchro-to-digital  sampling/multiplexing/conversion
system: the random variation in rotor-to-stator time-
phase-shift in the sensors themselves. First-order
correction of these uncertainties is discussed later,
but they are always a final limitation on all multichan-
nel systems.
In  the  "addressing"  of  the  multiplexer  -  i.e.,  the
means  by  which  it  is  commanded  to  switch  from
channel to channel - it is important to note that the
scanning of a set of channels need not be sequen-
tial. The multiplexer may be commanded to select
channels in any order. This capability is called "ran-
dom" scanning, and may take many forms - arbitrary
sequences  that  have  no  predictable  pattern  but
respond instead to a computer's reactive behavior;or
deliberate  "skipping"  of  certain  channels  in  a
sequence on certain passes;or attenuated-scan/full-
scan programs, in which some channels are exam-
ined in every pass, some in every tenth pass, etc.
Synchro- or Resolver-To-Digital Converters for
Two-Speed Systems
Earlier, on page 11, the characteristics of two-speed
synchros for very high-resolution applications were
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
33
QUADRANT
SELECTOR
FUNCTION
GENERATOR
ISOLATION
XFMR
(FINE)
ERROR
PROCESSOR
UP-DOWN COUNTER
QUADRANT
SELECTOR
ISOLATION
XFMR
(COARSE)
DIGITAL
MULTIPLIER
S1
S2
S3
S1
S2
S3
RH
RL
FINE
ERROR
COARSE
ERROR
CROSS-OVER
DETECTOR
INH
CB
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
sin
sin
sin
cos
cos
cos
F
G
H
D
E
1
16
A
B
C
COARSE
SYNCHRO
FINE
SYNCHRO
FUNCTION
GENERATOR
I
Figure 2.15.Two-Speed S/D Converter.
introduced. Typical converter circuitry for digitizing
two-speed inputs is shown in Figure 2.15. Note its
similarity to the basic single-speed tracking convert-
er of Figure 2.1. In fact, if one considers only circuit
blocks A through E, the "coarse" converter, the cir-
cuits are identical. The "fine" converter feeds circuit
blocks F, G, and H, and shares blocks I, D, and E, the
error processor, cross-over detector and switching
circuit and the up-down counter, with the coarse-syn-
chro converter.
Each  of  the  two  sets  of  circuit  blocks  described
above constitutes, in itself, a single-speed tracking
converter. The only difference between them is that
the  coarse loop has  much lower  resolution -  i.e.,
fewer "bits". The fine-synchro converter provides the
additional resolution required by the application. The
number of bits provided by the coarse converter is
determined by the speed ratio, and is always at least
a fraction of a bit higher than the value of Nc, calcu-
lated from:
Where Nc is the resolution of  the coarse-synchro
converter, and Vf/Vc is the speed ratio of the syn-
chros.
Circuit block I, the crossover detector, monitors the
sin (θ - φ) error signal produced at the differencing
junction following the sine/cosine multipliers of the
1
N
2
90˚ of the fine synchro
V  /V  
f
c
c
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
34
COARSE
GEAR
FINE
GEAR
TRANSDUCER
DIGITAL
DATA
DIGITAL
PROCESSOR
OR
TWO-SPEED
R/D
CONVERTER
M
1
18
Figure 2.16.Microprocessor Combining of Two-Speed Data.
R/D
R/D
FINE
COARSE
TWO-
SPEED
COMBINER
RESULTANT
ANGLE
SD-15900
nx
1x
Figure 2.17.Two-Speed Resolvers.
coarse converter, and, when that error signal falls
below approximately 90° of the fine converter it gates
the error signal of the fine converter into the error
processor.
It is important to note that the sine/cosine multipliers
of both converters are simultaneously presented with
the digital state of the up-down counter ... so that
when the coarse-to-fine crossover occurs, the transi-
tion is smooth, and the tracking continues without
significant discontinuity. Anytime the coarse-convert-
er error signal exceeds the crossover threshold of
the coarse converter, the crossover detector switch-
es the error processor back to the error signal pro-
duced by the coarse converter.
Although it may not be immediately obvious, it is true
that the behavior of this two-speed tracking convert-
er is exactly the same as that of the single-speed
tracking converter. Both are true Type II closed-loop
servos; both are free of velocity error, and both pre-
sent information that is always "fresh."
Hardware Combining of Two-Speed Data
With  the  advent  of  low-cost  single-speed  tracking
R/Ds and microprocessors being used in most sys-
tems, many engineers are using the microprocessor
to do the combining where two-speed configurations
are necessary. Figure 2.16 is a diagram of such a
system. In  place  of  a  microprocessor,  DDC  has
developed a two-speed combining circuit (see Figure
2.17), the SD-15900, that will control the digital data
from two single-channel R/D converters (i.e., RDC-
19220 series) or a two-channel S/D or R/D hybrid
(i.e., SD-14620 series) and produce one digital word.
The combiner is available in two types: one to com-
bine a 1:36 system and the other is programmable
for 1:4, 1:8, 1:16, 1:32, and 1:64 systems.
The main advantages of using this approach are cost
and flexibility. Two-speed S/Ds, because they are
built  in  relatively  small  numbers,  are  costly  and
restricted to 1:36  (except on special order) speed
ratios. With microprocessor combining of the data
from  two  single-speed  converters,  nonstandard
speed ratios may be used and even changed from
system to system under software control.
The biggest disadvantage of using this approach is
that the velocity of the fine-speed shaft is limited to
the tracking rate of the converter used whereas in the
crossover  detector method  it  is  the  coarse-speed
shaft velocity that is limited to the tracking rate of the
converter. Thus  the  microprocessor  combining
method has a 1/n (n=speed ratio) tracking rate limi-
tation compared to the crossover detector method.
The algorithm for  combining  the  two  single-speed
data words is to use the fine-speed data for accura-
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
35
+15 +5
-15 GND
S1
S2
S3
S1
S2
S3
S1
S2
S3
RH
RH
RH
RH
RL
RL
RL
RL
SYNCHRO
SIMULATOR
SIM 31200
CX WITH
VERNIER
S/D
CONVERTER
MSB
LSB
LAMP &
DRIVER
LAMP &
DRIVER
TO
OR
REFERENCE
SR 203
SYNCHRO ANGLE
INDICATOR
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 2.18.Test Configurations, Single-Channel Tracking and Sampling Converters.
36
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
cy and  the  coarse-speed data  for  turns  counting.
Since it is impossible to have the two synchros exact-
ly aligned it is necessary to correct the coarse-speed
data word (since it is used only to know which turn
the fine synchro is on). This can be done by taking
the  coarse  speed  data  and  multiplying  it  by  the
speed ratio n and doing an ambiguity analysis by
comparing  the  two  MSBs  of  the  fine  data  to  the
appropriate two bits of the coarse data. If they are
equal then the coarse data is correct. If the fine data
is 1 LSB larger than the coarse data then add 1 LSB
to the coarse. If the fine data is 1 LSB smaller than
the coarse then subtract 1 LSB from the coarse data.
If the difference is greater than 1 LSB then the sys-
tem is out of sync and the synchros or resolvers must
be mechanically realigned. Once the data has been
corrected,  discard  the  coarse data  not  needed  to
simply count turns, and take the combined data word
and divide by the speed ratio n for the output data
word. If the speed ratios happen to be binary the
multiplication and divisions are trivial.
Testing S/D Converters
Testing or evaluating a synchro-to-digital or resolver-
to-digital  converter  will generally  require  a  synchro
standard (a calibrated synchro with an accurate dial or
a synchro/resolver simulator), an interconnection box
or fixture, and LED bank or Digital Voltmeter (DVM).
Single Channel S/D or R/D Converter
Figure  2.18  illustrates configurations  to  test static 
accuracy  on  single-channel  tracking  or  sampling
converters. A LED driver or suitable readout is nec-
essary  for  each  of the data outputs. (The circuit
shown in Figure 7.7, is recommended.)  The syn-
chro/resolver standard is set to the test angles. The
angles corresponding to the LEDs that are on are
added and compared with the standard angle.Table
2.2 shows the relationship of angles vs. bits.
A typical room temperature error curve is shown in
Figure 2.19. Each quadrant is identical; the error
shown is for the first quadrant. Error limits are also
indicated for temperature extremes.
Multiplexed S/D Converters
Figure 2.20 illustrates the test setup for multiplexed
S/D converters. It requires, in addition to power sup-
plies, an accurate source of synchro or resolver sig-
2
N
LSB AS % OF
FULL SCALE
DEGREES
PER BIT
MINUTES
PER BIT
SECONDS
PER BIT
RADIANS
PER BIT
RESOLUTION
N IN BITS
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
1,024
2,048
4,096
8,192
16,384
32,768
65,536
131,072
262,144
524,288
1,048,576
100.
50.
25.
12.5
6.25
3.125
1.5625
.78125
.390625
.1953125
.09765625
.04882813
.02441406
.01220703
.00610352
.00305176
.00152588
.00076294
.00038147
.00019074
.00009537
360.
180.
90.
45.
22.5
11.25
5.625
2.8125
1.40625
.703125
.3515625
.1757813
.0878906
.0439453
.0219727
.0109863
.0054932
.0027466
.0013733
.0006866
.0003433
21,600.
10,800.
5,400.
2,700.
1,350.
675.
337.5
168.75
84.375
42.1875
21.09375
10.54688
5.27344
2.63682
1.31836
.65918
.32959
.16479
.08240
.04120
.02060
296,000.
648,000.
324,000.
162,000.
81,000.
40,500.
20,250.
10,125.
5,062.5
2,531.25
1,265.6250
632.8125
316.4063
158.2031
79.1016
39.5508
19.7754
9.8877
4.9438
2.4719
1.2360
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
6.28318531
3.14159265
1.57079633
.78539816
.39269908
.19634954
.09817477
.04908739
.02454369
.01227185
.00613592
.00306796
.00153398
.00076699
.00038350
.00019175
.00009587
.00004794
.00002397
.00001199
.00000599
Table 2.2. Binary Angle Relationships
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested