Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape 
Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
Techniques and Methods 2–G1
Prepared in cooperation with the NORTH COAST AND CASCADES NETWORK, 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
Chapter 1 of Book 2,
Collection of Environmental Data
Section G, Remote Sensing
Pdf searchable text converter - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select all text in pdf; pdf text search
Pdf searchable text converter - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
cannot select text in pdf; pdf text searchable
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
text select tool pdf; convert pdf to searchable text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
search text in pdf image; pdf text select tool
Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of 
Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and 
Cascades Network Parks
By Robert E. Kennedy, Warren B. Cohen, Alan A. Kirschbaum, and Erik Haunreiter
Chapter 1 of  
Book 2, Collection of Environmental Data 
Section G, Remote Sensing
Prepared in cooperation with the  
NORTH COAST AND CASCADES NETWORK, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
Techniques and Methods  2–G1
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats.
cannot select text in pdf file; search text in pdf using java
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
select text in pdf reader; pdf searchable text
U.S. Department of the Interior
DIRK KEMPTHORNE, Secretary
U.S. Geological Survey
Mark D. Myers, Director
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia: 2007
For product and ordering information: 
World Wide Web:  http://www.usgs.gov/pubprod 
Telephone:  1-888-ASK-USGS
For more information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, 
natural hazards, and the environment: 
World Wide Web:  http://www.usgs.gov 
Telephone:  1-888-ASK-USGS
Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the 
U.S. Government.
Although this report is in the public domain, permission must be secured from the individual copyright owners to 
reproduce any copyrighted materials contained within this report.
Suggested citation:
Kennedy, R.E., Cohen, W.B., Kirschbaum, A.A., and Haunreiter, Erik, 2007, Protocol for Landsat-based monitoring of 
landscape dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 
2-G1, 126 p.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
pdf search and replace text; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
search text in multiple pdf; search multiple pdf files for text
iii
Figures
Figure 1. Graphs showing conceptual relations affecting the choice of remote-sensing 
technologies and methods for monitoring different ecological phenomena ………
3
Figure 2. A schematic view of the steps needed to convert raw remote-sensing data into 
information useful to natural-resources professionals ……………………………
6
Figure 3. Schematic showing conceptual description of the relation between apparent 
spectral change and real, meaningful change on the ground  ……………………
7
Figure 4. Tasseled-cap spectral space, showing regions where physiognomic types 
approximately are consistent across ecosystems  ………………………………
8
Figure 5. Tasseled-cap images and associated change products for an area adjacent to 
Mount Rainier National Park ……………………………………………………… 11
Figure 6. Flow diagram showing steps in the startup phase  ……………………………… 14
Figure 7. Flow diagram showing steps in Type 1 change detection ………………………… 15
Figure 8. Flow diagram showing steps in Type 2 change detection ………………………… 16
Figure 9. An example of a full error matrix used to report validity of a change product …… 18
Tables
Table 1. Ecological monitoring goals of the North Coast and Cascades Network Parks 
evaluated at three project meetings, 2004 and 2005 ………………………………
4
Table 2. North Coast and Cascades Network monitoring goals grouped by change 
interval needed for detection  ……………………………………………………
5
Table 3. Satellite-to-satellite interpretation change classes ……………………………… 12
Table 4. Linking monitoring goals to satellite-to-satellite interpretation classes  ………… 13
Table 5. Sequential phases in the monitoring program …………………………………… 17
Contents
I. Background and Objectives......................................................................................................................1
II. Sampling Design ........................................................................................................................................9
III. Methods ...................................................................................................................................................10
IV. Data Handling, Analysis, and Reporting .............................................................................................17
V. Personnel Requirements And Training ................................................................................................18
VI. Operational Requirements ....................................................................................................................19
VII. References Cited...................................................................................................................................20
SOP 1. Acquiring Landsat Imagery ...........................................................................................................23
SOP 2. Preprocessing Landsat Imagery ..................................................................................................31
SOP 3. Physiognomic Change Detection .................................................................................................67
SOP 4. Validation of Change-Detection Products ..................................................................................91
SOP 5. Data Management ........................................................................................................................117
SOP 6. Revising Protocol ..........................................................................................................................125
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
select text in pdf file; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
PDF converter SDK for converting adobe PDF from TXT in Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF
converting pdf to searchable text format; how to make a pdf file text searchable
iv
This page is left blank intentionally.
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
less searchable for search engines. The other is the crashing problem when user is visiting the PDF file using web browser. Our PDF to HTML converter library
find and replace text in pdf file; how to select text on pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
how to search pdf files for text; find text in pdf files
Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape 
Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
By: Robert E. Kennedy,
1
Warren B. Cohen
1
, Alan A. Kirschbaum
2
, and Erik Haunreiter
2
1
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, OR 97330
Department of Forest Service, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330
I. Background and Objectives
As part of the National Park Service’s larger goal of 
developing long-term monitoring programs in response 
to the Natural Resource Challenge of 2000, the parks of 
the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) have 
determined that monitoring of landscape dynamics is 
necessary to track ecosystem health (Weber and others, 2005). 
Landscape dynamics refer to a broad suite of ecological, 
geomorphological, and anthropogenic processes occurring 
across broad spatial scales. The NCCN has sought protocols 
that would leverage remote-sensing technologies to aid 
in monitoring landscape dynamics. The parks’ personnel 
considered remote sensing necessary for several reasons 
(adapted from Woodward and others, 2002):
Monitoring must cover large areas often inaccessible 
by foot travel.
Some large-area processes are best viewed from the 
landscape perspective afforded by remote sensing.
1.
2.
Narrative
Version 1.01 (September 6, 2006)
Revision History Log:
Previous 
VersionNumber
Revision Date
Author
Changes Made
Reason for Change
New Version 
Number
n.a.
07-05-06
REK
Final version under 
agreement
1.0
1.0
09-15-06
REK
Wordsmithing and 
updating to reflect 
use of current-year 
rather than historical 
PMR field data
Preparation for 
publication
1.01
I. Background and Objectives    1
Some small-area events are captured more efficiently 
and consistently with repeat viewing using remote 
sensing.
At a workshop organized by Andrea Woodward (U.S. 
Geological Survey-Biological Resources Division/Forest 
and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center), October 2002, a 
variety of remote sensing experts were convened to develop 
strategies for remote-sensing based monitoring (Woodward 
and others, 2002). Several factors were considered potential 
challenges to application of remote-sensing methods to the 
parks in the Pacific Northwest, including frequent cloud 
cover and dense coniferous vegetation. Considering costs and 
benefits of a wide range of active and passive remote-sensing 
systems, one of the central conclusions of the workshop was 
that Landsat Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper 
(TM/ETM+) data should serve as the core tool for monitoring 
landscape dynamics. This protocol describes a strategy for 
monitoring a wide range of landscape dynamics using such 
data.
3.
The project was conducted under an interagency 
agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest 
Service and the U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources 
Division/Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Ccenter 
program (Interagency Agreement 03WRPG0008), and was 
divided into four tasks. Task 1 was development of a study 
plan between January and June 2004. Between June 2004 
and February 2005, the authors did field and remote sensing 
analysis for Task 2, which was the testing and evaluation 
stage. Task 2 finished in February 2005 when the authors 
presented their findings to the National Park Service (NPS) 
and BRD personnel. Three meetings were held during Tasks 1 
and 2 to allow NPS personnel to prioritize goals and evaluate 
options for inclusion of methods in the final protocols. Task 
3 was the writing of this protocol, and Task 4 is the revision 
of the protocol according to comments gathered in the 
anonymous peer review process.
The authors’ original proposal to the USGS BRD/FRESC 
and the NPS (hereafter, the “parks”) had several themes. First, 
the remote-sensing monitoring program would be built around 
the TM and ETM+ sensors (Cohen and Goward, 2004). 
Second, the original strategy for monitoring change was to 
identify a baseline landcover map from among several already 
available at the parks, use various change detection methods 
to identify areas of change, and remap only the changed 
areas. The remapped areas could then be field tested for 
accuracy, allowing comparison across different baseline maps 
and change-detection methods. Following the first meeting 
with the parks (January 14, 2004), this approach was altered 
substantially. The resulting strategy is discussed in the section, 
Strategy for Monitoring.”
The third major theme of the original proposal was the 
goal of articulating the cost, confidence, and utility of using 
remote-sensing technology to address specific landscape 
monitoring goals. Some attributes can be tracked by remote-
sensing technologies with relatively high confidence even 
at relatively low cost (Type I), while others are difficult to 
monitor even with substantial outlays of time and money 
(Type II; fig. 1A). In general, confidence in results is related 
positively to investment costs, but the confidence/cost ratio 
(the slope of the increase) varies by the attribute being tracked.
Predicting whether a given ecological phenomenon or 
landscape attribute is more likely Type I or Type II requires a 
basic understanding of core remote sensing and scale concepts. 
Remote sensing instruments measure electromagnetic 
energy emanating from or being reflected by an object. The 
sensitivity of an instrument is determined primarily by its 
engineering design, which represents a strategy to balance 
   Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
tradeoffs between sensor grain size, temporal frequency, and 
spectral response. Grain size is the spatial property describing 
the smallest footprint on the ground over which the sensor 
measures electromagnetic energy (corresponding roughly to 
the “pixel size” reported for many sensors). The smaller the 
grain size, the more sensor elements or the more measurement 
occasions are needed to map a given geographic area, which 
means that the same location can be mapped less frequently 
(with a coarser temporal grain). Spectral response describes 
both the region of the electromagnetic spectrum over which 
the sensor measurements electromagnetic energy, and the 
sensor’s physical sensitivity across that region. The larger the 
region of the electromagnetic spectrum over which a sensor 
measures energy, the more energy it can capture per time 
period, which tends to increase the signal relative to ambient 
noise levels. Taken together, these design specifications define 
an instrument’s measurement properties.
At the most basic level, a landscape phenomenon can 
be considered Type I when its physical properties match 
well with an instrument’s measurement properties. A good 
match sets the upper limit on the theoretical confidence with 
which that attribute can be sensed. This confidence level 
is diminished by grain mismatch between the sensor and 
the object (spatial, temporal), by uncoupling between the 
landscape phenomenon and its detectable physical properties, 
by inappropriateness of the analysis tools applied to the 
problem, or by poor quality of reference data used to build and 
test models. Note this important implication: Improving grain 
size match, analysis techniques, or reference data cannot 
boost detection confidence above the theoretical maximum 
level determined by an instrument’s measurement properties
Often, however, actual confidence levels are far lower than this 
theoretical maximum, and thus increased effort (cost) applied 
toward analysis and reference data collection can achieve 
higher confidence.
Although confidence depends to some degree on cost, 
utility to the parks may not depend entirely upon confidence 
(fig. 1B). In some cases, attributes that can be measured with 
high confidence through remote-sensing methods may not be 
useful to the parks (curve labeled “irrelevant information” in 
fig. 1B), while others may be extremely useful to monitor even 
if confidence in their accuracy is relatively moderate (curve 
labeled “relevant information” in fig. 1B). Often, it is possible 
to attain higher ultimate utility to the parks by monitoring a 
slightly different attribute than the parks might originally have 
intended, simply because its confidence can be much higher at 
a given cost than for the original attribute.
Narrowing Goals
The first phase in the project was to narrow and 
articulate monitoring goals. At the January 14th, 2004, 
meeting in Seattle, the authors aided the parks in articulating 
their monitoring goals in the framework of remote-sensing 
technology. Monitoring goals were grouped into broad 
monitoring themes: Alpine vegetation, Forested vegetation, 
Disturbance and recovery, Riparian areas and rivers, Land 
use and land cover, and Snow and ice. Key monitoring 
goals were then described in terms of their relevant spatial 
and temporal grain and extent, which were then matched 
to the appropriate remote-sensing technology. Considering 
these scale issues, as well as the authors’ recommendations 
on relative difficulty of monitoring, the parks prioritized 
which monitoring goals were to become the foci of protocol 
development testing of Task 2. These priorities were revisited 
at the May 13, 2004, meeting in Seattle, resulting in a slight 
adjustment of some priorities. The combined result of group 
prioritization of monitoring goals from the January 14 and 
May 13 meetings is listed in table 1.
Only monitoring goals identified as “Achievable 
Monitoring Goals” in table 1 were considered for testing in 
Task 2 of this study. By narrowing monitoring objectives 
to those likely to be achieved with TM/ETM+ imagery, the 
parks began defining the cost/confidence/utility envelope 
for their goals. Several monitoring goals were considered 
unachievable under the current protocol development. These 
included goals that required information at a finer grain size 
than Landsat (for example, many riparian monitoring goals) 
or involved changes with minimal spectral manifestation 
(changes between herbaceous communities in the alpine). 
Figure 1.  Conceptual relations affecting the choice 
of remote-sensing technologies and methods for 
monitoring different ecological phenomena. (A) 
Confidence in an ecological remote-sensing product 
generally increases as increased resources are applied 
to imagery, processing, analysis, and collection of 
ground-truth data. Some ecological attributes can 
be mapped with high confidence at minimal expense 
(Type I), while others are extremely difficult to map 
with a given class of remote-sensing technology, even 
with significant expense (Type II). (B) Usefulness to a 
park depends, in part, on the confidence with which 
the attribute can be determined and mapped, but not 
always. Some attributes that can be derived from remote 
sensing are irrelevant for the National Park Service, 
and will be of little utility even when confidence in 
their measurement is high. Others are relevant, even at 
relatively low confidence levels.
I. Background and Objectives    
Other goals to be skipped under this protocol include those 
already being tracked by other agencies (volcanic eruptions 
and shoreline change). Encroachment of trees into the alpine, 
although a high priority, was acknowledged to be particularly 
challenging. Snow and ice monitoring are discussed separately 
in the following sections.
For additional clarity, the monitoring goals were grouped 
according to the time period of observation needed to capture 
them. Fast processes, such as disturbance, must be monitored 
yearly because post-event recovery can obscure the original 
signal if intervals of monitoring are too great. Slow processes 
require a long period to manifest themselves. Most of the 
achievable monitoring goals are regrouped in table 2.
The goals for monitoring snow, ice, and glaciers fell 
into an entirely different temporal scheme. Here, important 
monitoring questions involve attributes such as the maximum 
extent of snow cover in a year, duration of snow cover across 
the landscape, and spatial distribution of glacial snow and 
ice at the snow-minimum time of year. In all three cases, 
observation must occur many times within a single year, yet 
the time period over which these attributes change spans 
many years. Landsat TM/ETM+ data lack the high-temporal 
frequency needed to answer these questions alone. Moderate 
Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Advanced 
Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data have an 
appropriate temporal frequency, and the MODIS sensor has a 
standard product of an 8-day map of snow extent (with both 
daily and aggregate snow-cover information). The confidence 
at which fine-grained properties of snow cover could be 
mapped with MODIS was expected to be relatively low, but 
the information was important enough even at a coarse grain 
that exploration of this topic was desired (an example of 
highly “relevant information” in fig. 1B).
Table 1.  Ecological monitoring goals of the North Coast and Cascades Network Parks evaluated at three project meetings, 2004 and 
2005.
[All goals are characterized in terms of spacial and temporal grain. Based on spatial and temporal grain, as well as importance to the NCCN parks, each goal was 
assigned a priority for consideration in the study plan. Priority: Topics marked “advise” indicate goals that likely were not achievable within this protocol using 
Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery, but on which the parks sought separate guidance on possible approaches. Those that were thought likely to be achievable using 
Landsat-based satellite data are noted. Abbreviations: USGS, U.S. Geological Survey; NCCN, North Coast and Cascades Network; m, meter; ?, uncertain;  
>, greater than; <, less than]
Topic
Subtopic
Spatial grain
Temporal grain
Priority
Achievable 
monitoring goal?
Alpine
vegetation
Bare ground impacts
1 m
5 year
Skip (need higher resolution)  
Interface with forest
1 m / 30 m
Decadal
High/Advise
Yes
Vegetation communities 1 m
> Annual
High
Advise
Forested
vegetation
Hardwood/conifer
30 m
> Annual
High
Yes
Forest structure (classes) 1 m / 30 m
> Annual
High
Yes
Disturbance and 
recovery
Vegetation disturbance in
avalanche chutes
1 m / 30 m
5–10 years
High
Yes
Landslides
1m / 30 m
Annual / > Annual
High
Yes
Fire 
30 m
Annual / > Annual
High
Yes
Insect/disease
1 m / 30 m
Annual / > Annual
High
Yes
Windthrow
1 m/ 30 m
Annual / > Annual
High
Yes
Pollution
?
?
Low (important in future; 
impacts are not extensive
enough to detect at present)
Shoreline change
1 m
Annual / > Annual
Skip (problematic and
already being done)
Developed areas (within
parks)
1 m / 30 m
Skip (accessible and need
higher resolution)
Forest harvest
30 m
Annual  
High
Yes
Volcanic
500 m–1,000 m
> Annual
Skip (already being done by
USGS)
Riparian areas 
and rivers
Riparian vegetation
1 m (30 m)
High (hardwood/conifer 
distinction)
Yes (30 m)
Riparian width
1 m
Advise (Landsat not useful)
Floods and channel
1 m
Advise 
Wood
? 1 m Lidar ?
Advise
Lake shoreline
1 m
Advise
Land use
1 m
Advise
Sedimentation
1 m
Advise
Land use and 
land cover
Various (primarily
outside of parks,
including clearcuts)
30 m for most
> Annual
High
Yes
Snow and ice
Glaciers
1m / 30 m
> Annual
High
Yes
Snow cover
30 m / 500–1,000 m Annual
High (integrating Landsat
with MODIS)
Yes
Ice out (lakes)
1 m / 30 m
Annual
High
Maybe
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested