how to open pdf file using c# : Search pdf documents for text control software utility azure winforms web page visual studio thomas_kas_dataimpexp2-part1461

The result: 
This dialog will appear when you restart Acrobat (and every time you launch 
Acrobat, thereafter, unless you delete the script file!). 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
19
Search pdf documents for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select all text in pdf file; find and replace text in pdf
Search pdf documents for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search pdf files for text; search text in pdf image
What's the Fast Way to Test/Debug Scripts? 
ANSWER: Use the console! 
Rapid feedback. Execute code with ENTER key. See 
immediately whether your code does what you expect. 
Some API functions, such as 
app.addMenuItem()
, can't 
easily be tested any other way.  
'Esc' will break an infinite loop. 
Lets you modify onscreen items interactively. 
Rule of thumb: Make sure it works in the console before attaching 
code to a form field, bookmark, doc-open action, etc. 
AGAIN: USE THE CONSOLE! 
If you aren't sure about the syntax of an API method: 
execute:    
theMethod( "?" )
in the console to get syntax 
help (not helpful for core-JS methods) 
Test whether a method exists in a given object instance. E.g.: 
"openDoc" in app; // returns true 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
20
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
For some important PDF documents, you may can select PDF text region, copy and paste PDF text for edit for C# .NET also supports to search PDF text, which help
convert pdf to searchable text; how to select text in a pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
is designed to offer C# developers to compress existing PDF documents in .NET size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded search index.
pdf text searchable; converting pdf to searchable text format
Database Access via ADBC
Thanks to Acrobat JavaScript's new ADBC (Acrobat DataBase Connectivity) plug-
in, it's now possible to create JavaScript-powered PDF forms that present a user-
friendly "front end" to relational database systems. Extremely powerful PDF database 
applications are possible because of the SQL binding built into ADBC.  
Database connectivity is a large, complicated subject, and a comprehensive 
discussion of how ADBC works would fill many pages (if not ring binders). The 
following is merely a brief overview of the subject as it pertains to Acrobat 5.0+. 
Limitations 
ADBC is not without limitations. The main limitation is that you cannot derive any 
benefit from it on a server, because Acrobat is not licensed for server use. ADBC's role 
is limited to desktop operations. 
Another limitation, of course, is that Reader offers no participation for database 
clients. ADBC is not supported on Reader. 
A third limitation involves the fact that the API is in its first release and has yet to be 
proven in the real world. Until some large "lead customers" prove out the technology in 
real-world settings, it's probably too early to recommend ADBC as the basis of 
mission-critical applications, if for no other reason than that the API doesn't allow 
access to SQLCODE and other standard SQL status information (SQLSTATE, 
UPDATECOUNT).  
By the time Acrobat 5.5 or 6.0 comes out, we should know more. Until then, you're 
definitely in the Early Adopter camp if you use ADBC.  
Basic Architecture 
It's important to get an overall understanding of how database access via ADBC 
works. ADBC, which requires Acrobat (not Reader) running under Windows, as well 
as the ADBC.api plug-in (check your Plug_ins folder), bridges over to Microsoft's 
Open DataBase Connectivity (ODBC) model. Under the ODBC model, databases 
created in diverse software environments can be manipulated via a standard, platform-
independent application programming interface (API), using drivers (software utilities 
with no user interface) whose purpose is to handle proprietary interactions behind the 
scenes so that the database user doesn't have to worry about anything but ODBC-
defined behaviors. Almost all database-software vendors offer ODBC drivers for their 
databases, so that any given database can be "reached" by multiple users on multiple 
platforms, using multiple (diverse) host programs. ADBC likewise isolates the end user 
from the ugly low-level details of dealing with many types of relational databases, 
exposing only a common set of features via a common interface. With ADBC (as with 
ODBC), you can "reach into" a relational database using ordinary SQL queries. As long 
as you know Structured Query Language, and as long as your database is accessible via 
a suitable ODBC driver, it doesn't matter whose software created the database, or on 
what machine. In theory. 
The following graphic shows the relationship (in terms of flow of control) between 
the various software "pieces" involved in handling Acrobat database connectivity. 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
21
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF.
pdf search and replace text; search text in multiple pdf
VB.NET PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in vb.net, ASP.NET
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
make pdf text searchable; pdf searchable text
Acrobat database connectivity relies on communication between Acrobat's 
JavaScript interpreter, the ADBC plug-in, and the ODBC driver for your 
particular database system, in order to read and write data (via SQL) from a 
relational database. 
JavaScript Interface
Acrobat JavaScript defines several objects that play a role in database connectivity: 
• 
ADBC Object: This object has two methods, called 
getDataSourceList()
and 
newConnection()
. The former returns an array containing a 
DataSourceInfo
object (see below) for every available database in the system. The 
newConnection()
method allows you to obtain a Connection object that defines session behavior. 
• 
DataSourceInfo Object: This object, returned by the ADBC object's 
getDataSourceList()
method, has just two properties: 
name
and 
description
These properties contain strings describing a given DSN (Data Source Name), or 
database. 
• 
Connection Object: The Connection object encapsulates session behavior. It 
provides methods for creating Statement objects (see below), enumerating tables, and 
enumerating column lists within tables. 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
22
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
C#.NET WinForms Viewer SDK provides C# WinForms Viewer, which is also an powerful documents and images Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview.
how to search a pdf document for text; search text in pdf image
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Overview. RasterEdge C#.NET WPF Viewer SDK is an powerful documents and images viewer. Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview.
pdf text search tool; search multiple pdf files for text
• 
Statement Object: The Statement object allows you to execute SQL queries 
against a database and get column and row information of various sorts, plus inspect 
columnCount
and 
rowCount
status values generated by SQL calls. 
• 
Column Object: The Column object, which is returned by the 
getColumn()
method of the Statement object, encapsulates data associated with a particular column 
in a given row in a table. The 
name
and 
value
properties of this object are useful in 
identifying data of interest. 
• 
ColumnInfo Object: This object holds basic information (such as name, 
description, data type, etc.) about a particular column in a table. The 
getColumnList()
method of the Connection object returns an array of ColumnInfo 
objects. 
• 
Row Object: The Row object is returned by the 
getRow()
method of the 
Statement object. It has one property, the 
columnArray
property, which points to an 
array of Column objects. 
• 
TableInfo Object: This object is returned by the 
getTableList()
method of 
the Connection object. It holds general information about a table within a database, 
such as the name of the table and a short description (if available). 
Bear in mind that the whole point of connecting to a database via ADBC is to be able 
to make queries via SQL. Everything you do will ultimately be aimed at this goal. 
Through SQL, you can do just about any kind of database manipulation that you might 
need to do, whether it involves reading or writing data.  
A Word about DSNs 
In order for a database to be visible to ADBC, it must be available under a Data 
Source Name (DSN) on your system. The DSN is simply an arbitrary string that 
associates a given database file (which could be a file created by Microsoft Access, say, 
or Sybase Adaptive Server Anywhere, etc.) with a given ODBC driver. The DSN may 
be a User DSN (in which case it will be "visible" only to you, on your machine) or a 
System DSN (in which case all users of your system can see the database, even across 
networks). Either one will work for ADBC. 
On Windows machines, you can assign DSNs to database files using the ODBC Data 
Source utility in the Control Panels folder.  
Simple Code Example 
Let's run through a quick code example that gets information from a known data 
source. We will assume that a DSN by the name of "MyTestDB" exists on the local 
machine. In addition, we'll assume that we want to inspect the first available table in 
MyTestDB so as to develop a list of all the column names in that table. Our goal will 
be to display all column names in an alert dialog. We can do all this in about eight lines 
of JavaScript (if we sacrifice error-checking code in the name of clarity): 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
23
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program.
pdf editor with search and replace text; search pdf documents for text
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET
how to select text in pdf; how to select text in pdf image
var myConnection =  
ADBC.newConnection("MyTestDB");  // open a connection 
var myTables = myConnection.getTableList(); // get table info 
var theTableName = myTables[0].name; // get name of first 
table 
// now obtain column info for that table: 
var myColumnList = myConnection.getColumnList(theTableName); 
// prepare a list of names of columns 
var theNames = ""; 
for (var i = 0; i < myColumnList.length; i++) 
theNames += myColumnList[i].name + "\r"; 
app.alert(theNames); // display the names 
The easiest way to test this code is to type it into the JavaScript console window, 
highlight (select) all of it, then hit the Enter key on the numeric keypad (which executes 
the selected code). Assuming you have a database on your system that's registered 
under the DSN "MyTestDB," you should see an alert window (perhaps similar to the 
following graphic) pop up containing the column headings for all columns in the first 
table of that database. Each column name will be on a separate line. 
Below: The result of our code example: all column names of the first table in 
MyTestDB. 
Let's look at what we did. First, we opened a connection to the database with 
ADBC.newConnection()
. Then we called the connection's 
getTableList()
method,  which simply returns a JavaScript array containing TableInfo Objects 
corresponding to all the tables in "MyTestDB." Since we're only interested in the first 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
24
table, we inspect the zeroth item of the array, specifically the 
name
property of that 
item. We need the table name as an argument to the Connection object's 
getColumnList()
method. Once we've called the 
getColumnList()
method, we 
have an array of ColumnInfo objects stored in a local variable, 
myColumnList
. What 
we're interested in is the 
name
property of each ColumnInfo object. To get those 
names, we must iterate through all members of the ColumnInfo array; hence the "for i" 
loop, which concatenates names (and carriage returns) into a single string. Finally, we 
display the string in an alert. 
Obtaining Data via SQL Queries 
The previous code example is a good one if you don't know the name of the first 
table in your database nor the names of the columns in that table. But in reality, you 
probably will know the name of the table (and the names of the columns) if you are 
going to execute SQL queries of the type: 
SELECT Name, Address, City, State FROM "Customers" 
In this query, for example, we're interested in obtaining data from the columns named 
"Name," "Address," "City," and "State" in the table called "Customers." It's a little 
awkward (though by no means impossible) to construct a statement like this 
programmatically, in JavaScript, using table and column names looked up at runtime. 
Real-world SQL statements, however, tend to use hard-coded values for things like 
column and table names. 
So let's pose a slightly different problem. Suppose we want to execute the above SQL 
query against the Customers table of MyTestDB (which may or may not be the first 
table in that database). How can we do that in JavaScript? We start, as before, by 
opening a connection to the database: 
var myConnection =  
ADBC.newConnection("MyTestDB");  // open a connection 
Next, we have to create a Statement object: 
var myStatement =  
myConnection.newStatement();  // create Statement object
For convenience, we'll store the SQL query as a JavaScript string. Notice that we 
escape the quotation marks around the table name using backslashes: 
var mySQL = "SELECT Name, Address, City, State FROM 
\"Customers\"";
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
25
Finally, we execute the query: 
myStatement.execute(mySQL);  
What does this statement actually do? It tells the JavaScript interpreter to go ask the 
ODBC driver to query the database and obtain a result set, which in this case will 
consist of the requested columns from all rows in the table. The returned data set 
becomes part of the Statement object. How do we get at each row of data? This is 
where it gets a bit tricky. We have to ask for each row of data in the following way: 
var success = myStatement.nextRow(); // returns a Boolean 
if (success) 
var myRowObject = myStatement.getRow();
The Statement object's 
nextRow()
method must always be called before processing 
any row of data (even the first row). But the return value from 
nextRow()
is just a 
Boolean value indicating whether the next row could be obtained. (Maybe it doesn't 
exist.) If the next row does exist and is obtainable, you must then call 
getRow()
to 
obtain it as a Row object. In the above case, we store the returned Row object in the 
local variable 
myRowObject
. To loop through all available Row objects in the result 
set, we could set up a while loop that looks something like: 
while(myStatement.nextRow() == true) { 
myRowObject = myStatement.getRow(); 
// ... do something with the data 
}  // end of loop
Working with Row Objects 
At this point you may be wondering how to get at the column data obtained via an 
SQL query. If you're guessing that this data might be reachable via the Row object, 
you'd be right. The Row object, as the name implies, contains all the information in a 
single row of data (consistent with any constraints you may have imposed in your SQL 
statement). Every Row object has a 
columnArray
property, which is just a JavaScript 
array filled with Column objects. 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
26
Column Object properties 
PROPERTY 
ACCESS 
DESCRIPTION 
columnNum 
The number identifying the 
column's place in the 
Statement from which the 
Column was obtained.
name 
The name of the column.
type 
The SQL Type (data type) of 
the data. This can be one of 19 
predefined types (documented 
in AcroJS.pdf).
typeName 
A database dependent string 
representing the data type. 
This property may give useful 
information about user-defined 
data types.
value 
R/W 
The value of the data in the 
column in whatever format the 
data was originally received in.
To iterate through the column values contained in one row of table data, you could do 
something like the following. Remember that since the 
columnArray
is just an 
ordinary JavaScript array, it has a length property. 
var theColumns = myRowData.columnArray; // get column array 
for (var i = 0; i < theColumns.length; i++) // loop over 
length 
if (theColumns[i].name == "Name")  
// do something with theColumns[i].value 
if (theColumns[i].name == "Address")  
// do something with theColumns[i].value 
// etc. 
In many cases, of course, it will be simpler (if you know the column names) just to 
grab values directly from columns by name. It turns out that although the Row object 
begins life with just one property, the 
columnArray
, it has additional properties after a 
result set has been returned to a Statement object. The additional properties are Column 
objects that have names corresponding to the headings of the columns you requested. 
So in the above example, you could alternatively do: 
var customerAddress = myRowData.Address.value; 
// ... do something with customerAddress 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
27
var customerCity = myRowData.City.value; 
// ... do something with customerCity 
// etc.
To summarize: Our SQL statement generated Row objects, which we must access 
using 
nextRow()
and 
getRow()
. Each Row object has a bunch of Column objects 
attached as properties; and those properties have names like "Name," "Address," 
"City," etc. Since each property refers to a Column object, we must use the 
value
property to find the object's data value.  
These seemingly arcane operations will become clearer for you as you begin working 
with live code. As you know if you've developed database applications before, crafting 
robust database management forms is a difficult challenge (particularly in an HTTP 
environment, where session state is difficult to track). A great deal of thought and effort 
need to be devoted to things like user interface design, data validation, error checking, 
security administration, state management, transaction management (via SQL 
"commit" and "rollback" verbs), and so on. What PDF brings to this picture is an 
opportunity for the database application designer to take advantage of exceptional 
graphic appeal, security, application stability, cross-platform interoperability, and 
programming power (via Acrobat JavaScript) in database forms that might otherwise 
be far too unwieldy to implement in HTML, far too sluggish-performing in Java, or far 
too platform-dependent in a 4GL (fourth-generation language) app. 
Copyright 2002 by Kas Thomas. All rights reserved.
28
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested